An Inside Look at INSEAD

Listen to the full recording of our interview! INSEAD. The place where graduates speak three languages. And where 40% of graduates go into consulting.

Listen to the recording of our conversation with Pejay Belland, Director of Marketing, Admissions & Financial Aid at INSEAD, for great insights into the program and tips that applicants to any MBA program should know.

00:01:42 – Singapore, Fontainebleau, and the USA in 10 months?

00:03:25 – Does the exchange program come at the expense of community?

00:05:04 – Why INSEAD likes consultants and consultants like INSEAD.

00:07:33 – Entrepreneurship at INSEAD (50% of grads start their own company at some time in their career!).

00:09:52 – Changes to the INSEAD application: Really getting to know candidates as people.

00:16:25 – The new dean and his initiatives.

00:18:51 – The video essay: in the cards.

00:20:38 – INSEAD’s admissions process and what it means for applicants.

00:24:32 – Can you demonstrate “international outlook” if you’ve never left your home country?

00:25:42 – What Pejay wishes she could tell all applicants.

Admissions Straight Talk Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes so you don’t miss  a single show!

*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Relevant Links:

•  INSEAD
•  INSEAD Admissions Video
•  INSEAD Application Essay Tips
 MBA Admissions A-Z: 26 Terrific Tips
•  2014 Virtual Panel: Exploring European B-Schools

Related Shows:

•  Leadership is King: Interview with IMD’s Lisa Piguet
•  Global Business Leadership at Wharton’s Lauder Institute
•  The Stanford MSx Program for Experienced Leaders
•  Case Interview Secrets and More with Victor Cheng

Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk:

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INSEAD 2014- 2015 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines – Take Two

Check out out INSEAD B-School Zone!Not long ago, in the tips post for INSEAD, I wrote that INSEAD was “bucking the trend” of fewer and shorter essays.  Well, scratch that.  Mid-application-cycle, INSEAD has decided to hew to the trend and changed its essays starting now.  The result is a shorter, more condensed set of essays.  

In the new set, the essays are divided into two categories: Job Description Essays (the same as before), and Motivation Essays.  The use of the word “motivation” should be forefront in your mind as you draft those essays; the concept should appear directly or indirectly in each.  It means that the adcom wants to know what drives you, what propels your choices, decisions, and actions.

Job Description Essays:

Essay 1. Briefly summarise your current (or most recent) job, including the nature of work, major responsibilities, and, where relevant, employees under your supervision, size of budget, clients/products and results achieved.

The key to strong job descriptions is “results achieved.” Definitely provide the other requested elements, but the distinguishing factor will be those results. Quantifying impact usually shines a spotlight on your impact and contribution. The second most important element is “major responsibilities.” Don’t list the mundane or the aspects of your job that everyone with your title will share. Where did you shoulder “major responsibility”? Be specific in these descriptions to differentiate yourself, especially if you are from a common professional group in the applicant pool.   

Essay 2. Please give a full description of your career since graduating from university. If you were to remain with your present employer, what would be your next step in terms of position?

Don’t confuse “full description” with “complete history.” How would you characterize your career since college? You also have to answer the second pat of the question and you only have 250 words. Choose the most important elements — those elements that show contribution, leadership, and since this is INSEAD, a multi-cultural and global perspective. 

Essay 3. If you are currently not working, what are you doing and what do you plan to do until you start the MBA programme if applicable? (250 words maximum)

State the facts straightforwardly.  Note not just what you’re doing but why you’re doing it.  If you have room and if it’s relevant, consider addressing why you are unemployed at the moment.

Motivation Essays:

Essay 1. Give a candid description of yourself (who are you as a person), stressing the personal characteristics you feel to be your strengths and weaknesses and the main factors which have influenced your personal development, giving examples when necessary. (600 words max.)

For a question like this I recommend two strengths and one weakness. If you can choose one anecdote that reveals both the strengths and the weakness, it’s efficient with space and can strengthen the essay. Don’t forget to discuss how these qualities influenced your personal development. For more on INSEAD 1 and writing about weaknesses, please see this video:

A word on weaknesses. Be honest without going overboard. Don’t make up a phony weakness. I attended an HBS info session a few years ago. One of the alumni said that he discussed a “phony weakness” in his essays (required for HBS that year), and his interviewer focused right on it, and basically said, “Come on. What’s a real weakness?” The applicant had to get real in a hurry. Take advantage of the essay: Give it some thought and respond with the benefit of that reflection. For more information, please see “Flaws Make You Real.”

At a recent AIGAC conference one of the adcom members remembered that an applicant in response to a similar question had listed his weakness as “pitching new ideas in a meeting.” The adcom member felt that the applicant was specific, real, and showed self-awareness by revealing this flaw. In fact, by demonstrating these qualities in addition to the requested weakness that he was working on, the applicant actually enhanced his chances of acceptance with his response.

Don’t write about “weakness in pitching new ideas in meetings” as your flaw just because you saw it here. It will become the lame, stale example everyone uses. However, you all have weakness. Just be thoughtful enough and honest enough to reveal yours.

(NOTE: There is potential for some overlap in this essay with Essay 2, so look at both questions together and organize content before writing them.)

Essay 2. Describe the achievement of which you are most proud and explain why. In addition, describe a situation where you failed. How did these experiences impact your relationships with others? Comment on what you learned. (400 words max.)

With only 400 words to describe 2 significant experiences, and the specified discussion points, you need to use stories that can be told without a lot of background information.  And keep in mind Essay 1 – don’t use stories that reflect exactly the same messages.  “Achievement of which you are most proud” is a high bar, and it can be from either work or outside of work. It also should be something that reveals qualities or attributes about you that are positive and relevant. I suggest using something from the last two to three years.  Luckily you don’t have to write about the failure about which you are most ashamed… ;-)   Discuss a failure that is specific, fairly recent, and meaty enough to have rattled you a bit.  Again, work or non-work topic is fine. 

In discussing what you learned from the experiences and how they impacted your relationships, identify one specific thing for each point for each story – there isn’t room for more.  And there isn’t need for more, because one can be very powerful if it’s insightful.

Essay 3. Tell us about an experience where you were significantly impacted by cultural diversity, in a positive or negative way.  (300 words max.)

In choosing your topic story, think about “impact” – often people describe being surprised or emotionally challenged by encountering new or different cultures, but that’s not enough to make this a good essay.  Impact is what happens after the initial response: how did the experience change your behavior, or change your perception, or inspire you to learn something, or cause you to reconsider beliefs/ideas – these are impacts. 

Narrate the story succinctly, vividly portraying the impact on you.  The adcom wants to see that you are thoughtful, resourceful, and responsive in encountering cultural diversity, because it is a key attribute of their program.

Essay 4. Describe all types of extra-professional activities in which you have been or are still involved for a significant amount of time (clubs, sports, music, arts, politics, etc). How are you enriched by these activities? (300 words max.)

Simply discuss the range of activities you participate (or have participated) in – those that are major passions, and those that are “just fun” – clarifying their relative role and importance in your life.  Be straightforward in how they enriched you – no need to strive for something “different” that no one has ever felt or experienced before….  Imagine you are meeting with clients or superiors – between the business dealings (and perhaps over a drink); you and they might chat about non-work interests – approach this essay like such a conversation.  Not quite as casual as with a peer, but still conversational, straightforward, and intended to connect on a person-to-person level.

Optional Essay: Is there anything else that was not covered in your application that you would like to share with the admissions committee?  (300 words max.)

Use the optional essay to explain anything that needs explaining and/or to give them one more reason to accept you. DON’T use it for a superficial summary, a restatement of your other essays, or anything similarly boring and trite. If you choose to write it, produce a tight, focused essay revealing something you haven’t yet discussed.

INSEAD Application Deadlines:

September 2014 intake:

March 5, 2014

January 2015 intake:

Round 1 March 21, 2014; Round 2 May 28, 2014; Round 3 July 25, 2014

Help! The MBA application is shrinking!

Cindy Tokumitsu By , co-author of The Finance Professional’s Guide to MBA Admissions Success, and author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her last fifteen years with Accepted.com.

FT’s Best Global MBA Programs in 2014

The Financial Times released its 2014 global MBA rankings! Read on for the list, the facts, the analysis, and the sources.

The List:

2014 Rank

3 Year
(Avg) 

School Country 
1 1 Harvard Business School USA
2 2 Stanford Graduate
School of Business
USA
3 4 London Business School UK
4 3 U Penn Wharton USA
5 5 Columbia Business
School
USA
6 6 INSEAD France/Singapore
7 8 IESE Business School Spain
8 8 MIT Sloan USA
9 10 Chicago Booth USA
10 15 Yale School of Management USA
11 12 UC Berkeley Haas USA
12 15 IMD Switzerland
13 11 IE Business School Spain
14 11 Hong Kong UST
Business School
China
15 15 Northwestern Kellogg USA
16 19 Cambridge Judge UK
17 17 Duke Fuqua USA
18 18 NYU Stern USA
19 19 CEIBS China
20 18 Dartmouth Tuck USA

To truly understand the rankings, much less use them, please see the methodology so you’ll know what’s being ranked. While there are twenty factors considered in the FT rankings, the FT methodology puts the most weight on increase in salary in $US PPP (Purchasing Power Parity) and weighted salary in $US PPP.

Poets and Quants criticizes the FT rankings for absurd results in calculating “Value for Money” as well as for having too many criteria and several criteria that really don’t reflect the quality of education. Others say that it is biased against U.S. programs.

Regardless of the criticism’s validity, the FT ranking is arguably the most cited ranking of global programs because it compares U.S. and international programs in one ranking and seems to do a better job of it than the alternatives. That prominence doesn’t mean these rankings are Gospel. It does mean you have a lot of data in a format where you can easily compare MBA programs from around the world on designated criteria.

The Facts:

Here are some fun facts about FT’s 2014 rankings:

• 7 of the top 10 and 12 of the top 20 programs ranked are US schools.

• Big jumpers this year include Boston University’s business school and Washington Forster, which each jumped 20 spots, to 75th and 58th place, respectively. Another big US jumper this year was USC Marshall which jumped 17 spots to 65th place. UNC Kenan Flagler jumped up 12 slots this year from its 3-year average rank, moving from #45 to #33.

• The biggest losers this year include Dublin’s Smurfit School (dropped 27 spots to 91st place) and Vlerick Business School (fell 16 places to 100th place), as well as the schools which disappeared off the list entirely: U of Iowa’s Tippie School (74th last year), Korea University Business School (86th last year), Incae Business School in Costa Rica (90th last year), Case Western’s Weatherhead School (94th last year), and others.

• Newcomers to the list include: UC Davis (98th), Wake Forest (94th), BYU’s Marriott School (93rd), and ESMT European School of Management and Technology in Germany (89th).

• In terms of geographic representation, the top 20 schools are all in the US, UK, Europe (France, Spain, Switzerland), China, and Singapore, but further down the list, other countries gain their spots: India comes in at 30th place with the Indian Institute of Management in Ahmedabad; SDA Bocconi in 31st place represents Italy; South Korea appears in 45th place with Sungkyunkwan University’s GSB; Canada’s first school on the list is Toronto Rotman at 51st place; Portugal follows with The Lisbon MBA in 52nd place (new to list); South Africa’s U. of Cape Town GSB comes in at 59th place; in the 62nd slot we have Australia’s Australian Graduate School of Management; and Brazil’s Coppead is in 79th place.

•  The city with the highest concentration of schools in the top 100 is (of course) Boston with six top b-schools – Harvard (1), MIT Sloan (8), Hult International Business School (61), BU School of Management (75), Boston College Carroll (82), and Babson Olin (95).

The Analysis:

While it’s fun to look at the changes – who climbed and who sank – for me the real lessons from this ranking are:

1. The top programs move and change very slowly. That lack of drama in these rankings is a better reflection of reality than the gyrations one sees outside the top twenty. Significant change takes time so sharp jumps and dives probably mean nothing. Sustained change in ranking has greater credibility – if you value the same qualities as the FT.

2. The one point made repeatedly in the commentary on this ranking, and it is the same conclusion I draw from both the FT ranking and the Forbes ranking, which both emphasize ROI and increase in salary, is this: The MBA education at top programs provides a solid return on investment for most students. The MBAs surveyed for the FT rankings started their MBA in 2008, just as the Great Recession hit, and graduated in 2010. These MBAs still report on average a 100% increase in salary over what they were making before they started business school.

There are obviously critics of graduate business education, specifically the MBA, and those detractors either believe an MBA isn’t valuable or that the value has declined. I agree with the latter group. However, the questions for today’s applicants are:

1. “Given my current professional background and salary and my anticipated salary after I earn an MBA, do the anticipated financial rewards plus increased job satisfaction justify the investment (both out of pocket and opportunity costs)?” The fact that those entering b-school ten or twenty years ago could anticipate a higher ROI is irrelevant. It is merely a historical curiosity and for you an unfortunate one.

2. “Is the full-time MBA – or whatever flavor you are considering – the optimal way for me to attain my MBA goals?”

FT, to its credit, also has an article on those claiming the MBA is not worth the effort. Sometimes they are right. Each one of you individually needs to examine your circumstances and goals to see if for you the MBA is an expensive waste of time and effort, or if for you it is likely to be worth both. Clearly, most of the people surveyed by Forbes, the Financial Times, and GMAC are in the latter group.

In this video  Della Bradshaw, FT’s Business Education Editor, discusses the results of this year’s FT Global MBA rankings including the finding that MBAs in the class of 2010 are now enjoying salaries double those they were earning before they entered b-school.

The Sources

• FT Global MBA Ranking 2014

•  FT: MBA Ranking 2014: Key & Methodology

•  FT: Big Names Dominate FT MBA Ranking Top Spots

•  P&Q: Winners & Losers in 2014 FT MBA Ranking

•  Accepted: 4 Ways You Should NOT Use the MBA Rankings

•  Accepted: MBA Rankings: What You Need to Know

Learn how to evaluate your profile to determine the best business school for you!

Linda Abraham By , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

MBA Admissions: INSEAD and Marketing

A quick glance at INSEAD: INSEAD currently ranks in second place in Businessweek’s full-time global MBA rankings and in sixth place according to The Financial Times (2013).

Visit the INSEAD B-School Zone page for more info and advice.INSEAD Class of 2014 Profile

Key facts:

• Average age – 29 years old

• Average years work experience – 5 years

• Average GMAT score – 702

• Total number of students – 1024 students

Previous work experience:

• Corporate sectors – 46%

• Consulting – 25%

• Finance – 23%

• Public sector/non-profit – 6%

INSEAD Academics Related to Marketing/Consumer Products

INSEAD’s 10-month program is divided into five 8-week periods. In the first, second, and third periods, students take core courses. In the third, fourth, and fifth periods, students take electives (Note: The third period is a combination of both core and elective courses). Students can begin the program in January or September, but only the January intake offers a break for students to enjoy an internship.

Core Courses in Period 1

• Financial Accounting

• Organisational Behaviour 1

• Financial Markets and Valuation

• Prices and Markets

• Uncertainty, Data and Judgment

• Business Ethics

Core Courses in Period 2

• Corporate Financial Policy

• Marketing Management

• Organisational Behaviour 2

• Managerial Accounting

• Process and Operations management

• Strategy

• Business Ethics

Core Courses in Period 3

• International Political Analysis

• Macroeconomics in the Global Economy

(See core course descriptions here.)

Marketing Elective Course Offerings

• Advertising and Social Media Strategy

• Brand Management

• B2B Marketing

• Customer Insight

• Digital and Social Media Marketing (a week-long field trip to New York City)

• Distribution Channels and Sales Force

• Market Driving Strategies

• Marketing Communication

• Pharmaceutical Marketing Strategy

You can read more about the teaching and learning methods at INSEAD here and about INSEAD’s Marketing Research Seminar Series here.

INSEAD Marketing Research Centers

• INSEAD Social Science Research Centre (ISSRC)

• Wendel International Centre for Family Enterprise

• Centre for Decision Making and Risk Analysis (CDMRA)

Clubs for INSEAD Marketing Students

• INSEAD Consumer and Luxury Goods

• INSEAD High Tech & Telecom Club

• INSEAD Media Club

Marketing Hiring Stats at INSEAD

2012 marketing function:

9% of the class secures marketing positions after graduation

18% of those who entered the corporate sector hold marketing/sales roles

Top Marketing-Related Employers in 2012 / # of hires:

• Google / 18

• Amazon / 14

• Samsung / 11

• Shell / 11

• Siemens / 11

• BP Group / 10

• Apple / 8

• L’Oréal / 8

• Microsoft / 5

• Abbott / 4

• Cargill / 4

• Deutsche Post DHL / 4

• Hilti Corporation / 4

• Dong Energy / 3

• GE / 3

• GlaxoSmithKline / 3

• Johnson & Johnson / 3

• Syngenta / 3

2012 Internship Statistics

Industry # of Interns Weekly Salary Range (€)
Consumer/Luxury Goods 11 700 – 4,800
Media/Entertainment 5 600 – 2,200
Travel/Leisure Services 7 400-5,100

Please see our INSEAD B-School Zone for more information on how Accepted.com can help you get accepted.

Applying to INSEAD? Check out our 2014 Application Essay Tips!

Accepted.com

European MBA Admissions: GMAT or GRE?

Thinking of a European MBA? Find Out if You Should Take the GMAT or GRE! The question of whether applicants to European b-schools should take the GMAT or GRE was addressed in our most recent Q&A – 2014 Virtual Panel: Exploring European B-Schools with IMD, London Business School and INSEAD – as well as many other topics, including the length of different programs, program updates, career opportunities, diversity, and more.

Missed the event? Click here to get the recording and transcript.

See the following excerpt for a look into the GMAT/GRE question:

Linda Abraham: Do you accept the GRE?

Pejay Belland: Yes, we do.

Lisa Piguet: Yes, we do accept it. We do but we prefer the GMAT just because we find that it’s more – it’s a better predictor of success in the MBA. But we do accept it.

Linda Abraham: Okay, fair enough. That’s good to know.

Oliver Ashby: We only accept the GMAT for the MBA program. And what I’d say is, if you do, I generally believe you do on all career and in top-tier management consulting. You need to take the GMAT.

Lisa Piguet: Yes. And Oli, that’s actually a really good point because I was on another chat today with something else and somebody else asked that question. And I brought that point up, that if you want to do top-tier management consulting, they will ask for your GMAT score, not GRE.

Linda Abraham: They will have to take the GMAT.

Lisa Piguet: And I think that’s also true for investment banking and at least financial…and even some industrial-type companies, even like Google and some of those top-tier companies now are starting to ask for GMAT scores. Yes, so not GRE. It’s because they’re getting so many applications. It’s one way of weeding people out. So it’s the GMAT that they’re wanting now.

Linda Abraham: I didn’t know that. And I would think that with the IR, the consulting firms, they’re going to start wanting it even more.

Lisa Piguet: Yes, exactly. Yes, that’s a good point, Oli. I forgot about that.

Read through the full 2014 Virtual Panel: Exploring European B-Schools with IMD, London Business School and INSEAD transcript or listen to the audio for more information on applying to b-school in Europe! You can also listen to this Q&A recording (and others) on-the-go when you download the Accepted Admissions Podcast.

Need help prepping for the GMAT? See GMAT & MBA Admissions 101 – a tip-filled resource brimming with advice on how to increase your chances of acing your GMAT.

To automatically receive notices about these MBA admissions chats and other MBA admissions events, please subscribe to our MBA events list. To listen to the Q&A recordings on-the-go, please subscribe to the Accepted Admissions Podcast.

 

Accepted.com

 

Exploring European Business Schools: A Virtual Panel

Are you thinking about applying to a top European business school?

Are you interested in discovering some of the benefits of attending an international b-school?

Register now to reserve your spot!

Please join us tomorrow,  Wednesday, November 6, 2013 at 9:00 AM PST / 12:00 PM EST / 5:00 PM GMT / 6:00 PM CEST, for an interactive virtual panel with Pejay Belland, Director of Marketing, Admissions & Finance at INSEAD, Lisa Piguet, Associate Director MBA Admissions & Marketing at IMD, and Oliver Ashby, Senior Recruitment & Admissions Manager at London Business School.

The panelists will offer insights into their respective programs, share their perspectives on the benefits of studying in Europe, and answer your questions about life, work, and study in the EU. If you are considering applying to b-school in Europe, then you won’t want to miss this event!

Register now to reserve your spot for the Virtual Panel: Exploring European Business Schools.







What time is that for me? Click on the link to find out the exact time for your location.

INSEAD 2014 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

INSEAD

(c) INSEAD

If you are applying after March 21, 2014, please refer to the questions and tips here. INSEAD will no longer accept responses to these questions after March 21. After that date you will need to use the new essay prompts.

Bucking the trends of fewer essays and micro essays, INSEAD requires applicants to express themselves competently in writing on multiple topics, professional and personal, and at some length in one essay (these days, 600 words is long).  A key theme running through these questions is your perspective – your reflections, observations, thoughts; how you shape and present experiences.  You must articulate in writing not just facts and narratives, but the thoughts, lessons, and insights you draw from them.  These essays ask you to compose thoughtfully.  It’s notable that one of the most truly global MBA programs places such emphasis on verbal expression – give these essays effort accordingly.

Job Description Essays:

1. Briefly summarise your current (or most recent) job, including the nature of work, major responsibilities, and, where relevant, employees under your supervision, size of budget, clients/products and results achieved. (250 words maximum)

The key to strong job descriptions is “results achieved.” Definitely provide the other requested elements, but the distinguishing factor will be those results. Quantifying impact usually shines a spotlight on your impact and contribution. The second most important element is “major responsibilities.” Don’t list the mundane or the aspects of your job that everyone with your title will share. Where did you shoulder “major responsibility”? Be specific in these descriptions to differentiate yourself, especially if you are from a common professional group in the applicant pool.

2. Please give a full description of your career since graduating from university. If you were to remain with your present employer, what would be your next step in terms of position? (250 words maximum)

Don’t confuse “full description” with “complete history.” How would you characterize your career since college? You also have to answer the second part of the question and you only have 250 words. Choose the most important elements — those elements that show contribution, leadership, and since this is INSEAD, a multi-cultural and global perspective

3. If you are currently not working, what are you doing and what do you plan to do until you start the MBA programme if applicable? (250 words maximum)

State the facts straightforwardly.  Note not just what you’re doing but why you’re doing it.  If you have room and if it’s relevant, consider addressing why you are unemployed at the moment. 

Essays:

1. Give a candid description of yourself, stressing the personal characteristics you feel to be your strengths and weaknesses and the main factors, which have influenced your personal development, giving examples when necessary. (600 words maximum)

For a question like this I recommend two strengths and one weakness. If you can choose one anecdote that reveals both the strengths and the weakness, you could have a strong essay. Don’t forget to discuss how these qualities influenced your personal development. For more on INSEAD 1 and writing about weaknesses, please see this video:

A word on weaknesses. Be honest without going overboard. Don’t make up a phony weakness. I attended an HBS info session a few years ago. One of the alumni said that he discussed a “phony weakness” in his essays (required for HBS that year), and his interviewer focused right on it, and basically said, “Come on. What’s a real weakness?” The applicant had to get real in a hurry. Take advantage of the essay: Give it some thought and respond with the benefit of that reflection. For more information, please see “Flaws Make You Real.”

At a recent AIGAC conference one of the adcom members remembered that an applicant in response to a similar question had listed his weakness as “pitching new ideas in a meeting.” The adcom member felt that the applicant was specific, real, and showed self-awareness by revealing this flaw. In fact, by demonstrating these qualities in addition to the requested weakness that he was working on, the applicant actually enhanced his chances of acceptance with his response.

Don’t write about “weakness in pitching new ideas in meetings” as your flaw just because you saw it here. It will become the lame, stale example everyone uses. However, you all have weakness. Just be thoughtful enough and honest enough to reveal yours.

2. Describe what you believe to be your two most substantial accomplishments to date (if possible specify one personal and one professional) explaining why you view them as such. (400 words maximum)

Reference achievements from different areas of your life. (But don’t go back to high school and earlier to do so.) The accomplishments should show impact, contribution, and for INSEAD at least one should have a multi-cultural flavor. Quantify to add credibility and specificity to your attainments.

3. Describe a situation taken from your personal or professional life where you failed. Discuss what you learned. (400 words maximum)

OK. when did you blow it. What did you learn from the experience. That lesson is the key element. The question is about resilience — your ability to learn and bounce back from failure.  This essay is a place for you to show that quality. Leaders need it.

4. a) Discuss your short and long term career goals. (300 words maximum)  b) How will studying at INSEAD help you achieve your vision? (250 words maximum)

New variation on the goals theme. For A, show that you have a clear direction, a goal for your MBA. That means not that you know what you want to study while at INSEAD, but that you know what you want to DO and where you want to do it after you leave INSEAD. Define the function you want to perform and the industry you want to perform it in when you have your MBA. If relevant, you can also provide geographic preferences.

For the long-term goals, a little fuzziness is allowed, certainly more than for the short-term. However, the long-term goals should flow directly from the short term. It should all make sense and hang together. For B, given your goals, why do you want to attend INSEAD? What about its distinctive, intense, multi-campus program will help you achieve your goals. What do you anticipate learning and how will it help you realize your vision.

5. Please choose one of the following two essay topics:

a) Have you ever experienced culture shock? What insights did you gain?

Or

b) Describe the ways in which a foreigner in your country might experience culture shock. (250 words maximum)

Choose the option that is easiest for you to answer and allows you to bring out an aspect of your experience not found elsewhere. Keep it short, real short.

Optional Essay Is there anything that you have not mentioned in your application that you would like the Admissions Committee to know? (350 words maximum)

Use the optional essay to give them one more reason to accept you. DON’T use it for a superficial summary, a restatement of your other essays, or anything similarly boring and trite. If you choose to write it, produce a tight, focused essay revealing something you haven’t yet discussed.

If you would like professional guidance with your INSEAD application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our  MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the INSEAD application.

INSEAD 2014 MBA Application Deadlines (Sept 2014 Intake):

 Application Deadline  Decision Notification
Round 1 October 2, 2013 December 20, 2013
Round 2 November 27, 2013 February 21, 2014
Round 3 March 5, 2014 May 23, 2014

*To be included in a specific round, applications must be complete and submitted by midnight (23:59 Central European Time) on the day of the deadline.







Cindy Tokumitsu By , co-author of The Finance Professional’s Guide to MBA Admissions Success, and author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her last fifteen years with Accepted.com.

Top 10 International 1-Year & 2-Year MBA Programs in 2013

We recently posted the Forbes’ top 20 American MBA programs – now it’s time to turn our attention to the global b-school scene. Below are Forbes’ top 10 international MBA programs for 1-year and 2-year programs in 2013.

1-Year MBA Programs:

RANK & SCHOOL 5-YEAR MBA GAIN PRE-MBA SALARY  2012 SALARY
1. IMD – Switzerland $196,300 $84,000 $211,000
2. INSEAD – France/Singapore $168,700 $71,000 $175,000
3. SDA Bocconi – Italy $155,800 $57,000 $165,000
4. IE Business School – Spain $114,700 $53,000 $144,000
5. Oxford Said – UK $102,500 $58,000 $135,000
6. Warwick – UK $102,800 $43,000 $124,000
7. Cambridge Judge – UK $99,000 $62,000 $146,000
8. Cranfield – UK $94,500 $59,000 $127,000
9. Lancaster – UK $86,700 $41,000 $159,000
10. City U. Cass – UK $76,800 $60,000 $116,000

2-Year MBA Programs:

RANK & SCHOOL 5-YEAR MBA GAIN PRE-MBA SALARY 2012 SALARY
1. London Business School – UK $120,700 $77,000 $214,000
2. NUS Business School – Singapore $95,900 $14,000 $92,000
3. Hong Kong UST – China $91,000 $31,000  $131,000
 4. Manchester – UK $84,500 $48,000 $141,000
 5. IESE – Spain $80,300 $56,000 $146,000
6. Ipade – Mexico $78,100 $20,000 $75,000
7. CEIBS – China $73,100 $27,000 $121,000
8. Esade – Spain $65,500 $55,000 $127,000
9. HEC-Paris – France $61,700 $54,000 $140,000
10. York Schulich – Canada $54,400 $39,000 $115,000








Accepted.com

INSEAD Appoints Ilian Mihov New Dean

INSEAD

No longer the center of gravity.

Big news at INSEAD! The top European business school just appointed Ilian Mihov, an INSEAD economics professor, as dean. Mihov will be the first new dean appointed from “the inside” in more than 12 years and the first dean ever to carry out his deanship at the Singapore campus. A Poets & Quants article states that this switch in location is “a change which signals that the center of gravity for the school is likely to shift from the more mature European market to the more growth market in Asia.”

In a Financial Times article, Mihov explains that his decision to remain in Singapore will do “away with the idea that there was a headquarters in France and a satellite campus in Singapore.”

Future building plans will expand the Singapore Campus, to nearly the same size as the campus in Fontainebleau by the end of the decade. There are currently 59 professors at the Singapore campus, and 81 in France. (Last year there were 55 professors in Singapore and 84 in France.)

Mihov has been on the INSEAD faculty since 1996 and holds a B.S. in business administration from University of South Carolina’s Moore School of Business and a Ph.D. from Princeton.

Read more about Mihov at the INSEAD website here.








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INSEAD 2014 Application Deadlines

INSEADThere are a bunch of INSEAD application deadlines coming up, both for January 2014 intakes (class of 2014 – December) and for September 2014 intakes (class of 2015 – July).

Mark your calendars and please let us know how we can help you meet your INSEAD (or any other school) goals!

For January 2014 Start Date

- June 12, 2013 – R2 application deadline
- August 7, 2013 – R3 application deadline

For September 2014 Start Date

- October 2, 2013 – R1 application deadline
- November 27, 2013 – R2 application deadline
- March 5, 2014 – R3 application deadline

The first deadline on the list (in June) is less than a month away, and the others will creep up on you shortly thereafter! It’s time to get to work on those INSEAD applications!

For specific advice on how to get into INSEAD, check out our INSEAD B-School Zone. For one-on-one guidance through the application process, see our MBA Application Packages.







Accepted.com