An HBS Reapplicant’s Success Story

Read more MBA student interviews here!This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Prerit Jain, a future MBA student at Harvard Business School.

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What is your current job?

Prerit: My parents moved to New Delhi when I was less than a year old. This is where I grew up, went to school, college and have worked. In fact, it’s the only city I have ever lived in. (Well, you have to discount living out of a suitcase as a management consultant; more on that later.)

I went to the Indian Institute of Technology Delhi to study mechanical engineering, and did quite well academically, graduating at the top of my class.

Hoping to get diverse experiences, early in my career, I chose to start my career in consulting. Booz & Company had just opened its office in India, and seemed like an exciting opportunity. I worked there for more than three and a half years, before moving to my current role in early-stage venture capital with the First Light Accelerator Fund. I have been in my new role for only about a year now.

Accepted: Can you tell us about your application/reapplication experience? Where did you apply the first time around? What was the outcome? Where did you apply the second time?

Prerit: I submitted my first set of applications in Sept.-Oct. ’13 (R1 for the class matriculating in fall ‘14). I had worked at Booz for about three years, had been promoted twice, had a clear idea about my long-term goals and how an MBA would help. I was sure that I needed the MBA and the time was right. I applied to four schools: HBS, Wharton, Booth and Kellogg. I was interviewed by all four schools and in my view they all went well. I felt confident of getting admitted to more than one school. However, when the decisions came out, HBS put me on a waitlist and the other three said “thanks but no thanks.” I thought the world had come to an end and spent the next 2 weeks sulking!

Thankfully, I came out of that feeling in a couple of weeks, and began looking ahead. I decided to reapply. However, I realized that my learning curve at Booz had plateaued, and I needed to pursue something else. I was lucky to quickly find an exciting new opportunity (in venture capital), and by February, I had kick-started my new role.

Six months later, I reapplied in Sep ‘14 (R1 for the class matriculating in fall ‘15) to three schools: HBS, Booth, and Columbia. I was interviewed at all three schools, and finally received admits from HBS and Booth. I will be heading to Boston in the fall!

Accepted: What do you think went wrong the first time and what did you do when you reapplied to improve your candidacy?

Prerit: We can only speculate here! When I applied for the first time, I had only worked in one over-represented industry – consulting. Moreover, in hindsight, I perhaps did not practice my interviewing as much.

When I reapplied, I had gained some diverse work experience, and had some more interesting stories to tell. Also, I put in hours of practice before the interviews. I got several of my friends to interview me and I video recorded myself to observe softer elements such as body language and posture.

Accepted: Can you share some tips about applying to b-school as an over-represented minority? 

Prerit: Being an Indian-male-engineer-consultant, I knew I was indeed in a fiercely competitive pool. I knew I needed to show that I am both competent and interesting. I looked through the different parts of the application – the resume, application, essays etc. – and made choices about how I would use each of them.

Hard facts and stats went into the CV and the application form. The more differentiated and interesting personal qualities and experiences went into the essays.

Accepted: I see you got a 760 on your GMAT – amazing! What are your top 3 GMAT tips?

Prerit:

• A few weeks of dedicated preparation go farther than months of insincere efforts

• Practice those 4-hour full-tests. The GMAT is also a test of stamina.

• Right from day 1 of your preparation, get used to working under time constraint. Never attempt a GMAT question without having a timer in front of you.

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages. For specific advice on how to create the best application for Harvard see:

You can read more about Prerit’s journey by following him on Twitter at @preritjain1988. Thank you Prerit for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

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Related Resources:

• Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One
• Get Accepted to Harvard Business School, a free webinar
• Harvard Business School 2015 MBA Questions, Deadlines, Tips

UCLA Anderson Student Interview: Enjoying the MBA Whirlwind

Want to read  more MBA student interviews?  Click here!This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Tom Winterton, a first year student at UCLA Anderson.

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What was your most recent pre-MBA job?

Tom: I grew up in Nantwich, a small market town in north of England and completed my undergraduate degree in Physics with Finance at the University of Surrey. A slightly unusual combination but it stood me well in getting a job in financial services in London where I worked for a number of banks.

My last role was as a Strategy Development Analyst at Brewin Dolphin, one of the UK’s largest investment management and financial planning firms.

Accepted: Where are you currently in business school? What year?

I’m a 1st year full time MBA at the UCLA Anderson School of Management in Los Angeles.

Accepted: What’s your favorite thing about Anderson? And if you could change one thing about the program, what would it be?

Tom: My favorite thing about Anderson would have to be the school’s culture of shared success. Be it 2nd year students paying it forward through the career sessions they run, to the fact that MBAs competing for intern and full time positions regularly prep together ahead of interviewing for the same role. This supporting environment couldn’t be more different from uber competitive experience often associated with business school. While everyone is certainly pushing to land top positions at some of the most sought after companies, its important our class mates get there too and everyone’s committed to this principal of shared success.

They try to pack a lot into the MBA course and that’s especially true in your first few quarters. On top of that, UCLA operates on a quarter systems which seems to only compound this busy schedule.

If I could change one thing about the program it would be to start a bit earlier in the year and give 1st year students a little more time in the first quarter. I found this a big crunch time with recruiting and finals all in full swing. You find yourself living inside the business school bubble, neglecting friends from home as you become obsessed by informationals, GPAs, interview prep and all things MBA.

Accepted: Now that you’ve well into your first year of b-school, can you talk about your transition back to school? Is b-school what you thought it would be like? Any surprises? Any advice for next year’s incoming class?

Tom: It fair to say I’ve found the transition back to school at bit of a shock to the system. If it were only about being back in the class room that would be one thing, but the truth is you end up having to perform a juggling act skipping between company presentation, case competitions, sorting out the administrative nightmare that comes with moving countries, informational interviews, group assignments and much more in between. Plus of course socializing with everyone in your new MBA class. Fear of Missing Out (FOMO) means for the first few months at least you’re compelled to sign up to as many things as possible. Often the academic work ends up being just one point on a long list of priorities.

My advice to incoming MBA students would be to clear the decks before your MBA. If you’ve got the time to get ahead with career research do so. Start doing informational interviews and building connections with companies you’re interested in as early as possible; it will pay dividends when it comes to recruiting.

While the MBA experience is great, be prepared, it’s a whirlwind. Don’t expect to have many evening or weekends to yourself, and let friends and family know they’re about to see a lot less of you.

Accepted: Do you plan on heading back to the UK after you receive your MBA? What are your post-MBA plans

Tom: I haven’t decided where I want to be after my MBA. Much of it will depend on how the recruiting process goes, my summer internship and the connections I’m able to make over the two years. That said studying at a US school, MBA recruiting is obviously skewed toward American companies, with a large proportion of students getting full time jobs through on campus recruiting.

California is home to so many of the world’s most innovative businesses and I’ll certainly be exploring all the opportunities it has to offer.

Accepted: What’s your favorite class so far?

Tom: I would have to say Marketing has been my favorite class so far. For the first few quarters your timetable at Anderson (like most MBA programs) is dominated by a core class – Accounting, Finance, Statistics, etc. While these were great, well taught with lively debate and new interesting content, I had some experience of them from my undergraduate degree and professional career.

While Marketing is still a core class, I came into it with almost no background whatsoever and I’m enjoying being exposed to a whole new strand of business.

I also enjoyed that fact that as opposed to my other core class there isn’t necessarily one right answer when it comes to Marketing. Different approaches, targeting different segments of the market can both be effective. There’s really room to be creative as you look for the best way to market a product. While I wouldn’t say I had a favorite assignment, it was interesting writing a “Positioning Statement” for yourself, in the context of a job market, dating market or otherwise.

Accepted: Can you share your top 3 MBA admissions tips with our applicant readers?

Tom:

• Really think about why you want an MBA and how it will help reach your future goals. Every school will ask this as one of their essay questions and you need to have a good answer that makes sense. This story becomes even more important as an MBA, when you start talking to companies and applying for internships. Recruiters need to see how your skill and experience fit together and relate to the role your applying for.

Don’t just look at the rankings when applying to programs; sure they matter but only up to until a point. Instead I’d recommend looking on where a school’s MBAs interned and accepted full time positions. Do the companies you’re interested in recruit on campus? Does the school have strong alumni connections in the industries and with the firms you wanting to work for?

A big part of the recruiting process is getting to know companies, networking and for companies to get to know you. You’re at a big advantage if your school already has those connections.

• If you’re able to, visit the school and sit in on a class or two. At a very minimum make sure you speak to alumni and current students; they’re the best source of advice when it comes to applying to a school. While I wasn’t able to visit Los Angeles before applying to Anderson, I was able to speak to a number of current alumni. I also had good friends who’d attended UCLA as undergraduates. This was invaluable when making my decision. Remember where you’re living will be a big factor in your MBA experience.

Accepted: Can you tell us about your blog? When and why did you start blogging? What have you gained from the experience?

Tom: I had to check the dates, I started my current blog some 2.5 years back now, with my first post in May 2012. I’d also experimented with a couple of other blogs and websites prior to this.

I think the initial interest came about went I was working on a project to develop online services for a bank. Working with developers I decided should really know a bit more about how to build a website, having learned little to nothing in school. The blog developed out of this curiosity, I liked the thought of creating content and sharing it online, as well as experimenting learning bits of CSS and HTML to customize the site along the way.

What have I gained from my experience blogging? Well it’s really been an ongoing learning experience for me. From picking the basics of markup languages and web styling, to finding out more about different web services by experimenting with things like Google Analytics and Adwords. I’ve used it as a public record of what I’ve been up to, from hiking in Switzerland to my sharing my MBA orientation week experience; it’s a great way to add context and tell a story with the photos you’ve taken.

If nothing else it’s fed my curiosity and added a few lines to the interests section of my resume.

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages

You can read more about Tom’s journey by checking out his blog, Tom’s Blog. Thank you Tom for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

Download our free report on choosing the best MBA program!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Related Resources:

• MBA Rankings: What You Need to Know
• UCLA Anderson 2015 MBA Questions, Deadlines, Tips

Cornell Tech Student Interview: Where CS Meets the MBA

Want to read more student interviews?  Click here!This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Will Hester, an M. Eng. Cornell Tech student in NYC.

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What’s your favorite non-school book?

Will: I was born and raised in Austin, Texas. I went to the University of Texas at Austin and was conferred two degrees: A Bachelor of Science in Electrical and Computer Engineering with a focus on Software Engineering, and a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science.

My favorite non-school book is Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes (never read it for school, believe it or not).

Accepted: Can you tell us about the new program you’re in? How did you choose Cornell Tech? Why was it the best match for you?

Will: Cornell Tech is a pretty unique graduate program. In addition to the individual MBA and CS curriculum, there is also a co-curriculum led by Greg Pass, former CTO at Twitter. The co-curriculum consists mainly of exercises and projects done in groups of both CS and MBA students. Most notably during the fall semester, we were all split into groups of 4-5 half-MBA, half-CS company project groups, in which we worked closely with companies like AOL, Bloomberg, eBay, Google, LinkedIn, and Microsoft just to name a few. All the while the co-curriculum is conducted in a very fast-paced, startup-like atmosphere (we are constantly encouraged by faculty and guest speakers to follow the startup path, be it start one’s own venture, or join a startup post-graduation).

Cornell Tech was the best match for me because I knew I wanted to pursue my masters in CS, but I also wanted some business education without going all-out trying to get an MBA as well. I always have had an interest in startups, so the faster-paced, smaller nature of the program was extremely attractive. I could not be happier to be at Cornell Tech.

Accepted: If you could change one thing about the program, what would it be? 

Will: If I could change one thing about the program, I wish we were already in the future campus.

Accepted: Can you talk about your program’s relationship on campus with the Cornell Johnson MBA students? Can you explain why some people would choose Cornell Tech and some Cornell Johnson? 

Will: The CS students have a very close relationship with the MBA students. There’s a set time every week for us to work side-by-side on our company projects, and several learning exercises we work together on. The Cornell Tech MBA program is exclusively a 1-year program, whereas the normal Johnson MBA program in Ithaca has both one- and two-year options. The biggest difference between the Ithaca and Cornell Tech programs is that Cornell Tech is much more entrepreneurial/startup-focused. Our guest speakers are mostly serial entrepreneurs, and the projects are fast-paced and you typically build a real product with the CS students.

The Cornell Tech MBA students are in Ithaca for courses with the other Johnson one-year MBAs for three months over the summer before coming to the NYC campus. Additionally, the Cornell Tech MBAs spend a couple of weeks over winter break in Israel, working with Israeli startups.

Accepted: Are you involved in any clubs or competitions on campus? 

Will: Since the program is very new, Cornell Tech doesn’t have many official, established clubs. We are in the process of founding them. The most well-developed club is probably the Disruptive Technology Club.

Accepted: What do you plan on doing once you graduate? 

Will: I accepted a job with a Boston-based fantasy sports company called DraftKings, where I will start in July.

Accepted: Can you tell us about some of the projects you’ve been involved with lately?

Will: At Cornell Tech, I was part of a group with one other M. Eng. CS student and two MBAs in which we spent a semester working on a mobile application for AOL using beacons. At Cornell Tech, we’d meet with the other company project teams every Tuesday to see what everyone else was working on and receive help from industry specialists, entrepreneurs, and each other if we needed it. Once a month, we have a “hack day” on campus. All students participate in a 24-hour hackathon with their company project team and show off what they accomplished at the end. My AOL team developed an Android and iOS messaging application in which users can send messages to a particular user and location combination, so the recipients won’t receive the message until they are physically near where the message was sent to. We placed Bluetooth Low Energy beacons all around campus to provide locations that messages could be sent to.

Outside of school, JustGotGood.com is my most notable project. JustGotGood provides text message alerts for NBA games that are triggered when a particular game is within X points with less than Y time remaining, where the user defines X and Y.

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages.

You can read more about Will’s journey by checking out his About Me page. Thank you Will for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

Download our free report on choosing the best MBA program!

Accepted.com: The Premier Admissions Consultancy

Related Resources:

Honing in On the Cornell Johnson MBA: An Interview with Ann Richards
Leadership, Tech & Forte: IV with a Cornell MBA Student
Johnson at Cornell University 2015 MBA Questions, Deadlines, Tips

 

MBA/MMM Kellogg Interview with Shriansh: Explaining What Makes Kellogg, Kellogg

Read  more MBA student interviews!This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Shriansh Shrivastava, a student at Northwestern Kellogg’s joint MBA/Masters in Design Innovation program.

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What was your most recent job? Where are you currently studying?

Shriansh: I grew up in India, then moved to the UK for undergrad in electronics and communications at the University of Sussex. After graduation, I worked at Ericsson UK, working with mobile phones and broadband, and also worked in the Ericsson Innovation Scheme. After this, I moved to Canada to work with mobile phone innovations in suicide prevention.

I’m currently attending the Kellogg School of Management, due to graduate in June 2016.

Accepted: Can you tell us more about your joint degree? What do you plan on doing with your degrees?

Shriansh: The MMM program at Kellogg has to be the best kept secret in the MBA world. It’s a joint program – you end up with a Kellogg MBA and a Master in Science in Design Innovation from the McCormick/Segal schools at Northwestern.

The biggest misconception about the MMM is that it’s an ‘engineering-y’ program. Not true. Around 50% of my class is from a completely non-technical background! My MS:DI degree is teaching me design thinking: how to approach any problem creatively and differently. So skills I’m going to end up with will be a very creative spin on an already great MBA program. This fits best with my current objective of getting involved with innovation in big tech post graduation.

Accepted: How are you liking Chicago? Do you plan on staying local after you receive your degrees? Any ideas yet where you may be headed?

Shriansh: Chicago’s brilliant. We’re based in Evanston, which is about 20 minutes north of Chicago by the Metra. Evanston’s very self-sufficient, so I actually don’t end up going to Chicago all that much. But it’s an awesome city, of course. The architecture is amazing, the culture’s friendly and the food is awesome. And it’s cold. Very cold. Having spent the last year in Canada, I’m actually comfortable with the weather so far, but my peers from tropical parts of the world are…having fun!

Accepted: Do you have a favorite coffee shop or another nice place where you like to study or hang out with friends? 

Shriansh: We MMMs have our very own exclusive lounge, which is a modern space, well lit, with some sort of creativity always going on. I love hanging out here with my peers. There are actual coffee shops and breakout rooms around campus, of course, but this is the best place to be at, at least for me.

Accepted: Why did you choose Kellogg? Which other programs had you considered? How would you say that you’re a good fit for Kellogg’s program?

Shriansh: For me, it came down to Haas or Kellogg – what both have in common is the extremely cooperative, friendly spirit. Kellogg really embodies this – from day #1, we were thrown into tons of group work – at this time, I’ve completed 9 courses, each with its own team, and have done more coursework in groups than individually. Also a brilliant example: For recruiting, a bunch of us work together on making each other better – we all know we’ll be gunning for the same job, but that ‘competition’ is just not in the picture. For me, it’s important that my peers do well – and vice versa. This lack of any sort of animosity actually makes Kellogg, Kellogg.

Discover free MBA admissions resourcesAccepted: If you could change one thing about the program, what would it be? 

Shriansh: I’d move it to someplace warmer…I’ve heard Hawaii is nice this time of the year…

Accepted: What’s your favorite class so far?

Shriansh: I’d like to say Operations, with Professor Chopra. It’s not my favorite, but it’s the one that’s blown my mind the most. I enjoyed Marketing, really enjoyed Research-Design-Build, and Strategy. But ops is a different beast, and portrays concepts you learn in Marketing in a completely different light (e.g. Selling more can end up ruining your business!!).

Accepted: Can you share your top 3 admissions tips with our readers?

Shriansh:

1. In essays and interviews, be clear why you want the second degree and tie it to your goals. If it brings you new skills, say that. If you have the skills and want to practice them in the real world, say so.

2. Saying ‘what people might want to hear’ rather than what’s real will get you into trouble. An interview is a ‘personality fit’ test as much as a competence test. If you fake it, you might even end up in a program, but probably will end up around the type of people you don’t gel with, instantly diluting the value of the MBA.

3. Network, network, network – talk to alumni – LinkedIn is a great resource for this. When I was applying, I spoke to a lot of alums. All Kellogg alums I reached out to were happy to help, which actually factored a lot into my decision. When approaching an alumni or current student, do ask precise and intelligent question. Asking someone “So tell me what Kellogg does” is horribly vague and will probably irritate the person. A better question could be “I’m interested in photography. What do you think the photography club on campus is like? Did you go to events?

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages

You can read more about Shriansh’s journey by checking out his About Me page. Thank you Shriansh for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

Learn How to Choose the Best MBA Program for You!

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Related Resources:

• Kellogg 2015 MBA Questions, Deadlines, Tips
• MBA/MMM Interview with Kellogg Student: Using Empathy to Succeed
Mastering Kellogg’s Changing Brand

Interview with Josh: An Inside Look at the Tepper MBA Family

Read more MBA student interviews here!

“Tepper feels like a family”

This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a follow up interview with Josh Howatt, a second-year student from CMU Tepper. (We first met Josh last year – you can read our first interview with him here.)

Accepted: Last we spoke you had just been accepted to Tepper. Can you please bring us up to date? How have you been the last year and a half?

Josh: My time at Tepper has been absolutely fantastic! Currently, I’m pursuing the Management of Innovation and Product Development track, and working with other CMU schools in Engineering, Public Policy, and Design Schools for my Capstone. We’re collaborating on real-life problems with F500 companies and start-ups. It’s great to be putting the tools we’ve learned into practice. Also, I’m concentrating in Marketing, Strategy, and Information Systems – a far cry from where I originally intended in CPG. The curriculum is rigorous and highly quantitative, but also provides its fair share of soft-skill classes, e.g. Managerial Communications, Negotiations. So far, it’s been an amazing (see: challenging) experience.

Accepted: What is your favorite thing about Tepper?

Josh: My favorite thing about Tepper is that it’s a small program, so the feeling is collegial. It’s absolutely true that if you work at it, you can get to know every single person in your class. This also makes for a great teacher to student ratio. Meaning, there is plenty of opportunity to engage in discussion with your professors outside of the classroom. With regard to the student body, everyone has certain expertise and is more than willing to lend a hand or teach what they know. Tepper feels like a family, and I don’t think you fully realize how true that is until you visit and see it firsthand.

Accepted: Where did you intern this past summer? Can you talk about the process by which you secured the position and how Tepper helped along during the process?

Josh: This summer I interned at Autodesk as a Thought Leadership, Content Marketing Intern. Tepper was instrumental to me landing this position. We have a fantastic COC that allows you to meet with as many counselors as often as you like. Fortunately, I loved my originally assigned counselor from the start. She was fantastic at connecting me with alumni in companies I was interested in, and often times would shoot off an email right then and there during our meetings. The COC is also great in preparing students for the recruiting process; everything from developing your STAR stories, to getting your resumes and cover letters into pristine condition. One of the most helpful parts of the process is the month-long BaseCamp before Mini 1. Not only do you get an opportunity to engage with your future classmates, but you get a jumpstart on the recruitment process, because it starts SO EARLY.

Accepted: Do you have a job lined up yet for next year? 

Josh: I do! I will be starting as a Sr. Consultant for Verizon in their Marketing Leadership Development Program. I can’t even tell you how excited I am!

Accepted: Congratulations on your job with Verizon!

Can you tell us about the difference between “concentrations” and “tracks” at Tepper? How early in your studies do you need to declare these specifications? 

Josh: I would equate concentrations and tracks to undergrad minors and majors. Concentrations are specializations that require completion of 3 elective classes within a certain field (so you could essentially have up to 3 or 4 concentrations). Tracks go much deeper in that they involve completing core specialization classes, and then choosing from specified electives. You typically apply to be part of a track, and choose only one.

Accepted: Are you involved in any clubs on campus? How central to student life is club involvement?

Josh: I’m VP of Technology for our Marketing Club and VP of Marketing for Out&Allied (Tepper’s LGBT club). I’m also a member of our Business&Technology Club and the Public Speaking Club. Club involvement in very central to student life at Tepper. Outside of board duties, at least twice a week I’m participating in a club sponsored event, which is great! There’s always something interesting going on, whether it’s a social event, educational series, or recruiting prep.

Accepted: Do you have any tips to incoming Tepper students? What do you wish you would have known when you were starting out?

Josh: My best advice for incoming Tepper students is: realize you are only human and don’t be so hard on yourself! There’s going to be so much interesting stuff to do, and you’ll want to do it all, but that’s just not possible. I was a huge stress case my first two Minis (my friends will attest to this, and is sort of a running joke now). Get used to saying “no” and learn to prioritize what’s most important to you and your Tepper experience. Between classes, recruiting, social events, club events, corporate presentations, career fairs, and everything else in your life, your head is going to spin. Just know that ahead of time. Find a way to balance school and life. Take time for you. And if you find yourself starting to lose it, just know that there is a Tepper family there to help hold you together.

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school applications, please see our MBA Application Packages. For specific advice on how to create the best application for Tepper, check out our CMU Tepper 2015 MBA Questions, Deadlines, Tips.

Thank you Josh for continuing to share your story with us!

Download our free special report: Best MBA Programs

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Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One
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CMU Tepper B-School Zone