Post-Interview Advice for Med School Applicants

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All that’s left for you to do is wait patiently for an acceptance.

“Post-Interview Advice” is excerpted from the Accepted.com special report, The Ultimate Guide to Medical School Interview Success. To download the entire free special report, click here.

As the interview day is nearing its end, you may find yourself in the company of other applicants. Try not to engage in discussion about your interview in detail. These conversations only serve to increase anxiety and often lead to self-doubt. Talking about the school or topics you may have discussed with current students is great, but steer clear of discussing the actual interview content with your fellow applicants.

Also, don’t forget to follow-up with a personal thank you note to your interviewer(s). If you had a special experience with a student, student group, or a non-interviewing faculty member, then include that experience in your note.

When your interview experience is over, spend some time taking stock of all you’ve heard. Think about whether this school felt like home to you. Could you blend in with the current students? Did you connect with the faculty? Did you feel like there was a place waiting for you there – a place where you could grow both personally and professionally? If so, then all that’s left for you to do is wait patiently for an acceptance.

Click here to download your complete copy of The Ultimate Guide to Medical School Interview Success!

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

• Insights, Advice and Experiences of a Non-Traditional Med Student
• Med School Application Process: From AMCAS to Decisions
Medical School Reapplicant Advice: 6 Tips for Success

3 Reasons Why You Shouldn’t Worry about Your Med School Interview Invite

Need med school admissions advice? Check out our Medical School Admissions 101 pages!

Keep in touch with the adcom.

Yes, it’s November and some of your fellow applicants may have already been invited to their medical school interviews. But that doesn’t give you due cause to throw a fit and assume you’re as good as dinged.

Don’t worry. There’s still hope for you.

Consider the following:

1. When did you submit your application? Did you send it in early August, or just a few weeks ago? The later you send it in, the later the admissions committee will review it and get back to you with an interview decision. In fact, the adcoms are only NOW reviewing and interviewing for those applications submitted in July and August.

2. Keep in touch! Unlike most other admissions categories (like college admissions or MBA admissions), med school adcom sometimes allow applicants to keep in touch after they’ve submitted their applications but before any decisions have been made. If you submitted your application 8 or more weeks ago, then you may want to drop the admissions office a note (or call, depending on their preference) and ask if/when you might expect an interview invite. If you know you’ll be in the vicinity of the school over the holidays, you may want to mention that and ask if you can schedule an interview during that time. (This is a particularly good idea if you’ve applied to more than one school in a given city.)

3. Send new info. If your target program allows you to send new/updated information, you should definitely do so, but please make sure that it is really new and that it will enhance your application. This would include any recent achievements (either at school, in the workplace, or in a volunteer position), improved test scores, a new med school recommendation, or something else of that sort. You should send this med school admissions updated information in the form of a brief – not more than one page – letter with important documents attached.

Did you already score that coveted interview invite? Prep with the best when you purchase Accepted.com’s med school interview services.

Click here to download your complete copy of The Ultimate Guide to Medical School Interview Success!

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

• How to Write Waitlist Update Letters
• Not So Secret Secrets to Nailing the Med School InterviewThe Medical School 
• Interviewing with Impact: How to Make an Impression in Your Medical School Interviews

8 Tips for the Actual Medical School Interview

Click here for your copy of The Ultimate Guide to Medical School Interview Success!

Definitely don’t bring a cup of coffee with you!

“8 Tips for the Actual Interview” is excerpted from the Accepted.com special report, The Ultimate Guide to Medical School Interview Success. To download the entire free special report, click here.

You know what to say. You know what to wear. You are prepared. You’ve got this! Now, all you need to do is keep your composure – stay calm, breathe, and keep the following eight points in mind as you enter that interview room and wow your way into med school:

1. Make sure you smile when you shake hands. Give a firm handshake, but don’t break the interviewer’s hand. (Yes that really happened.) And if you have sweaty palms, wash and dry your hands with cold water before you go in. Keep a handkerchief in your pocket or purse for drying your hands right before you walk into the interview.

2. Maintain eye contact throughout the interview.

3. Relax as best as you can. A good interviewer will work to help you relax during those initial questions. Ideally you and your interviewer will have a conversation that flows rather than a disjointed and strained grilling session.

4. Definitely don’t bring a cup of coffee with you.

5. Try not to fidget.

6. Take notes if it seems relevant – this shows that you are truly interested.

7. Be yourself. You can’t reinvent yourself, but rather try to shine during the interview with your best qualities. That means:

• If you are animated and outgoing go right ahead and show it.

• If you are describing an experience that was particularly important to you, do show your passion.

• If you are shy that’s fine, but still try to find a connection with your interviewer.

8. Present yourself honestly. Specifically:

• Own up to your mistakes and then stress your improvements. Don’t minimize your past, but try to move on to more recent positives.

• Be sincere, especially when talking about strengths and weaknesses. Confidence is fine but make sure you include a touch of humility.

• When answering questions about yourself think about what you really want the interviewer to know about you. What defines you? Make sure you share those traits. Show some level of self-reflection demonstrating a clear understanding of how you’ve gotten to this point.

• If you have had to come back from adversity share the experience. If you are one of the lucky ones who has not had many struggles in your life, then still think about how to answer an adversity question. Adversity comes in many shades – physical, financial, personal, and/or emotional. Each of us has had some degree of struggle.

Most importantly go into the interview with a clear vision of what you want the interviewer to know about you and do your very best to get those particular key points across.

Click here to download your complete copy of The Ultimate Guide to Medical School Interview Success!

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

• Weakness, What Weakness?
• How to Ace Your Medical School Interview
• Sample Questions to Ask Your Interviewer

The Men’s Guide to Dress for Medical School Success

Want more medical school interview advice?

Picking your shirt and tie can be a tricky balance between standing out from the crowd and being the obnoxious peacock.

After the tests are scored, resumes printed, and applications submitted, interview day is the last—and potentially most—stressful part of getting to your school of choice. This is your chance to make a great first impression with the interview committee, and your appearance should mirror the image of a medical student; clean, professional, and detailed. Follow this simple guide to make sure you’re dressed for medical school success on interview day.

First, you need a black or dark colored suit that fits well. Keep in mind that your audience will most likely be older professionals with more conservative styles. This doesn’t mean you need to run to a tailor for a custom fitting, but you need something that’s going to fit better than raiding your dad’s closet. The shoulder of the suit should end at your shoulder. If your suit looks like it has Grandma’s shoulder pads it’s too big. Second, make sure the top button of a two-button suit (middle button of a three-button suit) is higher than your belly-button. Finally, drop your arms to your sides; the sleeves should stop around the base of your thumb, and the body of the jacket should end around your knuckles or palms. Leave the suit pockets stitched closed to prevent sagging. Slacks are easier; they should be hemmed so that the back of the pant reaches somewhere around the heel of the shoe. Although pant length is a matter of personal preference, always make sure your pants never drag the ground or expose the tops of your shoes. If you need a suit, be sure to check your local consignment shops before spending a ton of money for a brand new suit.

No matter what you wear, make sure it’s clean, pressed, and lint free. Having your suit pressed by a professional makes you look sharp and keeps your suit in good condition. If you’re staying at a hotel, they may even offer this service in-house. When wearing a brand new shirt, iron out the folds, and make sure all the pins and stickers are removed. On interview morning, run a lint brush over your clothes, especially if you have hairy pets!

Picking your shirt and tie can be a tricky balance between standing out from the crowd and being the obnoxious peacock. Remember that your main goal is to convey a professional and confident image, so save your flashy shirts for a night out. Your shirt and tie need to match your suit, so always keep your suit color and pattern in mind. A white, light blue, or checkered pattern in a complementary color is usually a safe bet, but be sure to stick to more traditional patterns. Finally, pick out a tie that complements your suit and shirt. Leave your solar system and other novelty ties at home, and use a professional knot (not an Eldredge or Ellie knot). If you’re still wanting to express your personality, the best place to go wild is socks. Wearing a pair of fun socks that complement your suit is a great way to show a little bit of a fun side, while still looking professional.

To bring your look together, shoes should be well polished and your belt should match. Causal loafers or boat shoes are not appropriate, and you should never wear a brown shoe with a black suit, or vice-versa. A simple watch, pair of cufflinks, or lapel pin can refine the look, but stay away from anything gaudy or large. Be sure to schedule a haircut prior to your interview, and make sure your nails are well trimmed. Keep in mind your audience is probably conservative about dress, so be sure to remove any piercings and cover any tattoos prior to your interview.

Evan Kuhl is a fourth-year medical student wanting to match in emergency medicine. Evan is interested in the intersection of sports and medicine, and is an avid cyclist. His website, www.evankuhl.com, includes helpful tips for pre-med and current medical students.

Click here to download your complete copy of The Ultimate Guide to Medical School Interview Success!

Related Resources:

• Common Myths about Medical School Interviews
• What Should You Wear to Your Med School Interview?
• How to Ace Your Medical School Interview

Last-Minute Pointers for Your Med School Interview Day

Click here to download the complete Medical School Interview Guide!

Make sure to eat a reasonable breakfast.

“Last-Minute Pointers for Interview Day” is excerpted from the Accepted.com special report, The Ultimate Guide to Medical School Interview Success. To download the entire free special report, click here

Most interviews are a day event that includes a welcome session, a school walking tour, a financial aid session, a lunch, and of course the formal interview.

1. Plan to arrive 10-15 minutes early for the start of the day. You definitely DO NOT WANT TO BE LATE.

2. Make sure you get a good night’s sleep before the big day.

3. Eat a reasonable breakfast so that your stomach isn’t empty but not too much. You don’t want to have the stress of the day affect you physically.

4. Minimize your coffee consumption to keep anxiety low.

5. If you arrive to campus early, pick up a school paper (or other reading material) to keep you occupied while you are waiting and to get a more personal feel of the school.

You’re almost there! You’ve prepped for this day and checked off all your to-do’s for the day of. Now it’s time to sit down and ace that interview!

Click here to download your complete copy of The Ultimate Guide to Medical School Interview Success!

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

• Help, I Was Rejected by All the Med Schools I Applied To!
• Common Myths about Medical School Interviews
• Introducing the MMI (Multiple Mini Interview)

*Photo courtesy of Viktor Hanacek.