MBA Project Search: Matchmaking for MBAs and Businesses

Get the scoop on MBA Project Search!You got into b-school, graduated, and now you’ve got to pay back those loans. Enter Dan Mullaney, a McDonough grad and founder of MBA Project Search.

Listen to the full recording of the show to learn about MBA Project Search, its origins, how it functions today, and how it can help soon-to-be students and professionals live the lives they want to lead.

00:02:09 – The birth of MBA Project Search.

00:03:33 – All over the map: What makes MBA Project Search unique.

00:05:44 – MBAs only?

00:08:54 – What first year MBA students and top-level CEO candidates have in common.

00:11:02 – Free to post, free to peruse. When do I pay?

00:11:53 – Nice. Nearly 10,000 consultants in the database.

00:13:17 – Active matchmaking: The MBA Project Search process.

00:17:09 – What the future holds.

00:17:48 – Why a philosophy major went to Georgetown McDonough.

00:19:07 – Business School: Irrelevant or Indispensable?

00:20:15 – Dan’s tip for non-traditional MBA applicants (and all applicants).

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Relevant Links:

•  MBA Project Search
•  MBA in Sight: Focus on Management Consulting
•  MBA in Sight: Focus on Finance

Related Shows:

•  CommonBond’s Story: A Revolution in Student Loans
•  Interview with SoFi Co-Founder, Daniel Macklin
•  Jeff Reid on Entrepreneurship
•  Business, Law and Beyond: An Interview with John Engelman
•  Which Schools are Good for PE/VC and VC-Backed Entrepreneurship

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Looking for MBA Application Essay Tips?

B-school applicants: Are you looking for advice to help you answer specific essay questions on top MBA applications? Are you looking for a resource that offers up-to-date advice for the questions found on THIS YEAR’S apps?

We’d like to introduce you to our updated special report, Top MBA Program Essay Questions: How to Answer Them Right! In this report, you’ll receive school-by-school, question-by-question advice on how to answer the questions on this year’s MBA applications.

Download your copy of "Top MBA Program Essay Questions: How to Answer Them Right"

If you want the most detailed advice available for creating the best MBA application possible, then you’ll want to download Top MBA Program Essay Questions: How to Answer Them Right! now!

Download your free MBA application essay tips now!

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The MBA Admissions Directors’ Recipe for Rejection

We asked 14 admissions directors, “What behavior or information would cause you to reject an MBA applicant who otherwise is a strong candidate?

For tips on how to get accepted to b-school, check out MBA Admissions 101While the recipe for instant rejection may vary slightly from school to school, the common ingredients are ethical lapses and poor behavior. These are broad categories that each admissions director elaborates on below, but one sentiment provides the dominant seasoning – dishonesty and rudeness are simply not tolerated. For example, Sara Neher, Assistant Dean of MBA Admissions at UVA Darden, writes, “Treating others with respect is something of paramount importance to Darden. Sometimes rudeness is an indicator of bad character and sometimes it means that the applicant is not really that interested in Darden. In either case, I do not want to admit that person, no matter the quality of their work experience or GMAT.”

A clear lack of fit or improper motivation for choosing a particular program frequently peppers the responses. For example, Sherry Wallace, Director of Admissions at UNC Kenan-Flagler explains: “Regardless of whether we are the top choice or the third choice, we want to see some passion and enthusiasm in the candidate.”

For the full recipe, read the admissions directors’ responses in full to the question: “What behavior or information would cause you to reject an MBA applicant who otherwise is a strong candidate?”

________________________________________________________________________________________

Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business, Liz Riley Hargrove, Associate Dean for Admissions

Behavior: Off the bat, candidates who falsify or plagiarize any component of their application would be denied. We also deny candidates whom we feel would not represent the school well or would not be positive contributors in the classroom and Fuqua/Duke communities.

Information: We collect a lot of information on our applicants and this information is used to determine the academic ability as well as overall fit with our culture and community. If we determined that a candidate did not have the necessary background to be successful academically, we would not admit them to our programs.

________________________________________________________________________________________

Georgetown McDonough, Shari Hubert, Associate Dean of Admissions

• Rude or offensive behavior towards any staff member throughout the application process.

• Finding out that the applicant lied on their application (i.e., not being truthful about a position, title, transcript etc., or not disclosing a lay-off, being fired, etc.) or did not disclose a criminal conviction.

• Finding out that the applicant misrepresented him or herself in taking an exam (TOEFL, GMAT/GRE) or in an interview (i.e., sent someone else in their place to conduct the interview. We can usually guard against this since we ask for IDs from each interviewee, even those we conduct via Skype).

________________________________________________________________________________________

HEC Paris MBA, Philippe Oster, Communication, Development & Admissions Director

When discussing the characteristics and behaviours that turn us off a candidate, the same things always spring to mind: a lack of respect for both the admissions process and the interviewers, telling lies on the application, poor letters of recommendation….But there are few other habits that will put us off a seemingly strong candidate.

Whilst it is important to sell yourself on your application, it is important to remain true to yourself and your achievements. When a candidate goes overboard trying to sell themselves, it raises a few eyebrows. We double check our applications, and if we find out that a candidate has been less than honest about the scale of his or her achievements – even if it was all in the name of making themselves sound a more appealing candidate – we will not be best impressed. We are fully aware that the top MBA courses are competitive but we also know at the same time that the perfect candidate doesn’t exist; when a candidate seems almost too good to be true, they usually are!

Another key factor in a candidate’s application is coherence. We want to attract the best, most driven candidates, and so their motivation in applying for HEC Paris MBA has to be clear. It is completely normal for a candidate to apply for more than one business school, but when someone just blindly applies to the top 25 without thinking about whether that school offers the best experience for them and their professional aspirations, it doesn’t motivate us to accept them. Eclectic choices with little consideration are not an indicator of the strong-decision making and foresight that is so important when studying for an MBA.

Each business school is different, and so it is important for the candidate to carefully consider their choices and only apply for the ones that cater to both their professional goals and personality. We wouldn’t expect a candidate to find that more than four of the top MBAs complement them perfectly, and so their application should reflect this.

________________________________________________________________________________________

IE Business School, Jean Marie Winikates, Director of North America at IE Business School

1. Information that doesn’t add up on the application and is still unclear after the interview.

2. Behavior that exhibits poor judgment.

3. Someone who exhibits goals that do not align with the program outcomes.

________________________________________________________________________________________

IMD, Lisa Piguet, Associate Director MBA Admissions and Marketing

As far as behaviour goes – as you know, our interview process is the most unique in the industry so we get to witness all kinds of behaviours. For me, I do not tolerate people who do not give space to others in a discussion. IMD is 95% international so English is the second language to most of our class (if not the third, fourth or fifth language). Therefore it is really important to me that people give each other the respect and courtesy to express themselves in the best way they know how. If someone in a group discussion does not allow this, I do not tolerate it.

The second part to the question – rejecting someone. We reject people when we see that they have written their own letters of recommendation or if they’ve lied on their application. We also do background checks at IMD (only after someone has been accepted) so if anyone has lied in the application we will find it out here as well and this is automatic grounds for dismissal (obviously we give them a chance to explain or clear things up before dismissing them).

________________________________________________________________________________________

London Business School, Oliver Ashby, Senior Manager, Recruitment & Admissions, MBA Programme

Every communication and information point is a valuable addition to our assessment of a candidate. We have a set of values that define us as a learning community and we look for evidence that candidates are aligned with those when assessing their fit for our school. We do not seek out behaviour to exclude applicants but instead actively seek to champion evidence that a candidate has the right ‘cultural fit’ for LBS. That is to say they demonstrate they are communal, open and engaged. We also look for candidates who we feel are likely to play an enduring role in the schools future.

________________________________________________________________________________________

Michigan RossSoojin Kwon, Director of Admissions

Here are some things that would cause us to reject a seemingly strong MBA applicant:

• Evidence of plagiarism

• Falsification of background

• Poor judgment – could be demonstrated through an essay, a recommendation letter, an interview, a formal or informal interactions

• Lack of cultural awareness and openness to diversity

• Inability to work well with others

________________________________________________________________________________________

Notre Dame Mendoza, Debby Herczeg, Assistant Director, Graduate Business Programs Admissions

Our focus is in ethics and values, so something that may cause us to reject an otherwise strong candidate, would be behavior or information that has shown the candidate to be unethical. There are many situations where a person can fall into this category, so of course, we would review the entire case to see if there would be need for concern.

The additional consideration is values. Does the candidate have any example of not having similar values as the University? Ethics and values are an important part of our curriculum and we hope that all of our graduates represent the program and University based on what they learn here at Notre Dame.

________________________________________________________________________________________

Toronto Rotman, Niki da Silva, Director, Recruitment & Admissions, Full Time MBA

The behaviour that would cause our admissions committee to reject an otherwise strong candidate would be arrogance. The culture at Rotman is a program of equals where individuality is a core value at the School, so a candidate who comes across as arrogant simply won’t be a good fit with others in the program, despite having otherwise impressive qualifications.

We are looking for people who value the contribution and unique skills/experiences others can bring and admitting candidates who believe they are superior to others is far too damaging to the culture to be considered. This arrogance can come across in an admissions interview, sometimes in an essay, and also in reference letters.

________________________________________________________________________________________

The Lauder Institute, (Joint-Degree MA International Studies & Wharton MBA/Penn Law JD), Meghan Ellis, Associate Director of Lauder Admissions

As a program that focuses on international business and management issues, global and regional studies, and cross-cultural proficiency, the Lauder Institute has a strong emphasis on foreign language skills. A successful Lauder applicant must have at least an advanced level of proficiency in one of our non-native language programs (Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Hindi, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish).

The only exceptions are that native-level Spanish, French, and Italian speakers can enter our Portuguese program without prior knowledge of the language, and for our new Global program we ask that applicants have strong proficiency in two languages other than English.

The above comments refer specifically to the Lauder Institute – not the Wharton MBA.

________________________________________________________________________________________

UVA Darden, Sara E. Neher, Assistant Dean of MBA Admissions

I’m continually amazed by how some applicants every year are rude, either directly to me, or to members of the Admissions team. Examples are things like signing up for events and not attending, short, terse emails, or canceling a class visit or interview at the last minute and expecting the admissions team to be able to accommodate you at your convenience (amazingly – expecting a class visit when there are not classes, like Fridays).

Treating others with respect is something of paramount importance to Darden. Sometimes rudeness is an indicator of bad character and sometimes it means that the applicant is not really that interested in Darden. In either case, I do not want to admit that person, no matter the quality of their work experience or GMAT.

________________________________________________________________________________________

UNC Kenan-FlaglerSherry Wallace, Director of Admissions

Some of the reasons we would avoid admitting applicants that might appear to be strong candidates, include:

• Candidate perceived to be a mismatch with our school. Maybe the candidate’s values (expressed or witnessed) don’t match Kenan-Flagler values. Maybe the candidate seeks a particular curriculum that we don’t offer or a career outcome that we don’t think we are best suited to help them achieve.

• Candidate has been excessive in contacting the admissions office and requesting individual attention. Too many inquiries, too many requests for one-on-one meetings or phone calls – beyond that which is appropriate. Note that we encourage candidates to engage with us. I’m referring here only to those people whose demands for individual attention are unreasonable.

• Candidate received negative feedback from staff or students. Perhaps the candidate came to campus and was rude or inappropriate with the staff or students they met.

• Candidate doesn’t display sincere interest in being a student at our school. We expect that most applicants will consider multiple schools. Regardless of whether we the top choice or the third choice, we want to see some passion and enthusiasm in the candidate.

• Candidate presented fraudulent information.

________________________________________________________________________________________

Vanderbilt Owen, Christie St. John, Director of Admissions

What are reasons we would deny an otherwise strong candidate? I can think of three main reasons.

First, if we hear from our students that a candidate has acted inappropriately in a social situation with the students, i.e., having said or done something highly offensive, we would not admit the person. It doesn’t happen a lot, but when our students report such an incident, we know that the person would not be a good fit in our community.

Second, if we feel that the person has career goals that are simply not feasible, whether because of their lack of essential work experience, their interpersonal skills, or maybe because they want something that we don’t feel our program can help them with. We talk very frankly and honestly with applicants whose goals don’t seem to align with their experience. We explain that we want them to get a job and that we will do everything we can to help, but they may need to be flexible and be willing to work very hard to get into something they just don’t have the background for. We feel this is the only ethical way to do business – to set people up for success.

Finally, we occasionally “google” some of the people we are interviewing, just to get an idea of what their interests are. Many times we discover fun facts that help us find the right students to connect with the applicant. But once, a colleague actually discovered some very serious criminal allegations against an applicant which led to his incarceration. No mention of this was made in the application, and had we not done some searching, we would not have known about this. Many schools use background checks for all admitted students to verify credentials and check for criminal offenses. We haven’t done that for a while at Vanderbilt but we are considering it now.

There are probably other things but these are at the top of the list.

________________________________________________________________________________________

UCLA Anderson, Jessica Chung, Associate Director, MBA Admissions

Blatant plagiarism in the application essay is something that can make an otherwise strong MBA candidate inadmissible. An applicant can have great academics, work experience and other qualities, but if he/she behaves unethically by copying passages from other sources and passing off as his/her own work, there’s a strong chance that this behavior can continue as a student in the program and that’s not someone we want as a part of our community.

________________________________________________________________________________________

Get clear, practical guidelines for answering the MBA goals essay question. Click here to download our free report.

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Round 2 Applicants: Looking for Tips for Specific MBA Application Questions?

Round 2 (and 3) applicants: Are you looking for advice to help you answer specific essay questions on top MBA applications? Are you looking for a resource that offers up-to-date advice for the questions found on THIS YEAR’S apps?

We’d like to introduce you to our updated special report, Top MBA Program Essay Questions: How to Answer Them Right! In this report, you’ll receive school-by-school, question-by-question advice on how to answer the questions on this year’s MBA applications…and just in time to submit those R2 apps!

Download your copy of "Top MBA Program Essay Questions: How to Answer Them Right"

If you want the most detailed advice available for creating the best MBA application possible, then you’ll want to download Top MBA Program Essay Questions: How to Answer Them Right! now!








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Georgetown McDonough 2014 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

Learn more about Georgetown McDonough

The top MBA program at the intersection of business and government

Georgetown McDonough, the top MBA program at the intersection of business and government, clearly articulates its principles: Learning, International Mindset, Integrity, Professionalism, Community.  Make no mistake. It wants students who are guided by those same values.Your application should show that you need the education provided by McDonough to achieve your goals and that you wholeheartedly embrace its values.

Essays:

Essays should all be double-spaced using 12pt. font. Prepare your attachments offline in separate document files and upload them individually. Please follow the instructions regarding length of each attachment, and label each page with your name.

1: Answer both Part A and Part B Essays

Part A – What is your short-term goal following graduation from the Georgetown McDonough MBA Program? What skills are you seeking to develop or improve upon in order to reach your goals? (500 words or fewer)

What do you want to do immediately upon earning your MBA? Frame your answer in terms of function — what do you actually want to do — and industry. If geographic is relevant, you can include that too.

Then what do you need to learn at Georgetown that in combination with your previous experience and education will enable you to achieve your MBA goals?

You could start this essay with a short vignette that illustrates both your strengths and what you need to learn in order to achieve your goals. Or you could start with your first day on the job after your MBA. Or with your first major success on that new job. Show that you have a clear picture of the future you are seeking and then circle back to where you’re at and what you need to learn to get to where you want to go.

Part B – What is your long-term career goal? (100 words or fewer)

Where do you see your career headed over time. You won’t have room for stories in this response, or certainly not long ones. Just one piece of advice, your long-term career goal should relate to either what you have done in the past or what you want to do in the future. It should make sense.

2: Answer either option A or option B

Choose the one that you can respond to most enthusiastically and most easily. Choose the one that will allow you to add the most information and insight to the portrait you already presented. 

Option A – Describe a global business challenge and its relevance to your post-MBA career. (750 words or fewer)

This is a wide-open question, however if you intend your business to be primarily domestic, it may be a hard one to answer. On the other hand, if you are used to working with global questions, have an interest in international business, and see yourself working on a multi-national scale, this could be a home run for you. Just make sure that you tie your challenge to your career either by showing how you are going to take advantage of the opportunity that is almost always inherent in challenge or how you will contribute to solving this challenge.

- Or -

Option B – Describe yourself both personally and professionally and how you will contribute to the Georgetown McDonough community. (750 words or fewer)

This is a more traditional MBA question and option. What in your background or talents will you draw upon to contribute to McDonough’s community? And then how specifically do you intend to contribute? Will you be a leader of Net Impact at Georgetown? Or will you spearhead the 2014 Georgetown Energy & Cleantech Conference? Or…?

 3: Why do you want to attend the Georgetown McDonough MBA Program? Tell us in tweet format. (140 characters or fewer)

Be specific & concrete. Leave off articles. Use common abbreviations. Do not exceed 140 characters. 

The preceding line provides advice “in tweet format.” It is 99 characters. :-)

Optional 1: If you are not currently employed full-time, use this space to provide information about your current activities. (250 words or fewer)

Optional 2: Please provide any information you would like to add to your application that you have not otherwise included. (500 words or fewer)

Please see “The Optional Essay: To Be or Not to Be.”

If you would like professional guidance with your Georgetown McDonough School MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our  MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Georgetown McDonough MBA application.

Georgetown McDonough 2014 MBA Application Deadlines:

Application Deadline Decision Notification
Round 1 October 10, 2013 December 20, 2013
Round 2 January 5, 2014 March 20, 2014
Round 3 April 1, 2014 May 15, 2014

Get clear, practical guidelines for answering the MBA goals essay question. Click here to download our free report.
Linda Abraham By , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

Georgetown MBA Interview with Teri Delgado

Click here for more MBA student interviews.

This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. We hope to offer you a candid picture of student life, and what you should consider as you prepare your MBA application.

Accepted: First, can you tell us a bit about your background? Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What is your favorite flavor ice cream?

Teri: My background is Puerto Rican and Mexican-Irish and I grew up in Kensington, MD, just outside of Washington, D.C. I studied psychology at Dartmouth College in Hanover, NH. Go Big Green! My favorite flavor of ice cream is Dulce de Leche.

Accepted: What events or experiences in your life led you to pursue an MBA?

Teri: I chose to pursue an MBA to build a strong general management foundation. After undergrad, I joined an education start-up to teach high school students and design AP curriculum, but discovered my passion for marketing when the start-up’s founder asked me to support the growth of the company by managing the company’s marketing campaigns and sponsorships. Focused on advancing my marketing career, I spent the next 5 years with the Advisory Board Company, a healthcare research, technology, and consulting firm based in Washington, D.C., where I pioneered the firm’s first product marketing role and grew the strategic marketing team over the physician performance technology and consulting divisions. Partnering with product development and sales teams, I launched 5 new technology products and designed a strategic plan for the firm’s physician-focused solutions. This experience working across cross-functional teams to advance corporate strategy and drive both top-line sales and bottom-line growth helped me build a strong marketing foundation, but also motivated me to deepen my knowledge of other business functions. Through conversations with mentors at work and other professional women that I met through the Forte Foundation, I knew that getting my MBA was the best next step for me.

Accepted: Can you talk about your experience with the Forte Foundation? What are some of the benefits of being involved with this organization?

Teri: As a Forte Fellow, I have access to many great benefits, including networking events, webinars, and the annual Forte Conference. Even before school started, I was welcomed by my second-year Forte mentor from Georgetown who helped me navigate the first weeks of school. Through my Forte participation, I contribute to the Forte Fellow blog and have been empowered to lead the first-year women’s mentoring program as the VP, Mentorship for the Georgetown Women in Business club. Forte sponsored events helped me evaluate pursuing an MBA early on and I am thrilled that I can share my experience and help other women strategically consider this decision as well.

Accepted: I see you’re also an NSHMBA Fellow and a Toyota Fellow. Can you tell us a little about these programs?

Teri: Through Georgetown, I received a National Society of Hispanic MBAs (NSHMBA) Scholarship and a Toyota Fellowship.

NSHMBA is committed to increasing the number of Hispanics with graduate business degrees and is a premier networking and skill development organization for Hispanic professionals. As a NSHMBA Scholar, I have received a financial scholarship, access to exclusive networking events and skill-building workshops, and admission to the annual NSHMBA career conference where I secured my summer internship offer. I also have volunteered for NSHMBA and participated in the annual Brillante Awards gala where McDonough’s full-time program was honored for Education Excellence.

The Toyota Fellowship recognizes successful undergraduate academic performance and at least four years of professional achievement for MBA candidates concentrating in marketing, strategy, or finance. As a Fellow, I have been invited to exclusive networking events with Toyota.

Accepted: What is your favorite thing about the MBA program at Georgetown McDonough? Least favorite?

Teri: McDonough has empowered me to apply my leadership skills in both global and local contexts. My favorite part of the experience has been building relationships with students and the community as a Marketing Club Leader and as a Board Fellow where I helped an international non-profit with brand building and digital platform development. My least favorite thing about Georgetown is probably the limited dining options on campus, but I heard that they are planning to renovate the food court this year!

Accepted: Which other b-schools had you considered? Why did you think Georgetown was the best fit?

Teri: I was accepted at NYU Stern and Duke as well but chose Georgetown because I felt a strong connection to the people and the place. The Georgetown culture is collegial and grounded in service to others. I can honestly say that the people I have met are committed to solving the world’s challenges and serving the local community- we have partnerships with over 40+ community service organizations and non-profits in D.C. Georgetown’s general management and international focus was a great fit for my career goals. Being close to home and family was a great bonus!

Accepted: What are you doing for your summer internship? What role did Georgetown play in helping you secure that position?

Teri: This summer, I have a brand management internship with Johnson & Johnson’s OTC Global Franchise Organization in Fort Washington, PA. As a member of the Global Franchise team, I am focused on identifying and sizing pain care growth opportunities for key brands (TYLENOL® and MOTRIN®) across 16 global markets to inform the 2013 global strategic plan. Georgetown’s Career Services team and the Graduate Marketing Club peer advisors (second-year MBA students) were invaluable in helping me prepare for my interviews at the NSHMBA career conference. I felt confident going into internship recruiting because of the time that Career Services and my marketing peers invested in me to help me prepare for company conference calls, mock interviews, and case interviews.

Accepted: How would you rate Georgetown and Washington, D.C. as a setting for business school?

Teri: Georgetown is a fun and unique setting for business school. Georgetown’s D.C. location gives students unparalleled access to government, business, and cultural leaders. Some of the highlights of my first year have been campus events with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Bill Clinton, Muhammad Yunus founder of Grameen Bank, and Bono.

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages







Accepted.com

Jeff Reid on Entrepreneurship

Jeff ReidIf you dream of entrepreneurship, tune in to our conversation with Jeff Reid, Director of the Georgetown Entrepreneurship Initiative. Listen to the full recording to get the lowdown on the program as well as great info, insights and advice for entrepreneurs.

00:01:52 – Meet Jeff Reid, Director of the Georgetown Entrepreneurship Initiative.

00:02:51 – The Entrepreneurship Initiative at Georgetown University: What is and how it works.

00:04:16 – Why universities struggle with entrepreneurship. (Do you know what the opposite of an entrepreneur is?)

00:07:54 – Location, location, location. Entrepreneurial culture thrives alongside the government presence of DC.

00:15:28 – More on “the power of entrepreneurial communities and networks to create social value.”

00:19:51 – What is the Entrepreneurship Initiative doing for MBA students? (Classes, competitions, mentorship, internships, and more)

00:21:46 – Not just for business students: law and med students join the bandwagon.

00:23:36 – Do you advise students to work for someone else before starting their own ventures?

00:25:04 – The most important quality for future entrepreneurs to develop.

00:27:14 – Important courses for the entrepreneurially inclined.

00:28:19 – Are entrepreneurs at a disadvantage when applying to b-school because lower salaries reduce rankings?

Admissions Straight Talk Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes to keep up with the latest in admissions news and trends! You know you want to give us a 5-star rating!

*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Show Note Links:

StartupHoyas

• Georgetown Entrepreneurship Initiative

Focus on Entrepreneurship – posts about entrepreneurship at Accepted.com

Related Admissions Straight Talk Shows:

MBAs Across America: The Coolest HBS Internship

• Interview with Anne Perigo, UM Master in Entrepreneurship

Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk:

• Admissions Straight Talk on iTunes

• Admissions Straight Talk on Stitcher

More 2012 Economist MBA Rankings Data

MBA Rankings Data for 2012We already analyzed The Economist’s rankings of the top 25 global MBA programs; now we’re going to provide insights from the Poets & Quants article, “The Economist’s Winners & Losers.” In short, volatility is the name of the game.

  • 23 of the 100 top global MBA programs saw double-digit changes (jumps or falls) this year.
  • The awards for the biggest falls go to University College Dublin’s Smurfit School and Vlerick Leuven, both of which dropped 25 places.
  • In the U.S., USC Marshall takes the loser’s cake with a 21-spot drop from 22nd to 43rd place. Penn State’s Smeal School of Business dropped 18 places from 50th to 68th.
  • The Indian Institute of Management-Ahmadehad wins points for the biggest jump, going from 28th place in 2011 to 56th place this year (22 places). The next biggest jump was Lancaster University Management School which went from 100th to 80th place over the course of the year.
  • The biggest jumpers in the U.S. were Temple University Fox (89th to 77th), Cornell Johnson (25th to 15th), and Georgetown McDonough (44th to 35th).
  • Newcomers to the top 100 list include Arizona State (59th), Texas Christian (71st), the International University of Japan (79th), St. Gallen University (81st), WHU Germany (87th), the International University of Monaco (97th), and Case Western Reserve Weatherhead (100th).

Please see our article on The Economist’s top 25 MBA programs for 2012 for more information.

rankings-full-size


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Georgetown McDonough 2013 MBA Application Questions, Deadlines, Tips

Georgetown McDonoughThe 2014 Georgetown McDonough tips are now available. Click here to check them out!
 
To gain acceptance to Georgetown McDonough, you’ll have to prove to the adcom members that you have the skill, passion, and motivation to pursue an education that extends far beyond the campus gate. When the admissions committee is done reading your essays, they should hold a distinctive image of you as a strong, capable businessperson and leader.
 
Our tips are in blue. 
 
Georgetown McDonough 2013 Essay Questions
(Essays should be double-spaced using a 12-point font.)

Essay One:   (answer both part A and part B)

Part A: What is your short-term goal following graduation from Georgetwon McDonough Full-time MBA Program?  What skills are you seeking to develop or improve upon in order to reach your goals? (500 words or fewer)

What do you want to do immediately upon earning your MBA? Frame your answer in terms of function — what do you actually want to do — and industry.If geographic is relevant, you can include that too.

Then what do you need to learn at Georgetown that in combination with your previous experience and education will enable you to achieve your MBA goals?

You could start this essay with a short vignette that illustrates both your strengths and what you need to learn in order to achieve your goals. Or you could start with your first day on the job after your MBA. Or with your first major success on that new job. Show that you have a clear picture of the future you are seeking and then circle back to where you’re at and what you need to learn to get to where you want to go.

Part B: What is your long-term career goal? (100 words or fewer)

Where do you see your career headed over time. You won’t have room for stories in this response, or certainly not long ones. Just one piece of advice, your long-term career goal should relate to either what you have done in the past or what you want to do in the future. It should make sense.

Essay Two:   (answer either option A or option B)

First you have to choose which essay to answer. Choose the one that you can respond to most enthusiastically and most easily. Choose the one that will allow you to add the most information and insight to the portrait you already presented. For more on making the choice, please see “You’ve got options!”

Option A: Describe a global business challenge and its relevance to your post-MBA career. (750 words or fewer)

This is a wide-open question, however if you intend your business to be primarily domestic, it may be a hard one to answer. On the other hand, if you are used to working with global questions, have an interest in international business, and see yourself working on a multi-national scale, this could be a home run for you. Just make sure that you tie your challenge to your career either by showing how you are going to take advantage of the opportunity that is almost always inherent in challenge or how you will contribute to solving this challenge.

Option B:
Describe yourself both personally and professionally and how you will contribute to the Georgetown McDonough community. (750 words or fewer)

This is a more traditional MBA question and option. What in your background or talents will you draw upon to contribute to McDonough’s community? And then how specifically do you intend to contribute? Will you be a leader of Net Impact at Georgetown? Or will you spearhead the 2014 Georgetown Energy & Cleantech Conference? Or…?

Essay Three:
Why do you want to attend the Georgetown McDonough Full-time MBA Program?  Tell us in tweet format*. (140 characters or fewer)

*Twitter is an online social networking service that enables its users to send and read text-based messages of up to 140 characters known as “tweets”. Applicants not familiar with Twitter can learn more, here. (http://twitter.com/about) Follow Georgetown McDonough on Twitter @msbgu for daily student, alumni, and faculty-sourced content.

“Be specific & concrete. Leave off articles. Use common abbreviations. Do not exceed 140 characters.”

The preceding line provides advice “in tweet format.” It is 99 characters. :-)

Optional Essay One:
If you are not currently employed full-time, use this essay to provide information about your current activities. (250 words or fewer)

Option Essay Two:
Please provide any information you would like to add to your application that you have not otherwise included. (500 words or fewer)

Please see “The Optional Essay: To Be or Not to Be.”

RE-APPLICANT ESSAY (required only for reapplicants)
How have you strengthened your candidacy since your last application? We are particularly interested in hearing about how you have grown professionally and personally. (500 words or fewer)

How are you a better applicant now than you were last time? What growth can you point to? Why do you think you will get accepted this time if you didn’t last time?  How are you “new and improved”?

Georgetown McDonough 2013 MBA Deadlines

   Deadlines                 Decisions Released

Round One:       October 15, 2012       December 15, 2012
Round Two:       January 5, 2013        March 15, 2013
Round Three:   April 1, 2013               May 15, 201

If you would like professional guidance with your McDonough MBA, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our Georgetown School Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Georgetown MBA application.

Linda AbrahamBy , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties:The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

The GMAT is Slipping and So are Applications

Good news for b-school applicants: There has been a decline in business school applications. While that might not mean that getting into MBA programs has gotten easier, it does mean that the median GMAT score has been lowered.

Poets and Quants (“GMAT Scores Slip At Many Top Schools”) did an analysis of the median GMAT score at the top 25 US business schools and discovered that median scores are slowly dropping. MIT Sloan, Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management, Carnegie-Mellon’s Tepper School, North Carolina’s Kenan-Flagler Business School, and the University of Southern California’s Marshall School all reported a 10-point drop in their median GMAT scores.

Poets and Quants analysis also reveals that a larger percentage of students were accepted to some b-schools this year than in 2010. USC’s Marshall School accepted 38% of applicants, in comparison with 22% last year, Georgetown’s McDonough School accepted 49% of its applicants, up from 42% last year, and Michigan’s Ross School accepted 32% of its applicants, up from 25% last year.

Implications for MBA applicants:

This is an excellent year to apply to business school.

While you still can’t slap together a mediocre application and expect to get accepted to a top-tier MBA program, if you know why you want an MBA and where you would like to get it, now is the time to apply. If you are competitive at your target schools, invest the time in your MBA essays, work with your recommenders, and submit for the round 2 deadlines.

You may also want to apply to an additional “reach” school or two. However, don’t get too cocky. This data does not imply that all your target programs should be “reaches” or that the GMAT no longer matters.

There is just a little less competition to enter the MBA class of 2014, especially for those not coming from super-competitive cohorts in the applicant pool.

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