Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog http://blog.accepted.com Admissions consulting and application advice Fri, 03 Jul 2015 19:02:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.2 Happy July 4th From Accepted! http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/03/happy-july-4th-from-accepted/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/03/happy-july-4th-from-accepted/#respond Fri, 03 Jul 2015 19:02:24 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32018 Tags: College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

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Happy July 4th from Linda Abraham and the Accepted Team!Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

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Can You Apply To Med School With Low Stats? [On-Demand Webinar] http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/02/can-you-apply-to-med-school-with-low-stats-on-demand-webinar/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/02/can-you-apply-to-med-school-with-low-stats-on-demand-webinar/#respond Thu, 02 Jul 2015 19:32:32 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31636 The answer: YES! Now’s your chance to catch up on valuable information you may have missed during last week’s webinar, Get Accepted to Medical School with Low Stats. Med school applicants with low GPA and/or MCAT scores – you don’t want to miss this! Tags: low stats, Medical School Admissions, webinar

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The answer: YES!

Watch the webinar!Now’s your chance to catch up on valuable information you may have missed during last week’s webinar, Get Accepted to Medical School with Low Stats.

Med school applicants with low GPA and/or MCAT scores – you don’t want to miss this!

Watch the webinar! Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

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Snag Your Seat At Harvard Business School! http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/02/snag-your-harvard-business-school-class-of-2018-seat/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/02/snag-your-harvard-business-school-class-of-2018-seat/#respond Thu, 02 Jul 2015 19:09:57 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31725 If you’re aiming to attend Harvard Business School in 2016, then you’ll want to check out our recent webinar, Get Accepted to Harvard Business School. In her presentation, Linda Abraham, CEO & Founder of Accepted.com, offers important advice on how to gain a competitive edge to a top b-school in general, and Harvard Business School in […]

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If you’re aiming to attend Harvard Business School in 2016, then you’ll want to check out our recent webinar, Get Accepted to Harvard Business School.

Watch the webinar!In her presentation, Linda Abraham, CEO & Founder of Accepted.com, offers important advice on how to gain a competitive edge to a top b-school in general, and Harvard Business School in particular.

View Get Accepted to Harvard Business School now!

Watch the webinar!Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

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Accepted And Next Step Bring You: MCAT Diagnostic Test Review Session http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/01/accepted-and-next-step-bring-you-mcat-diagnostic-test-review-session/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/01/accepted-and-next-step-bring-you-mcat-diagnostic-test-review-session/#respond Wed, 01 Jul 2015 17:49:36 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32000 Next Step Test Prep has invited Accepted’s Linda Abraham to present What Does the MCAT Reveal About You? as part of its free webinar for med school applicants! Join NSTP and Accepted for the MCAT Diagnostic Test Review Session, Thursday July 9th @ 8pm EST. The MCAT review part of the webinar will be presented […]

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Next Step Test Prep has invited Accepted’s Linda Abraham to present What Does the MCAT Reveal About You? as part of its free webinar for med school applicants! Join NSTP and Accepted for the MCAT Diagnostic Test Review Session, Thursday July 9th @ 8pm EST.

The MCAT review part of the webinar will be presented by Bryan Schnedeker from Next Step.  Bryan will review lessons learned from Next Step’s free MCAT diagnostic test, and Linda will provide an overview of the MCAT’s role in the med school admissions process.

Join the webinar and learn what the MCAT reveals about you!

Don’t miss this opportunity to learn about the new MCAT and the med school application process! Register today.

Following the event, Next Step will raffle off two 5-packs of their full length MCAT practice tests, and attendees will also be entered into a grand prize drawing, where they’ll have a chance to win all 9 Next Step MCAT prep books, 5 practice tests, and a two hour session with Next Step’s National Director of MCAT Content.

Any other questions about the med school application process? Subscribe to our blog or check out our med school consulting services!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

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Save 10%. Get Accepted. Smile. http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/01/save-money-get-accepted-smile/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/01/save-money-get-accepted-smile/#respond Wed, 01 Jul 2015 17:46:02 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31994 Hey b-school applicants – are you looking to save money this summer AND get one step closer to gaining acceptance to your top choice school? Introducing Accepted’s SUPER Summer Sale – 10% off your choice of MBA services through Wednesday, July 15th.* Not sure which service is best for you? Check out these options: • […]

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Hey b-school applicants – are you looking to save money this summer AND get one step closer to gaining acceptance to your top choice school?

Save 10% on MBA Admissions Services by using 'SUMMERMBA' through July 15

Introducing Accepted’s SUPER Summer Sale – 10% off your choice of MBA services through Wednesday, July 15th.*

Not sure which service is best for you? Check out these options:

MBA Essay Editing
MBA Application Packages
MBA Interview Help
MBA Resumes
Admissions Consulting

We look forward to helping you get into business school!

Shop and save!* Offer valid only on non-rush services and may not be combined with other offers.

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

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The Doctor As Renaissance Man http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/01/the-doctor-as-renaissance-man/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/01/the-doctor-as-renaissance-man/#respond Wed, 01 Jul 2015 16:14:21 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32033 Ajay Major is a fourth year medical student who has accomplished an amazing amount while pursuing a combined BS/MBA/MD program. Look at all those letters that will soon follow his name! Listen to the recording of our interview to be inspired by this current medical student who is also the founder and editor-in-chief of an […]

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Listen to the show!Ajay Major is a fourth year medical student who has accomplished an amazing amount while pursuing a combined BS/MBA/MD program. Look at all those letters that will soon follow his name!

Listen to the recording of our interview to be inspired by this current medical student who is also the founder and editor-in-chief of an online magazine for med school students, Medstro Medical Student Ambassador, and somehow juggles a host of other roles while preparing to apply to residency programs.

00:02:16 – Regrets about choosing the BS/MBA/MD path.

00:04:16 – The case for a non-brand name education.

00:06:35 – What Ajay likes most about medical school.

00:08:29 – Best tip for premeds: Step out of your comfort zone!

00:10:30 – Glimpse into the activities of an “entrepreneur, medical student activist, and aspiring physician-journalist.”

00:16:10 – The trick to having time for everything.

00:17:22 – In-Training: what it is and who writes it.

00:19:10 – How Medstro and In-Training differ from SDN.

00:23:51 – Last piece of advice for med students and premeds.

Click here to listen to the show!*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com

Related links:

Ajay’s website
In – Training
In-House
Medstro
BS/MBA/MD Student Interview with Ajay Major
• 
Getting Ready for Residency: IV with a Med Student on the Way to Mayo
Writing Secondary Essays that Get You Accepted [webinar]

Related Shows:

• Elliptical, Meet Med School: Interview with Andrea Tooley
• Overcoming The Odds: A Story Of Med School Inspiration
• Baylor College Of Medicine: A Holistic Approach To Admissions
• Attn Med Applicants: A Class Is Matriculated Every Single Year
• Medical School Admissions 2015-2016: A Dean’s Perspective

Leave a Review for Admissions Straight Talk:

Check Out Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes! Check Out Admissions Straight Talk in Stitcher!
Download your copy of "Navigating the Med School Maze" today!

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Get Accepted To Stanford GSB! http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/30/get-accepted-to-stanford-gsb/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/30/get-accepted-to-stanford-gsb/#respond Tue, 30 Jun 2015 18:35:47 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31979 A beautiful campus in the heart of Silicon Valley. An entrepreneurial mindset. Gorgeous Northern California weather. All the cultural offerings of the SF Bay Area. And…you? Will you be at Stanford GSB next year? If you’re preparing to apply, don’t miss our upcoming webinar, Get Accepted to Stanford GSB! Accepted.com’s founder and CEO, Linda Abraham, […]

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A beautiful campus in the heart of Silicon Valley. An entrepreneurial mindset. Gorgeous Northern California weather. All the cultural offerings of the SF Bay Area. And…you?

Will you be at Stanford GSB next year?

Register for our webinar to see how to get accepted to Stanford Graduate School of Business!

If you’re preparing to apply, don’t miss our upcoming webinar, Get Accepted to Stanford GSB!

Accepted.com’s founder and CEO, Linda Abraham, will teach you how to:

• Master the 4 key strategies for showing that you belong at Stanford.

• Apply those strategies in the different elements in Stanford’s 2015-2016 application.

…and much more!

Register for the webinar, now!The details:

Who: Anyone applying to Stanford GSB

When: Tuesday, July 21st at 10 AM PT/1:00 PM ET

Presented by: Linda Abraham, Accepted.com Founder & CEO

Register for Get Accepted to Stanford GSB now to boost your chances of joining the 7% of students who will be accepted at Stanford GSB!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

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An Interview With Our Own: Alicia McNease Nimonkar http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/30/an-interview-with-our-own-alicia-mcnease-nimonkar/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/30/an-interview-with-our-own-alicia-mcnease-nimonkar/#respond Tue, 30 Jun 2015 16:46:46 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31803 Curious about the life and times of our spectacular admissions consultants? Please enjoy our newest blog series in which we interview the fabulous people who make up the Accepted.com staff. Next up is…Alicia McNease Nimonkar. Accepted: Can you tell us a little about yourself? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? Do you […]

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Click here to view Alicia's bio!Curious about the life and times of our spectacular admissions consultants? Please enjoy our newest blog series in which we interview the fabulous people who make up the Accepted.com staff. Next up is…Alicia McNease Nimonkar.

Accepted: Can you tell us a little about yourself? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? Do you hold any graduate degrees? Where do you currently live?

Alicia: Since my dad served in the Air Force for thirty years, I grew up all over the U.S. Fascinated by other perspectives, I chose to study English Literature for my Bachelor’s Degree. I am currently completing a Master’s Degree in Composition and Rhetoric as well as Literature.

My first book, The Definitive Guide to Premedical Postbaccalaureate Programs was published this year and is available on Amazon and the Accepted.com website. I teach yoga and quilting where I live in the Boston area.

Accepted: Congratulations on your new book! Can you tell us about it? Do you have any plans for future books?

Alicia: The book describes all the different types of postbac programs in existence and includes interviews with students who I helped gain acceptance into medical school as well as interviews with postbac program directors from around the country. I hope that it will serve as a resource for students who might otherwise give up on their dream of pursuing a medical education.

I have collaborated with the renowned psychiatrist, Dr. Loma K. Flowers, to write a book on emotional competence. The manuscript is currently under review. For my next project, I plan to write a book on secondary application essays to help students prepare for the application process in advance.

Accepted: Can you share 3 fun facts about yourself?

Alicia:

1.   I try to practice yoga and meditate almost every day.
2.  I have lived in Italy and Germany.
3.  I love to cook and just recently started making my own sushi.

Accepted: How does your experience as a yoga instructor contribute to your role as an admissions consultant?

Alicia: As a teacher, I am continually learning from my students how I can better support them. After receiving my 200 Hour Yoga Teacher Certificate, I have started a 500 Hour Yoga Teacher Training with Natasha Rizopoulos and Barbara Benagh in Boston. I also recently completed Level 1 and Level 2 in Integrated Positional Therapy with Lee Albert, NMT.

In learning to assess body posture and language, I am able to provide clients with more in depth feedback during mock interviews about how they, often, hold their breath and their bodies. I hope to empower every student I work with to be more authentic and comfortable in the way they present themselves to selection committees – in writing and interviews.

Accepted: Can you tell us about your experience at UC Davis School of Medicine? How did that contribute to your career as an admissions consultant?

Alicia: Leading and serving on selection committees for over five years to select students for our postbac program provided me with a strong understanding of what factors help or hurt a student’s application. Supporting students through the entire application process from beginning to end brought me a lot of joy! I learned that with the right strategy and support my students were able to earn record high GPAs and the highest acceptance rates for any program like it in the State of California.

Accepted: What are your top 3 admissions tips?

Alicia:

1. It’s essential that you have an increasing trend in your GPA.

2. If possible, do not submit your application before you receive your MCAT score so that you can use that information to guide your strategy and school selection.

3. Be yourself. In all of your essays and interviews and allow the reader and interviewer to get to know you, for the best results.

Learn more about Alicia and how she can help you get accepted!

See what our medical admissions services has to offer!Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy
Related Resources:

• A Second Chance at Medical School: The A-Z of Applying to Postbac Programs
• Med School Admissions Consulting and Editing Services
• How to Get the Most Out of Your Experience Working With A Medical School Consultant

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MBA Admissions: Preparing For The Interview http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/30/mba-admissions-preparing-for-the-interview/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/30/mba-admissions-preparing-for-the-interview/#respond Tue, 30 Jun 2015 16:09:19 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31915 “MBA Admissions: Preparing For The Interview” is the latest post in our series Navigate the MBA Maze. Here are three key tips on how to present yourself during those crucial face-to-face minutes. 1.  Structure Your Answers. Structure helps your interviewer see where you’re going with your answer and helps you remember where you’re going, too. […]

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Download "Navigate the MBA Maze" today!

“MBA Admissions: Preparing For The Interview” is the latest post in our series Navigate the MBA Maze.

Here are three key tips on how to present yourself during those crucial face-to-face minutes.

1.  Structure Your Answers. Structure helps your interviewer see where you’re going with your answer and helps you remember where you’re going, too. So when they ask, “Why do you want to attend Harvard/Stanford/Kellogg?” don’t say, “Well, I was born in Florida in 1984, and . . .” Instead, lay out a clear structure: “There are three primary reasons why this school is my top choice: curriculum, culture, and community.” After providing the structure upfront, provide details for each reason you mention. Not every interview answer requires an upfront structure (some are more story-oriented), but use one for those that lend themselves to it. You’ll be glad you did.

2.  Project Confidence. Regardless of your general confidence level, do your best to clear your mind of doubt and believe that you deserve an offer. As you prepare for the interview remind yourself of your past achievements in challenging circumstances. And make sure your confidence doesn’t spill over into arrogance (“Well of course you should accept me because…”).

3.  Read Your Interviewer. Some are high-energy. Some aren’t. Some like humor. Some don’t. Some are by-the-book. Some won’t ask a single question you’ve practiced for. While you can’t prepare for every single type of interviewer, you can adjust your style a bit to match theirs. Though schools stress that they seek objective opinions from their interviewers, we all know the reality: a large factor in interview performance is likeability, and interviewers like candidates who remind them of themselves. An even simpler strategy is to pay attention to clear cues from your interviewer— if they’re yawning and looking at their watch, you’re probably being too long winded or need to use more compelling examples; if they’re asking probing questions for everything you say, try including more details in your initial answers.

If you are interested in individualized interview coaching or a mock interview, check out Accepted.com’s MBA interview assistance packages.

Download your copy of Navigating the MBA MazeAccepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Related Resources:

• How To Ace Your MBA Interview [Free Guide]
• MBA Admissions Interviews: Behavioral AND Qualitative Questions [Short Video]
• MBA Interview Questions: Walk Me Through Your Resume

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LBS Launches New Finance Master’s For New Grads http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/29/lbs-launches-new-finance-masters-for-new-grads/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/29/lbs-launches-new-finance-masters-for-new-grads/#respond Mon, 29 Jun 2015 16:46:48 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31976 LBS has announced a new master’s program in finance. The new Master’s in Financial Analysis (MFA) will be a 12-month intensive program aimed at recent graduates from quantitatively-focused fields, who want a rigorous grad program that will prepare them for careers in the finance sector. The first class will begin the new program in the […]

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Click here for more information on LBSLBS has announced a new master’s program in finance. The new Master’s in Financial Analysis (MFA) will be a 12-month intensive program aimed at recent graduates from quantitatively-focused fields, who want a rigorous grad program that will prepare them for careers in the finance sector.

The first class will begin the new program in the fall of 2016. The MFA curriculum will focus on six areas: Corporate Finance (including M&A and Capital Structure); Asset Management (incorporating topics such as credit markets, practical asset allocation, market efficiency and anomalies, liquidity, long-short investing or slow-moving capital); Accounting (focusing on Accounting and Securities Analysis and Valuations); Financial Markets (financial institutions, personal finance); Financial Econometrics; and Global Markets and World Economy.

Students will also develop their soft skills, such as communication, commitment, and commercial awareness. The program will balance coursework in London with international fieldtrips.

LBS’s Masters in Finance has been ranked number 1 by the Financial Times for five years running. Drawing on the school’s strengths, as well as the manifold advantages of studying in London, the new Masters in Financial Analysis program will provide an intensive, 1-year option for students near the beginning of their careers.

Click here for the lowdown on one of the most up and coming specialized masters programs in the business world.Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Related Resources:

London Business School Master’s in Finance Application Essay Tips
• Master in Finance: What You Need to Know
• The Facts About Financial Services

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Dartmouth Tuck 2016 MBA Essay Tips And Deadlines http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/28/dartmouth-tuck-2016-mba-essay-tips-and-deadlines/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/28/dartmouth-tuck-2016-mba-essay-tips-and-deadlines/#comments Sun, 28 Jun 2015 17:15:25 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31572 The Dartmouth Tuck adcom is interested in learning about what you as an individual, a businessperson, and a leader can contribute to Tuck’s small, close-knit program. Use your essays as a platform for expressing your earnest desire to enter the world of management and to make a difference.   I strongly recommend Tuck applicants read “The MBA […]

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Want to learn more about Tuck? Check out our Dartmouth Tuck MBA Zone!The Dartmouth Tuck adcom is interested in learning about what you as an individual, a businessperson, and a leader can contribute to Tuck’s small, close-knit program. Use your essays as a platform for expressing your earnest desire to enter the world of management and to make a difference.  

I strongly recommend Tuck applicants read The MBA Gatekeeper To Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business,” Poets and Quants interview with Dawna Clarke, Director of Admissions at Tuck. The article is a couple of years old, but still worth reading if you are applying to Tuck. I also recommend you review Dartmouth’s six evaluation criteria for admission.

Tuck tweaked its Essay #1 and #2, but the optional is unchanged.

Tuck provides length guidelines, not limits.  That “encouragement” and gentle suggestion gives you a little leeway. Please don’t make the mistake of abusing that typical Tuck friendliness. It is an opportunity for you to show judgment and consideration of your reader by still being succinct.

Accepted has been helping applicants to Tuck gain acceptance for roughly 20 years. Explore our services to learn more about how we can help you prepare your Tuck MBA application. 

Essays:

Please respond fully but concisely to the following essay questions. There are no right or wrong answers. We encourage applicants to limit the length of their responses to 500 words for each essay. Please double-space your responses.

1. What are your short- and long-term goals? Why do you need an MBA to achieve those goals? Why are you interested in Tuck specifically?

I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again: The MBA is a means to an end, not an end in itself. That’s why Tuck (and many other schools) ask question like this one. Tuck wants to know that it can help you achieve your goal.  So clearly you have to have both short- and long-term goals to respond to the question.  And then you need to explain how an MBA will help you realize those goals and finally, why Tuck is the best place to do so.

You have to know  Tuck as well as your goals to respond effectively to this question. Why do you want a small, tight-knit program in rural New Hampshire? Why do you want a program that stresses the integration of business functions?  Which of Tuck’s strengths appeal to you? How will they help you achieve your goals? 

2. Tell us about your most meaningful leadership experience and what role you played. How will that experience contribute to the learning environment at Tuck?

This question reflects the importance Tuck, like many MBA programs, places on leadership, and Tuck really wants to see you as a leader. 

Have you chaired  a fundraiser that raised a record amount of money? Have you been a board member for a not-for-profit organization? Have you captained a sports team that led your company league? Have you been a team lead on a project that came in early and under budget? Are you the head of a sales team who empowered other members of your team in a way that greatly contributed to the success of that initiative? These could all be examples of leadership. How did you motivate your teammates? Tell the story of that event.

Then, how will your leadership style and the lessons learned through this experience enable you to contribute? Tuck treasures its close-knit, collaborative culture and values teamwork.  How does this experience reveal about you and how you will interact with the MBA community at Dartmouth. In answering the last question, don’t fall into the trap of answering “What do they want to hear?” What do you most want them to know?

3. (Optional) Please provide any additional insight or information that you have not addressed elsewhere that may be helpful in reviewing your application (e.g., unusual choice of evaluators, weaknesses in academic performance, unexplained job gaps or changes, etc.). Complete this question only if you feel your candidacy is not fully represented by this application.

It is almost impossible for two (or even three) 500-word essays plus a bunch of boxes, a transcript, and a GMAT score to represent fully the uniqueness and talents of a truly impressive candidate. That comment has nothing to do with writing style and everything to do with the complexity of accomplished human beings. In my opinion this “optional essay”  is optional in name only.

At the same time, don’t waste the reader’s time by writing a meaningless, superficial “grand finale” or summary. Don’t repeat what can be found elsewhere.

4. (To be completed by all reapplicants) How have you strengthened your candidacy since you last applied? Please reflect on how you have grown personally and professionally.

Straightforward MBA reapplication question. It is critical that every reapplicant be able to answer it for every school they are reapplying to: What has changed that would compel Tuck to admit you this year?

If you would like professional guidance with your Dartmouth Tuck MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our  MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Dartmouth Tuck application. 

Dartmouth Tuck 2016 Application Deadlines:

Round Due Date Decisions Released
Early Action October 7, 2015 December 17, 2015
November Round November 4, 2015 February 12, 2016
January Round January 6, 2016 March 11, 2016
April Round April 4, 2016 May 13, 2016

5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid on your MBA Essay Questions

Linda Abraham By , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

Related Resources:

• The Tuck School of Business and the Global Insight Requirement 
Darmouth Tuck Zone Page
• School-Specific MBA Application Essay Tips

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What You Need To Know About The New MCAT http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/28/what-you-need-to-know-about-the-new-mcat/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/28/what-you-need-to-know-about-the-new-mcat/#respond Sun, 28 Jun 2015 16:29:42 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31935 Beginning with test dates this spring, the MCAT changed to a new format. What do you need to know about the new MCAT? How is it scored? How is it different from the old version? Here are a few points: 1.  The new exam has 4 sections: •  Chemical and Physical Foundations of Biological Systems […]

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Difference #4: The new MCAT is LONGER.

Beginning with test dates this spring, the MCAT changed to a new format. What do you need to know about the new MCAT? How is it scored? How is it different from the old version? Here are a few points:

1.  The new exam has 4 sections:

•  Chemical and Physical Foundations of Biological Systems

•  Biological and Biochemical Foundations of Living Systems

•  Psychological, Social, and Biological Foundations of Behavior

•  Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills.

2.  The newer version tests more material. It has been designed to integrate subjects and test your critical thinking skills, in order to test skills that are vital in med school.

3.  Along with the different exam structure comes a new scoring structure. Each section will be scored 118-132, for a total possible score of 528. The mean score for each section is expected to be 125, with an overall mean score of 500.

4.  The new exam is much longer than the old one: over 6 hours of testing time, and over 7 hours total.

5.  Score reports will include percentile ranks.

The AAMC expects about half of this year’s applicants to submit scores from the new exam, and that this number will grow in the coming years. (They will continue to report scores from the older exam through the 2019 application cycle.) However, some schools will stop accepting the old exam before that application cycle: check with the schools you are applying to if you want to apply with an old MCAT for the 2016-17 or later application cycles.

How can committees evaluate a pool that includes some applicants with scores from the old exam, some with scores from the new exam, and some who may have two separate scores (one old and one new)? Isn’t it like comparing apples and oranges?

A bit, and that’s why AAMC advises that med schools not try to compare one with the other, but rather evaluate each applicant’s score in the context of his/her application. Also, scores from the older exam will be understandable within the framework that they always have been, and scores from the new exam can be contextualized with the help of the percentile information.

Good luck on your MCAT!

Check out The New MCAT webinar now to learn how you can ace the exam!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy
Related Resources:

• Medical School Reapplicant Advice: 6 Tips for Success
MCAT Scores, MCAT Prep, and #MCAT2015 [Podcast]
• How the Adcom Views Multiple MCAT Scores

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4 Things To Do Before Submitting Your AMCAS Application http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/26/4-things-to-do-before-submitting-your-amcas-application-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/26/4-things-to-do-before-submitting-your-amcas-application-2/#respond Fri, 26 Jun 2015 15:54:48 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31898 While the AMCAS process is open for several months, it’s to your advantage to apply earlier rather than later, so that med schools can consider your application when they have more seats available to fill. With an ongoing process, how can you tell when your application is ready to submit? Here are four things we […]

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Watch our recent webinar "Create a Winning AMCAS Application"

Caution: You want 1-3 people to review your essay – not the entire world.

While the AMCAS process is open for several months, it’s to your advantage to apply earlier rather than later, so that med schools can consider your application when they have more seats available to fill. With an ongoing process, how can you tell when your application is ready to submit? Here are four things we advise that you do before you submit, to make sure that your app is in great shape:

1.  Check that your application paints an impressive, holistic, and accurate picture of you.

Each section of your application – your essays, your CV, all those boxes and fields, your letters of recommendation, your MCAT score – should provide a snapshot of who you are. Double check that all information is accurate, and that your snapshot presents you in the best light. The sections of your application should complement one another, similar to a puzzle, where each piece works together to create a complete, cohesive, unified picture.

2.  Recruit/hire someone to review your essays.

Your AMCAS essays and secondary essays aren’t done until another person (or other people) have looked them over. Have a friend, family member, or an experienced Accepted editor read through your essays, check for errors and inconsistencies, and offer constructive criticism. No, it’s not fun to have someone point out your mistakes, but your essays will be better because of it, and as a result, so will your chances of getting into your top choice med school. (Caution: You want 1-3 people to review your essay – not the entire world. This is definitely a case where too many cooks can spoil the soup—or, more precisely, confuse matters hopelessly.)

3.  Proof your entire application.

Applicants spend so much time proofing their essays (which is great) but often forget that they need to proof the rest of their application as well (not great). Proofread every component of your application – your personal statement, the boxes, the experienceseverything. Check for proper spelling and grammar and correct any errors. The entire application package should be neat and clean and error-free. Try reading your application aloud – it’s an excellent way to catch mistakes that your eyes may miss.

4.  Think about timing AND quality.

While it is important for medical school applicants to submit early in the process, it is better to send in the application a day or two later and present something that is polished and excellent, rather than submit a sloppy and rushed AMCAS app at the beginning of the process. So don’t procrastinate; there is no time to waste. At the same time, don’t compromise on quality in a rush to submit.

Once you’ve completed these four items then it’s time to confidently hit that “Submit” button!

Now, take another step: subscribe to our blog for helpful advice to guide you through your med school application journey!

Click here to view a recording of our "Create a Winning AMCAS Application!" webinarAccepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy
Related Resources:

Ace the AMCAS Essay [Free Guide]
Med School, AMCAS & Personal Statement Consulting Services
• WHAT Should You Include in Your AMCAS Essay?

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Approaching The Diversity Essay Question http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/25/writing-the-diversity-essay/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/25/writing-the-diversity-essay/#respond Thu, 25 Jun 2015 16:27:04 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31871 Many applications now have a question, sometimes optional, geared to encouraging people with minority backgrounds or unusual educational or family histories to write about their background.  If you are an immigrant to the US, the child of immigrants or someone whose ethnicity is a minority in the US, you might find this question an interesting […]

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Learn How to Use Examples to Write an Exemplary Essay

Explain how your experiences built your character.

Many applications now have a question, sometimes optional, geared to encouraging people with minority backgrounds or unusual educational or family histories to write about their background.  If you are an immigrant to the US, the child of immigrants or someone whose ethnicity is a minority in the US, you might find this question an interesting one to show how your background will add to the mix of perspectives at the program you are applying to. If you are applying after having an unusual experience for applicants like joining the military, becoming part of a dance troupe, or caring for an elderly relative, you can use your experience to evoke the way in which you will bring diversity to campus.

Your family’s culture, situation and traditions, and the way they have helped you develop particular character and personality traits are of interest, as well unusual experiences that have shaped you. Perhaps you have grown up with a strong insistence on respecting elders, attending family events or learning your parents’ native language and culture. Perhaps you are close to grandparents and extended family who have taught you how teamwork can help everyone survive. Perhaps you have had to face and deal with difficulties that stem from your parents’ values being in conflict with those of your peers. Perhaps teachers have not always understood the elements of your culture or outside-of-school situation and how they pertain to your school performance. Perhaps you have suffered discrimination and formed your values and personality traits around your success in spite of the discrimination. Perhaps you have learned skills from a lifestyle that is outside the norm–living in foreign countries as the child of diplomats or contractors, performing professionally in theater, dance, music or sports, or communicating with a deaf sibling.

Understanding and explaining how your experience built your empathy for others, a strong will, and character is a good focus for the diversity question.

Learn how to use sample essays to create an exemplary essay of your own!Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy
Related Resources:

• The Quick Guide to Admissions Resumes [Free Guide]
Writing About Overcoming Obstacles in Your Application Essays [Short Video]
• How To Write About Overcoming Challenges Without Sounding Like A Whiner

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How Good A Predictor Is The MCAT? http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/25/how-good-a-predictor-is-the-mcat/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/25/how-good-a-predictor-is-the-mcat/#respond Thu, 25 Jun 2015 15:49:59 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31847 According to a study in JAMA, students who took extra time on the MCAT (due to disability) were admitted to medical school at the same rate as other students, but later earned lower average scores on the USMLE Step Exams and took longer to graduate. Researchers looked at data from 1991-2015, and studied the MCAT […]

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Medical School Reapplicant Advice: 6 Tips for SuccessAccording to a study in JAMA, students who took extra time on the MCAT (due to disability) were admitted to medical school at the same rate as other students, but later earned lower average scores on the USMLE Step Exams and took longer to graduate.

Researchers looked at data from 1991-2015, and studied the MCAT information (and subsequent academic achievement) of applicants who received extra time on the exam, compared with those who took the standard time. They found that while admission rates were not significantly different between these two groups, students who used extra time on the MCAT had lower pass rates on their first attempt taking the USMLE exams (Step 1, 82% vs 94%; Step 2 CK, 86% vs 95%; Step 2 CS, 92% vs 97%). They also graduated at lower rates, and took longer to do so:  after 4 years, 67 percent vs 86 percent; 5 years, 82 percent vs 94 percent; 6 years, 85 percent vs 96 percent; 7 years, 88 percent vs 96 percent; and 8 years, 88 percent vs 97 percent.

Researchers suggest that the new MCAT, which provides more time per question, might help ensure that the exam functions as a more accurate predictor, by alleviating some people’s need to request extra time.

They also suggested that the gaps illuminated by the study indicate that medical schools could do a better job creating a supportive learning environment for students with disabilities.

Download your copy of "Navigating the Med School Maze" today!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Related Resources:

Applying to Medical School with Low Stats: What You Need to Know
• Improve Your MCAT Score for Medical School Acceptance
How To Write The Statement Of Disadvantage

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Venture For America: Champion Of U.S. Entrepreneurship http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/24/venture-for-america-champion-of-u-s-entrepreneurship/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/24/venture-for-america-champion-of-u-s-entrepreneurship/#respond Wed, 24 Jun 2015 16:17:47 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31837 Entrepreneurship among 18 – 30 year olds in the USA is at a 24 year low, but the founder of Venture for America, is on a mission to spur economic growth through entrepreneurship. Listen to our talk with Andrew Yang, Venture for America’s founder, for great insights into the state of entrepreneurship today, the case […]

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Listen to the show!Entrepreneurship among 18 – 30 year olds in the USA is at a 24 year low, but the founder of Venture for America, is on a mission to spur economic growth through entrepreneurship.

Listen to our talk with Andrew Yang, Venture for America’s founder, for great insights into the state of entrepreneurship today, the case for why you should become an entrepreneur (and not a management consultant), and more.

00:02:14 – What is Venture for America?

00:04:20 – The story of how Venture for America came to be.

00:06:35 – How to create 100,000 jobs by 2025.

00:09:00 – Becoming a Venture for America fellow.

00:11:04 – What VFA Fellows do after boot camp.

00:14:27 – A look at where grads of the program end up.

00:19:20 – Chickpea pasta: A Venture for America success story.

00:22:18 – What inspired Andrew to write Smart People Should Build Things.

00:23:34 – Society aside, what is the benefit of becoming an entrepreneur to the individual.

00:28:45 – Do entrepreneurs need business school?

00:30:30 – Why the best and brightest should be kept out of consulting.

00:35:17 – Advice for making the transition from the corporate world to the start-up world.

00:37:20 – The definition of entrepreneurship and what it takes to be an entrepreneur.

Click here to listen to the show!*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com

Related links:

• Venture for America
• Smart People Should Build Things: How to Restore Our Culture of Achievement, Build a Path for Entrepreneurs, and Create New Jobs in America
Smart People Should Build Things: The Venture for America Podcast
• The MBA and Entrepreneurship
Which B-Schools Send the Most Grads into Entrepreneurship?

Related shows:

• Jon Medved & OurCrowd: The Remarkable Story of an Entrepreneur
• A Wharton Grad Rids the World of Bank Fees
• An HBS Entrepreneur Promoting Career Flexibility
• Entrepreneurship at UCLA Anderson
• Entrepreneurship at Stanford GSB: Carlypso Drives Down the Startup Street
• A B-School Professor on Main Street, USA
• MBAs Across America: Entrepreneurs with a Heart

Leave a Review for Admissions Straight Talk:
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How To Write About Overcoming Challenges Without Sounding Like A Whiner http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/24/write-about-overcoming-challenges-without-sounding-like-a-whiner/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/24/write-about-overcoming-challenges-without-sounding-like-a-whiner/#respond Wed, 24 Jun 2015 15:51:33 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31814 It’s a classic MBA essay question: Write about a time when you overcame a challenge. How did you handle it? What did you learn from the experience? Let’s start by easing one worry you may have. Not everyone has faced a significant challenge at work by the time they apply for an MBA. If that […]

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Download our Example to Exemplary guide today!

Just state the facts – they speak for themselves.

It’s a classic MBA essay question: Write about a time when you overcame a challenge. How did you handle it? What did you learn from the experience?

Let’s start by easing one worry you may have. Not everyone has faced a significant challenge at work by the time they apply for an MBA. If that is your situation, think of another significant challenge you have faced in another realm: a community or volunteer organization, the military, or perhaps even a difficult personal situation. It’s important that the challenge be something in the recent past – preferably within the last two or three years. If the challenge you write about is farther back than that, it will need to have that much greater impact or significance.

What makes a good “challenge” for the purpose of this essay? The possibilities are almost limitless, but here are a few strong examples:

•  “Joe’s” boss informed him he was going to fire “Freddy,” a new-hire Joe had been mentoring, for poor performance. Joe believed in Freddy’s technical skills, and felt Freddy’s shyness and lack of English fluency had hurt him. Joe took it upon himself to try to help save Freddy’s job. He convinced his boss to give Freddy another chance, and coached him after-hours, directed him to a language fluency program, and engaged in role playing to help Freddy gain confidence. Freddy began to thrive, kept his job, and became the go-to guy in his department for certain technical knowledge.

At no time did Joe complain about his boss or call him unreasonable or insensitive. At no time did Joe play the martyr, patting himself on the back about the extra steps he was taking to work with Freddy. He just stated the facts about what he did, which spoke for themselves.

•  Here’s another example. “Lori” joined a community service organization whose membership was plummeting. Lori believed in the organization’s goals, volunteered to spearhead a membership drive, which was successful, and then ran for president of the organization and won. Then, she worked to create more dynamic programming, a social media presence, and added appealing incentives for people joining or renewing membership.

Joe made a huge impact on one man, and by extension, an impact on his organization. Lori also was able to show direct and tangible impact on her group. Neither Joe nor Lori made themselves out to be heroes by describing their exhaustion because of long hours spent on their respective “projects.” They didn’t pat themselves on the back for the contributions they made. They simply stated the circumstances, why they believed in their mission, and related what they did to fix what was wrong around them. Presenting their stories in a “just the facts, Ma’m” manner make Lori and Joe sound like exciting management material: filled with vision, creativity, incentive, and energy. And it is succinct.

•  Let’s look at one final example. “Gary” had written a marketing plan to boost awareness and fundraising at the non-profit where he worked. His CEO at first approved his plan, then suddenly nixed it, replacing it with his own plan. Gary was sure the CEO’s plan was not viable. It lacked a marketing budget yet had lofty target goals for fundraising. The CEO gave Gary six months to achieve these goals.

Now that’s a challenge.

When Gary couldn’t get the CEO to reconsider, he appealed to others in the organization who had the CEO’s ear. Fortunately, they were willing to speak to the CEO, who then agreed to Gary’s original plan. Now, based on the first few examples we’ve seen, you will already have guessed that in this case, Gary did not complain about the CEO, call him short-sighted or stingy. He did offer some explanations for why the CEO might have seen the situation as he did, but nothing pejorative was written.

Gary’s workaround to his challenging situation showed boldness, initiative, and perseverance. At no time did he complain about the added workload of having to unravel this situation, or make himself sound like he had saved the day.

Let’s recap: A strong “challenge” example will allow you to show direct impact on either your organization or another individual. Ideally, it will be something that happened in the last two or three years, unless it was a monumental achievement. Finally, do not cast blame on others who may have helped create the problem/challenge in the first place, and do not sound like a martyr in describing the efforts (no matter how great) you made to get the job done. Simple, direct writing about the challenge will make it abundantly clear that you have the initiative, problem solving, communications, and organizational skills a good MBA program looks for.

Learn how to use sample essays to create an exemplary essay of your own! Judy Gruen By , MBA admissions consultant since 1996 and author (with Linda Abraham) of MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

Related Resources:

• The Quick Guide to Admissions Resumes
• Writing About Overcoming Obstacles in Your Application Essays
Selling Yourself Short?

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Exclusive Low Stats Med Webinar Airing Live On Thursday! http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/23/exclusive-low-stats-med-webinar-airing-live-on-thursday/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/23/exclusive-low-stats-med-webinar-airing-live-on-thursday/#respond Tue, 23 Jun 2015 17:43:35 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31632 Have you registered and marked your calendars for Thursday’s webinar, Get Accepted to Medical School with Low Stats? Be sure to reserve your spot by signing up ASAP (free) and get ready to learn how to boost your strengths so that the admissions committee won’t dwell on your weaknesses! Register here: Get Accepted to Medical […]

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Have you registered and marked your calendars for Thursday’s webinar, Get Accepted to Medical School with Low Stats?

Register for the webinar!

Be sure to reserve your spot by signing up ASAP (free) and get ready to learn how to boost your strengths so that the admissions committee won’t dwell on your weaknesses!

Register here: Get Accepted to Medical School with Low Stats

Time: This Thursday (That’s June 25th) at 5:00 PM PST/8:00 PM EST

Grab your spot! See you soon!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

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An Interview With Our Own: Jessica Pishko http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/23/an-interview-with-our-own-jessica-pishko/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/23/an-interview-with-our-own-jessica-pishko/#respond Tue, 23 Jun 2015 16:06:21 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31799 Curious about the life and times of our spectacular admissions consultants? Please enjoy our newest blog series in which we interview the fabulous people who make up the Accepted.com staff. Next up is…Jessica Pishko. Accepted: Can you tell us a little about yourself? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? Where do you […]

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Read Jessica's Bio here!Curious about the life and times of our spectacular admissions consultants? Please enjoy our newest blog series in which we interview the fabulous people who make up the Accepted.com staff. Next up is…Jessica Pishko.

Accepted: Can you tell us a little about yourself? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? Where do you currently live?

Jessica: I went to Rice University in Houston, Texas for undergrad where I majored in English and French. I currently live in San Francisco with my family.

Accepted: Can you share 3 fun facts about yourself?

Jessica:

1. I used to be a yoga teacher (but haven’t taught in a few years).

2. I worked in the French department in college where one of my primary jobs was to open bottles of wine for faculty parties. So, I got very good at it and used to work at a few faculty parties as a bartender for extra money.

3. I have a two-year old daughter and a Chihuahua named Sammy.

Accepted: Do you hold any graduate degrees? 

Jessica: Yes, I have a JD from Harvard Law School and an MFA in fiction writing from Columbia University.

Accepted: Can you walk us through the jobs and experiences you had that led you to become an admissions consultant for Accepted? 

Jessica: Before I went back to school for my MFA, I worked as a recruiter – this was 2008, which was a terrible time to be recruiting. But, I did learn a lot about the legal job market and found that I enjoyed working with people. As an MFA student, I had the opportunity to work in Columbia’s writing center, where I helped all sorts of students with their writing, from admissions essays to final papers. Based on my work there, I was asked to become a writing consultant for Columbia’s Postbac Program and worked with students applying to medical school. I really enjoyed helping people achieve their dreams, as cheesy as that sounds, and am thrilled to be on the team at Accepted.

Accepted: What’s your favorite thing about consulting?

Jessica: As someone who switched careers herself, I’m very sympathetic to the challenges of applying to school and getting accepted into the right program. I really like to help people who are working hard to achieve their goals and make their dream careers happen. That’s very satisfying for me, and I hope it’s equally satisfying for my clients!

Accepted: What sorts of applicants do you mostly work with?

Jessica: Law school, medical school and graduate school.

Accepted: What are your top 3 admissions tips?

Jessica:

1.  Try to see the application – including the personal statement and interview, if applicable – as an opportunity rather than a hurdle to overcome. I think that changing your attitude about the process helps to reduce anxiety.

2.  Be flexible and willing to change. It can be hard to take criticism or encounter a set-back, but if you are able to let go of your preset notions, it’s a lot easier to revise and improve your application and admissions strategy.

3.  Be yourself. Too often, I think applicants worry about what admissions committees want or try to “stand out” rather than write something that actually reflects who they are.

Learn more about Jessica and how she can help you get accepted!

View our catalog of admission services! Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy
Related Resources:

Get Your Game On: Prepping for Your Grad School Application
• Law School Admissions Consulting and Editing Services
• How to Get the Most Out of Your Experience Working With A Medical School Consultant

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“What Next….” Is Graduate School For You? http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/23/what-next-is-graduate-school-for-you/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/23/what-next-is-graduate-school-for-you/#respond Tue, 23 Jun 2015 15:51:46 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31791 I was grading midterm exams in my office one frigid day in March when I was surprised to see Marco, a former student, standing in my doorway. He had that all too familiar “deer in headlights” look on his face. I invited him to step in and asked how I could help. He proceeded to […]

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Prepping Early for Grad School Applications Can Get You Accepted!

Calm the deer in headlights by using the 3 E strategy.

I was grading midterm exams in my office one frigid day in March when I was surprised to see Marco, a former student, standing in my doorway. He had that all too familiar “deer in headlights” look on his face. I invited him to step in and asked how I could help. He proceeded to look up at the ceiling (almost as if he was seeking divine intervention) and mumbled, “I don’t know where I am and what I should do.”  Since I knew that he would earn his bachelor’s degree in May, I sensed that he was probably experiencing some of the usual emotions associated with college graduation.  Most college students can’t wait to “get out” until the reality of the “getting out” hits them.  That’s when they begin to question— What next?  Marco confirmed my assumption when he said that he needed to make some plans, and he didn’t know where or how to start.

All of his questions, concerns, and fears for the future came flying out in machine gun-like fashion. He finally took a deep breath and said that “getting it all out there” was actually a relief and that he was now ready to ask, “How do I decide if graduate school is the right path for me.” From my experience leading graduate school workshops I was sure that I could successfully guide Marco through this process. I told him that in order to find the answers he was seeking, he would need to ask himself the right questions. I promised to develop a problem-solving plan for him and we scheduled a follow-up meeting.

I decided to “borrow” some of the critical thinking and problem solving techniques I use in the interpersonal communications classes that I teach at the undergraduate level.  I was planning to use the “Three E’s”, as I have coined them, involved in the brainstorming process.

At our next meeting I told Marco that I had developed a 3 “E” (explore, examine, evaluate) brainstorming strategy that he would need to apply to four graduate school-related questions in order to find his answers. He would, by answering all four questions utilizing this strategy, be in the best position to successfully make an informed decision about his future. Here’s how we did it:

QUESTION #1:  What are your short and long-term goals/objectives?

Explore:  Make a list of what you believe are your short and long-term goals as well as your educational and professional objectives. Try not to over-think this question.  In other words, list everything that comes to mind.

Examine:  Once you have listed everything and anything you can think of, you will be ready to carefully examine your list. Did you omit anything? Did you include items that may not really belong in this category?  Would you like to revise a list item?

Evaluate:  You are now ready to evaluate and prioritize all of the items in order of importance to you. You may well be surprised by how much you learn about yourself.

This three step process is even more important for those who have been out of school for a few years, hate what they are currently doing, and have no idea of what they want to do. For this group an additional list of what they do well and enjoy doing will help to facilitate their decision-making process.

QUESTION #2:  Will graduate school help you to reach your goals?

Explore:  Conduct some field research. Gather information from current and/or former professors, attend a graduate open house or info session, participate in content-specific breakout sessions, request feedback from graduate students in a variety of programs,  make contact with people who are currently employed in your area of interest and, of course, seek additional assistance from graduate admissions’ consultants who are experts in the field

Examine:  Compile an all-inclusive breakdown of all of your findings. Read the results and look for patterns in the responses from different sources. Once you note any patterns or lack thereof, you will be ready to evaluate.

Evaluate:  Place some sort of weight or value by priority next to each of the responses you received.  Take the reliability/ credibility factor into consideration in each case. Whose opinion do you trust? Is she or he a credible source of information? And last, but not least, what really “grabbed” your interest. Have some fun with this—use emoticons  (happy faces, winky faces, angry faces, fist pumps, hearts, etc.) – whatever works for you and helps you to evaluate the information you have collected.

QUESTION #3:  Is now the right time?

Explore:  The answer for this question is somewhat dependent on the field you think you may want to pursue. You will need to explore the admissions’ criteria as this may vary from program to program.  For example some MBA programs require 2-3 years of business experience in order to apply, while other MBA programs welcome applications from students’ who have just earned their bachelor’s degrees. An Executive MBA program will require that applicants present with 5-7 years of higher level management experience. Another example might be Ph.D. programs that will only consider those who will earn the master’s degree enroute to the Ph.D.  Other programs will consider both categories in making admission decisions.  Clearly, you need to explore all of the options that may be available to you as well as their requirements.

Examine:  Compile all of your research on the timing of graduate studies in terms of field of study and personal needs. Create a balance sheet listing the timing based on field of study on the left and your personal needs on the right.  This will help you to compare/contrast, organize and visualize, so that you can move on to the assessment/evaluation step.

Evaluate:  At this time you should weigh each of your needs and plans in order to assess, under what circumstances, the timing and your needs intersect or appear to be oppositional. This is not quite as easy as it sounds since there are so many variables to consider.  For example, what do you do if  you need to start right now, need to cut costs and stay in your home city but  all of the programs in your city require 2 or more years of experience.  Something has to give. As a result, you may need to be open to all possible options in order to decide the best course of action for you.

QUESTION #4:  What are the benefits/costs of pursuing an advanced degree?

Explore: Since costs and benefits vary from person to person, you will, once again, need to explore the personal benefits and costs based on your expectations. For some the costs will be strictly financial, while, for others, the costs may include time to degree, lost earnings, energy, and impact on interpersonal relationships. Just as with costs, the benefits are also subjective.  Some will perceive the value of an advanced degree strictly in terms of salary levels while others will view it in terms of how the advanced degree will expand them intellectually. I suggest that you fold a sheet of paper in half and list what you consider the benefits on one side and the costs on the other side. You are now ready to examine the information that you have compiled.

Examine:  Once you have listed all costs/benefits that came to mind, you are ready to carefully examine the items on both sides of the page.  Did you miss something?  Are all of the items relevant to the question?  Is there something you wish to eliminate or change in some way?

Evaluate:  Now you will need to weigh the level of importance of each cost and benefit. In fact, I suggest you use “Interpersonal Exchange Theory.”   This theory is based on a very simple equation (Benefits-Costs= + or – gain.)   If we deduct the costs we pay from the benefits we receive we can come up with either a positive or negative outcome.  Clearly if the benefits outweigh the costs then will have a positive gain. Keep in mind that this is not strictly a “numbers” game.  The weight of each benefit and cost must also be carefully considered. You may have many more benefits but the costs, though few, may carry a greater weight.  Even though this equation may seem somewhat simplistic, it can be one more helpful technique in the decision making process.

Marco couldn’t wait to get started and thanked me for the help.  About 4 weeks later he once again appeared at my office door.  This time the “deer in the headlights” look was replaced by a huge smile. He said he had decided to pursue a master’s degree and wondered if I had a plan that would help him identify graduate schools that would be a good fit for him. I smiled and said, give me some time to develop a strategy for you.  His answer, “You got it!”

Get Your Game On: Preparing for Your Grad School Application, a free guide
Carol DrummerBy Carol Drummer, Former Hofstra University Dean of Graduate Admissions, who for 10 years reviewed and signed off on over 4500 admissions decisions per year and has taught communications and rhetoric since 1991.

Related Resources:

• Graduate School Admissions Consulting and Editing Services
Should You Pursue a PhD? [Podcast]
Which Graduate Schools Should You Apply To? [Podcast]

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Create A Winning AMCAS Application [Watch On Demand!] http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/22/free-amcas-workshop-available-online/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/22/free-amcas-workshop-available-online/#respond Mon, 22 Jun 2015 18:36:59 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=30464 Now’s your chance to catch up on valuable information you may have missed during our recent med school admissions webinar, Create a Winning AMCAS Application. Med school applicants struggling with the AMCAS application – you won’t want to miss this! View Create a Winning AMCAS Application for free now! Tags: AMCAS, Medical School Admissions, webinar

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Watch Create a Winning AMCAS Application!

Now’s your chance to catch up on valuable information you may have missed during our recent med school admissions webinar, Create a Winning AMCAS Application.

Med school applicants struggling with the AMCAS application – you won’t want to miss this!

Watch the AMCAS webinar!

View Create a Winning AMCAS Application for free now!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

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MBA Admissions: Letters of Recommendation http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/22/mba-admissions-letters-of-recommendation/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/22/mba-admissions-letters-of-recommendation/#respond Mon, 22 Jun 2015 16:35:53 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31758 “MBA Admissions: Letters of Recommendation” is the latest post in our series, Navigate the MBA Maze. The best letters of recommendation come from people who have seen you perform. The weakest letters are of the “character reference” variety (from the clergy member who knows you only as a person who dozes during weekly services) or […]

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The best letters of recommendation come from people who have seen you perform.

MBA Admissions: Letters of Recommendation” is the latest post in our series, Navigate the MBA Maze.

The best letters of recommendation come from people who have seen you perform. The weakest letters are of the “character reference” variety (from the clergy member who knows you only as a person who dozes during weekly services) or the VIP genre (from influential people like your mother’s college roommate’s sister, who is on an admissions committee). In both cases, the recommender barely knows you. A letter need not be lengthy to be effective, and the writer need not have known you since grade school. A letter from an immediate supervisor who describes your work and rates your performance as much stronger than that of other employees in similar positions, tells an admissions committee something significant about you.

It’s important to avoid repetition and duplication in your letters. “Only one recommendation per single source” is a good rule of thumb. Each letter should highlight a different facet of you and your accomplishments and, ideally, present you from a different vantage point. If you have a job in which you report to more than one person, don’t ask each person for a letter. Ask one of them and then ask another supervisor from a different project or a previous position.

Last but not least, request your letters in person whenever possible, and give each recommender a copy of your resume and your personal statement. Ask the person if s/he is able to write you a strong letter, and offer to provide any additional material the person requests.

Download your copy of Navigating the MBA Maze
Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy
Related Resources:

• Quick Guide to Admissions Resumes [Free Guide]
• MBA Letters Of Recommendation
• Recommenders And Recommendations

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Using Med School Admissions Stats Strategically http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/22/using-med-school-admissions-stats-strategically/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/22/using-med-school-admissions-stats-strategically/#respond Mon, 22 Jun 2015 16:13:40 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31727 As the new med school application cycle hits its stride, it can be easy to become overwhelmed by stats and rankings. For example, US News recently posted a list of the med schools that received the highest volume of applications in 2014. Here’s the list: (A couple of notes: RNP indicates that a school is […]

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As the new med school application cycle hits its stride, it can be easy to become overwhelmed by stats and rankings. For example, US News recently posted a list of the med schools that received the highest volume of applications in 2014.

Here’s the list:

Find out what the med school rankings really mean. [Free Download](A couple of notes: RNP indicates that a school is ranked in the bottom quarter of the US News rankings. Unranked schools were not considered for this listing. For more information, see the report. )

Now, a few things: by itself, the number of applications a school received—without any other information (such as the admission rate, the yield, the average GPA/MCAT of admitted students)—is not that helpful. You need to contextualize this data as part of the other information you have about each school.

For example, if all you know about Drexel is that it received 14,648 applications, that’s not a lot to go on. If you can add to that the information that 622 applicants were admitted (a rate of about 4.25 %), you immediately know much more. Of those 622 admitted applicants, 260 enrolled. The median GPA of admitted students was 3.59, and median MCAT was 31. Now you have a fuller picture, and you can start to evaluate whether your own scores might make you a competitive applicant.

With this in mind, here are a few tips for how to use stats strategically in your application process:

1. Be realistic about where you are competitive and apply accordingly.

2. Apply to a lot of schools— around 15-20 is reasonable (and more if you’re applying to schools where your scores are less competitive). Medical school is hard to get into!

3. Think carefully about stats and their implications. On its own, application volume doesn’t tell you very much. But when you add information about acceptance rates, yields, and the scores of admitted students, you have more to go on.

Are you misusing the med school rankings? Click here to find out!Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Related Resources:

• U.S. News 2016 Best Medical Schools – Research & Primary Care 
• Numbers Aren’t Everything When You Choose Your Med Schools
• Where Should I Apply To Med School?

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Future Harvard Business School MBAs – Tune In On Tuesday! http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/21/future-harvard-business-school-mbas-tune-in-on-tuesday/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/21/future-harvard-business-school-mbas-tune-in-on-tuesday/#respond Sun, 21 Jun 2015 18:16:03 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31723 You have just a couple days until our webinar, Get Accepted to Harvard Business School, airs live. If you plan on applying to Harvard Business School or another top-tier MBA program, then you’ll want to make sure you catch the important advice that Linda will cover in Get Accepted to Harvard Business School. The webinar will take […]

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You have just a couple days until our webinar, Get Accepted to Harvard Business School, airs live. If you plan on applying to Harvard Business School or another top-tier MBA program, then you’ll want to make sure you catch the important advice that Linda will cover in Get Accepted to Harvard Business School.

get-accepted-to-hbs-live-webinar

The webinar will take place Tuesday, June 23rd, at 5:00 PM/8:00 PM ET. [Please note: The June 24th 10:00 AM PT and the 5:00 PM PT sessions are now completely FULL.]

See you there!Save your spot at the webinar!Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

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Applying For Your MBA Through The Consortium: Best Deal In Town http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/21/applying-for-your-mba-through-the-consortium-best-deal-in-town/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/21/applying-for-your-mba-through-the-consortium-best-deal-in-town/#respond Sun, 21 Jun 2015 16:12:42 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31741 Our consultants receive a lot of questions from clients about applying to MBA programs through The Consortium for Graduate Study in Management.  I’ve heard myths flying around that applying to one (or more) of the 18 Consortium schools through The Consortium’s application is disadvantageous.  But as the former director at two Consortium schools, I can […]

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Download our 'MBA in Sight: Focus on Management" guide, today!Our consultants receive a lot of questions from clients about applying to MBA programs through The Consortium for Graduate Study in Management.  I’ve heard myths flying around that applying to one (or more) of the 18 Consortium schools through The Consortium’s application is disadvantageous.  But as the former director at two Consortium schools, I can assure you that nothing could be further from the truth — provided you meet the Consortium’s minimum qualifications.

Though the requirements, the schools, and the corporate partners have changed over its 49-year history, the Consortium is not only the best deal in town; it also gives Consortium members an alumni network that expands throughout the 18-member schools.

Initially, The Consortium provided opportunities for young African American men to have a fair chance at rising up the corporate ladder via the MBA. Later, the Consortium added Hispanic Americans, Native Americans and women to its mix.  Membership came along with the fellowship.

However, after the Supreme Court decided on the Gratz vs. Bollinger and Grutter vs. Bollinger cases, the Consortium opened up its doors to offer membership to selected applicants that further the mission of The Consortium in providing inclusion of African Americans, Hispanic Americans and Native Americans in business.  Members and fellows do not have to belong to these groups. Thus, membership is no longer race-based, but rather mission driven.  Applicants must also demonstrate the ability to succeed in an MBA program.

Like the undergraduate Common Application, candidates can apply to up to 6 Consortium schools with only one application for a fraction of the cost the candidate would incur applying to each of these schools separately.  The catch:  the candidate must rank order the schools.  Having just attending a Consortium recruiting event, the Admissions representatives on the panel suggested that candidates rank order the schools from the most preferred to the least preferred.  However, in order to obtain a fellowship, I believe there is a strategy involved in the ranking.

To be sure, Consortium membership assures the candidate of access to the orientation and corporate partners.  In fact, many candidates receive internship offers prior to the start of school.   Membership, however, does not guarantee admission to the schools of choice, nor does it guarantee a full-tuition fellowship.

To summarize the benefits:

1. One application for up to six schools at one low cost.

2. Access to vast alumni network of 18 schools that includes mentorship from Consortium alumni (formal or informal).

3. If selected as a member, access to corporate sponsors at orientation

4. If selected as a fellow, full tuition and stipend

To learn more about applying through the Consortium and the strategy behind the rank order, please contact me for a free consultation.  Moreover, Accepted will offer Consortium applicants a special coupon code for 10% off all purchases of $2000 or more for services to help you apply through the Consortium. The best deal in town just got even better.

Download your copy of Navigating the MBA Maze
Natalie Grinblatt Epstein By , an accomplished Accepted.com consultant/editor (since 2008) and entrepreneur. Natalie is a former MBA Admissions Dean and Director at Ross, Johnson, and Carey.

 

Related Resources:

5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid In Your MBA Application Essays [Free Guide]
• The Consortium: Diversifying B-School and Corporate Management [Podcast]
• Approaching the Diversity Essay Question

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How To Write The Statement Of Disadvantage http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/21/how-to-write-the-statement-of-disadvantage-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/21/how-to-write-the-statement-of-disadvantage-2/#respond Sun, 21 Jun 2015 15:47:26 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31715 If you have experienced any form of social, economic or educational disadvantage—at any time in your life—you can apply to medical school as a disadvantaged applicant.  To receive this designation means that you will need to complete an additional essay on the AMCAS application.  The character limit for this short essay is 1,325.  Examples of […]

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You are heroic for overcoming obstacles that would have prevented most people from applying to medical school.

If you have experienced any form of social, economic or educational disadvantage—at any time in your life—you can apply to medical school as a disadvantaged applicant.  To receive this designation means that you will need to complete an additional essay on the AMCAS application.  The character limit for this short essay is 1,325.  Examples of each of the three forms of disadvantage are listed below:

1. Social: Being treated differently due to ethnicity, language or religion.

2. Economic: Receiving any form of government aid or growing up in a single parent household on one income that is below the poverty threshold.

3. Educational: Overcoming a learning disability or attending low performing public schools.

It can be difficult to know what to include in the Statement of Disadvantage.  I recommend approaching it by using the following strategies:

• Create a timeline that includes any forms of social, economic or educational barriers that you experienced, from the beginning of your life through college.
•  State the facts, no need to express any emotions or to emphasize any details.
• End on a high note.

It’s important to remember that your application will be treated with the utmost respect and that you are heroic for overcoming obstacles that would have prevented most people from applying to medical school.  Congratulate yourself for making it to this point in your education!

It can be helpful to have another person review this essay to make sure that you have included all relevant information.  Be sure to include the details of the most significant obstacles that you have overcome to reach higher education.  The advantage of applying to medical school as a disadvantaged applicant is that most medical schools will not reject your application until it has been reviewed by at least one admissions officer.

If you’re unsure whether you should apply as a disadvantaged applicant or not, you are welcome to contact me for a free consultation.

Download your free Quick Guide to Admissions Resumes! Alicia McNease Nimonkar is an Accepted.com advisor and editor specializing in healthcare admissions. Prior to joining Accepted, Alicia worked for five years as Student Advisor at UC Davis’ postbac program where she both evaluated applications and advised students applying successfully to med school and related programs.

Related Resources:

Create a Winning AMCAS Application! [Webinar]
AMCAS Application Packages 
• WHAT Should You Include in Your AMCAS Essay?

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Georgetown McDonough 2016 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/19/georgetown-mcdonough-2016-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/19/georgetown-mcdonough-2016-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/#respond Fri, 19 Jun 2015 17:47:21 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31681 Georgetown McDonough, the top MBA program at the intersection of business and government, takes advantage of its Washington D.C. location, its connections to the greater Georgetown University community, and its Jesuit roots while at the same time focusing on the global nature of twenty-first century business.  Your application should show that you need the education provided by […]

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Check out the rest of our 2015 MBA application essay tips!Georgetown McDonough, the top MBA program at the intersection of business and government, takes advantage of its Washington D.C. location, its connections to the greater Georgetown University community, and its Jesuit roots while at the same time focusing on the global nature of twenty-first century business.  Your application should show that you need the education provided by McDonough to achieve your goals and that you wholeheartedly embrace its values.

Essay:

Create your essays in separate documents and upload them into the appropriate application fields. Please adhere to word limits, and label each page with your name. Re-applicants will be prompted to submit a specific essay question. Dual degree applicants and Georgetown MBA re-applicants will be prompted to submit specific essay questions.

(Essays should be double-spaced using a 12-point font.)

1. Why You? (Hint: we are looking for an answer that cannot be found from research on our website) (750 words or fewer)

This question is all about fit. It is an attempt by Georgetown to learn about you and why you think you belong at Georgetown and why Georgetown should admit you.  Georgetown wants to see how you think and come to a major decision. It also wants you to make a coherent case for your own acceptance to McDonough.

There are lots of different ways to approach this essay. Clearly you shouldn’t spit back the McDonough web site. If you can, talk to current students about the culture and distinctive elements of the program to gain a deeper understanding of it. You also need to reflect on the reasons Georgetown should choose you? While your reasons for wanting to attend are a factor, the big question will be what do you intend to contribute. What will you add?

You could start with a highly influential experience that molded your decision to pursue an MBA, go into more depth about what you hope to achieve and why you believe Georgetown is the best place for you to achieve it.

Alternatively, you could start with a day in the future where you attain your goal and then circle back to discuss the development of that goal and McDonough’s role in helping you achieve it. You can also discuss how you intend to contribute to McDonought’s community.

In short, why should McDonough accept you? How will you make the school proud that they did?

Optional Essays:

1. If you are not currently employed full-time, use this essay to provide information about your current activities. (250 words or fewer)

Show them that you are using this period of unemployment to acquire new skills, contribute to your community, or grow in some way.

2. Please provide any information that you would like to add to your application that you have not otherwise included. (500 words or fewer)

Please see The Optional Essay: To Be or Not to Be.

Re-Applicant Essay:

How have you strengthened your candidacy since your last application? We are particularly interested in hearing about how you have grown professionally and personally. (500 words or fewer)

This is a key question (whether asked explicitly or not) for all reapplicants to any MBA program. What has changed? How are you “new and improved” since last year — when you were rejected? Georgetown does you the favor of providing this explicit prompt so you can address this question while retaining the ability to address the main essay.

If you would like professional guidance with your Georgetown McDonough School MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our  MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Georgetown McDonough MBA application.

Georgetown McDonough 2016 MBA Application Deadlines:

Application Deadline Decision Notification
 Round 1  October 1, 2015  December 15, 2015
 Round 2  January 5, 2016  March 20, 2016
 Round 3  April 1, 2016  May 15, 2016

Linda Abraham By , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

Download our free special report: Best MBA ProgramsRelated Resources:

2016 MBA Application Essay Tips
Optional Essays: When and How to Write Them [Short Video]
The Georgetown McDonough MBA: Everything You Need to Know

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Around The Word At MIT Sloan http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/19/around-the-word-at-mit-sloan/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/19/around-the-word-at-mit-sloan/#respond Fri, 19 Jun 2015 16:11:37 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31658 This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Kate Agnew, a student at MIT Sloan…. Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an […]

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Read more MBA student interviews!This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Kate Agnew, a student at MIT Sloan….

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What are your hobbies? Favorite TV show?

Kate: I was born and raised in Minnesota and lived there right up until I moved to Boston for business school. I went to Macalester College for my undergrad, where I studied mathematics and also got an environmental studies minor. Outside of school, I almost entirely allow myself to be consumed by TV and movies. I’m a big fan of superheroes and action movies as a whole, and watch most of the major hit TV shows. Scandal, Walking Dead, Criminal Minds, Longmire, Orange is the New Black, Arrow, and Covert Affairs just to name a few…

Accepted: Congrats on finishing your first year at MIT Sloan! What were some of the most challenging and rewarding parts of your first year of b-school? Is there anything that you would change?

Kate: Contrary to what some students like to tell perspective students, business school is really hard. I was only out of school for 3 years and still found it hard to jump back into the groove of things. I had little exposure to economics before, so I found that subject to be especially difficult. There is also always something to do, so prioritizing my time was hard but extremely important.

So far, the most rewarding experience has been participating in The Yarn, which is a monthly event at Sloan where select students share stories from their lives. It was one of the few times I really allowed myself to be vulnerable to such a large group of people in person. I was proud of myself for having the courage to do it, but was also really encouraged by the feedback I received from my peers afterwards. If my story can help even just one other person, it is all worth it. This is why I write as honestly as I do.

Accepted: I see that you’ve had the opportunity to travel a good deal this year. What have those experiences been like, and what have you learned?

Kate: One piece of advice I received my first week of orientation was to write down my 5 goals for business school and to use that when prioritizing my time. My goals were: travel internationally, explore the entertainment industry, decide between entertainment and consulting, engage in empowering women in business, and make strong social connections (in this order). Because of my goal to travel more, I have taken advantage of every travel opportunity that has presented itself.

First I went to Turkey. A small group of Sloan students spent a weekend in Istanbul during the fall, solely because flights were cheap (less than $500 round trip!). Turkey really allowed me to see that things outside of the US are not always as they seem. I was so surprised to find that the city was more… European… than what I expected when traveling to a country in the Middle East. It was also an experience that reminded me how unbelievably fortunate I am. I saw mothers of infants who fled from Syria and were living on the streets with their children. It was heartbreaking.

This Spring I enrolled in a class titled China Lab that allowed me to work on a small consulting project with a partner from MIT and two from Yunnan University. It was different from any other travel experience I’ve had in that it allowed me to see the business side of the country. Corruption is extremely prevalent there and it is concerning how many of the business decisions are made while people are completely intoxicated. Additionally, I saw literally hundreds of skyscrapers being built that still have no plans for tenants. It feels like an economy built on vaporware, or a false expectation of growth. China’s economy plays such a huge role globally and supports so much of the economy of the United States that these issues cannot be ignored.

Most recently I spent 10 days in Israel. On the way there, I had a 12 hour layover in Amsterdam and got to explore the city. It was my first time in a new country all alone and it was quite a liberating experience. I went to the Van Gogh museum and took more selfies than one should in a day.

Israel itself was surreal. In so many ways it is very similar to the United States, especially Tel Aviv where we went clubbing and shopping. I had the opportunity to visit their air force base as well, and it was inspiring to see how much pride everyone has for their country, in part because of their required military service. I seriously left wanting to join the Israeli Army, but I do have a tendency to be easily influenced. Later, we went ATVing about 100 yards from the Syrian “border” (it is really a cease-fire line) and even explored a building that used to be the Syrian Military Headquarters. All of a sudden everything I had read about online or heard on the news was right in front of me… I will definitely think differently of these events moving forward.

Accepted: Your blog covers a lot of topics- from b-school, to work, to more personal writing (and thoughts on the process of writing itself). I can tell you take writing seriously! How did you decide to blog about your experience? What have you gained from the experience?

Kate: Growing up, I felt very alone. I thought I was the only one who had a difficult childhood. Once I got older, I realized my past wasn’t all that unique. I began reading stories of other childhoods, books such as Angela’s Ashes by Frank McCourt and Running with Scissors by Augusten Burroughs. They provided me a lot of comfort. I saw that I could be successful and craft my own future; my past didn’t have to dictate who I would become. It also inspired me to begin writing. I figured that if some stories helped me growing up, potentially my stories could help others. The drive behind my writing is really helping others feel connected and less alone.

Additionally, writing has given me the opportunity to deeply reflect on things and to become more open and comfortable with who I am. There are still things about me that are unique, and I’ve been able to embrace these attributes rather than shy away from them. It is still a work in progress though.

Accepted: Can you share some advice to incoming first year students, to help make their adjustment to b-school easier? What do you wish you would’ve known when you were starting out?

Kate: Business school feels more like high school than it should. While in some ways this can be frustrating, it is also refreshing. Everyone has gone through high school and most cases college as well. By applying those same skills both socially and academically, b-school can feel more approachable. Your reputation will be extremely important, but don’t worry too much about what people think about petty things.

Accepted: Do you have any advice for our b-school applicant readers?

Kate: Deeply consider how business school will help you grow and why that growth is important for who you want to be. Because I’m interested in entertainment, b-school wasn’t a requirement for my career. However, I am a first generation college student and have spent a lot of time mentoring younger girls and encouraging them to seek higher education. I felt that having a master’s degree would enhance my ability to be a strong role model and giving back to the community is very important to me.

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school applications, please see our MBA Application Packages

To read more about Kim’s b-school journey, please check out her blog, Kate’s a Cliche. Thank you Kate for sharing your story with us! 

Download your free copy of 12 Terrific Tips for MBA Applicants Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Related Resources:

Why MBA? [Free Guide]
• It’s MBA Season: Do You Know Where Your Applications Are? [Podcast]
• Hone Your MBA Goals [Short Video]

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Tips For Applicants With A Low MCAT Score (Part 2) http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/19/tips-for-applicants-with-low-mcat-scores-part-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/19/tips-for-applicants-with-low-mcat-scores-part-2/#respond Fri, 19 Jun 2015 15:39:27 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31586 The MCAT score is crucial to making it to the interview stage of the medical school application process. For those with low MCAT scores who want to attend a US allopathic medical school, the only real option is retaking the exam. When you determine that your MCAT is not competitive, you can either choose to […]

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Click here to download our "Navigate the Med School Maze" guide now!The MCAT score is crucial to making it to the interview stage of the medical school application process. For those with low MCAT scores who want to attend a US allopathic medical school, the only real option is retaking the exam.

When you determine that your MCAT is not competitive, you can either choose to work harder and retake the MCATs, or consider alternative career paths. DMD, patent law, and PhD programs are just a few of the common alternative career options that allow you to remain in science.

If you are committed to obtaining a MD, then you should plan to retake the exam and make it your last retake. Although schools do not penalize applicants who take the MCAT two or three times, before taking the exam for a 3rd time it is key that you make the third sitting your final attempt; more attempts reflect poorly on your application.

Keep in mind that many students do not prepare enough for the MCATs, thinking that their coursework is sufficient preparation. This is a faulty assumption, especially for applicants who struggle on standardized tests. Applicants need to study hundreds of hours over several months to review and prepare for the test. Applicants should utilize preparatory courses, private tutors and varying prep approaches to succeed. Applicants need to have real discipline to do the necessary work — 40 hours a week for several months. It is also extremely important to take practice tests regularly (ideally weekly) in order to master not just the content but also the necessary test-taking skills to succeed under the additional test-day stress.

There are many different resources out there to help –no one resource is the best – you need to find the approach that works best for you. Kaplan, Princeton Review and Exam Crackers are the most commonly used with Exam Crackers providing a more problem-based approach.

A last piece of advice: do not take the test unless you are scoring (on practice tests) above the range that you feel you need for admission. The confidence you possess on test day knowing you were scoring a 33 on practice tests is a large part of the mind–game you must master to succeed. Hard work, discipline and true motivation are the necessary ingredients to MCAT success.

See Part 1 for advice about Options Without Retaking the Exam.

Applying to Medical School with Low Stats CTAAccepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Related Resources:

The Results Are In: Analyzing Your MCAT Diagnostic Exam [Webinar]
• Improve Your MCAT Score for Medical School Acceptance
• Boost your GPA for Medical School Acceptance

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A Groundbreaking $100 Million Gift For Cornell Tech http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/19/a-groundbreaking-100-million-gift-for-cornell-tech/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/19/a-groundbreaking-100-million-gift-for-cornell-tech/#respond Fri, 19 Jun 2015 15:32:08 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31693 At a groundbreaking ceremony on June 16, Cornell Tech announced a $100 million gift from Bloomberg Philanthropies that will help fund the construction of the campus. The first academic building on the new campus will be named the Bloomberg Center, honoring Emma and Georgina Bloomberg, the daughters of former NY mayor Michael Bloomberg. Cornell Tech […]

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Learn how to write excellent essays for your application by downloading "From Example to Exemplary" today!At a groundbreaking ceremony on June 16, Cornell Tech announced a $100 million gift from Bloomberg Philanthropies that will help fund the construction of the campus. The first academic building on the new campus will be named the Bloomberg Center, honoring Emma and Georgina Bloomberg, the daughters of former NY mayor Michael Bloomberg.

Cornell Tech is a partnership between Cornell and the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, aimed at promoting high-tech entrepreneurship in New York City. In 2011, Cornell and the Technion won a bid to create an applied sciences institution on Roosevelt Island to foster high tech innovation in New York City.

The campus currently occupies temporary space in Manhattan. The new campus—the first phase of which is slated for completion in 2017—will house approximately 2000 graduate students and hundreds of faculty and staff on Roosevelt Island. The design of the buildings has already garnered attention and praise for innovation and sustainability.

At Cornell Tech, the Jacobs Technion-Cornell Institute promotes innovation in key areas, including Connective Media, Health Tech and the Built Environment.  They also offer an entrepreneurially-focused post-doc program for recent Ph.D.s who are interested in launching their own startups—the Runway Program. Cornell Tech offers degrees in conjunction with Cornell’s Engineering School and its Johnson Graduate School of Management.

Learn how to use sample essays to create an exemplary essay of your own!Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Related Resources:

A Conversation about Cornell Tech NYC with Dr. Douglas Stayman
Verizon Donates $50 Million to Cornell Tech
• Cornell Tech Student Interview: Where CS Meets the MBA

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Five Killer GRE Tips Webinar Available for Download http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/18/five-killer-gre-tips-webinar-available-for-download/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/18/five-killer-gre-tips-webinar-available-for-download/#respond Thu, 18 Jun 2015 18:53:35 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31272 Our recent webinar with Magoosh GRE expert Chris Lele was a huge success! If you missed it, it’s not too late—it’s available for viewing or download now. Watch it today! Tags: Grad School Admissions, GRE, Magoosh, MBA Admissions, webinar

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View a recording of the webinar now!Our recent webinar with Magoosh GRE expert Chris Lele was a huge success! If you missed it, it’s not too late—it’s available for viewing or download now. Watch it today!

Watch the webinar now!Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

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Get Accepted To Med School With Low Stats! [Webinar] http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/18/get-accepted-to-med-school-with-low-stats-webinar/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/18/get-accepted-to-med-school-with-low-stats-webinar/#respond Thu, 18 Jun 2015 17:44:12 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31628 Don’t forget to register for our upcoming webinar, Get Accepted to Medical School with Low Stats. Remember – this is a MUST-attend webinar for anyone applying to med school (or thinking about applying) with a less-than-desirable GPA or MCAT score. During the webinar, Alicia McNease Nimokar, senior advisor at Accepted.com, will provide loads of advice […]

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Don’t forget to register for our upcoming webinar, Get Accepted to Medical School with Low Stats. Remember – this is a MUST-attend webinar for anyone applying to med school (or thinking about applying) with a less-than-desirable GPA or MCAT score.

Register for our live webinar: Get Accepted to Medical School with Low Stats!

During the webinar, Alicia McNease Nimokar, senior advisor at Accepted.com, will provide loads of advice on how to get accepted to medical school despite those low numbers.

Mark your calendars!

Date: Thursday, June 25, 2015

Time: 5:00 PM PT/8:00 PM ET

Get Accepted to Medical School with Low Stats (Registration is free, but required.)

grab-your-spotAccepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

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Harvard Business School: Engaged Community Citizenship http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/18/harvard-business-school-engaged-community-citizenship-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/18/harvard-business-school-engaged-community-citizenship-2/#respond Thu, 18 Jun 2015 15:58:38 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31645 This is not about “community service” — it’s not about doing halo-worthy things in your free time. (Though neither HBS nor I will discourage that, and “engaged community citizenship” and “community service” certainly can overlap.) Community service is an activity that you do; engaged community citizenship is a quality that you embody. Doing community service […]

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Register for our upcoming webinar "Get Accepted to Harvard Business School" now!This is not about “community service” — it’s not about doing halo-worthy things in your free time. (Though neither HBS nor I will discourage that, and “engaged community citizenship” and “community service” certainly can overlap.)

Community service is an activity that you do; engaged community citizenship is a quality that you embody. Doing community service does not automatically mean you possess the quality of engaged community citizenship.

Harvard Business School explicitly seeks this quality in its applicants – announced in bold letters on its “Who are we looking for?” page.

Plaudits to HBS for the directness and clarity. Yet it’s a complex idea. Let’s see exactly what “engaged community service” means by examining each element.

Engaged: Showing up. Participating, with your heart and mind as well as your actions. When you ask questions or make a comment, it’s not just for participation brownie points; it’s thoughtful, pertinent, contributing. You share doubts and fears as well as offer solutions. You know how to listen, you do listen, and you synthesize what you hear. You check your ego at the door, knowing it’s not about you, it’s about the issue or project or process.

Community: Your organization and your team or department within it. Your social circle. Your sports team and/or religious group and/or music ensemble and/or hobby club. Your service organization. Not least, your school – including the HBS classroom. It is also your neighborhood. And your country. It’s the people around you on the subway platform. It’s every group formal or informal with which you have a connection.

Citizenship: A sense of responsibility. A sense of ownership. The values that inform and drive your engagement with your community. First and foremost, you care. About the community at large, the people within it, and, yes, yourself. You act on that caring and your actions reflect that caring. Therefore, you are ethical and honest. You are reliable and generous. In a nutshell: You can be counted on to pitch in and do the right thing for your community.

Actually, the quality of engaged community citizenship is something that any b-school adcom will value. So how do you express it effectively in your application? Use example and anecdote. For HBS, focus on it in your responses to your “Three most…” questions in the body of the app. Also, try to bring it out in your resume and your interviews. Ask your recommenders to highlight it.

If you have it – let it enhance your candidacy.

Watch the webinar of 'How to Get Accepted To Harvard Business School' today!

Cindy Tokumitsu By , author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted. She can help you assess your strengths and weaknesses and develop a winning MBA admissions strategy. She is a member of the Association of International Graduate Application Consultants.

Related Resources:

• Harvard Business School 2016 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
• What Does Harvard Business School Want?
• Harvard Business School: The Habit of Leadership

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June Already! What Now? http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/18/june-already-what-now/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/18/june-already-what-now/#respond Thu, 18 Jun 2015 15:29:48 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31672 It’s June, and your plan is to apply to Round 1 deadlines. That’s three months away. What should you be doing now? 1. Hopefully, you have taken the GMAT or GRE already and are happy with your score. One less thing to worry about. If you haven’t, now it’s the time to take it. 2. […]

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Download our free guide on how to "Navigate the MBA Maze" now!

Get those Round 1 applications started now!

It’s June, and your plan is to apply to Round 1 deadlines. That’s three months away. What should you be doing now?

1. Hopefully, you have taken the GMAT or GRE already and are happy with your score. One less thing to worry about. If you haven’t, now it’s the time to take it.

2. You have done your research and have a pretty good idea of what schools you will be applying to. Get the final list of schools ready, with their deadlines arranged in chronological order. In that list, you should include your dream school for sure, a couple where your profile fits right in, and at least one ‘safety’, where you are almost sure you can get admitted. This is the time to narrow down your choices. Having this list will help you narrow your research and concentrate on those schools only.

3. Finalize your resume. There’s no need to wait around any longer. Your resume should be good to go now so that you have one less piece of the puzzle to worry about.

4. Fine tune your goals. If your goals are still not quite clear in your mind, this is the time to give them some deep thought and write them down. This is particularly true if you are planning on changing fields. Do your homework now so that you start your applications with a clear idea of what you want to do short and long term.

5. Start choosing your recommenders and track them down.  Maybe you haven’t seen one of them in a while, so it’s probably a good idea to contact him/her and re-connect. Taking care of this now will allow you to find alternates if for some reason one of the people you had in mind is unwilling or unable to write a recommendation for you.

6. If you feel you lack community service or extracurricular activities, get on it right away. See my blog about this on Extracurriculars and Community Service.

7. Start working on your essays. If you have completed 1-6 and your target schools have released their application questions, you can start drafting essay responses.  If your schools’ questions aren’t out, then just start a file, mind map, or folder where you jot down examples of leadership, top achievements, successes, failures, teamwork, initiative etc. When the questions are available this file will put good stories and examples at your fingertips to anchor your essays.  It will also be useful when you want to prepare for interviews.

The coming months will be very stressful for you, no doubt. So start working on these things now to allow time to dig deeper on the essays and the rest of your application materials later. You will find that ninety days go by very quickly, so make sure every day counts.

Get clear, practical guidelines for answering the MBA goals essay question. Click here to download our free report. Esmeralda CardenalBy Esmeralda Cardenal, previously the Associate Director of Admissions at Yale SOM, Director of MBA Admissions at MSU Broad, and consultant at Cardiff Business School in the UK. She is happy to help you showcase your achievements in your MBA application.

Related Resources:

7 Steps To A Strong MBA Application [Webinar]
• It’s MBA Season: Do You Know Where Your Applications Are? [Podcast]
• Why Extracurricular Activities Make a Difference

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Is A Harvard MBA In Your Future? http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/17/is-a-harvard-mba-in-your-future-3/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/17/is-a-harvard-mba-in-your-future-3/#respond Wed, 17 Jun 2015 18:20:29 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31615 If you want to answer that with a resounding “yes,” then you need to tune in to our upcoming webinar, The Accepted Guide to Harvard Business School. The webinar will take place on Tuesday, June 23rd, at 5:00 PM/8:00 PM ET. [Please note: The June 24th 10:00 AM PT and the 5:00 PM PT sessions […]

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If you want to answer that with a resounding “yes,” then you need to tune in to our upcoming webinar, The Accepted Guide to Harvard Business School.

The webinar will take place on Tuesday, June 23rd, at 5:00 PM/8:00 PM ET. [Please note: The June 24th 10:00 AM PT and the 5:00 PM PT sessions are now completely FULL.]

Register for our upcoming webinar on June 24th!

Reserve your spot for Get Accepted to Harvard Business School now!

save my spotAccepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

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Promoting Financial Health For Doctors http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/17/promoting-financial-health-for-doctors/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/17/promoting-financial-health-for-doctors/#respond Wed, 17 Jun 2015 17:09:42 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31607 “All doctors are rich.” “Doctors don’t know anything about money.” If you are a doctor (or will be one day), you’ve probably heard all sorts of myths about doctors and finance. Enter Dr. James Dahle, the White Coat Investor and your “colleague in the physician’s lounge who can tell you how the world really works.” […]

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Listen to the show!“All doctors are rich.” “Doctors don’t know anything about money.”

If you are a doctor (or will be one day), you’ve probably heard all sorts of myths about doctors and finance.

Enter Dr. James Dahle, the White Coat Investor and your “colleague in the physician’s lounge who can tell you how the world really works.”

Listen to the recording of our talk with Dr. Dahle to hear his views on successful financial strategy for doctors and future doctors.

00:03:09 – Why Jim joined the military and became an emergency medicine doctor.

00:06:36 – Sick of getting ripped off: How the White Coat Investor site got started.

00:10:29 – The bad financial experience that broke this camel’s back.

00:11:36 – Income vs. wealth and how to make yourself wealthy.

00:12:48 – Advice for premeds: Get accepted to medical school.

00:14:49 – Featured Applicant Question: Should I attend the med school I was accepted to or pursue a Masters and reapply to my dream school next year?

00:17:11 – The best financial move for medical school students.

00:19:32 – Important steps that residents can take to shape their financial futures.

00:21:25 – The optimal time to become financially literate.

00:24:47 – Set yourself up for financial success, but do work that you’d do for free.

Click here to listen to the show!*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com

Related Links:

whitecoatinvestor.com
Medical School Admissions 101
Residency Admissions 101

Related Shows:

• Everything You Wanted to Know About MD/MBA Programs
Baylor College Of Medicine: A Holistic Approach To Admissions
• Attn Med Applicants: A Class Is Matriculated Every Single Year 
• Elliptical, Meet Med School: Interview with Andrea Tooley
• Medical School Admissions 2015-2016: A Dean’s Perspective

Check Out Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes! Check Out Admissions Straight Talk in Stitcher!

Download your free Quick Guide to Admissions Resumes!

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For Parents: How To Help Your Premeds In Waitlist Limbo http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/17/for-parents-how-to-help-your-premeds-in-waitlist-limbo/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/17/for-parents-how-to-help-your-premeds-in-waitlist-limbo/#respond Wed, 17 Jun 2015 16:12:15 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31618 It’s happened.  You and your premeds’ worst fears are coming true.  They have not received an acceptance to medical school—only waiting list notifications—and it’s getting late in the cycle.  You are both getting more and more anxious. Having a decade of experience in this field, I recommend that you, as a parent, take the following […]

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"Medical School Reapplicant Advice: 6 Tips for Success" Download your guide today!

Allow them the time to grieve, but encourage them “to get back on the horse.”

It’s happened.  You and your premeds’ worst fears are coming true.  They have not received an acceptance to medical school—only waiting list notifications—and it’s getting late in the cycle.  You are both getting more and more anxious. Having a decade of experience in this field, I recommend that you, as a parent, take the following action:

1. Gain some perspective. This is not your application.  You have a lifetime of experience with which to help your premeds see the bigger picture.  The most important thing that you can do is to help them gain a sense of perspective. Worst case scenario, even if they get rejected this cycle, it is not the end of the world—even though it might feel like it.  Things could always be worse.  And they are for many people out there who will never be able to access higher education to even be on the path to pursuing a medical degree.  Think about engaging in volunteer work and helping others to have a stronger frame of reference from which to examine the situation, especially during this time.

2. Be encouraging. The way that you react to this situation will influence how your premeds do.  Stay active.  Exercise.  Keep busy.  Your example will help them to do the same.  If you ask them everyday about the status of their application, it could drive you and them crazy.  Focus on the positive and they will, too.

3. Help them strategize. If you want to do something to help, you can research their options and/or gift them an hour of editing/advising time with a consultant like me who routinely helps students at all stages of the process get into medical school.  They can use the time to talk about their options, postbac programs or SMP’s, or they can use the time to create an outline for a letter of interest with edits on their drafts.  These letters can remind the school of their interest and possibly even move them up the waiting list.

4. Teach them resilience. Even if they do receive a rejection, this situation is an opportunity to increase their resilience.  Allow them the time to grieve the lost opportunity, but when they’re ready, encourage them “to get back on the horse.”  Reapplicants who improve as much as they can on their applications demonstrate enormous resilience in simply having the courage to reapply.

When things do not go as planned, we are given the opportunity to demonstrate character.  Even after such a disappointing experience as receiving a rejection from medical school, we can encourage our premed students to learn from the experience. They can use the reapplication to improve their strategy and to fine tune their approach.

Give your premed the space to grow from the experience.  And when in doubt, call an expert—we’d love to help.

Download Medical School Reapplicant Tips for Succcess

Alicia McNease Nimonkar is an Accepted.com advisor and editor specializing in healthcare admissions. Prior to joining Accepted, Alicia worked for five years as Student Advisor at UC Davis’ postbac program where she both evaluated applications and advised students applying successfully to med school and related programs.

Related Resources:

• Parents of Pre-Med Students: How Much Help is Too Much Help?
• 7 Reasons Medical School Applicants are Rejected
• A Second Chance to Medical School: The A-Z of Applying to Postbac Programs

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The Importance Of Extracurriculars And Community Service http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/16/the-importance-of-extracurriculars-and-community-service/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/16/the-importance-of-extracurriculars-and-community-service/#respond Tue, 16 Jun 2015 16:28:27 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31596 While business schools deeply value your academic background, work experience, and career progression, they also ascribe significant weight to your extracurricular and community service activities. Why? Because they want to see that you are an individual who is not just focused on work, that you have other passions, and that you are well rounded. Whether […]

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Download our "The Quick Guide to Admissions Resume" today!

Start now! A little bit of community service is better than no community service at all.

While business schools deeply value your academic background, work experience, and career progression, they also ascribe significant weight to your extracurricular and community service activities. Why? Because they want to see that you are an individual who is not just focused on work, that you have other passions, and that you are well rounded.

Whether it be practicing sports, singing in your church’s choir, or helping at soup kitchens, community service and extracurricular activities are extremely important for you as an applicant beyond their feel-good value. What does being involved in this type of activity show b-schools?

1. It gives them a more holistic picture of you. You are not just the two-dimensional person going to work every day and taking it easy on the weekends. It shows them that you have other interests, and that you’re not afraid to take (mostly unpaid) responsibilities outside of your job.

2. It shows traits that would probably not come up on the rest of the application: your leadership, initiative, passion, and interpersonal skills. People that are used to acting to the benefit of others make for better team players, whether in the community or the corporate world. Those traits are indispensable in order to succeed at b-school and later on in your career.

3. Individuals who have a track record of community service, once they are in b-school, have no trouble getting involved in clubs, school initiatives and later, as alumni.

What if you haven’t volunteered and you are planning to apply to business school this fall? Start today. You may think that adcoms will notice that the sudden rise in your extracurriculars and community service coincided with the time when you started preparing your applications, and you would be right. They’ll notice that, but they won’t hold it against you. If anything, it will help you.

As the saying goes, better late than never. A little bit of community service is better than no community service at all. Why start right now? If you plan on applying to Round 1 deadlines, that would give you three months of service. By the time the schools invite you to interview, you’d have around six months under your belt. Those are six months of experience and anecdotes that can bring color to your interview.  By your enrollment date, you would have done over a year of community work, an invaluable experience that would give you an advantage when you meet recruiters and start interviewing for internships.

What if you don’t get admitted this time around? What if you have to re-apply? No one knows what the future holds and in spite of your hard work and dedication, there’s the chance that you will get waitlisted or, heaven forbid, denied admission. In this scenario, you would have 15 months of community service by the time you hit your application submit button next year, and that might make the difference the second time around.

So, go and do service. You’ll become a better applicant, and most importantly, a better person for it.

"7 Steps to a Strong MBA Application" watch the webinar now!

Esmeralda CardenalBy Esmeralda Cardenal, previously the Associate Director of Admissions at Yale SOM, Director of MBA Admissions at MSU Broad, and consultant at Cardiff Business School in the UK. She is happy to help you showcase your achievements in your MBA application.

Related Resources:

• Why Extracurricular Activities Make a Difference
• It’s MBA Season: Do You Know Where Your Applications Are? [Podcast]
• Selling Yourself Short?

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Tips For Applicants With A Low MCAT Score (Part 1) http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/16/tips-for-med-applicants-with-a-low-mcat-score/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/16/tips-for-med-applicants-with-a-low-mcat-score/#respond Tue, 16 Jun 2015 16:11:13 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31465 Options Without Retaking the Exam All medical school applicants (or any other professional school applicant) must assess their credentials realistically in order to present themselves best during the application process. Since applicants are evaluated based on specific academic (undergraduate and graduate GPA and MCAT scores) and non-academic (research and clinical exposures, leadership skills, mentoring experiences) […]

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How can you get into medical school with low stats? Register for our webinar and find out!

Many schools will screen you based solely on your MCAT score.

Options Without Retaking the Exam

All medical school applicants (or any other professional school applicant) must assess their credentials realistically in order to present themselves best during the application process. Since applicants are evaluated based on specific academic (undergraduate and graduate GPA and MCAT scores) and non-academic (research and clinical exposures, leadership skills, mentoring experiences) criteria as well as on personal attributes such as compassion, discipline, motivation, and work ethic, you must acknowledge your strengths and weaknesses.

Unfortunately, most medical schools do weigh the academic credentials heavily, in particular the MCAT score because strong MCAT scores have been correlated with success on the USMLE. There are very few, if any, medical schools that do not require the MCATs.

If your MCAT score is a borderline, and you choose not to retake the exam, you can try to present yourself in the best light by stressing your other attributes and credentials and taking extra coursework that illustrates your strong academic background. Some schools will accept students with MCATs in this range if the student is extremely strong academically, realizing that sometimes standardized tests are not always the best representation of a students’ aptitude. Some schools will be able to look beyond the MCAT score to see your other attributes.The truth, however, is many medical schools will just screen you based solely on your MCAT number.

Alternative options include applying to Caribbean and foreign medical schools or pursuing osteopathic medicine; their applicant MCAT scores are sometimes lower than allopathic schools. If you are committed to attending an allopathic medical school here in the United States, then you must retake the MCATs and somehow manage to earn a competitive score.

Applying to Medical School with Low Stats CTAAccepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy
Related Resources:

• Medical School Reapplicant Advice: 6 Tips for Success
• Numbers Aren’t Everything When You Choose Your Med Schools
Applying to Medical School With Low Stats: What You Need to Know

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An Interview With Our Own: Natalie Grinblatt Epstein http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/16/an-interview-with-our-own-natalie-grinblatt-epstein/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/16/an-interview-with-our-own-natalie-grinblatt-epstein/#respond Tue, 16 Jun 2015 15:50:09 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31580 Curious about the life and times of our spectacular admissions consultants? Please enjoy our newest blog series in which we interview the fabulous people who make up the Accepted.com staff. Next up is…Natalie Grinblatt Epstein. Accepted: Can you tell us a little about yourself? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? Do you […]

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View Natalie's bio page!Curious about the life and times of our spectacular admissions consultants? Please enjoy our newest blog series in which we interview the fabulous people who make up the Accepted.com staff. Next up is…Natalie Grinblatt Epstein.

Accepted: Can you tell us a little about yourself? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? Do you hold any graduate degrees? Where do you currently live?

Natalie: I’m a first generation immigrant who grew up in suburban Detroit surrounded by aunts, uncles and cousins (we have a large family) that didn’t speak English, so I picked up Yiddish, French, and a little Hebrew along the way. My parents felt travel and community service were both extremely important to our upbringing and by the time I was 18, I put in over 1000 hours of community service for organizations ranging from the American Cancer Association to UNICEF. We also traveled to 20 different countries before I began university (that count is closer to 80 now).

I attended the University of Michigan and my closest friends and I lived in the same dorm, so we created our own sorority without having to go through pledging. We are best friends to this day.

I waived out of a lot of courses through AP and university testing, so I actually started as a sophomore, but decided to use that to explore the sciences, the arts and a lot of literature. I was active in theater groups, political action groups and I was lucky enough to be assigned on a research project that changed my world. I studied the Elizabethan period in depth and dropped pre-med having fallen in love with Shakespeare instead of Jonas Salk.

Theater enabled me to be fearless, but it didn’t lead to post-BA careers, so after spending two years in retail, I returned to Ann Arbor for my MBA.

Accepted: Can you walk us through the jobs and experiences that led you to become an admissions consultant for Accepted?

Natalie: I initially pursued the MBA for a career in CPG, but again, a research project turned my world upside down and my marketing professor/mentor suggested I implement my research at Michigan. I thought I would stay for a year, I stayed for 11. Understanding that I needed to diversify my resume, I was offered and accepted the role of Admissions Director at Cornell.

My first day was memorable: I walked in from orientation and 75% of my staff had resigned (I hadn’t even started yet), I negotiated to move Financial Aid under my charge, I discovered 10,000 “inquiries” that were still being hand entered and then automated the system. That year we broke all prior records despite being short staffed, and I created a team that I knew could navigate the most rigorous rapids.

I worked my way up at Michigan from Assistant Director, to Associate Director and finally Director managing not only admissions, but also students services, student affairs, events, marketing (now each of those has separate departments, but I was a one woman shop under the guidance of amazing mentors). I created my own roles at both Michigan and Cornell. They trusted me to make the school better, and I used intra and inter university relationships to do so. I created recruiting teams out of multiple schools to share costs and also data. It worked well for all schools who are now solidly placed in the top 15. Moreover, I volunteered for GMAC (the Graduate Management Admissions Council) for 9 years in order to strengthen those relationships. At Cornell, no one thought it possible to work together with the Fundraising offices at other schools to pipeline students. I institutionalized this at Cornell and again, it works well for all parties involved.

I loved Michigan and Cornell, but on a snowy day in Ithaca, I received a call from Arizona State University. My best friend lived in Phoenix, and I was missing the sunshine. I accomplished a lot at Cornell and felt like it was time for a move. So I did.

Soon after moving to Phoenix, I met the man who became my husband. He sent me a business plan before our first official date. I wasn’t sure if he wanted to date me or hire me. He did both. We launched a business together and then tied the knot. I became a mother instantly to two wonderful boys (my stepsons) and a technology venture.

We sold the business two years later, and I missed higher education, so I called Linda Abraham and asked her if she needed another consultant. I knew Linda because she was running chats for us that benefitted Cornell and Accepted.com, and I really enjoyed working with her. I knew she was sharp and I always want to surround myself with brilliant and positive people and Linda certainly fits that definition. I’ve been with Accepted.com ever since that phone call in 2008 and I enjoy being on the other side of the table helping clients understand the inner workings of admissions. Transparency helps everyone, and my knowledge has been a powerful tool for my clients. I also brought on two of my former admissions colleagues and have been conducting some business development for Accepted.com when I have time.

Accepted: What is your favorite book?

Natalie: My favorite readings are Shakespeare’s canon. I still love to read the history plays. Currently, I’m reading The Swerve, by Stephen Greenblatt (no relation), but this Harvard professor writes eloquently and I’m learning a lot about how once lost classical literature was found again and created the entire Renaissance movement.

Accepted: What’s your favorite thing about consulting?

Natalie: My favorite thing about consulting is helping others make their dreams come true. I find it so gratifying to hear, “I’ve been accepted and I couldn’t have done it without you.” It’s a great boost to my ego, but more importantly, I love to see my clients blossom and grow. Education is vital to growth and if I can help clients gain the education they deserve, I feel I’ve accomplished my vision for the future.

In terms of the nuts and bolts, I love brainstorming ideas with my clients and preparing them for interviews. I believe I have the greatest impact in helping my clients shape their stories both in their application and in person.

Accepted: What sorts of applicants do you mostly work with?

Natalie: Given my business school background, I work mostly with MBAs and EMBAs, but I also work with high school students (because I did work with undergraduates at Michigan), PhDs (because I did work with the PhDs at Cornell), MF or MFEs (because I had experience reviewing those candidates files as well) and MPH or EMPH because they are similar to MBA candidates and I have a personal interest and read a lot about healthcare. I also work with a variety of dual degree candidates because I’ve had that experience as well.

Accepted: What are your top 3 admissions tips?

Natalie:

1. Keep it simple (many clients want to cram everything into an essay and it doesn’t work).

2. Show your multi-dimensionality. For example, I love Columbia Business School’s question, “What would your cluster be surprised to learn about you?” Surprise them. Many clients think this is business only, but as an admissions director, I loved reading about other things that motivated my candidates: athletics, cooking, unique travel; musical instruments; standup comedy (Twitter’s CEO, a fellow Michigan graduate, spent many years as a standup comic). Don’t be a one trick pony.

3. Use relationships you have to put in a good word for you (not too many or that becomes desperate, but a shout out coming from a faculty member, student or alum will gain the attention of the admissions director).

4. I know you asked for three, but I have 5 suggestions: Seek the help you need (consulting, tutoring, editing, proof-reading, resume-writing, interview rehearsals).

5. Finally, don’t wait until the last minute. Applying to school takes time, introspection, and a realistic outlook. Cast the net widely and you will land softly and in the right place for you.

Learn more about Natalie and how she can help you get accepted!

See how Accepted can help you succeed!Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy
Related Resources:

MBA Interview Prep: How to Ace Your Interviews [Free Guide]
• MBA Admissions Consulting and Editing Services
MBA Admissions According to an Expert [Podcast]

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Harvard Business School: Analytical Aptitude And Appetite http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/15/harvard-business-school-analytical-aptitude-and-appetite-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/15/harvard-business-school-analytical-aptitude-and-appetite-2/#respond Mon, 15 Jun 2015 16:28:38 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31550 So HBS wants “analytical aptitude and appetite.” What is there to add? I mean, it’s pretty obvious. We didn’t really need HBS to say it. Yet they did say it. Maybe it’s not as obvious as it sounds. Let’s take a look. Analytical: This concept encompasses a range of things – quantitative methods, various tools […]

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Learn How To Get Accepted to Harvard Business School!So HBS wants “analytical aptitude and appetite.” What is there to add? I mean, it’s pretty obvious. We didn’t really need HBS to say it. Yet they did say it.

Maybe it’s not as obvious as it sounds. Let’s take a look.

Analytical: This concept encompasses a range of things – quantitative methods, various tools and processes such as decision trees and FMEA, mental objectivity, an exacting attitude. Parsing the relationship between a whole and its parts. Pursuing root causes.

Aptitude: Ability, innate and/or learned.

Appetite: This is the really interesting word, because it’s open to interpretation. We can read it as meaning to enjoy, to savor, to be open to, to relish, to hunger for, to have capacity for. Here are some of its practical implications and nuances (in question form):

• Do you use objective analysis in understanding past events, planning future actions and strategies, and making decisions?
• Do you respect results and outcomes determined by analysis when they don’t jive with your preconceptions, ideologies, or preferences?
• Does your analytic mindset allow you to be comfortable with – even relish – ambiguity and uncertainty?
• Do you help your teammates understand and use analytic approaches and thinking?
• Perhaps most important, do you use language effectively as an analytic tool, e.g., when the team is facing a muddle, are you the one who can verbally separate the threads, clarify them, and guide the team to understand their relative weight and importance?

As the HBS website indicates, for HBS, analytical aptitude is not a solitary feast (regardless of how hearty the analytic appetite). You’ve got to bring your analytical chops to the table, i.e., to classroom debates and case studies, projects, etc. Therefore, you must be able not only to read and play the analytic score – but also to improvise, on the spot and with other virtuosos.

The adcom will grasp your analytic aptitude from your transcript(s), test score, and resume. But if you feel these elements don’t properly show this dimension, use other parts of the application (essay, short answers, additional info, recommendations) to amplify it.

As for showing analytical appetite:

• Your resume may reflect this quality, depending on your work.
• Invite your recommenders to discuss this quality and to provide examples.
• In your essay(s) use a story or two that demonstrates analytical appetite.

And be assured, it won’t hurt to let other programs you apply to appreciate your analytic aptitude and appetite!

Watch the webinar of 'How to Get Accepted To Harvard Business School' today!

Cindy Tokumitsu By , author and co-author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports, including Why MBAand Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted.com, including many successful applicants to HBS.

Related Resources:

• What Does Harvard Business School Want?
Harvard Business School: The Habit of Leadership
• Harvard Business School 2016 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

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TMDSAS Personal Characteristics Essay: What Do They Want? http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/15/tmdsas-personal-characteristics-essay-what-do-they-want/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/15/tmdsas-personal-characteristics-essay-what-do-they-want/#respond Mon, 15 Jun 2015 15:50:23 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31555 The Accepted editors recently had a productive discussion about the Personal Characteristics Essay from this year’s TMDSAS application. Here’s the prompt: Learning from others is enhanced in educational settings that include individuals from diverse backgrounds and experiences. Please describe your personal characteristics (background, talents, skills, etc.) or experiences that would add to the educational experience […]

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An experience doesn’t need to be earth-shattering. You don’t need to have cured cancer or climbed Everest. What it needs to be is meaningful. That means that you’ve thought through what this experience means to you, how it has prepared you for the environment you’ll encounter in med school, and how your unique/diverse perspective will help you contribute.

An experience is something that is meaningful. You don’t need to have cured cancer or climbed Everest.

The Accepted editors recently had a productive discussion about the Personal Characteristics Essay from this year’s TMDSAS application. Here’s the prompt:

Learning from others is enhanced in educational settings that include individuals from diverse backgrounds and experiences. Please describe your personal characteristics (background, talents, skills, etc.) or experiences that would add to the educational experience of others.

Is this primarily a diversity question? A question about your unique educational experiences? A combination?

Here’s what Dr. Herman (Flash) Gordon, one of our expert med school consultants, had to say:

“As a med school educator, and former chair of admissions, I see this as a purposeful question.  Medical education is changing from the old didactic style to peer-peer education (a subset of “interactive learning”).  Typical models are case-based instruction, team learning, and pair-share.  For this to be most effective, there needs to be something to learn from your peers.  In general, the more diverse your peers, the more you will learn.

“So I see this prompt as trying to elicit how well the candidate will fit into the new model of med ed.  It would be good for applicants to describe experience with such educational models and to reflect on what they got out of the experience, as well as what they were able to contribute to others.”

In other words: this is both a diversity essay and something more than that—it’s asking you to think through the ways that your unique background and experiences will help you contribute to an evolving peer-peer education model. Being able to discuss previous experiences in a meaningful way will help you here.

A diversity essay, like any personal essay, can be anxiety-producing for applicants: some people get caught up in telling the stories they think the committee wants to hear (but not putting their own, unique imprint on them), or block their own writing process by convincing themselves that they don’t have an experience worth sharing.

Another member of our med team, Dr. Rebecca Blustein, shared her advice: “It’s worth remembering that your experience doesn’t need to be earth-shattering. You don’t need to have cured cancer or climbed Everest. What it needs to be is meaningful. That means that you’ve thought through what this experience means to you, how it has prepared you for the environment you’ll encounter in med school, and how your unique/diverse perspective will help you contribute.”

As always, if you need help with essay strategy, our experts would be happy to speak with you!

See our catalog of medical services!Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy
Related Resources:

Ace the AMCAS Essay, a free guide
• Meaningful Experiences For Medical School Applicants
Get Accepted to Medical School with Low Stats, a free webinar

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Aligning Your Resume With Your Application Essays http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/15/aligning-your-resume-with-your-application-essays/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/15/aligning-your-resume-with-your-application-essays/#respond Mon, 15 Jun 2015 15:42:37 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31562 “Aligning Your Resume With Your Application Essays” is the latest post in our series, Navigate the MBA Maze. MBA and other graduate school applicants frequently submit a resume with their applications. Many schools require it, and some schools, such as Columbia Business School, even specify a given format. The resume not only will present a […]

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Download our "Navigate the MBA Maze" Special report now!

Everything you write should directly or indirectly relate to your goals – including the resume.

Aligning Your Resume With Your Application Essays” is the latest post in our series, Navigate the MBA Maze.

MBA and other graduate school applicants frequently submit a resume with their applications. Many schools require it, and some schools, such as Columbia Business School, even specify a given format. The resume not only will present a valuable context for your other materials, but it also will give the adcom readers an easy point of reference as they read your essays.

To use the resume strategically in the application, you must align it with your essays. First, follow the basic rules of good resume writing for your MBA application resume. Beyond that, there are several points to consider in preparing your resume for your graduate school applications:

• The resume can free up space in your essays. By summarizing your experience, responsibilities, and achievements in the resume, you don’t have to worry about cramming every noteworthy item into your essays or sketching out your career path. Rather, you can be very selective and detailed in the experiences you do elaborate on in the essays. These two components, the essays and the resume, should complement each other rather than being redundant. When they harmonize, they sharpen your message and give both depth and breadth to your application.

• Be consistent in your resume and essays: refer to companies, job titles, departments, technologies, and other items in the same way in both pieces. Not only does this practice prevent confusion, it also heightens the unity and coherence of the overall application.

• Review your essays and determine whether there are particular skills, abilities, talents, or experiences that you should reinforce. Then use your resume to do so. For example, if your verbal score was low, presumably you demonstrated your verbal skills in your essays. Use the resume to further strengthen the impression of strong verbal skills.

• Your goals anchor your application essays and statements of purpose; everything you write should directly or indirectly relate to them. So should the resume. In selecting the experiences and accomplishments to highlight, give the resume a slant that reflects your goals.

Download your copy of Navigating the MBA Maze
Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy
Related Resources:

The Quick Guide to Admissions Resumes
4 Tips for Demonstrating Professional Growth in a Flat Organization
Hone Your MBA Goals, a short video

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Michigan Ross 2016 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/14/michigan-ross-2016-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/14/michigan-ross-2016-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/#comments Sun, 14 Jun 2015 18:32:47 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31298 Michigan Ross essentially condensed last year’s two required questions into one and added a goals essay question.   Review Ross’ Evaluation Criteria and Admissions Director Soojin Kwon’s excellent blog post on the new questions before you sit down to write the essays. Most importantly remember: your essays should reveal the qualities Ross seeks — not just mouth them. Show that […]

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Click here for more top b-school application essay tips!Michigan Ross essentially condensed last year’s two required questions into one and added a goals essay question.  

Review Ross’ Evaluation Criteria and Admissions Director Soojin Kwon’s excellent blog post on the new questions before you sit down to write the essays. Most importantly remember: your essays should reveal the qualities Ross seeks — not just mouth them. Show that you walk the walk, not just talk the talk. 

My comments are in blue below. 

Essays:

1.  What are you most proud of and why? How does it shape who you are today? (up to 400 words)

The first part of the question is fairly straightforward. What are you truly proud of? The reasons for your pride and the influence of this experience require thought and soul-searching. And of course, you only have 400 words.

Possible examples: Contributed significantly to your team, department, company, or club. Raised money for a favorite charity. Organized a political event. Engaged in interfaith dialogue that broke down communications barriers. Led a sports team to victory.  Or perhaps, overcoming a significant personal challenge.  

If possible, quantify this part of your answer. Numbers are a great way to show both contribution and impact.  However, if your #1 achievement is qualitative or difficult to quantify, don’t let lack of numbers stop you from using it.

Your response to “why?” is extremely important.  As Soojin Kwon writes on her blog “We want to understand what makes something important to you. It gives us a glimpse into how you think about and process things, and what your priorities and values are.” Choose the reasons that genuinely reflect who you are and also show fit with Ross and its values. 

For the third part of the question (how did it shape who you are today?), think and then focus. Choose one or two lessons from this accomplishment that changed how you think or behave and describe those changes.  You don’t have room for many lessons learned, so select the most important.

Please don’t write that you learned you can do anything you put your mind to. That response is cliched and not really true. There are limits to what you can do. A good response will show how this crucial experience has molded you.2.  What is your desired career path and why? (up to 400 words)

What do you want to do after you earn your MBA? This question doesn’t limit itself to your first job. It ask for the “path” and is asking how would you like to see your career progress.  Why is this path appealing to you?

You can point to 1-3 experiences (don’t focus on the same one used in your response to #1) that convinced you that the desired one is right for you. Analyze the impact of these events. Highlight 1-3 aspects of these experiences that you enjoyed that will also be part of your desired future direction. 

Right genuinely about your future career, but realize as Soojin Kwon says that Ross uses the answers to see if business school makes sense. Ross doesn’t want to admit you if its MBA won’t help you go where you want to go professionally.  Show that a Ross MBA in the missing link between what you have done in the past and what you want to do in the future.

If you would like professional guidance with your Michigan Ross MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our  MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Michigan Ross application. 

Michigan Ross 2016 MBA Application Deadlines:

Round 1
Applications due Oct. 5, 2015 at 11:59 PM (EST)
Decisions posted Dec. 18, 2015 at 12:00 PM (EST)

Round 2
Applications due Jan. 4, 2016 at 11:59 PM (EST)
Decisions posted March 21, 2016 at 12:00 PM (EST)

Round 3
Applications due March 21, 2016 at 11:59 PM (EST)
Decisions posted May 13, 2016 at 12:00 PM (EST)

MBA Admissions A-Z: 26 Great Tips - Download your free copy!Linda Abraham By , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

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I’m About to Make Your Day… http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/14/im-about-to-make-your-day-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/14/im-about-to-make-your-day-2/#respond Sun, 14 Jun 2015 16:24:39 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31493 …by giving my essay a catchy opening line that doesn’t turn you away or bore you to tears. See, I could have started this tip post with “Today I am going to tell you how to create a compelling essay opening,” but you probably would have skipped over something as drab as that. How about […]

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Download Your Free Guide to Crafting a Killer Admissions Resume

Does your opening line catch the reader’s attention?

…by giving my essay a catchy opening line that doesn’t turn you away or bore you to tears.

See, I could have started this tip post with “Today I am going to tell you how to create a compelling essay opening,” but you probably would have skipped over something as drab as that. How about these?

It is the art of philosophical car washing that got me thinking about pursuing an MBA.

or

There are numerous ways to make a banana split cry.

…now THOSE are essays or personal statements I’d like to read!

Yes, you want an engaging opening for your admissions essay or personal statement, but you also want to make sure to avoid anything obvious or chock full of clichés.

A good essay opening is one that:

• …sets the tone. A serious essay should be introduced by a serious opening line. If an intro sentence makes you chuckle, on the other hand, then you can assume the essay itself it humorous as well.

• …raises intrigue. Your essay’s opening line should encourage questioning or engender curiosity. Like for our first example above, “What is philosophical car washing?” or “What is the art form of this activity like?” or, as per our second example above, “Huh?” And that’s okay too!

• …surprising, shocking, or suspenseful. Causing your reader to flinch, raise an eyebrow in surprise, jump with shock, or furrow her forehead from suspense is a good thing. That reader will want to read on.

Grab your readers’ attention so they will read your essay because they want to and not because they have to.

NOTE: If you can’t think of a catchy opening, but know what you plan on writing, feel free to write your essay first and add a catchy hook at the beginning of the essay once you’re done, or sometime along the way.

Download your free Quick Guide to Admissions Resumes! Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy
Related Resources:

5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Application
• From Example to Exemplary – A Free Guide
• Writing The MBA Application Essay

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Houston Anesthesiologist Rockets Through Residency http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/14/interview-with-rishi-kumar-md/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/14/interview-with-rishi-kumar-md/#respond Sun, 14 Jun 2015 16:18:24 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31513 This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with medical school applicants and students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top medical schools and the med school application process. And now, introducing Rishi Kumar… Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as […]

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Read more med school student interviews!This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with medical school applicants and students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top medical schools and the med school application process. And now, introducing Rishi Kumar…

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? Where did you go for med school? What are some of your hobbies?

Rishi: Howdy! I’m a Texan through and through having lived in Houston for practically my whole life. I finished high school a year early and decided to utilize a scholarship at Houston Baptist University to complete a double major in Chemistry and Biochemistry Molecular Biology over three years. I took a year off to teach MCAT courses and ultimately attended my dream medical school – Baylor College of Medicine.

I see myself as a stereotypical nerd who enjoys computer games, programming, and absolutely anything tech-related! I also enjoy watching/playing basketball and investing in the stock market.

Accepted: Where are you completing your residency, and what stage are you at? What specialty?

Rishi: I’m about to begin my third year of anesthesiology residency at Baylor College of Medicine in the Texas Medical Center. Afterwards, I plan to pursue either one or two fellowships in cardiovascular anesthesia +/- critical care medicine.

Accepted: What attracted you to anesthesiology?

Rishi: The biggest draw about anesthesiology is having the ability to apply advanced physiology and pharmacology to every anesthetic I perform. Additionally, anesthesiologists can perform a myriad of procedures. For example, I had a recent call shift where I placed an arterial line, performed a emergent endotracheal intubation in the ICU, came back to the pre-op area and did femoral and sciatic peripheral nerve blocks, placed several intravenous lines using ultrasound, performed an epidural anesthetic, and ultimately placed a central venous catheter. It’s a field which requires quick thinking in critical situations and finesse with procedures.

Another aspect which I’ve come to appreciate is that 100% of my attention is focused on the patient in front of me. I don’t have 20 patients to round on. I don’t spend eight hours talking about the diagnosis and treatment (a la internal medicine rounds). Instead, I’m the one immediately diagnosing problems, administering medications, and making adjustments to keep patients safe under the physiologic stress of surgery.

Finally, my colleagues are incredibly bright and laid back! Residency is tough, but it’s a little easier to tolerate when the people around you are amiable.

Accepted: What have been some of the challenging and rewarding aspects of your residency training so far?

Rishi: The most challenging aspect of residency was easily the steep learning curve in the first month of anesthesia – learning to properly intubate, place lines, prioritize events, anticipate problems, diagnose and treat changes, etc. There are hundreds of small parts which sum into an efficient anesthetic, so learning how to best execute each one was initially a struggle. Looking back, it’s almost laughable how much I’ve matured in terms of knowledge base and skill set as an anesthesia provider.

The most rewarding aspect of my training has easily been my commitment to patient safety. Circulating nurses are busy managing the operative flow. Surgeons and scrub techs are focused on the surgical goals of the case. Who is actually watching the patient? Your anesthesiologist!

Surgery is gruesome and unnatural. Patients are often times scared to tears in the pre-operative area. I take this as an opportunity to establish professional rapport by framing everything in the context of maintaining patient safety above all else. Their safe operative course is a responsibility I take very seriously and constantly motivate others to recognize. Also, no one can fault you for doing something in the patient’s best interest. My surgical colleagues have come to realize how I conduct my anesthetics, and many have expressed gratitude along the way. =)

Accepted: From your blog, it seems like you have a variety of diverse interests (sports, tech, gaming, etc). How do you balance work/life as a resident?

Rishi: Some of the more organized residents out there would likely say they have structured schedules incorporating recreational activities with their work loads.

I’m not one of them, lol.

I sort of let each day unfold depending on my mood. After a busy shift, I might just watch some sports, read, and then hit the sack early. Other days I’ll be doing laundry at midnight, grocery shopping at 6 AM, and playing video games in my PJs afterwards (always a kid at heart!) If there’s a big exam coming up, then my time will naturally shift towards preparing for it.

Truth be told, my work life is incredibly fulfilling in so many regards. Everything else I can squeeze into my schedule is just icing. =)

Accepted: What are your top 3 tips for residency applicants?

1. Be prepared to begin your real training. Medical school helped you learn the basics, but now you’re a doctor. Your colleagues and patients will be looking to you for answers. Serve them well.

2. Humility above all else. Medicine is filled with brilliant people with all sorts of incredible life experiences. Never let your accomplishments cloud your pursuit for selflessness.

3. Most importantly… remember what got you here. Your friends. Your family. Your hobbies and interests. Hold onto your past times and those who supported you.

You can follow Rishi’s blog at RK.md. Thank you Rishi for sharing your story with us – we wish you the best of luck!

Download your copy of "Navigating the Med School Maze" today!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy
Related Resources:

• 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Med School Essays
Residency Applications: How to Match, a free webinar
• An Inside Look at the Medical School Journey

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New Sustainability Center With Eco Leader At Helm For NYU Stern http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/12/new-sustainability-center-with-eco-leader-at-helm-for-nyu-stern/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/12/new-sustainability-center-with-eco-leader-at-helm-for-nyu-stern/#respond Fri, 12 Jun 2015 17:02:17 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31470 With concerns about sustainability and environmental/human impact gaining more currency in the business community, NYU Stern has announced the establishment of a new Center for Sustainable Business, launching in January 2016. The new center will be led by Tensie Whelan, President of the Rainforest Alliance and an experienced leader in the field. In addition to […]

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Check out NYU Sten's zone pageWith concerns about sustainability and environmental/human impact gaining more currency in the business community, NYU Stern has announced the establishment of a new Center for Sustainable Business, launching in January 2016. The new center will be led by Tensie Whelan, President of the Rainforest Alliance and an experienced leader in the field.

In addition to research and teaching, the Center will bring together companies from different sectors and parts of the world with stakeholders and experts for an annual conference exploring solutions for a particular environmental and developmental challenge.

Whelan holds a master’s degree in international communication from American University’s School of International Service and a bachelor’s degree in political science from New York University. She has been recognized as one of the “100 Most Influential People in Business Ethics” by Ethisphere for several years.

As president of the Rainforest Alliance, Whelan built the organization from a $4.5 million budget to $50 million, transforming the engagement of business with sustainability and recruiting 5,000 companies in more than 60 countries to work with the organization. She partnered closely with sustainability leaders from multinational corporations, CEOs from around the globe, key NGO and United Nations leaders, as well as donors.

During her 25 year career in environmental leadership, she has also served as vice president of conservation information at the National Audubon Society and executive director of the New York League of Conservation Voters.

“More and more, society and consumers expect companies to address social and environmental issues in their business models. Corporations, in turn, are seeking new employees who come ready to innovate and contribute. As educators, we have a responsibility to help our students develop their perspectives and skills to meet this new reality,” said NYU Stern Professor Bruce Buchanan in a statement. The new Center is aimed at doing just that.

Learn more at: Center for Sustainable Business

Download your free copy of 12 Terrific Tips for MBA Applicants Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy
Related Resources:

Navigate the MBA Maze
• The MBA Family: A Roundup and Overview
• 4 Ways to Show How You’ll Contribute in the Future

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Get To Know Accepted! http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/12/get-to-know-accepted/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/12/get-to-know-accepted/#respond Fri, 12 Jun 2015 16:39:22 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31490 As the dynamic and thoughtful community at Accepted continues to grow, we’d like to take a moment to thank you for your engagement and to introduce ourselves to those of you who may not know what we are all about. Keep up the great conversation in the comments section! We love hearing from you. Related […]

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As the dynamic and thoughtful community at Accepted continues to grow, we’d like to take a moment to thank you for your engagement and to introduce ourselves to those of you who may not know what we are all about.

Keep up the great conversation in the comments section! We love hearing from you.

See how Accepted can help you succeed!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy
Related Resources:

• Get to know our admissions consultants
Download a free admissions guide
Check out the Admissions Straight Talk Podcast

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Tips For Answering Common Application Essay Prompts http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/11/tips-for-answering-common-application-essay-prompts-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/11/tips-for-answering-common-application-essay-prompts-2/#respond Thu, 11 Jun 2015 16:18:41 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31460 If you are beginning your senior year of high school, this is the prime time to write your Common Application essay. The sooner you get started, the better. If possible, use the summer to focus your efforts on writing your essay. There are over 500 Common Application members in 47 states and the District of […]

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Find out how to do it right by downloading our special report, Ivy League and Common Application Tips: How to Get Accepted!

Give yourself time to think about the information you are conveying and what it reveals about you.

If you are beginning your senior year of high school, this is the prime time to write your Common Application essay. The sooner you get started, the better. If possible, use the summer to focus your efforts on writing your essay. There are over 500 Common Application members in 47 states and the District of Columbia, as well as in Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, France, Germany, Italy, Latvia, Qatar, Singapore, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. All these institutions have a common commitment to a holistic approach to the admissions process. This commitment means they look at more than just your test scores and GPA. They also give significant weight to your essay responses.

Keep in mind your essays help round out the picture of who you are and what is important to you. They also provide insight into the sort of student you might be in college. Regardless of which essay prompt you address, it is essential to give yourself time to think about the information you are conveying and what specifically it reveals about you. It is also important to invest the energy to revise your responses. Each rendition of your essay should work to clarify your intentions while projecting something meaningful about yourself. Your goal is to tell the admission committees something that is not already conveyed elsewhere in your application.

In addition to the main Common Application essay, many of these schools require additional supplemental essay responses. Those are the subjects of other blog posts.

Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story.

Describe your unique background, identity, interest, or talent and explain in detail what it reveals about your values. Why is it so meaningful to you? This is an opportunity to talk about various topics that are unique to you—cultural heritage, burning interests, outstanding talents, sense of identity, or unusual circumstances. Then discuss how this information/revelation/reflection/experience/talent/interest plays out in who you are and the way you look at the world. What motivates you? In short, why is the information you selected significant to you and how is it central to the way you view yourself? How does the meaningful information you shared help to prepare you for your future?

The lessons we take from failure can be fundamental to later success. Recount an incident or time when you experienced failure. How did it affect you, and what did you learn from the experience?

How do you deal with adversity and what does that say about you? Clearly describe the specific failure you experienced. Discuss what you learned from the experience and how it affects you in your day-to-day life as well as its impact on your way of thinking. Don’t focus on the setback itself; rather emphasize what you learned about yourself and how that changed your perspective or behavior. Maybe you learned that hard work pays off? Or that balance is important in your life? Or that you want to make different decisions in the future? As you reflect on this experience remember your goal in this response is to demonstrate resilience.

Reflect on a time when you challenged a belief or idea. What prompted you to act? Would you make the same decision again?

Recount a time when you stood up for something. Explain what created the conflict that motivated you to take action. Discuss why this so meaningful to you. What do your actions reveal about you? Then think about whether or not you would make the same decision again and why. Make sure you clearly communicate your values and beliefs. What did you learn from this experience?

Describe a problem you’ve solved or a problem you’d like to solve. It can be an intellectual challenge, a research query, an ethical dilemma-anything that is of personal importance, no matter the scale. Explain its significance to you and what steps you took or could be taken to identify a solution.

Clearly articulate the problem. Remember the scale is not a factor, it is important to focus on why it is significant to you. This could be an issue on a personal level, in a local community, or with worldwide impact. Did you learn anything in particular about yourself as you reflect on this problem? Consider what your concerns about this problem reveal about the kind of person you are or hope to be. Discuss what you did or what you might do to find a solution. The essence of this question relates to your values, character, creativity and sense of identity. It also examines how you problem-solve and your ability to conceive solutions. Your response demonstrates a number of personal characteristics—What is important to you? How do you process the world around you? What are some of your perceptions and assumptions? To what extent do you actively engage issues? How do you overcome challenges? Can you come up with creative/effective/unique solutions to problems?

Discuss an accomplishment or event, formal or informal that marked your transition from childhood to adulthood within your culture, community, or family.

This prompt asks how you gained independence and became more self-aware. Provide a rich context as you detail your selected accomplishment or event and then focus on how it demonstrates a significant transition in your life. Why was this event so important to you? Take it a step further and discuss how this new phase or different status can serve as a foundation in the future.

If none of the essay prompts immediately jump out at you, give yourself some time to reflect on your life experiences. Talk with your parents and teachers about your ideas. Eventually you will discover a topic that excites you and reveals something significant about you. The subject of your essay doesn’t have to be completely novel. However, it should reflect your unique perspective while clearly communicating your best self. Think about what is important to you and why. This is your opportunity to differentiate yourself from other applicants.  Remember, all the Common Application member schools are interested in learning more about you through your essays!

Find out what you can do NOW to make applying to college go as smoothly as possible!

Marie Todd By Accepted’s college admissions specialist. Marie has worked in college admissions for over twenty years. She has both counseled applicants and evaluated applications. Most recently she evaluated 5000+ applications for the University of Michigan’s College of Literature, Science and the Arts; College of Engineering; School of Kinesiology. She is available to assist you (or your child) with your applications.

Related Resources:

• The Quick Guide to Admissions Resumes
College Application Tips for Parents
• 4 Ways to Show How You’ll Contribute in the Future

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Harvard Business School: The Habit Of Leadership http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/11/harvard-business-school-the-habit-of-leadership/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/06/11/harvard-business-school-the-habit-of-leadership/#respond Thu, 11 Jun 2015 15:53:41 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31377 Thank you, Harvard Business School. IMHO, that’s what applicants should think when they visit the program’s website and find “habit of leadership” on its “Who are we looking for?” admissions page. It’s common knowledge that HBS values leadership, but with this phrase, the adcom succinctly expresses how they view leadership – dynamic, deep, intrinsic, long-term. […]

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Register for our upcoming live webinar on How To Get Accepted To HBS!Thank you, Harvard Business School. IMHO, that’s what applicants should think when they visit the program’s website and find “habit of leadership” on its “Who are we looking for?” admissions page.

It’s common knowledge that HBS values leadership, but with this phrase, the adcom succinctly expresses how they view leadership – dynamic, deep, intrinsic, long-term. It’s something you possess and bring to your experiences, not something that happens to describe your involvement in a few isolated incidents (i.e., the proverbial “leadership experience”). Not just HBS applicants, but all b-school applicants can benefit from reflecting on the phrase – and then determining how they embody it in their actions.

There are a gazillion excellent articles and treatises on the meaning of leadership. And most of them are valid. I’m focusing on the other word. The key to this message is habit. First, it’s active. It’s something done. It’s not something bestowed upon you (like the title Team Lead) and it’s not something ascended to (advanced to Project Manager). Whether good or bad, habits are something you do.

Second, a habit is reflexive, a part of you. You may think about it objectively in your mind, but it’s also behavior. Yet that doesn’t automatically mean it’s innate – a habit may be learned (you probably know someone who trained herself to become more patient or more decisive or less defensive). Therefore, if you aren’t a “born leader,” you can still develop the habit of leadership.

A habit knows no boundaries. You exercise the habit of leadership in school, in your family, with friends, at work, in your community. It means that when something needs doing or when you perceive an opportunity for positive impact, you shift into gear to make it happen – even if it’s hard, even if it’s not your designated role, even if you’re not sure exactly how you’ll do it. Simply, it’s what you do.

Because it’s action oriented, not title or ego oriented, the habit of leadership, ironically, may sometimes seem invisible, a hidden force. Routine and regular. Example: your friends, tired after a long day of canoeing on the Delaware River, squabble about where to go for dinner. You gently draw the group’s focus to the two most feasible options, proposed by two different members of the group; everyone starts to feel enthusiastic again. They may not consciously recognize your leadership; in fact, the person who proposed the “winning” idea might feel like the leader! (More irony: real leadership often allows others to feel like the top dog.) Of course, the opposite is also true sometimes: your leadership habit may require you to visibly assert an opposing vision or emphatically convince people to join you in taking a risk.

While this quality is something HBS explicitly seeks, any b-school adcom will value it – after all, someone with “leadership experience” isn’t necessarily a leader fundamentally, but someone with the “habit of leadership” is. All b-schools want leaders.

Having the habit of leadership is great, but it’s only helpful to the application if you express it effectively. That means – you’ve heard it from us ad infinitum – use example and anecdote. Look for opportunities to weave in the message of your habit of leadership, even in essays on other topics. Also, try to bring it out in your resume and your interviews. Ask your recommenders to highlight it. It can only enhance your application and your candidacy.

Watch the webinar of 'How to Get Accepted To Harvard Business School' today!
Cindy Tokumitsu By , author and co-author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports, including Why MBA and Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted.com.

Related Resources:

• Harvard Business School 2016 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
Life as an HBS MBA Student
• What Does Harvard Business School Want?

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