Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog http://blog.accepted.com Admissions consulting and application advice Mon, 01 Sep 2014 17:40:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 Admissions consulting and application advice Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no Admissions consulting and application advice Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog http://blog.accepted.com/wp-content/plugins/powerpress/rss_default.jpg http://blog.accepted.com A Youtuber Living Her Dreams in Medical School [Interview] http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/01/med-school-interview-with-megan/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/01/med-school-interview-with-megan/#respond Mon, 01 Sep 2014 15:52:13 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24888 ]]> Med Student Megan

This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with medical school applicants and students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top medical schools and the med school application process. And now, introducing Megan…

Accepted: First, can you tell us a little about yourself? Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? 

Megan: My name is Megan. I am 21-year-old marathoner, Youtuber, and first year medical student. TheMeganRantsAbout is the name of my YouTube channel. Y’all should stop by sometime and see me live my dreams in medical school!

Accepted: Where are you in med school and what year? 

Megan: I attend a public allopathic medical school in the South and am an M1. This is truly the journey of a lifetime.

Accepted: What are you most looking forward to in med school?

Megan: I’m definitely a people person. Talking and working with others comes easily to me. I love to listen to others’ stories and tell some of my own. That’s probably why I’m looking forward to patient interactions the most in med school.

Accepted: Did you go straight from college to med school? What do you think the advantages are of going straight from college to med school? 

Megan: I am proud to say that I’m one of those crazy kids who went straight from college to medical school. At 21, I’m actually one of the youngest in my class.

The biggest advantage of going straight from college to medical school is that the applicable material you learned in undergrad is still fresh in your mind and easily accessible for med school courses.

Accepted: Looking back, what was the most challenging aspect of the med school admissions process? How did you approach that challenge and overcome it?

Megan: Every premedical student struggles with the MCAT. It is a grueling test over almost everything you learn in undergrad that requires MONTHS of discipline and dedication. I ended up taking it twice. The first time I took the test, I actually thought I did quite well but was devastated to find out otherwise. The second time, I improved my score and ended up getting into my first choice school. Persistence pays off.

Accepted: Can you share your top 3 med school application tips with our readers?

Megan: I always tell my viewers that their medical school application needs to tell a story about their life, passions, and (most importantly) why they have a heart for medicine. Other advice – submit your application early and dress to impress for interviews!

Accepted: Can you tell us about your YouTube channel? If our med school applicant readers were to watch just one of your videos, which would you want it to be?

Megan: I make videos for premed students on topics that no one seems to be talking about. Some of my most popular videos are “The MCAT: How to Study, My Experience and Advice,” “Retaking the MCAT: Should You? Advice and What I did Differently,” and “What I Wish I Had Known About Being Premed.” I wish I had someone to ask these questions to when I was in undergrad! My sincerest hope is that I do that for my viewers.

You can read more about Megan’s med school journey by checking out her YouTube channel, TheMeganRantsAbout. Thank you Megan for sharing your story with us!

Do you want to be featured in Accepted.com’s blog, Accepted Admissions Blog? If you want to share your med school journey with the world (or at least with our readers), email us at bloggers@accepted.com.

Download your free special report: Navigate the Med School Maze!

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Related Resources:

• General Advice for Med School Applicants
• 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Med School Essays
• Med Applicant Blogger Interviews

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Make Your Perfect Match: Residency Admissions Video Link Here http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/31/make-your-perfect-match-residency-admissions-video-link-here/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/31/make-your-perfect-match-residency-admissions-video-link-here/#respond Sun, 31 Aug 2014 19:46:28 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25378 ]]> Want to match at your top choice residency program?

Residency Applications: How to Match - Register Now!

 

Boost your chances of getting the job done right by following the advice found in Residency Applications: How to Match – our newest webinar, now available for on-demand viewing!

During the webinar, you’ll learn:

• 6 fatal application blunders that can cost you your match.
• Advice on writing a persuasive, compelling personal statement.
• Tips on choose the right program for YOU.

…and more!

View Residency Applications: How to Match today – your future as a physician depends on it!

Save my spot!

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Last Day to Beat Accepted’s Price Increase! http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/31/last-day-to-beat-accepteds-price-increase/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/31/last-day-to-beat-accepteds-price-increase/#respond Sun, 31 Aug 2014 18:25:21 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25374 ]]> REMINDER: Today is your last chance to take advantage of Accepted.com’s current prices before we raise our prices tomorrow.

Price Increase Coming Up! Shop now to save.

Effective at 12:00 AM PT on September 1, 2014, we will increase our prices on our editing and consulting services.

Accepted.com editors have helped literally thousands of MBA, law, med, grad, and college applicants reach their higher education dreams. Purchase Accepted’s essay editing or admissions consulting TODAY and take advantage of our current prices…before it’s too late!

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Duke Fuqua 2015 MBA Essay Tips and Deadlines http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/31/duke-fuqua-2015-mba-essay-tips-and-deadlines/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/31/duke-fuqua-2015-mba-essay-tips-and-deadlines/#comments Sun, 31 Aug 2014 17:43:34 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24604 ]]> Want to learn more about Duke Fuqua? Click here!Leadership, teamwork, ethics, and a global approach to business are essential elements of the Duke Fuqua MBA, which is why you’ll need to make sure you express your passion for these ideals in your application essays. Impress the Fuqua adcom by positioning yourself as an innovative leader and team player, as someone who can see the big picture, work collaboratively, and shape global business.

My tips are in blue below. 

Three short answer questions and 2 essays are required from all applicants.

• Responses should use 1.5 line spacing and a font size no smaller than 10-point.
• Respond fully and concisely.
• Responses must be completed before submitting your application.
• Prepare your responses carefully. The Admissions Committee considers your answers important in the selection process.
• All essays are scanned using plagiarism detection software. Plagiarism is considered a cheating violation within the Honor Code and will not be tolerated in the admissions process.

Application Tip: Check out Fuqua’s section criteria.

Short Answers

Answer all 3 of the following questions. For each short answer question, respond in 250 characters only (the equivalent of about 50 words).

1. What are your short term goals, post-MBA?

State what you see yourself doing in terms of function and industry. If location or geography are important to your goal, include them.  If you know the type of companies you would like to work for, you can include that information too, but don’t say you want to work for Company X, unless Company X is sponsoring you. That’s probably too narrow.

2. What are your long term goals?

Your long term goals should flow logically from your short-term goals. They can be fuzzier and both in terms of direction and timing. But you should have them. They can, but don’t have to, include larger aspirations and present a broader perspective on where you are headed. But please don’t go so general and say something like “I aspire to be a good person” or “I strive to leave a lasting impact on my community.” Nice sentiments, but way to general.

3. Life is full of uncertainties, and plans and circumstances can change. As a result, navigating a career requires you to be adaptable. Should the short term goals that you provided above not materialize, what alternative directions have you considered?

What’s your Plan B? If you can’t get a job at a leading strategy consulting firm, what do you want to do? If Plan A is investment banking, what’s Plan B?

Essays:

1. Answer the following question — present your response in list form, numbered 1 to 25. Some points may be only a few words, while others may be longer. Your complete list should not exceed 2 pages.

The “Team Fuqua” spirit and community is one of the things that sets The Duke MBA experience apart, and it is a concept that extends beyond the student body to include faculty, staff, and administration. When a new person joins the Admissions team, we ask that person to share with everyone in the office a list of “25 Random Things About Yourself.” As an Admissions team, we already know the new hire’s professional and academic background, so learning these “25 Random Things” helps us get to know someone’s personality, background, special talents, and more.

In this spirit, the Admissions Committee also wants to get to know you–beyond the professional and academic achievements listed in your resume and transcript. You can share with us important life experiences, your likes/dislikes, hobbies, achievements, fun facts, or anything that helps us understand what makes you who you are. Share with us your list of “25 Random Things” about YOU. 

Have some fun with this list. It certainly allows a more creative approach than permitted by most essay prompts. Note that the questions asks you to go “beyond the professional and academic achievements listed in your resume and transcript.”  So you can list your Pez collection or perhaps your brief membership in a rock band or the fact that you took violin from age 6-18 or your membership in a gospel choir or your volunteer work in a hospital, your needlepoint, your favorite recipe or photo. Gosh the list is endless. Just let it reflect you. Think of this list as an introduction to potential friends.   For more insight into this question and the  motivation behind, please read Megan Overbay’s, the former Director of Admissions’, advice. I believe you will find it helpful. And very friendly.

2. Choose only 1 of the following 2 essay questions to answer. Your response should be no more than 2 pages in length.

Choose to the prompt that will let you reveal something important to you and impressive about you. Write the essay that you will be able to draft most enthusiastically and easily.

1. When asked by your family, friends, and colleagues why you want to go to Duke, what do you tell them? Share the reasons that are most meaningful to you

Why Duke? But you’re not talking to the admissions committee, whom you just may be a tad less than candid with. You are talking to your family, friends, and colleagues, people you know and like (at least the friends).  The Fuqua admissions staff really wants to get to know you. Authenticity is the goal. The admissions readers want to be able to imagine you as a part of Team Fuqua — their family — as a friend or colleague. Will you be real stiff and formal? Of course not. You will be friendly in a professional way. Don’t take this as an invitation to be inappropriate, coarse, or rude. Just friendly.

What appeals to you at Duke? What about its program, culture, and professional opportunities propels you to apply and would compel you to accept an offer of admission? Maybe address a letter to a close friend and tell her why you want to go to Duke.  That letter may morph into this essay.

2. The Team Fuqua community is as unique as the individuals who comprise it. Underlying our individuality are a number of shared ideas and principles that we live out in our own ways. Our students have identified and defined 6 “Team Fuqua Principles” that we feel are the guiding philosophies that make our community special. At the end of your 2 years at Fuqua, if you were to receive an award for exemplifying one of the 6 Principles listed below, which one would it be and why? Your response should reflect the research you have done, your knowledge of Fuqua and the Daytime MBA program and experience, and the types of activities and leadership you would engage in as a Fuqua student.

1. Authentic Engagement: We care and we take action. We each make a difference to Team Fuqua by being ourselves and engaging in and supporting activities about which we are passionate.
2. Supportive Ambition: We support each other to achieve great things, because your success is my success. The success of each individual member of Team Fuqua makes the whole of Team Fuqua better.
3. Collective Diversity:  We embrace all of our classmates because our individuality is better and stronger together.
4. Impactful Stewardship: We are leaders who focus on solutions to improve our communities both now and in the future. We aren’t satisfied with just maintaining the status quo.
5. Loyal Community: We are a family who looks out for each other. Team Fuqua supports you when you need it the most.
6. Uncompromising Integrity: We internalize and live the honor code in the classroom and beyond. We conduct ourselves with integrity within Fuqua, within Duke, and within all communities of which we are a part.

Do your homework about Fuqua (and yourself) before responding to this question. What activities and groups appeal to you? How do you see yourself participating? Making a difference? Then look at the list of six principles above. Which do you most identify with? Imagine how you would exemplify that principle in your activities. The story of that role and how would see yourself earning an award is your essay.  While you can reference similar activities in the past, keep the focus of this essay on what you would do at Fuqua and why you would earn recognition for exemplifying one of these six principles.

Optional Essay Question:

If you feel there are extenuating circumstances of which the Admissions Committee should be aware, please explain them in an optional essay (e.g. unexplained gaps in work, choice of recommenders, inconsistent or questionable academic performance, or any significant weakness in your application).

• Do NOT upload additional essays nor additional recommendations in this area of the application.
• The Optional Essay is intended to provide the Admissions Committee with insight into your extenuating circumstances only.
• Limit your response to two pages.

Why isn’t your current supervisor writing your rec? Why is there a six-month gap on your resume? Why did your grades dip during the first semester of your senior year? What are your responsibilities while working for a family business after having left a prestigious investment bank, and why did you make the change? Answering any of those questions (but not all) could be the topic of your optional essay.

If you would like professional guidance with your Duke Fuqua MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our  MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Duke application. 

Duke Fuqua 2015 MBA Application Deadlines:

Application Deadline Decision Notification
Early Action Sept. 17, 2014 Oct. 29, 2014
Round 1 Oct. 20, 2014 Dec. 19, 2014
Round 2 Jan. 5, 2015 Mar. 13, 2015
Round 3 Mar. 19, 2015 May 6, 2015

Click here for more school-specific MBA application essay tips!

Apply with an admissions pro at your side! Click here to learn more.

Linda Abraham By , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

 

Related Resources:

• What I Wish I Knew Before Entering the Duke MBA
• Culture, Location, and Support: A Duke MBA Speaks
• 2015 MBA Application Essay Tips

 

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Interview with MBA Reapplicant, “Top Dog” http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/29/interview-with-mba-reapplicant-top-dog/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/29/interview-with-mba-reapplicant-top-dog/#respond Fri, 29 Aug 2014 16:53:31 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24679 ]]> Click Here for More MBA Applicant Interviews

This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with MBA applicant bloggers, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at the MBA application process. And now…introducing our anonymous blogger, Top Dog.

Accepted: First, can you tell us a little about yourself? Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What is your current job?  

Top Dog: Hello, and thanks for the opportunity to talk about myself! I was born and went to school in the UK, studying for my Bachelor of Science at the University of London. I’m currently working in southern Europe as a global relationship manager for the largest corporate and investment bank in the energy and commodities sector.

Accepted: When did you first apply to b-school?  

Top Dog: I applied to five top 10 U.S. business schools in 2013/14 (Rounds 1 and 2). I got two interviews (at MIT Sloan and Wharton) but unfortunately failed to get an offer.

Accepted: What do you think went wrong and what are you doing this time to improve your candidacy?

Top Dog: I don’t think there were any obvious issues – aside from my 12 years WE and relatively low GPA – but my applications were maybe a bit bland and failed to fully explain what I have actually achieved so far and my detailed reasons for wanting an MBA. This year I got the chance to lead an international team after my boss resigned – that’s definitely an experience I’ll be writing about in my applications that I didn’t have last time.

Accepted: Where do you plan on applying this time?

Top Dog: I’m going to be focused and reapply to MIT Sloan and Wharton, plus INSEAD for the first time. I’ve done a lot of research and love the location, culture, collaborative spirit and emphasis on entrepreneurship and social enterprise at these b-schools. I’m toying with reapplying to Stanford too – the lure of the West Coast is difficult to resist!

Accepted: Can you talk about your decision to apply to/attend a European program versus a U.S. program? What are the pros and cons on either side?

Top Dog: I have tried to balance my target b-schools this time and, while most top b-schools will give you a great education, there are differences. In Europe, I really like the international classes (INSEAD’s incoming class has 90 nationalities with c. 60% from outside Europe), but 10 months is short to fully experience the teaching, culture and career prospects on offer. In the U.S., b-schools simply rock the MBA – this is where the MBA was born and it’s still the best place to study it – plus it broadens my otherwise European profile, while the con would definitely be the cost – ouch!

Accepted: What stage of the application process are you up to so far? What has been the most challenging step and how did you work to overcome it? 

Top Dog: I’m in a good position as I have my experience from last season so I’m all done with research, profile building and I’m about to start my essays. I’ve blogged about my mistakes from last time and I’m already falling into the first trap – leaving it too late to start writing my essays (where did July go!?). Another challenge was not keeping on top of my recommenders, and I’m definitely going to be focused on this this time around.

Accepted: Do you plan on staying in your current industry post-MBA, or changing to a new field/career?

Top Dog: A big motivation for the full time (rather than exec) MBA is the ability to transition into a new field. Post-MBA I’ll go back into banking with a focus on business development and corporate social responsibility – ideally in the emerging markets – where innovation and entrepreneurship are rewarded skills. Longer term I want to combine my finance experience in a start-up, potentially a social entrepreneur focused micro-finance venture in an emerging economy.

Accepted: Why did you decide to blog about your experience? What have you gained from the experience? What do you hope others will learn?

Top Dog: I got a lot of knowledge and comfort from other bloggers last season and I’d like to give something back to the MBA applicant community. My blog encourages me to keep on top of my applications while testing ideas with others in the same position (and some helpful consultants too!). In exchange, I hope I’m giving some useful insight, sparking a bit of debate and creating a sense of companionship among fellow and future applicants.

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages.

You can read more about Top Dog’sb-school journey by checking out his blog, TopDogMBA, and Twitter, @topdogmba. Thank you Top Dog for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

Get clear, practical guidelines for answering the MBA goals essay question. Click here to download our free report.

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Related Resources:

MBA Applicant Interviews
Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One
2015 MBA Application Essay Tips

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5 Questions to Help You Decide Where to Apply to Med School http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/28/5-questions-to-help-you-decide-where-to-apply-to-med-school/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/28/5-questions-to-help-you-decide-where-to-apply-to-med-school/#respond Thu, 28 Aug 2014 17:04:13 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25105 ]]> For more med school admissions advice, download your free copy of Navigate the Med Maze!

How do you choose where to apply?

There are literally hundreds of medical schools in the U.S. to choose from – how do you choose where to apply? Ask yourself the following five questions – their answers will help you narrow down you school selection list and choose the ones that are best for YOU.

1. Should you go in-state?

This is a great place to start as state schools are often cheaper, not to mention easier to get into for residents.

2. Where do you stand competitively?

You need to know where you stand when compared to other applicants. While some aspects of your profile won’t be able to be measured objectively (your clinical experiences or unique background), others are simple facts that are easily comparable. Check out recent rankings to determine average MCAT scores and GPAs for entering classes at the schools on your list. Then narrow down accordingly.

3. What’s your area of interest?

If you have a strong interest in doing health policy, then you might want to look at somewhere like Georgetown in Washington, D.C. as it offers great access to different health policy resources. Look at different areas that interest you or that you have some background in and then select the schools that focus on that, whether it’s infectious disease or rural medicine or emergency medicine or whatever it is that you’re passionate about pursuing.

4. Who do you know?

If you are friends (or friends of friends) or colleagues with professors, doctors, students, or alumni who are connected with one of the programs on your list, then you should definitely talk to them about their experience – their likes and dislikes.

5. How are the vibes?

A school could look perfect on paper, but if you step foot on campus and get negative vibes, then the school may not be for you. A school’s culture – the atmosphere on campus, the way the classes are run, the professor/student exchanges, and the students themselves – can get lost in translation. Often first-hand experience is needed to truly get a feel for what the experience of med school will be like. While it may not be feasible to visit every school on your list, you should certainly visit as many as you can, and then fill in the gaps by attending info sessions/pre-med fairs, and connecting with students and alumni off-campus (as in #4 above).

The advice in this post is based on a conversation we had in our recent webinar, Ask The Experts: Medical School Admissions Q&A with Cydney Foote and Alicia McNease Nimonkar. Check out the full transcript for more tips on applying to med school successfully!

Download your free special report: Navigate the Med School Maze!

Accepted.com

 

Related Resources:

Med School Rankings & Numbers: What You MUST Know, a free downloadable guide
• Applying to Medical School: Selecting Extracurricular Activities
• Identity, Community, and the World of Med School Admissions, a podcast interview

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Financial Aid and Health Insurance for International Students http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/28/financial-aid-and-health-insurance-for-international-students/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/28/financial-aid-and-health-insurance-for-international-students/#respond Thu, 28 Aug 2014 16:17:16 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25295 ]]> Listen to the interview!If you are one of the adventurous souls planning on leaving your comfort zone to study abroad, we’d like to introduce you to a treasure trove of invaluable resources.

Listen to the recording of our conversation with Ross Mason, VP of Envisage International for important tips and information about international student loans, health insurance, and other topics that matter to you.

00:03:31 – Envisage: Helping international students.

00:06:02 – How Ross got involved and what’s changed in past decade plus.

00:10:08 – Advice for a US resident applying to school abroad.

00:14:00 – Advice for a non-US resident applying to school in the United States.

00:19:42 – Health insurance for a US student accepted to an international school.

00:22:48 – What a non-US resident accepted to an US school needs to know about health insurance.

00:24:43 – Finding insurance: where to turn.

00:25:51 – What else is out there for students going abroad?

00:28:00 – Top advice for an international student preparing to go to school out of the country.

Listen to the full conversation to learn more!

*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Related Links:

•  International Student Loan
•  Financial Aid for International Students in the USA
•  International Financial Aid Resources
•  IEFA: International Financial Aid and College Scholarship Search
•  International Student Insurance Plans (Country pages on the bottom right)
•  US School Insurance Requirements
•  International Student Insurance Explained
•  International Student & Study Abroad Resource Center
• International Students and the Individual Mandate Under PPACA
• The Affordable Care Act and J1 Participants in Non-Student Categories

Related Shows:

• Global Business Leadership at Wharton’s Lauder Institute
• Non-Academic Careers for PhDs: A Talk with Dr. Paula Chambers
• CommonBond’s Story: A Revolution in Student Loans
• Is a PhD a Good Idea?
• An Inside Look at INSEAD
• Leadership is King: Interview with IMD’s Lisa Piguet
• Interview with SoFi Co-Founder, Daniel Macklin

Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk:

Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes!     Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in Stitcher!

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http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/28/financial-aid-and-health-insurance-for-international-students/feed/ 0 Financial Aid,podcast If you are one of the adventurous souls planning on leaving your comfort zone to study abroad, we’d like to introduce you to a treasure trove of invaluable resources. - Listen to the recording of our conversation with Ross Mason, If you are one of the adventurous souls planning on leaving your comfort zone to study abroad, we’d like to introduce you to a treasure trove of invaluable resources. Listen to the recording of our conversation with Ross Mason, VP of Envisage International for important tips and information about international student loans, health insurance, and other topics that matter to you. 00:03:31 – Envisage: Helping international students. 00:06:02 – How Ross got involved and what’s changed in past decade plus. 00:10:08 – Advice for a US resident applying to school abroad. 00:14:00 – Advice for a non-US resident applying to school in the United States. 00:19:42 – Health insurance for a US student accepted to an international school. 00:22:48 – What a non-US resident accepted to an US school needs to know about health insurance. 00:24:43 – Finding insurance: where to turn. 00:25:51 – What else is out there for students going abroad? 00:28:00 – Top advice for an international student preparing to go to school out of the country. *Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com. Related Links: •  International Student Loan •  Financial Aid for International Students in the USA •  International Financial Aid Resources •  IEFA: International Financial Aid and College Scholarship Search •  International Student Insurance Plans (Country pages on the bottom right) •  US School Insurance Requirements •  International Student Insurance Explained •  International Student & Study Abroad Resource Center • International Students and the Individual Mandate Under PPACA • The Affordable Care Act and J1 Participants in Non-Student Categories Related Shows: • Global Business Leadership at Wharton’s Lauder Institute • Non-Academic Careers for PhDs: A Talk with Dr. Paula Chambers • CommonBond’s Story: A Revolution in Student Loans • Is a PhD a Good Idea? • An Inside Look at INSEAD • Leadership is King: Interview with IMD’s Lisa Piguet • Interview with SoFi Co-Founder, Daniel Macklin Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk:       Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no 34:11
Free Webinar Recording: Can You Apply to Med School with Low Stats? http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/27/free-webinar-recording-can-you-apply-to-med-school-with-low-stats/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/27/free-webinar-recording-can-you-apply-to-med-school-with-low-stats/#respond Wed, 27 Aug 2014 20:46:06 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24429 ]]> Now’s your chance to catch up on valuable information you may have missed during last week’s webinar, How to Get into Medical School with Low Stats. Med school applicants with low GPA and/or MCAT scores – you don’t want to miss this! 

GetMedSchoolLowStatsView How to Get into Medical School with Low Stats for free now!

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Kellogg 2015 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/27/kellogg-2015-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/27/kellogg-2015-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/#comments Wed, 27 Aug 2014 16:20:27 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24566 ]]> I strongly urge you to watch the videos where Kellogg defines what it means by Think Bravely. The qualified applicants who show they profoundly identify with that mission will have the best chance of acceptance.

Essays:

1.
 Resilience. Perseverance. Grit. Call it what you will…. Challenges can build character. Describe a challenging experience you’ve had. How were you tested? What did you learn? (450 words)

A perfect prompt for an essay showing that you take responsibility for you actions — even in challenging situations — and that you courageously face those challenges, deal with them, and grow from them.

The question asks you to describe one experience that you found challenging. I suggest you open with either a difficult moment or interaction, then describe what led up to it and continue with how you dealt with it. Reveal results both in terms of the situation and more importantly in terms of your personal character growth.

For more thoughts on resilience, please see Resilience: Moving On.

2.
 Leadership requires an ability to collaborate with and motivate others. Describe a professional experience that required you to influence people. What did this experience teach you about working with others, and how will it make you a better leader? (450 words)

This question reflects Kellogg’s emphasis on collaborative leadership. As in question 1, Kellogg is asking you to describe one experience. This time  the school seeks a professional one where you influenced others. You can use a STAR framework for this response (Situation, Task, Action, Results). Start with the situation and simply describe what was going on. Then relate your group’s task and responsibility. How did you motivate the others to move in one direction? How did you influence and persuade? Finally what were the results for the group, but more importantly for you? What did you learn about leadership, collaboration, and influence?

While it isn’t a requirement and I can imagine instances where this may not be true, in general examples where you led by virtue of your stature and others’ respect for you will be more compelling than those where you led by virtue of station and title. 

Re-Applicants Only: Since your previous application, what steps have you taken to strengthen your candidacy? (250 word limit)

No trick questions here. How are you a better candidate today than when Kellogg rejected you? Have you addressed weaknesses in your previous application? Check out MBA Reapplicant 101 — a lot of (free) resources. 

Additional Information (Optional): If needed, use this section to briefly describe any extenuating circumstances (e.g. unexplained gaps in work experience, choice of recommenders, inconsistent or questionable academic performance, etc.) (no word count)

This is a true optional question If necessary, use it to provide context for possible negatives. Take responsibility for mistakes if necessary and discuss what you have changed so that you don’t err in the same way again.

Keep this section short and to-the-point. Don’t be fooled by “No word count.”

Video Essay: 

 • The Video Essays provide applicants with an additional opportunity to demonstrate what they will bring to our vibrant Kellogg community – in an interactive way. Each applicant will complete two short video essay questions. The questions are designed to bring to life the person we have learned about on paper.

 • After submitting a completed application, each applicant will be asked to complete two Video Essay Questions. One will be about the candidate’s interest in Kellogg and the other will be a “getting to know you” type of question.

 • There are 10 practice questions which candidates can complete as many times as they like to get comfortable with the format and technology. The practice questions and experience will simulate the actual video essay experience, so this is meant to be a useful tool and help applicants feel prepared.

 • There is not an opportunity to re-do the answer to the official video essay questions. We encourage applicants to practice so they are comfortable with the format once it is time to complete the official questions.

 • Candidates will have 20 seconds to think about their question and up to 1 minute to give their response.

• We estimate the Video Essays will take 30 minutes to complete – which includes time for set-up and answering all the practice questions.

To prepare for your webcam session, you need to practice for the experience of talking to a video camera with no responses from another human being. For tips on how to prepare and behave during the webcam session, please see Kellogg’s “Video Essay” on its Application Components page as well as my Tips for Video MBA Essay Questions.

If you would like professional guidance with your Kellogg MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our  MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Kellogg application. 

Kellogg 2015 MBA Application Deadlines:

Round     . Due Date*            . Decisions Released
Round 1 September 24, 2014 December 17, 2014
Round 2 January 7, 2015 March 25, 2015
Round 3 April 1, 2015 May 13, 2015

*Your application must be received by Kellogg no later than 5p.m. CT on the deadline for the round in which you are applying.

Click here for more school-specific MBA application essay tips!

Apply with an admissions pro at your side! Click here to learn more.

Linda Abraham By , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

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Heads Up: Price Increase Ahead http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/26/heads-up-price-increase-ahead/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/26/heads-up-price-increase-ahead/#respond Tue, 26 Aug 2014 20:37:32 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25222 ]]> We just wanted to give you a head’s up that we’ll be increasing our prices September 1.

So what does this mean for you? It means that you’ve got until August 31, 2014 to lock in a service at the current, low rate. Browse our catalog of services today to get an early start on your applications and to take advantage of our pre-increase rates!

Price Increase Coming Up! Shop now to save.

When you sign up for an Accepted service, you’ll receive the following advantages:

Move forward with your applications. Starting ASAP on your grad school or college applications means less stress, less rushing, and fewer careless mistakes. The early bird gets the worm!

Work with an eagle-eyed essay critic and mentor. Accepted consultants are experienced wordsmiths with a passion for the art of writing. They won’t write your essays for you, but with their guidance you will present yourself at your best.

Access years of professional experience. Our admissions consultants have years of admissions consulting experience that will give you wide-ranging perspective and new insights into the application process – from choosing where to apply to building a strong application strategy to advising you on scholarships and how to pay for school. And your consultant will apply that knowledge and insight to your specific situation.

Get convenience, confidence, and peace of mind. Our editors work extra hard to accommodate your busy schedule. Your essay drafts will be returned to you within two business-days of submission, and your calls and emails will be answered as soon as possible. By taking the proactive step of engaging Accepted to help make your b-school dreams a reality, you’ll receive a healthy boost of confidence and the peace of mind that you are putting your best face forward.

It always helps to have a pro on your side – purchase an Accepted.com service on or before August 31, 2014 at 11:59 PM PT, get the help you need on your applications, and take advantage of our pre-increase prices!

Click here to explore our services!

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Writing about Weaknesses in Your Med School Personal Statement http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/26/writing-about-weaknesses-in-your-med-school-personal-statement/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/26/writing-about-weaknesses-in-your-med-school-personal-statement/#respond Tue, 26 Aug 2014 17:29:47 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25206 ]]> Got low stats? You can still get into med school!

Answer the questions about your admissions profile before they are asked.

When coming up for material for your personal statement, it’s important that you ask yourself the following: Are there any weaknesses, any holes in my information, any questionable data that somebody may question about my application?

You don’t want your admissions reader getting to the end of your application and then asking, “But why was his GPA so low?” or “How does she think she’s competitive with no extracurricular activities?” If you answer their questions before they’re asked, then you’ll position yourself as a much stronger and more confident candidate, despite your weaknesses.

How can you anticipate their questions?

Get a friend, family member, or admissions consultant (like those of us here at Accepted) to review your application and highlight any potential weaknesses. Sometimes, as the subject of the application, you may not see these blemishes – recruiting an outside critic may be just what you need to pinpoint flaws so you can see them, and address them.

Tackle the issue!

Now you need to take a step back and be critical yourself. Was there a quarter or semester that you got some poor grades? That would need to be explained. Was there a reason why you were too busy for an arm’s length list of extracurricular activities? Explain what went wrong, what obstacle you faced, and how you worked to overcome that challenge.   Addressing the improvements you made (boosting your GPA, retaking a class) is an excellent strategy for your personal statement. You really do want to emphasize the steps you took and the self-development and self-awareness that you gained as a result. Medical schools love to see that level of self-reflection in essays and that level of maturity.

Don’t Be Too Negative!           

Tread carefully! It’s a mistake to focus exclusively on perceived weaknesses. You want to give the admissions committee positive reasons to accept you. Again, why are you going to make a great doctor as opposed to merely what are the weaknesses in your profile that may keep you out? What are the stories that you can tell? What experiences have you had that will tell somebody not just that you can claim, but that will tell somebody, “Hey, you have the qualities, the personal traits that will make a great doctor.” Frame your weaknesses as stepping stones for increased strength. Don’t be defensive; be confident that you were able to face your challenges and overcome them.

The advice in this post is based on a conversation we had in our recent webinar, Ask The Experts: Medical School Admissions Q&A with Cydney Foote and Alicia McNease Nimonkar. Check out the full transcript for more tips on applying to med school successfully!

Learn how you can get accepted to med school even with a low MCAT or GPA!

Accepted.com

 

Related Resources:

Get Accepted to Medical School with Low Stats, an on-demand webinar
• Tips For Applicants With A Low MCAT Score
A Second Chance at Medical School: The A-Z of Applying to Postbac Programs

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Timing & Funding for Grad School Applicants http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/26/timing-funding-for-grad-school-applicants/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/26/timing-funding-for-grad-school-applicants/#respond Tue, 26 Aug 2014 16:41:39 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25110 ]]> Dealing with Deadlines

Allow plenty of time and make checklists with dates.

If you’re applying for graduate admission and hope to receive funding, it is particularly important to pay attention to deadlines—your school’s deadlines for admission and aid consideration, any additional deadlines for scholarship materials, and any deadlines for funding from private sources or outside agencies.

Here are some things you should keep in mind:

1. Some programs that have rolling admissions will post an earlier deadline for full financial aid/scholarship consideration. Similarly, many programs with spring semester admission will only consider funding applications for fall admission—so make sure you take all deadlines into account if funding is important to you.

2. Take your tests (GRE, TOEFL, etc) with enough time for your scores to be processed and sent to your schools before the deadline. If you take a paper test, allow 6 weeks for delivery. For computer-based tests, 3 weeks is a safe guideline.

3. Allow plenty of time for your recommenders to submit their letters—and follow up to make sure all docs have been submitted and received. A polite thank you note, before your deadline, can serve as a gentle reminder to a busy recommender.

4. To qualify for need-based aid and federal student loans, file your FAFSA on time. States may have their own deadlines [fafsa.ed.gov].

5. If you are an international student, contact the financial aid office at your university for the appropriate forms to demonstrate financial aid eligibility. International students are not eligible for US federal student aid and do not use the FAFSA.

6. Many states have extended some financial aid eligibility and in-state tuition to undocumented students who meet certain requirements (see for example CA’s AB 540). If this is your situation, make sure you file the necessary paperwork before enrolling.

7. For each application you are working on—whether it’s for admission, scholarship funding, etc—make a checklist, with dates. Keep track of everything that you need to submit (transcripts, resume, letters of rec, essays, test scores), and when you have requested and/or uploaded each item.

Funding for graduate school may include scholarships, grants, loans, assistantships (such as teaching or research assistantships), fee remissions, or any combination of the above. While PhD programs often fund most or all of their students, it can be harder for Master’s students (or students in professional degree programs) to find funding. Do your research, and look for funding opportunities both at your university and through outside sources. Good luck!

Download our free report: GET YOUR GAME ON: Preparing for Your Grad School Application

Rebecca Blustein By , Accepted.com editor and former Student Affairs Officer at UCLA’s Scholarship Resource Center, and author of Financing Your Future: Winning Fellowships, Scholarships and Awards for Grad School. Rebecca will be happy to assist you with your grad school applications.

Related Resources:

• Obtaining Graduate Assistantships
Grad School Admissions Essay Writing Tips
• Financing Your Future: Winning Fellowships, Scholarships and Awards for Grad School, an ebook

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Applying, Waiting, & Lifelong Learning: IV with an Admitted Med Student http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/25/med-school-interview-with-future-doctor-dursteak/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/25/med-school-interview-with-future-doctor-dursteak/#respond Mon, 25 Aug 2014 17:47:59 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24871 ]]>
Dr. Dursteak

The [Future] Dr. Dursteak

This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with medical school applicants and students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top medical schools and the med school application process. And now, introducing Laysay (a.k.a. [Future] Doctor Dursteak)…

Accepted: First, some basics: Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What is your favorite book (fiction or non-fiction)?

Laysay: I am from a town south of Fort Worth called Burleson, Texas. I studied at a small liberal arts college in North Texas called Austin College where I got BAs in Biology and Psychology. I just recently graduated in 2014.

My absolute favorite book is the Perk of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky. I have never felt so connected to a character before as I do with the main character, Charlie. I first read Perks when I was a freshman in high school and I don’t believe I would have made it through those years had I not had someone to feel “infinite” with like I did with him.

Accepted: Can you tell us about your blog? When did you start blogging? What have you gained from the experience? And what do you hope others will take away from it?

Laysay: My blog is primarily about the highs and lows of pursuing a career in medicine. I have been writing since the fourth grade (when I was taught creative thinking and critical reasoning skills in the Talented and Gifted program at my elementary school). I decided to start blogging when I was looking for a blog about the LIFE of a med student and not the “tips and tricks” of getting accepted. By writing for my blog, I have started reflecting more on the goals that I have for my future and the things that are important to me in my life.

By reading my blog and following me on my journey to become a physician, I hope that others can be reminded that there are so many other important and unspoken aspects of medicine that aren’t necessarily covered in premed and med school courses.

Accepted: Congrats on your acceptance to med school! Which program will you be attending? 

Laysay: Thank you! I am attending Texas A&M’s College of Medicine as the graduating class of 2018.

Accepted: How many med schools did you apply to? How did you choose Texas A&M’s program?

Laysay: I actually only applied to six of the nine medical schools in Texas. I was really hard on myself during my application cycle and gave up on secondary applications before I had completed the last three that I had to do because I didn’t think I was competitive enough to get in.

I ended up choosing to attend Texas A&M because it was the only place where I felt completely welcomed, accepted, and very much at home. Those were all things that I figured where exactly what I needed to have in medical school.

Accepted: What was the most challenging aspect of the admissions process? What steps did you take to overcome that challenge?

Laysay: The most challenging part of the admissions process was WAITING. Waiting for the application to open, waiting for transcripts to be sent, waiting for schools to review your application, waiting to hear back from schools, waiting for interviews, waiting outside the door of an actual interviewer.

Oh, it was painfully dreadful having to wait for everything!

The only way I was able to survive all of the waiting was by turning off my WiFi and the push notifications for my email during the day (when I was in my undergrad courses) so that I was not obsessively checking to see if I had anything from medical schools!

Accepted: Thank you so much for sharing your personal statement on your blog! Can you walk us through the process of writing this important essay?

Laysay: No problem. :) Yes, writing your personal statement is by far one of the most stressful things that you do when filling out med school applications. What I found beneficial was spending much time reflecting on the moments where I thought to myself, “Yes. There is absolutely nothing else that I want to do besides this [being a physician].” For me, it was the experiences that I had with a very influential physician that I shadowed in pediatrics. I would say to start with figuring out what made you excited to pursue medicine and open your personal statement with a specific story that will engage the readers and show a bit of your personality to them.

Everyone has different life experiences that make them want to become physicians – my best advice for writing your PS is to be personable, avoid clichés, and let as many people as you can read and re-read your paper before submitting it.

Accepted: Will you be heading straight to med school from college? What do you think the advantages and disadvantages are of going this route?

Laysay: I am a traditional student, meaning that I started med school the summer after I graduated from college. What’s interesting is that there are not as many traditional students as you might expect there to be in medical school. Many of my peers have been graduated from college for several years before they started medical school. Many of them have spent some time in the workforce, completing higher education in different fields, or starting a family.

I don’t think there is a specific set of advantages or disadvantages for being a traditional or nontraditional medical student. Everyone has different goals in their lives and mine just so happened to be to go straight into medical school (if I could get in). Some people take time off to travel or work in different fields. It all just depends on what you want to do with your life and what your specific goals are.

Accepted: When did you decide you wanted to go into medicine? What were some of the experiences you had that led to that moment?

Laysay: I decided I wanted to go into medicine when I was very young, but I deviated from that path until I started college. I wanted to be a zoologist, a marine biologist, an artist, an author, a psychologist, and everything in between. I have always loved science and people, and am a total dork because I have also always loved school. I decided that I wanted to go into medicine when I realized that not only to physicians help and teach people, but they are also lifelong learners. For me, that is the best of both worlds. :)

You can read more about [Future] Doctor Dursteak’s med school journey by checking out her blog, Doctor Dursteak. Thank you Laysay for sharing your story with us!

Do you want to be featured in Accepted.com’s blog, Accepted Admissions Blog? If you want to share your med school journey with the world (or at least with our readers), email us at bloggers@accepted.com.

Download your free special report: Navigate the Med School Maze!

Accepted.com

 

Related Resources

Med School Applicant Interview Series
• Medical School Secondary Essay Handbook: School Specific Tips for Top Programs
• Med School Rankings & Numbers: What You Must Know

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Tips for Answering Common Application Essay Prompts http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/25/tips-for-answering-common-application-essay-prompts/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/25/tips-for-answering-common-application-essay-prompts/#respond Mon, 25 Aug 2014 16:02:24 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25076 ]]> For more college admissions tips, check out our College Admissions 101 Pages!

Tell the adcom something that is not already conveyed in your app.

If you are beginning your senior year of high school, this is the prime time to write your Common Application essay. The sooner you get started, the better. There are over 500 Common Application members in 47 states and the District of Columbia, as well as in Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, France, Germany, Italy, Latvia, Qatar, Singapore, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. All these institutions have in common a commitment to a holistic approach to the admissions process. This commitment means they will look at more than just your test scores and GPA. They give significant weight to your essay responses.

Keep in mind that your essays help round out the picture of who you are and what is important to you. Regardless of which essay prompt you address, it is essential to give yourself time to think about the information you are conveying and what specifically it reveals about you. It is also important to invest the energy to revise your responses. Each rendition of your essay should work to clarify your intentions while projecting something meaningful about yourself. You want to tell the admission committees something that is not already conveyed elsewhere in your application.

In addition to the main Common Application essay, many of these schools require additional supplemental essay responses. But they will be the subject of other blog posts.

Some students have a background or story that is so central to their identity that they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story.

Describe your unique background or story and explain in detail what it reveals about your sense of identity. Then discuss how this information/revelation/reflection/experience plays out in who you are and the way you look at the world. In short, why is the background or story you shared significant and how is it central to the way you view yourself?

Recount an incident or time when you experienced failure. How did it affect you, and what lessons did you learn?

How do you deal with adversity and what does that say about you? Clearly describe the specific failure you experienced. Discuss what you learned from the experience and how it affects you in your day-to-day life. Don’t focus on the setback itself but rather emphasize what you learned about yourself and how that changed your perspective or behavior. Maybe you learned that hard work pays off? Or that balance is important in your life? Or that you want to make different decisions in the future? You want to demonstrate resilience.

Reflect on a time when you challenged a belief or idea. What prompted you to act? Would you make the same decision again?

Recount a time when you stood up for something. Discuss what created the conflict that motivated you to take action. What do your actions reveal about you? Then think about whether or not you would make the same decision again and why. Make sure you clearly communicate your values and beliefs.

Describe a place or environment where you are perfectly content. What do you do or experience there, and why is it meaningful to you?

Briefly describe the place or environment where you are perfectly content. Then focus on your experiences there and why they are significant to you. How do you feel? What are you thinking? What do these emotions/reactions reveal about your character/values/perceptions/assumptions? And can you apply this self-knowledge to your life?

Discuss an accomplishment or event, formal or informal that marked your transition from childhood to adulthood within your culture, community, or family.

This prompt asks how you gained independence and became more self-aware. Provide a rich context as you detail your selected accomplishment or event and then focus on how it demonstrates a significant transition in your life. Take it a step further and discuss how this new phase or different status can serve as a foundation in the future.

If none of the essay prompts immediately jump out at you, give yourself some time to reflect on your life experiences. Talk with your parents and teachers about your ideas. Eventually you will discover a topic that excites you and reveals something significant about yourself. The subject of your essay doesn’t have to be completely novel. However, it should reflect your unique perspective while clearly communicating your best self. Think about what is important to you and why. Remember, all the Common Application member schools are interested in learning more about you through your essays!

Download 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid to learn how to eliminate the most common flaws in your application essays.

Marie Todd By  who served for over 20 years in higher education as an Instructor, Mentor, Academic Advisor and Undergraduate Admissions Specialist at top universities including the University of Michigan. At Michigan, she reviewed over 5000 applications. She would be happy to help you with your or your child’s college application.

Related Resources:

Ivy League and Common Application Tips: How to Get Accepted
Important Admissions Tip: Be Yourself
College Admissions 101 Pages

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UVA Darden 2015 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/24/uva-darden-2015-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/24/uva-darden-2015-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/#comments Sun, 24 Aug 2014 16:13:46 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24162 ]]> UVA_DardenDarden led the way with a one-essay application.  Some may feel that fewer essays indicate that essays are losing importance. My suspicion is that the remaining essays and short-answers are as or more important than they ever were. Especially at a program emphasizing the case method and experiential learning, evidence that you can communicate, analyze a problem from multiple perspectives, and handle the rigorous program that Darden is famous for are all critical. 

My tips for answering the Darden application essay are in blue below.

Essay:

1. Describe the most courageous professional decision you have made or most courageous action you have taken at work. What did you learn from that experience? (500 word maximum)

First of all, I strongly encourage you to watch the video with Darden’s Assistant Dean of MBA Admissions Sarah Neher where she lays out what they’re looking for in this essay:

What is courage? The strength to act in the face of fear, difficulty, criticism, opposition, and possibly danger. Hopefully you didn’t need courage because you were facing true danger on the job, but perhaps you needed it for some of the other reasons I provided. When did you have the strength and courage to take ownership of a project, position, or initiative? When did something become your baby?  What was the decision?  What did you do? Why was it so important to you? What was the result? And most importantly (per the video), what did you learn? 

They not only want to know your reaction to a particularly challenging situation; they want to see how you respond when you are personally invested and excited about a challenge, initiative, or project.

Final tidbit: Make sure you answer all elements of the question. That’s critical.

If you would like professional guidance with your UVA Darden MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the UVA Darden application. 

UVA Darden 2015 Application Deadlines:

Application Deadline Decisions Released
Round 1 October 10, 2014 December 17, 2014
Round 2 January 7, 2015 March 25, 2015
Round 3 April 1, 2015 May 6, 2015

Want more school specific MBA application essay tips? Click here!

Linda Abraham By , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

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Why Johnson? An Admitted Student Shares her Journey http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/22/follow-up-mba-interview-with-johnson-student-debra-yoo/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/22/follow-up-mba-interview-with-johnson-student-debra-yoo/#respond Fri, 22 Aug 2014 16:36:40 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25059 ]]> Debra_Yoo_Cornell_Johnson_StudentThis interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a follow up interview with Debra Yoo, who was recently accepted to Johnson at Cornell University. (We first met Debra last year – you can read our first interview with her here.)

Accepted: Welcome back! Can you just remind our readers — where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? Do you hold any other degrees?

Debra: I grew up in the Chicagoland area and attended Columbia University for undergrad where I majored in English and Asian American Studies along with completing Columbia’s Creative Writing Program (as you can see, I did not have a very business-oriented background!). After spending a few more years in NYC, I moved to Los Angeles with my husband. We were there for about four years before we relocated to Ithaca last month.

Accepted: Congrats on gaining accepted to Johnson! What are the 3 main traits of the Johnson school that attracted you to it?

Debra:

1) The people. Of all the students and alumni that I contacted at the various schools I applied to, those who attended Johnson had the highest response rate–by far. And not only did they respond promptly, they answered my questions very thoroughly and honestly. I was so impressed. It really speaks to the quality of Johnson’s smaller, tight-knit community.

2) The location. I know, I know–many folks out there don’t apply to Johnson because of its location, but Ithaca really appealed to me. Aside from its natural beauty, I wanted to be in a small town where I could get to know my fellow students without the distractions of a big city. I’m finding that many others here also had the same mindset when they chose Johnson, which once again shows that community is a high priority for most everyone here.

3) Johnson’s immersion program. I didn’t want my schooling to be completely academic and theoretical–I wanted as much hands-on experience as I could possibly get. At Johnson, most of the core coursework (accounting, finance, marketing, etc.) is completed during the first semester of the first year, leaving time during the second semester to complete an in-depth consulting project for a real-life company. For the marketing immersion, students in the past have completed projects for companies including Microsoft, Bayer and HP.

Accepted: How did you go about researching schools? Did you participate in any MBA fairs or events?

Debra: I attended a Forte Forum in Los Angeles in August 2013, which was unbelievably helpful. The Forum really helped me finalize my choices of schools; at that point, I had pored over a ton of websites but hadn’t made any connections with the schools in person. I looked into other MBA fairs, but none of them had all the schools I wanted to apply to–maybe two or three at most. The Forte Forum was the only event that had almost all the top schools present. If you are a woman planning on applying to top 20 b-schools, the forum is a great way to speak to recruiters from them in one room. And you get to do it in a smaller, female crowd. It’s wonderful all around.

Aside from the forum, I also emailed/spoke with ambassadors and alumni at all the schools I was interested in. I was originally planning on staying in the nonprofit space after graduating, so I had many questions about nontraditional paths that I wanted answers to. Speaking with the right alumni whose careers post-b-school resonated with me played a lot into my final decision making.

I was told that it was really important to visit campuses in person before applying, but I did not have the resources or time to do so. For a long time I agonized over whether I was decreasing my chances of admission by not doing campus visits, but I believe the impact was minimal (if it impacted me at all). But if you’re able to visit campuses, you really should! They can give you great fodder for your essays and help you make sure that the school is the right place for you.

Accepted: Can you talk about your experience with the Forte Foundation? What do they do and how have they helped you?

Debra: I love the Forte Foundation, and I owe much of my success so far to their support!

The Forte Foundation is a consortium of top b-schools and leading companies who support women in business. Women still have a ways to go when it comes to equal representation in business, especially in senior management. It’s an issue we all need to remain aware of and take thoughtful and deliberate actions to address.

I first discovered Forte when I started my MBA application process, and I’m so glad I did. I never thought that I would one day attend business school, so I was really starting my learning from scratch. I listened to several of Forte’s free webinars about the application process and read through their entire website for guidance.

I am also very thankful to have been selected a Forte Fellow by the Johnson admissions team. In addition to receiving a scholarship (that I am very, very grateful to have!), being a Fellow comes with many other benefits including networking opportunities and support for your job search.

I also attended the 2014 Forte MBA Women’s Leadership Conference that was held in Los Angeles earlier this year. It was an amazing feeling to be surrounded by hundreds of other talented, ambitious women who were all about to begin their MBA journeys. And it was also a great way to kick off our new lives as students and remind us that we are all working together toward closing the gender gap in business.

Accepted: Have you taken any classes or prepared in any other way to your smooth transition to business school?

Debra: I have never taken a single economics or statistics course in my entire life, much less accounting or finance. I was really concerned about my lack of experience in the area, so I completed an online pre-MBA mathematics course at a nearby university earlier this year. It exposed me to some of the common terms and calculations I’ll come across in school.

Johnson also provided us access to mbamath.com (I believe several other business schools do this, also) over the summer. I’ve been working my way through the units on finance, economics and statistics to prepare myself.

In addition to all the math, I switched my leisure reading time to business-related books, including authors like Malcolm Gladwell, Dale Carnegie and Sheryl Sandberg.

Accepted: What sort of career do you plan on pursuing post-MBA?

Debra: My background so far is in marketing/communications in the nonprofit sector. After school, I plan on doing marketing in the corporate world in the consumer packaged goods industry. I am hoping to return to the nonprofit sector later on down the line at a senior management level.

Accepted: B-school’s not cheap!  Do you have tips for financing an MBA?

Debra: It’s tough; really, really tough. The (very) few third-party scholarships I’ve found out there are for very specific populations and are for smaller amounts. All I can say is to really take your future career path into account when considering the cost of your program. If you are planning on entering the nonprofit space, look for schools with loan forgiveness programs like Yale or Stanford. And if you get scholarship offers, try negotiating the amount. When budgeting, keep a large buffer for travel expenses. Also check out loan alternatives like Common Bond. There’s some interesting stuff out there if you look for it!

Accepted: Do you have any advice for applicants about the start the MBA admissions journey?

Debra: Go beyond rankings, career placement stats and average starting salaries when narrowing down your options. Try to get as good a feel as you can for the community and the types of people at the schools you’re interested in. I think a good way to measure this is whether you feel a desire to contribute to and help develop and grow that community. You’ll be spending the next two years with those people and they will be your professional network for the rest of your life, so find a good match!

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school applications, please see our MBA Application Packages

Thank you Debra for sharing your story with us!

Attend_The_Forte_Forum

Accepted.com

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Reflections on Getting Accepted to Medical School http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/21/reflections-on-getting-accepted-to-medical-school/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/21/reflections-on-getting-accepted-to-medical-school/#respond Thu, 21 Aug 2014 18:48:38 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25052 ]]> Are You Trying to Navigate the Med School Application Process?  In general, all the cliche tips you’ve heard are true: get good grades, you need an ‘acceptable’ MCAT, definitely get patient experience, and you’ll likely need some extracurriculars. All of these things about this pseudo check-list are true, it’s just a matter of figuring out a strategy to execute it. It’s also important to take a 10,000 feet look at the process of trying to get into medical school: you just want to get in, but medical schools are looking for people who can add to their program.

1.    Find a mentor as soon as possible, it’s never too late.
2.   Go at your own pace (grades, scheduling and taking the MCAT, and extracurricular activity).
3.   Gain marketable skills during your undergrad.
4.   Have the right attitude.
5.   Understand how the admissions process works overall and for the specific programs you’re applying to.

Finding a Mentor

Finding a mentor is easier for some more than others. If you already have connections, then it’s a rather straight forward process since all you need to do is reach out to who you already know. This mentor doesn’t have necessarily have to be a medical doctor, they should just know or be willing to get to know the difficulties you’ll face. Statistically speaking, since you’re in college you’ll probably have more access to a PhD professor than a MD or DO, it’s okay to start there. My mentor was my old physiology professor, I later worked on several projects with this individual. Because my mentor was an active researcher in electrophysiology it allowed for me to gain marketable skills and later find a job after graduation in the office of research at my old university. This made it easier for me to develop a set of traits and experience that may come of value to my matriculating class. I think people put too much emphasis on finding a physician mentor, while it’s great to have a physician as one, it’s important not to neglect your other resources. If you don’t know where to start, try checking out your universities “Office of Undergraduate Research” (or something analogous to it) as they typically specialize in aligning undergraduates with research mentors. I highly suggest research mentors because of the amount of depth and involvement that will be required for both you and your mentor — the deeper your involvement the easier it is to argue to medical schools just how you’d add to their program. Research certainly isn’t required (for most programs), but it’s a lot easier to explain what you did if you were part of a research team than say passively shadowing a physician. A good mentor will know your personality traits (the good and the bad) and will be able to work with you, helping you to become your own person and not necessarily a miniature version of them. Another trait of a good mentor is that they’ll often push you further when you’re all but ready to give up, not to torture you but because they know you’re capable of it.

Go at your own pace, don’t rush into failure

It’s easy to get sucked up into following another’s pace. Don’t be afraid to slow down, and be sure to get help when you need it — rushing to apply when you’re not ready, or trying to plow through the organic chemistry series isn’t the best strategy if things aren’t going your way (unless you’re applying for DO remember that your retakes at best are averaged together with the old scores). You have to be flexible about your abilities at the moment and pragmatic about what you can accomplish. That’s not to say you can’t get past the MCAT, but maybe trying to rush to take it so you can apply isn’t the best strategy. I’ve seen a lot of friends lose their chance to apply to medical school because they tried to sprint through the requirements or stack up too many extracurriculars concurrently. Take your time, this is your life, one or two years won’t really make a big difference in the long-run; take on challenges at a pace you can handle, you need not emulate anyone else or follow other premeds “suggested timeline.” Really, the only timeline you need to worry about is applying early during your application season, everything before that should be a personal journey. For myself, I didn’t go straight into the university I actually found myself working for years and considered dropping out of college completely because I had a career going at a young age. I later decided to go back, and went to a university and graduated in 5 years with a major, minor, and research under my belt. I took my time, and found my own path, with the help from mentors and several friends, and I ignored people whenever they questioned my timeline. Realize that a lot of people who you think are “rocking it” and will “surely get in” won’t, part of this is probably because of rushing and doing badly or burning out while doing well.

This also means that it’s better to do several things exceptionally than to do 100-mediocre things. In my old lab we used to host premeds who were ‘interested’ in research, but it soon became obvious where their heart was when they’d stop showing up once they got what they wanted, wouldn’t finish their assignments, or would put minimal effort into what they considered to be “scut work”. At that point, for example in lab, you’re probably unnoticeably sabotaging the lab. So, keep in mind that if you’re involved in activities you may be hurting more than helping by participating. If you hurt the organization more than help then don’t expect either a transformative experience or a letter of recommendation. So, if you can’t commit, and things are going too fast for your pace, slow down and figure out your priorities and only commit to things that you can help.

Gain some marketable skills

I wasn’t sure if I’d get into medical school, so I was terrified to graduate without any marketable skills. In other words, try to “specialize” in college. Unfortunately, not everyone will have an appreciation for your pipetting prowess or that you took labs like the thousands of others — so don’t be fooled into thinking that just because you’re a premed you’re automatically skilled because you’ve titrated a few times (some people get their PhD on titrations). If you get into research, it’s rather straightforward, you’d likely gain skills because you’d have to grow more proficient than the average premed because the success of your lab is riding on it. If you’re not a research orientated person, learning how to start service orientated clubs for example is an excellent skill, as is learning how to fundraise. What helped me in this process was to keep a resume and a CV, this way I was always objective when it came to “why” I was doing something. This also makes writing your applications for medical school dramatically easier, as you already understand your motivation and your objectives. Most premeds have a problem filling out the AMCAS application, though if you’re used to applying for jobs (jobs that require a degree) then  it’s not an extraordinary process.

Have the right attitude — once you think of it as “scut work” all is lost

“Scut work” is a amorphous phrase, one person’s ‘scut work’ is another’s dedicated career. You may feel wiping out vomit and feces is below you, but besides the lessons in humility it’s also a lesson in relativity and often a lesson in team work. You may wonder what mopping the floor with disinfectant has to do with you becoming a physician. Well, in that case a lot, because you’re helping to prevent MRSA infections in the hospital, lessening the load of the staff etc. You may feel washing lab ware  is beneath you, after all you just shadowed a neurosurgeon on Friday, but I’ve seen months of data lost (plus the lives of mice wasted) because premeds thought rinsing out the soap at the bottom of our glassware wasn’t important enough of a task for them. Yes, shadowing the surgeon was probably conceptually cooler, but how much did you really do besides observe? Often, it’s really the “scut work” that is where you can have the most impact. Besides, if you can’t wash glassware, or pipette properly, why would you be given harder tasks that you seem to not able to handle?

Once you start seeing things as “scut work” you’ve probably already missed the lesson, and the lesson is typically team work. Yes, I’ve gotten coffee for my lab mates and professor, but at the same time my lab mates and professor have brought me food and coffee because they knew I couldn’t leave my work space until dusk.

At the end of the day, hypothetically if you didn’t get into medical school and you abhorred your extracurriculars, than you probably weren’t doing it for the right reasons.

Know how the admissions process works

There’s a ton of advice floating around, some of it is legit, most of it is garbage. There’s a certain website, who’s name I won’t mention, that is ripe full of useless or misleading advice. Some advice you’ll get will be bad because people are ignorant of the process because they’ve personally have never went through it, but they’ll consider themselves self appointed experts because they’ve read enough anecdotes. Instead, go with people with admission experience and keep up with the latest AAMC news, and of course your specific programs’ guidelines and advice. The AAMC isn’t an evil agency as some would make it out to be; they’re rather invested in making sure you have the best shot possible at getting in — though, you wouldn’t know it by how some people act about the process of applying to medical school. Applying to medical school isn’t necessarily a mysterious process, but it sure will be if you didn’t do your own homework. Make sure not to be pulled into 20 different directions, stick to a few good sources (including the crown jewel aka the AAMC website), and don’t dilute your efforts too much by taking disparate advice from others. — even those who’ve applied many years ago are likely out of touch with what is required or expected of you currently, so it’s very important that you secure your future by doing your own background research. In the end, if you don’t get in no one will be accountable or more affected than you.

And lastly, it’s okay to be pragmatic, but don’t give up hope because of a bad grade or MCAT score. For the most part, courses and the MCAT can be retaken. Sure, it’s ideal to get past them with flying colors, but life doesn’t work that way usually. A test of your commitment is not only getting past these things, but learning how to do what it takes to get past them. This may mean you can’t apply to all Ivy Leagues, or that you’ll have to make a few detours. But, one C (or even D) won’t exile you from medicine, nor will a bad MCAT score — nor does it imply that you couldn’t survive medical school. You might find yourself taking a few detours, but in the end if you’re satisfied than that’s all that matters. Getting into medical school isn’t that transformative, but the journey to get there is, and if your endgame is just to get in without trying to better yourself then it’ll make applying just that much harder.

Are you misusing the med school rankings? Click here to find out!

About the AuthorI’m a non traditional first year medical student at BUSM who was originally planning to obtain a PhD. Growing up, I often struggled in school because I was usually absent because of constant hospitalizations, and I never expected to go into college never mind medicine. Though, later in college I learned how to excel in the sciences and became a department recommended organic chemistry, biochemistry, general chemistry, and human physiology tutor. During college I was also involved in numerous electrophysiology projects where I studied principally muscle chloride channels under my research mentor. Towards the end of my college career volunteering at a children’s impatient oncology center as a science instructor helped to solidify my decision to apply to medical school. To better serve my community I later served the underserved as a academic advisor and tutor within correctional institutions in hopes to reduce inmate recidivism in my local community. Around the same time, I became a contributing writer where I wrote health and fitness. While applying to medical school I became a member and Ethical Compliance Associate for both the Institutional Review Board (IRB) and Animal Care and Use Committee. Currently, as medical student I write as a hobby and will never turn down a beer or wine tasting opportunity (maybe except around exams), play guitar, socialize, and dabble in art. 

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A B-School Professor on Main Street, USA http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/21/a-b-school-professor-on-main-street-usa/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/21/a-b-school-professor-on-main-street-usa/#respond Thu, 21 Aug 2014 17:11:56 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25048 ]]> Listen to the full recording of our interview with Scott Schaefer!Dr. Scott Schaefer escaped an economics conference and ended up in a fortuitous encounter that changed his life.

Listen to the recording of our conversation with Dr. Shaefer, Kendall D. Garff Chair in Business Administration and Professor of Finance at the University of Utah’s David Eccles School of Business, for some great insights into small business, business school, and the place where the two meet.

00:02:03 – How a trip to the shoe store inspired Roadside MBA.

00:06:35 – The Roadside MBA Manifesto.

00:12:54 – Want to hear some great stories?

00:17:43 – The story Scott wishes he had included in the book (and so does Linda).

00:24:57 – Surprising takeaways from Roadside MBA project.

00:28:53 – How the Roadside MBA changed the way Scott teaches.

00:33:45 – If only MBA students came to campus knowing…

Listen to the full conversation to learn more!*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Related Links:

Roadside MBA: Backroad Wisdom for Entrepreneurs, Executives and Small Business Owners (Linda highly recommends it.)
• 
Roadside MBA
Roadside MBA on Twitter
Entrepreneurship & the MBA

Related Shows:

MBAs Across America: Entrepreneurs with a Heart
• MBAs Across America: The Coolest HBS Internship (original interview)
Dr. Douglas Stayman Shares the Scoop on Cornell Tech NYC
Introducing the Master in Entrepreneurship Program at the Univ. of Michigan

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http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/21/a-b-school-professor-on-main-street-usa/feed/ 0 podcast Dr. Scott Schaefer escaped an economics conference and ended up in a fortuitous encounter that changed his life. - Listen to the recording of our conversation with Dr. Shaefer, Kendall D. Garff Chair in Business Administration and Professor of Finance... Dr. Scott Schaefer escaped an economics conference and ended up in a fortuitous encounter that changed his life. Listen to the recording of our conversation with Dr. Shaefer, Kendall D. Garff Chair in Business Administration and Professor of Finance at the University of Utah’s David Eccles School of Business, for some great insights into small business, business school, and the place where the two meet. 00:02:03 – How a trip to the shoe store inspired Roadside MBA. 00:06:35 – The Roadside MBA Manifesto. 00:12:54 – Want to hear some great stories? 00:17:43 – The story Scott wishes he had included in the book (and so does Linda). 00:24:57 – Surprising takeaways from Roadside MBA project. 00:28:53 – How the Roadside MBA changed the way Scott teaches. 00:33:45 – If only MBA students came to campus knowing… *Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com. Related Links: • Roadside MBA: Backroad Wisdom for Entrepreneurs, Executives and Small Business Owners (Linda highly recommends it.) • Roadside MBA • Roadside MBA on Twitter • Entrepreneurship & the MBA Related Shows: • MBAs Across America: Entrepreneurs with a Heart • MBAs Across America: The Coolest HBS Internship (original interview) • Dr. Douglas Stayman Shares the Scoop on Cornell Tech NYC • Introducing the Master in Entrepreneurship Program at the Univ. of Michigan Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk: Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no 49:55
What is the Value of an MBA? [Infographic] http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/20/what-is-the-value-of-an-mba-infographic/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/20/what-is-the-value-of-an-mba-infographic/#respond Wed, 20 Aug 2014 16:41:13 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24970 ]]> We just had to share this excellent infographic about the ROI of an MBA from MBA@UNC:

Brought to you by MBA@UNC: an online mba program

Are You Misusing the B-School Rankings?

Accepted.com

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Can You Submit Your AMCAS Application BEFORE Retaking the MCAT? http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/19/can-you-submit-your-amcas-application-before-retaking-the-mcat/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/19/can-you-submit-your-amcas-application-before-retaking-the-mcat/#respond Tue, 19 Aug 2014 17:03:07 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24684 ]]> Check out our Med School Admissions 101 Pages!

You don’t want your application relegated to the bottom of the stack.

It’s risky to apply to med school before taking or retaking the MCAT for a few reasons:

1. Applying to med school is expensive and time intensive. It would be a shame to put in all that effort and then bomb the test and risk rejection. When you submit your application without an MCAT score, your application remains pending until your scores are submitted. There’s no taking back your application if your scores aren’t what you’d like them to be.

2. Not only does it make the application process more stressful – knowing that you’ve submitted but that your application is still incomplete – but it makes the MCAT exam itself more stressful as well, and for some applicants, this stress could negatively impact their score.

3. Finally, it may not be the best idea to go this route because some schools won’t look at an application until the MCAT score has been submitted. So if they see “MCAT score pending” on an application, it’ll go to the bottom of the stack until it’s ready to be reviewed in full.

A better option…

I recommend taking the MCAT, getting your score, and then applying early in the next cycle, rather than going through the stress of submitting an application with an unknown MCAT score and then taking the test under pressure, knowing that the results will be used and weighed heavily, regardless of how you performed.

If, however, you do decide to apply to med school before you’ve taken the exam, then I recommend the following: Apply only to schools with less competitive programs, those that you think you have a good chance of getting into with, say, the lowest score you think you may get. You can always go back and add more schools later. This way, at least you’ve gotten your application verified on the AMCAS side. Worst case scenario – you don’t score well and have to wait and apply again next year. Not the end of the world.

You know yourself best…

The final word on this is that you know yourself best. If you think you can apply before taking the MCAT without the stress killing you and knowing that if you bomb the exam, you’ll bomb your chances of admission – then go for it. There’s always next year. And some people are fine embracing that attitude.

The advice in this post is based on a conversation we had in our recent webinar, Ask The Experts: Medical School Admissions Q&A with Cydney Foote and Alicia McNease Nimonkar. Check out the full transcript for more tips on applying to med school successfully!

Great Advice on All Things MCAT!

Accepted.com

 

Related Resources:

• How to Get into Medical School with Low Stats, a free webinar
• MCAT Mania: How to Prepare
Tips For Applicants With A Low MCAT Score (Part 1)

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UCLA Anderson 2015 Essay Tips & Deadlines http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/19/ucla-anderson-2015-essay-tips-deadlines/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/19/ucla-anderson-2015-essay-tips-deadlines/#comments Tue, 19 Aug 2014 16:54:23 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24714 ]]> Check out the rest of our school-specific application essay tips!

UCLA Anderson

The advice that UCLA Anderson provides below is excellent, not just for Anderson’s essays, but for most MBA essays. Read it carefully. 

My tips are in blue below.

Your essays are the primary way for you to share your perspectives and plans with the admissions committee. The best essays are introspective, genuine and succinct in directly answering our questions and responding to our topics.

• Essay questions are listed below for both first-time applicants and re-applicants.
• You should try to distinguish yourself by showing what makes you different from others who share similar profiles.
• Personal expression is what we are looking for, not platitudes.
• Making a strong case for your future plans requires you to first do research on career paths and find one that resonates. Even if this target will change during business school, your application essays should lay out a clear trajectory for short-term and long-term goals. Do this by demonstrating how you expect to build on skills from your past, and those you expect to gain from the MBA.
• Essays are more compelling if they include specific courses, programs, groups, opportunities, activities, etc. from which you would benefit, if admitted to UCLA Anderson. These references are best found through website research, personal discussions and a campus visit (if possible).
• Content and clarity are key elements, as we seek superior communication skills.
• Style is a consideration too, although we understand that those who speak other languages may have different manners of expression in English.
• We do check your essays for plagiarism, so make sure you always submit your own work.
• Length does not equal strength. A well-written short essay can have even more impact than a longer essay. Please try to respect the word limits indicated below.
• All responses to essays must be on double-spaced pages that are uploaded as a document. We do not accept essays in any other media but written form.

Essay:

UCLA Anderson is distinguished by three defining principles: Share Success, Think Fearlessly, Drive Change. What principles have defined your life and pre-MBA career? How do you believe that UCLA Anderson’s principles, and the environment they create, will help you attain your post-MBA career goals?  (750 words maximum)

Anderson has simplified it’s essay requirements but gives you enough room to write a revealing response. Make sure that essay shows that can answer the question articulately and belong at Anderson.

First think about what’s important to you. What guides and drives your behavior? If you can summarize those principles in two words as Anderson does, that’s great. If not, don’t sweat it, but do be succinct. If you come up with more than three principles, choose the three that are most important to you, but I advise against going with more than three. If you want to use fewer than three, that’s OK too. And, for Heaven’s sake don’t be tempted to say that your guiding principles are verbatim identical to Anderson’s.

A great way to approach this essay would be to discuss an experience or anecdote that represents your guiding principles and then connect that story and your values to UCLA’s critical principles and the Anderson culture.  Then conclude by addressing the last part of the question: How Anderson’s principles and “environment” will help you realize your post-MBA career goals.

Optional Essay:

Are there any extenuating circumstances in your profile about which the Admissions Committee should be aware?  (250 words maximum)

If there are extenuating circumstances that would add perspective on or “explain” a weakness, you can discuss them here. A few years ago, UCLA added the following: “Please do not submit redundant information in the Optional Essay.” Good advice for all optional questions. For more suggestions, please see The Optional Question: To Be or not To Be

Required Re-applicant Essay:

Reapplicants who applied for the class entering Fall 2013 or 2014 are required to complete the following essay. Please be introspective and authentic in your response. We value the opportunity to learn about your aspirations and goals.

Please describe your career progress since you last applied and ways in which you have enhanced your candidacy. Include updates on short-term and long-term career goals, as well as your continued interest in UCLA Anderson. (750 words maximum)

This is the key question in every MBA reapplication: How have you enhanced your candidacy? Career progress is an obvious place to start and something you must address, but if academics were a weakness, then what have you done since you last applied to show you can excel at Anderson? 

If you would like professional guidance with your UCLA Anderson application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our  MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the UCLA application.  

Want more school specific MBA application essay tips? Click here!

UCLA 2015 Application Deadlines:

UCLA Anderson Application Deadlines

Linda Abraham By , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

 

Related Resources:

UCLA Anderson B-School Zone
• Student Body, Recruitment, Location: Future UCLA Anderson MBA Interview
• Hard Work and Humility: Reflections of a UCLA Anderson Student

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Wharton Class of 2015 Profile http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/18/wharton-class-of-2015-profile/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/18/wharton-class-of-2015-profile/#respond Mon, 18 Aug 2014 17:14:40 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24831 ]]> Let’s take a look at Wharton’s class of 2015 profile (from Wharton’s website):

Applying to Wharton? Join our webinar to learn how to get in!• Total applicants: 6,036
• Women: 42%
• Enrolled class: 837
• International students: 35%
• U.S. minorities: 30%
• Range of years of work experience: 0-13
• Mean years of work experience: 5
• Mean overall GMAT: 725
• Middle 80% GMAT range: 690-760
• Undergraduate majors:

-  STEM (25%)
-  Business (28%)
-  Humanities/social sciences/economics (44%)
- Other (3%)

 • Industry experience:

Join our upcoming webinar for great advice on how to get accepted to Wharton!

Are you looking to join the next Wharton class? Join us for our upcoming webinar, Get Accepted to the Wharton School, to learn key strategies to help you get accepted to Wharton and other top business schools!

Date: Tuesday, August 19, 2014
Time: 10:00 AM PT/1:00 PM ET

Register now: Get Accepted to the Wharton School

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Gap Years, Blogging, and Applying to Med School: IV with Derin http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/18/gap-years-blogging-and-applying-to-med-school-iv-with-derin/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/18/gap-years-blogging-and-applying-to-med-school-iv-with-derin/#respond Mon, 18 Aug 2014 16:51:31 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24847 ]]> Click here for more interviews with med school applicant bloggers!This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with medical school applicants and students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top medical schools and the med school application process. And now, introducing Derin…

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad?

Derin: Hey readers! My name is Aderinola but most people know me as Derin. I am originally from Lagos, Nigeria but I moved to the U.S. when I was l0 years old. I moved around a bit but the longest place I have lived in the U.S. is now Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

I went to the University of Pennsylvania here in Philadelphia and was a double major in Sociology of Health & Medicine and African Studies. I also minored in Biology to supplement my pre-med requisites. I loved the education I received, being able to combine my love of medicine with the social sciences and humanities.

Accepted: How have you been spending your time since graduating college (other than applying to med school)? Why did you decide to take a gap year, rather than jump directly from college to medical school?

Derin: I have been working as a Clinical Research Coordinator at Perelman School of Medicine – University of Pennsylvania. I love the work I do! I work mostly with qualitative data, so it’s essentially utilizing qualitative and mixed methods methodology to solve clinical research questions.

I remember when I decided to take a gap year. It was the summer going into my junior year and I had just received my physics grade. I was very disappointed at my performance. At the same time, I realized it had been difficult trying to succeed in physics and working many hours at my summer job. My self-esteem felt shot and I concluded that I needed to reduce my workload. So instead of taking organic chemistry the first semester of my junior year, I decided to take only social science/ humanities courses for that semester and focus my energy on my two majors. At that point, I also started thinking about having a real world experience. I decided I wanted to have some professional work experience before plunging right into medicine. Most of the positions I was interested in required at least a two year commitment, so I decided  I would have a two year gap.

Accepted: I see you submitted your AMCAS application just a few hours after the system opened for submissions. Can you talk about how you managed to be so prepared and why you felt it was important to submit early?

Derin: Well, I literally started working on my application the first day it opened up – May 1st. Step one was actually logging in. The next day I started filling in the biographical information and my work and activities. Surprising the work and activities section took a lot longer than I thought because I had been involved in so much during undergrad! I utilized my resume/CV to fill out this particular section, along with past journals and written reflections. At UPenn, there is a process pre-health applicants have to go through to obtain a committee letter; the process also helps in getting some materials for AMCAS ready. I had a rough draft of my work and activities section ready to go because of this.

By the middle of May, I started working on my personal statement and actively editing and rewriting. I had a very rough outline that I had started a few months ago and I built my personal statement off that. I also had some awesome mentors and friends help me by reading and critiquing my essay.

I wanted my personal statement to be an accurate representation of both my writing abilities and my journey to med school. It was a juggling act trying to get my application ready and working full-time. However, when it comes to deadlines and applications, I am a very organized individual. By June 3rd, I was ready to submit my application.

Accepted: What would you say has been the most challenging aspect of the med school admissions process so far? How did you approach that challenge and overcome it?

Derin: The most challenging part is trying not to stress out and think of the worst scenario. To tackle this, I surround myself with positive people and read a lot of success stories. I also exercise a lot and do obstacle races like the Spartan race to remind myself that no challenge is too big, it CAN be conquered. In addition, I write in my journal to ease the anxiety and talk to my friends who have also been on this journey. I wrote a post on my blog called “Strategies for Managing the Stress of the Application Process” where I list some other tactics I utilize. Check it out!

Accepted: Where are you applying to med school? Do you have a top choice program?

Derin: I am applying to schools in the east coast and a few in the midwest and south. Each of these schools have their own specific strengths. I spent a great deal of time researching my schools well in advance and had 12 of the schools on my list since May 2013. The qualities these schools have in common are emphasis on research, commitment to the underserved/ local community, and working with diverse population. I could see myself at any of these schools, and well my top choice program, is one that enables me to thrive. I am looking forward to finding that out during my interview process.

Accepted: Do you have any idea at this early stage what sort of medicine you want to practice?

Derin: Yes! I am very interested in Obstetrics and Gynecology. I got interested in this while doing a winter internship in Peru and shadowing an OB/Gyn doctor. Prior to that I had no exposure to the specialty, but that experience sparked my interest and I looked into the field. All of a sudden, it seemed like I was meeting female Ob/Gyns everywhere I went! All my medical mentors right now are Ob/Gyn doctors. One is currently practicing, two started their residency and the fourth is in her final year, so it’s pretty cool seeing their different stages. I will add that, I did not go looking specifically for mentors who are Ob/Gyns; I believe this was just God setting me up, divine intervention really.

Accepted: Do you have any other advice for our med school applicant readers?

Derin: Plan ahead, stay organized, and don’t be afraid to ask for help. One thing that I have learned along the way is that “The well laid plans of mice and men often go awry.” Sometimes you can’t sweat the small stuff. What may seem like a down fall or rejection is just a redirection. Pick your head up and plunge ahead! Taking this gap year for instance, has been the best redirection I could have ever imagined. Another example: I was initially supposed to do a fellowship abroad after I graduated college, however due to funding, it got cancelled. I was crushed and the next day began frantically applying to jobs, that’s when I actually stumbled on my current job. It was the best redirection! I have attained a certain level of maturity, explored my interests and grown so much in just a short while.

Also, don’t let procrastination get the best of you!

In addition, don’t be afraid to go at your own pace! Some things just can’t be rushed.

Lastly, ask for help if you need it! I wish I had talked to more upperclassmen while in undergrad, or had some strong mentorship. I didn’t do that. I made silly mistakes like not researching my professors before I took the class and not asking upperclassmen what they did to succeed in the class. I’ve realized now that no man is an island and you just have to open your mouth and ask. And even if one person isn’t willing to help, ask the next person.

Accepted: Can you tell us about your blog? When did you start blogging? What have you gained from the blogging experience?

Derin: I’ve been blogging since 2011. My last two blogs were travel blogs, one on my trip to South Africa and one on my internship in Peru. I love blogging and recounting my experience for the sake of posterity. I started “Curve Balls and Med School” because I envisioned my gap years as being a critical stage in my life that I’d want to record and look back on. I also knew a few undergrads on this path and I wanted to be a source of inspiration. Of course, there was the initial fear of failure so even though I started the blog in July 2013 right after I graduated, it was anonymous until a few months ago. I wanted to demystify the med school application process and I felt there would be more credibility by being open.

From blogging, I’ve learned that no one’s journey is the same, everyone has their own curve balls and that’s what makes it so unique. I feature current med students and it’s interesting learning about their journey to med school. It’s also been really cool to see how encouraging and receptive people have been to my blog. I felt a little vulnerable at first – there is a very real possibility for failure and people are following my journey knowing fully well I am not in med school – yet. At the same time, I live by faith and I walk by faith, so I know God is in control. Blogging has been a humbling experience, and that’s why I adopted this quote by my favorite author Maya Angelou: “When you learn, teach, when you get give.”

For one-on-one guidance on your med school applications, please see our catalog of med school admissions services.

 

You can read more about Derin’s med school journey by checking out her blog, Curve Balls and Med School. Thank you Derin for sharing your story with us!

Download your free special report: Navigate the Med School Maze!

Do you want to be featured in Accepted.com’s blog, Accepted Admissions Blog? If you want to share your med school journey with the world (or at least with our readers), email us at bloggers@accepted.com.

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MBA Admission: The Great Round 1/Round 2 Fight http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/18/mba-admission-round-1-vs-round-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/18/mba-admission-round-1-vs-round-2/#respond Mon, 18 Aug 2014 16:05:19 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24800 ]]> Check out MBA Admissions 101 for more b-school admissions advice!

“On my right, now entering the ring is Round 1. A perennial favorite with those who have stratospheric GMATs, patents, Nobel Prizes, and the like. And on my left, waving to the crowd is Round 2. He is favored by those with more average, but still respectable scores, grades, and experience.”

So goes the fight about when to submit an application. I am not impressed by attempts to win the admissions game through timing, at least using these arguments, which are specious and weigh less significant or non-existent factors as opposed to those that really count.

What counts above all else  is the quality of your application. You want to submit when it is at its best.

The argument that Round 1 is for superstars simply isn’t true. Many superstars apply round 2 (and even later, but I am going to limit this discussion to Rounds 1 and 2). But when you wait to apply Round 2, many seats have already been given to round 1 applicants.

At the same time, some applicants are absolutely determined to submit Round 1 because they want the “early advantage.” They will even foolishly rush their applications, submit something less than their best in this mad dash to a R1 deadline.

Let’s call this match a draw. The boxers can take off their gloves and pull up a chair. Listen to Linda’s rule:

“Apply as early as possible PROVIDED you don’t compromise the quality of your application.”

Just today I received an email from an applicant who has been struggling with her GMAT and wants to attend a top 15 program. She is unlikely to be admitted with her current score and she wants to apply Round 1. She is better off raising her GMAT and postponing her application to Round 2.

Someone else writes to a mailing list that he has good scores, grades, and work experience, but is in a common applicant sub-group and wants to apply round 2 because he believes competition will be less intense.

Big mistake. Competition is intense both rounds. Instead of focusing on this timing question, he should be working to improve his profile, differentiate himself, learn about the schools, and start on his essays so that he can submit round 1 when there are more spots available.

Is there an advantage to applying early in a round, especially round 1?

I don’t think so. More importantly, there is an advantage to holding onto a completed first application and submitting it closer to the deadline (Any school, CBS for example, on rolling admissions could be exceptions to this part of this post.) As you work on subsequent applications, you will improve your essays and see (and relate) experiences and goals with greater clarity. If you just put that first completed application away while you work on applications 2, 3, & N, then you can go back to Application 1 before that school’s R1 deadline and tweak it before you submit. That first application will then benefit from your recent writing experience and greater clarity.

Don’t, however, wait until the 11th hour to  upload your app and press SUBMIT. Many times servers are overloaded on deadline day. You don’t want to miss a deadline on an application that was completed weeks earlier because you waited too long.

Navigating the MBA Maze

Linda Abraham By , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

 

Related Resources:

• How Many B-Schools Should You Apply To?
• How to Write and Edit MBA Essays
• Top MBA Program Zones

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Learn How to Match: Live Webinar on Tues! http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/17/learn-how-to-match-live-webinar-on-tues/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/17/learn-how-to-match-live-webinar-on-tues/#respond Sun, 17 Aug 2014 17:46:46 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24816 ]]> Reminder: Our residency webinar will air on Tuesday, August 19, 2014 at 5:00 Pm PT/8:00 PM ET.

Residency Applications: How to Match - Register Now!

Valuable tips on choosing the right program, optimizing your personal statement, setting a timeline, and avoiding detrimental (yet very common) mistakes await you! Don’t miss it!

Spots are limited, so sign up now to reserve your spot: Residency Applications: How to Match

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Future Whartonites…Tune On Tuesday! http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/17/future-whartonitestune-on-tuesday/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/17/future-whartonitestune-on-tuesday/#respond Sun, 17 Aug 2014 17:12:40 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24814 ]]> The webinar you’ve all been waiting for, Get Accepted to the Wharton School, will take place on Tuesday, August 19, 2014 at 10:00 AM PT/1:00 PM ET.

GetAcceptedToWharton

Reserve your spot now and tune in on Tuesday to hear important Wharton application tips that could transform your Wharton dream into reality!

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Interview with a Future NYU Stern MBA and Forte Fellow http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/15/interview-with-a-future-nyu-stern-mba-and-forte-fellow/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/15/interview-with-a-future-nyu-stern-mba-and-forte-fellow/#respond Fri, 15 Aug 2014 16:22:39 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24765 ]]> NYU Stern Admitted Student InterviewThis interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for an interview with Lourdes, a Forte Fellow who was recently accepted to NYU Stern.

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What’s your favorite non-school book?

Lourdes: I was born in Lima, Peru, and my family moved to Charlotte when I was very young. I grew up there and attended North Carolina State University, where I obtained degrees in Political Science and Spanish with a minor in Business Management. My favorite non-school book is “It Happened on the Way to War” by Rye Barcott.

Accepted: Why did you choose NYU Stern?

Lourdes: I decided to go to business school to fine tune my analytical and economic skills and sought a program that offered practical knowledge applied in real-world settings. I also wanted to be in a location that could offer a business playground as a complement to my education. NYU Stern offers the opportunity to learn in NY, which is at the vortex of the business world. I also appreciated the dynamic leadership of the administration, faculty and students. NYU Stern was a curriculum that not only had a legacy of excellence but also a commitment to innovation. Being able to build on the history of the program, as well as implement visionary thinking, was a key factor for me.

Accepted: How would you say you’re a perfect fit with the program? (Unless you believe you’re not a good fit, in which case, please talk about that!)

Lourdes: Throughout the admissions process, the more I learned about NYU Stern, the more I found I had in common with the program. From speaking with students about their goals, with Admissions representatives about international treks to reading articles in the school newspaper about student life, it became clear that NYU Stern was the right fit for me. The students I met were impressive, fun-loving and helpful. They were willing to share insight about their experiences and also be real with me.

At Diversity Weekend, Dean Peter Henry asked us to think about how we would use our MBA degree to make a difference. That resonated profoundly with me in my decision to attend NYU Stern.

Accepted: What clubs or extracurricular activities are you planning on being involved in with?

Lourdes: I plan on being involved with Stern Women in Business, the Association of Hispanic & Black Business Students and the Social Enterprise Association.

Accepted: What have you been doing professionally since college?

Lourdes: My family has a business in the construction and design/build industry. Upon graduating, I worked for the firm in a marketing capacity. I created a separate division of the company dedicated to the real estate investments and property management. I wanted to get my feet wet in the corporate world and was able to gain a position on the sales and trading floor at Sanford C. Bernstein in NY. I was on the sell-side research team dedicated to hedge fund clients. I learned from leaders in the field and wanted to amplify my client-facing skills in a setting more directly tied to the business community. I came across a role in which I could apply my marketing and relationship building skills as the director of public policy at the Charlotte Chamber of Commerce. I monitored issues that affect the cost of doing business in Charlotte and actively engaged chamber members to learn about pro-business public policies. It was necessary to collaborate with stakeholders from the private, public and social sectors to gain their buy-in for issues.

Accepted: Do you plan on staying in that same industry post-MBA, or switching to something new?

Lourdes: My experience in different industries has driven me to learn a holistic approach to business. For that reason, I am looking forward to specializing in Management, Strategy and Social Innovation and Impact to learn the best tools for achieving profit by means of impactful initiatives. I am considering different industries and am seeking a career that will allow me to help a company reach fiscal goals while maintaining a social-conscious approach.

Accepted: What has your experience with the Forte Foundation been like? How has Forte helped you?

Lourdes: I became aware of the Forte Foundation while I was working on my school applications. I was thankful that there was an organization dedicated to promoting women in business. So you can imagine how excited I was to be named a Forte fellow! I was able to attend the Forte Conference in Los Angeles in June. I benefited from networking with the companies and panelists offering advice based on their experiences both in business school and their careers. I was offered an internship at the conference, which I am considering, for next summer. Forte helped make those connections.

Accepted: As someone who’s successfully applied to business school, you must have some good advice! Can you share your top 3 admissions tips with our readers?

Lourdes: I found the most important part of the admissions process to be self-discovery in terms of why I was pursuing an MBA, how I hoped to use my degree and what school was the best fit. Although the applications ask these questions, it’s important you ask yourself them as well. My top three tips would be:

1. Know your strengths and weaknesses.


2. Attend every MBA event (that your schedule allows) to learn the most about each program’s offerings.

3. Speak with at least two current students from each program you are considering.

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages. For specific advice on how to create the best application for NYU Stern, check out our NYU Stern 2015 MBA Essay Tips.

Thank you Lourdes for sharing your story with us!

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Washington University (St. Louis) Medical School 2015 Secondary Application Essay Tips http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/15/washington-university-st-louis-medical-school-2015-secondary-application-essay-tips/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/15/washington-university-st-louis-medical-school-2015-secondary-application-essay-tips/#respond Fri, 15 Aug 2014 16:20:02 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24773 ]]> Get the rest of our school-specific secondary application tips!In the top ten ranking for research, WUSOM provides exciting opportunities for medical students to participate in research at the basic science or clinical levels. They are looking for students with strong ties to their communities—with excellent communication skills, a dedication to service, and well-rounded interests. The secondary application requests three essays.

Washington University (St. Louis) 2015 Secondary Application Essay Questions:

• Three essays are requested: two essays with a 3,000-character limit and one essay with a 1,800-character limit.
Applicants should use single line spacing and 12 point size font.
• Responses should be constructed strategically to highlight an applicant’s strengths.

The following are required in the Secondary Application:

1. Describe a time or situation where you have been unsuccessful or failed.  (maximum 3000 characters including spaces)

The best responses to this type of question will demonstrate resilience.  It will be important to select an event or commitment that you clearly did not perform well on but one in which you did not give up.  Choose something that you had to repeat or improve and demonstrate how, through hard work, you were able to succeed.  For example, you could use your first teaching experience.  For most people, the first time you have to teach a class or group, it does not go well but we learn from that first experience and improve.  Focus the bulk of the essay on how you improved and on outcomes.  End on a high note.    

2. Do you have unique experiences or obstacles that you have overcome that were not covered in your application about which you would like to inform our Admissions Committee? (maximum 3000 characters including spaces)

Given this institution’s dedication to community service, I recommend sharing the details of any long-term volunteer work that you have not discussed in your personal statement.  What was your role?  How did you help the community?  What was your connection to this group of people?  Staying true to the prompt, have you overcome any significant challenges in your life to be successful?  Learning a new language or finding resources to reach your goals can be good examples.  Think broadly of your life experiences—were there difficulties in your life that you have overcome which other people may see as obstacles?     

3. If you have already completed your education, if your college or graduate education was interrupted, or if you do not plan to be a full-time student during the current year, describe in chronological order your activities during the time(s) when you were not enrolled as a full-time student. (maximum 1800 characters including spaces)

Using an updated copy of your resume or CV, be comprehensive in your response.  Capture the diversity of your activities and interests.  Include all work experiences or volunteer activities.  Review a copy of your transcript to be sure that you have covered all significant gaps in your education.  If there were increases or decreases in your GPA before or after these breaks, explain.    

WUSOM Application Timeline:

AMCAS Application Due December 1, 2014
Secondary Application *December 31, 2014 (Strong recommendation: Submit within two weeks after receipt.)
Interviews Conducted October 2014 to March 2015
Rolling Admissions November 2014 to April 15, 2015
School Begins August 11, 2015

If you would like professional guidance with your Washington University School of Medicine application materials, please consider using Accepted’s Medical School Admissions Consulting and Editing Services, which include advising, editing, and interview coaching for the WUSOM application materials.

Check out the rest of our school-specific secondary essay tips!

Alicia Nimonkar is an Accepted.com advisor and editor specializing in healthcare admissions. Prior to joining Accepted, Alicia worked for five years as Student Advisor at UC Davis’ postbac program where she both evaluated applications and advised students applying successfully to med school and related programs. Explore Accepted.com’s services to see how Alicia can help you achieve your professional dreams in healthcare.

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Reminder: Residency Webinar to Help You Match http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/14/reminder-residency-webinar-to-help-you-match/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/14/reminder-residency-webinar-to-help-you-match/#respond Thu, 14 Aug 2014 17:52:58 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24762 ]]> Just a reminder about next week’s upcoming residency webinar, Residency Applications: How to Match.

Find out how to avoid common application mistakes and learn how to write personal statements that will get you noticed!

Residency Applications: How to Match

Details:

Date: Tuesday, August 19, 2013

Time: 5:00 PM PST/8:00 PM EST/5:00 PM GMT (click link for time in your time zone)

Save my spot!

Grab your spot (free) for Residency Applications: How to Match!

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Identity, Community, and the World of Med School Admissions http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/14/identity-community-and-the-world-of-med-school-admissions/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/14/identity-community-and-the-world-of-med-school-admissions/#respond Thu, 14 Aug 2014 16:12:00 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24746 ]]> Click here to listen to the conversation! Meet the doctor who is on a mission to spread the word that med school admission is an attainable goal (and he’ll help you get accepted, too).

Listen to the recording of our conversation with Dr. Ryan Gray, founder of The Medical School Headquarters for some great advice and an insider’s perspective on the world of med school admissions.

00:02:18 – Ryan’s journey from dissecting cats to Flight Surgeon in the United States Air Force (what is that?).

00:07:52 – Making med school admissions less intimidating: The Medical School Headquarters.

00:10:02 – The Medical School HQ Academy and the case for identity.

00:19:53 – Should you apply to med school in Aug or wait for next year?

00:26:28 – Secondary applications: an important opportunity.

00:29:16 – Tips for med school interviews and MMIs.

00:34:16 – The very big difference between med and residency admissions.

00:37:51 – Tips for matching – and not matching.

Listen to the full conversation to learn more!*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Relevant Links:

• Medical School Headquarters
• The Medical School Headquarters Podcast
 Ryan’s Interview with Dr. Norma Wagoner
Create a Compelling AMCAS Application, a webinar
• Secondary Essay Strategies that Score Interviewsa webinar

Related Shows:

• Med School Application Process: AMCAS, Secondaries, Interviews, Decisions & More!
• What You Need to Know About Med School Admissions
• MCAT Mania: How to Prepare
• MCAT Scores, MCAT Prep, and #MCAT2015
• All About AMSA and the Premed Journey
• Insights, Advice and Experiences of a Non-Traditional Med Student

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http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/14/identity-community-and-the-world-of-med-school-admissions/feed/ 0 podcast Meet the doctor who is on a mission to spread the word that med school admission is an attainable goal (and he’ll help you get accepted, too). - Listen to the recording of our conversation with Dr. Ryan Gray, Meet the doctor who is on a mission to spread the word that med school admission is an attainable goal (and he’ll help you get accepted, too). Listen to the recording of our conversation with Dr. Ryan Gray, founder of The Medical School Headquarters for some great advice and an insider’s perspective on the world of med school admissions. 00:02:18 – Ryan’s journey from dissecting cats to Flight Surgeon in the United States Air Force (what is that?). 00:07:52 – Making med school admissions less intimidating: The Medical School Headquarters. 00:10:02 – The Medical School HQ Academy and the case for identity. 00:19:53 – Should you apply to med school in Aug or wait for next year? 00:26:28 – Secondary applications: an important opportunity. 00:29:16 – Tips for med school interviews and MMIs. 00:34:16 – The very big difference between med and residency admissions. 00:37:51 – Tips for matching – and not matching. *Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com. Relevant Links: • Medical School Headquarters • The Medical School Headquarters Podcast • Ryan's Interview with Dr. Norma Wagoner • Create a Compelling AMCAS Application, a webinar • Secondary Essay Strategies that Score Interviews, a webinar Related Shows: • Med School Application Process: AMCAS, Secondaries, Interviews, Decisions & More! • What You Need to Know About Med School Admissions • MCAT Mania: How to Prepare • MCAT Scores, MCAT Prep, and #MCAT2015 • All About AMSA and the Premed Journey • Insights, Advice and Experiences of a Non-Traditional Med Student Subscribe: Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no 42:28
Seats Running Out for Our Wharton Webinar… http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/13/seats-running-out-for-our-wharton-webinar/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/13/seats-running-out-for-our-wharton-webinar/#respond Wed, 13 Aug 2014 21:24:23 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24730 ]]> GetAcceptedToWharton

If you are applying to Wharton – then you’ll want to tune in on Tuesday, August 19, 2014 at 10:00 AM PT/1:00 PM ET for our webinar, Get Accepted to the Wharton School.

Access winning tips that put you ahead of your competition including the 4 key strategies you need to get accepted and advice for your team-based discussion.

Don’t get left behind – reserve your spot for Get Accepted to the Wharton School now!

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3 Tips for Writing Successful Secondary Essays http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/13/3-secondary-essay-tips-for-success/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/13/3-secondary-essay-tips-for-success/#respond Wed, 13 Aug 2014 16:58:48 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24682 ]]> Secondaries with Sizzle

The task looks harder than it is.

If you sent your AMCAS application off promptly in June, you’re now working your way through secondary application essays. Here are some suggestions to help you with a task that looks harder than it is.

First, recycle. You will find considerable repetition among the questions posed by your schools, so feel free to reuse essays in whole or in part whenever it’s appropriate to do so.

Second, read the questions very carefully! Be sure that your answers, whether recycled or new, respond to the questions asked. Don’t try to push your own agenda. Don’t recycle essays that don’t fit the question. There may be points you want to make and experiences or aspects of your record you want to emphasize, but you must answer the questions as written. Be alert for questions which limit you to matters not covered elsewhere in the application and don’t go back over old ground. When the question relates to activities, don’t include information about jobs or research projects. If you haven’t had much extracurricular involvement, “fudging” an answer is the least desirable way to improve that area of your application.

Third (and somewhat related to the second point), think long and hard before writing an optional” essay. Unless the question invites you to expand on one or more items you addressed in another part of the application, assume that the admissions committee is looking for new information. If the question is, “Is there anything else you think we should know about you?” understand that the emphasis is on “else.”

Finally, don’t use this open-ended sort of question as an opportunity to discuss one or more grades which could have been better. The goal of every essay you write should be to make you a more attractive candidate.

Click here to view our free webinar: Secondary Essays That Score Interviews

Accepted.com

 

Related Resources:

• Medical School Secondary Essay Handbook: School Specific Tips for Top Programs
• Secondary Strategy: Why Do You Want To Go Here?
Optional Essays: When and How to Write Them

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George Washington School of Medicine and Health Sciences 2015 Secondary Application Essay Tips http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/12/george-washington-school-of-medicine-and-health-sciences-2015-secondary-application-essay-tips/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/12/george-washington-school-of-medicine-and-health-sciences-2015-secondary-application-essay-tips/#respond Tue, 12 Aug 2014 18:11:51 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24670 ]]> Check out the rest of our school-specific secondary essay tips!

Share your dedication to helping others through leadership and education.

The curriculum and goals of George Washington SMHS center on its ability to graduate “Physician Citizens.” Since the school is located in the most powerful city in the U.S., Washington D.C., GW emphasizes the opportunities to treat the area’s diverse communities. It is essential to have years of service, either clinical or nonclinical, with diverse populations and to have a demonstrated record of long-term leadership experience.

In addition you need to know about GW’s educational approach. It is initiating a brand new curriculum in Fall 2014 that incorporates more technology, independent study time, active learning models and clinical exposure. It also offers a Track System that allows students to gain special training in the following areas: Community/Urban Health, Emergency Management, Global Health, Health Policy, Integrative Medicine, Medical Education Leadership, Medical Humanities and Research. The Track System will influence the direction of a students’ education throughout their four years at George Washington SMHS.    

George Washington 2015 School of Medicine and Health Sciences Essay Questions:

  • Four essays total requested: two essays with 750-character limits, one essay with a 1,000-character limit and one essay with a 2,000-character limit.
  • Applicants should use single line spacing and 12 point size font.
  • Responses should be constructed strategically to highlight an applicant’s strengths.

The following are required in the Secondary Application:

1. Please provide the Admissions Committee with a brief summary of your activities, academics, employment or other occupations to account for full-time activity (approx. 30-40 hours/week) for the 2014-2015 application cycle, or from the point of application through matriculation in 2015. (750 characters)

The best way to approach this type of question is to create a list of the commitments you have made for the next year. Only include those activities that you have already started or plan to definitely complete. It will not be helpful to list things that you end up not participating in because you could be asked about them in an interview and it will not help your application if you have to explain why you are not completing the activities you listed on the secondary. Ideally, you will be able to bring an updated CV or resume to the interview with the new experiences you have completed listed.  

2. What is your most significant achievement outside the classroom? (750 characters)

What they are really asking you is, “what is important to you in your life?” They want to understand your maturity level and priorities. Based on the fact that they emphasize leadership, community service and a commitment to life-long learning, you can select an achievement that 1) you are truly proud of and that 2) allows you to share your dedication to helping others through leadership and/or education. It’s essential to be authentic so do select something that is important to you. Situations that reveal creative leadership will be most effective.

3. What makes you a unique individual? What challenges have you faced? How will these factors help you contribute to the diversity of the student body at GW? (1000 characters)

In responding to this essay prompt, it will be important for you to select a challenge that you have overcome that will allow you to demonstrate by showing, rather than telling, how you are a “unique individual.” For example, if you came up with a unique way to approach an issue that provided a successful resolution for everyone involved, this would be an effective choice.

Creating an outline will help you ensure that you have selected a subject that will cover all three questions in the prompt. In identifying what was unique about your approach to the challenge, you will be answering the third question listed. Many different challenges would work well for this essay, just be sure to select one that highlights your approach to problem solving.

4. What is your specific interest in the MD Program at GW? What opportunities would you take advantage of as a student here? Why? (2000 characters)

Do your research for this question. There are lots of wonderful special programs at GW. Create a list as you read through their website. After you’ve read through all of their webpages, rank your list in the order of importance to you. Create an outline based on these rankings. Again, it’s essential to be authentic in your response and to demonstrate how you have used similar opportunities in the past. It’s even more helpful if you have visited the school or spoken with representatives or students.

George Washington SMHS Application Timeline:

AMCAS Application Due     December 1, 2014

Secondary Application        *January 1, 2014 (Strong recommendation: Submit within two weeks after receipt.)

School Begins                         Early August, 2015

If you would like professional guidance with your George Washington School of Medicine and Health Sciences application materials, please consider using Accepted’s Medical School Admissions Consulting and Editing Services, which include advising, editing, and interview coaching for the GWSMHS application materials.

Check out the rest of our school-specific secondary essay tips!

Alicia McNease Nimonkar is an Accepted.com advisor and editor specializing in healthcare admissions. Prior to joining Accepted, Alicia worked for five years as Student Advisor at UC Davis’ postbac program where she both evaluated applications and advised students applying successfully to med school and related programs.

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Tips for Video MBA Essay Questions http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/12/tips-for-video-mba-essay-questions-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/12/tips-for-video-mba-essay-questions-2/#respond Tue, 12 Aug 2014 15:55:11 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24533 ]]> Get more MBA video essay tips!

The Kellogg School of Management

Rotman led the charge with a video essay question and last year Yale and Kellogg followed.

Worried about being literally on stage? Here are my tips if you need to respond to a question in a short 1-2-minute video.

First, realize that these video essays, like the written ones, are attempts to get to know you. Unlike the written word, however, the schools are seeking to see how you present yourself visually and with little time to prepare or polish answers. They are testing articulation and presence in a way that essays can’t and at much less expense than interviews. In that sense, these videos are a pre-interview screening device in addition to a way to learn more about your likes and dislikes, achievements, dreams, goals, and challenges.

And while you may not be able to prepare for a specific question, you definitely can and should prepare.

Learn how video essays came about, how they work, & how to ace them!

You need to practice for the experience of talking to a video camera with no responses from another human being. No body language. No facial expressions. No audience energy. Zero feedback. It’s just a dumb machine. Having created videos for Accepted, I found the experience very unnatural, but I think/hope I’ve gotten better with practice. You can too.

Until the questions become known, practice answering different essay questions in the announced time limit and then view the video. Here are a few sample questions to get you started, but I may update this list as we get more information from the schools:

• What do you do for fun?
• What are your passions, interests, and hobbies?
• If you could travel across the United States in a car with anyone, whom would you choose to travel with and why?
• What would you do on a rainy Sunday afternoon?
• How have you handled a difficult interaction? What did you learn from it?
• Describe a difficult professional decision you had to make.  What were the consequences, and what, if anything, did you learn?

If you are really nervous about the video exercise or about speaking in public, consider joining Toastmasters and forcing yourself to speak publicly. You will improve your “presence” and gain confidence. Both will help you with your video interview, any admissions interview, job interviews, and required public speaking.

So beyond preparing and simply getting comfortable with the format or anticipated questions, when it comes time for the real thing, do the following:

1. Dress neatly. Follow any dress guidelines the school provides. Women, put on make-up and jewelry lightly. If you wonder if your attire is too revealing, it is.  Men, have a hair-cut and shave. Make sure beard or mustache, if you have, are trimmed and neat.

2. It should go without saying, but keep your language clean — no profanity.

3. Think for a few seconds before you reply and then minimize pauses that we tend to fill with “ums” and “uhs.” They don’t contribute to “presence.”

4. If you tend to perspire, put on the air conditioning so the room is cool.

5. Sit up straight and lean a little bit forward.

6. Remember to smile. I put a smiley face next to the camera.

And two final points:

1. Schools want to accept students who reflect well on them.
2. You’ll do great!

If you would like help with your video essay, Accepted’s experienced MBA admissions experts, who have been prepping and critiquing MBA applicants for almost twenty years, are more than happy to help you.

Learn how video essays came about, how they work, & how to ace them!

Linda Abraham By , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

Related Resources:
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Interview with a Duke University School of Medicine MD/PhD Student http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/11/duke-med-md-phd-student-interview/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/11/duke-med-md-phd-student-interview/#comments Mon, 11 Aug 2014 16:14:16 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24640 ]]> Check out more med student interviews!This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with medical school applicants and students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top medical schools and the med school application process. And now, introducing Rui Dai…

Accepted: First, some basics: Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What is your favorite flavor ice cream?

Rui: I call Cleveland, Ohio home, but I was born in Kunming, China and spent some of my childhood in Germany before moving to Cleveland at age 10. I went to elementary school, middle school, and high school in Cleveland. It’s the place I know best and I’m a fierce defender of the great city.

I went to Duke for undergrad and majored in neuroscience. I liked it so much that I decided to stay for grad school!

My favorite ice cream flavor is dark chocolate. The darker the better.

Accepted: What year are you at Duke University School of Medicine? 

Rui: I just started my 2nd year at Duke Med, but unlike most medical schools that start their clinical year in 3rd year, clinical year starts at the beginning of 2nd year at Duke. So I’m headed to the wards in a couple weeks, with radiology as my first rotation. Kind of nervous, but super excited!

Accepted: What is your favorite thing about med school so far — med school in general and Duke in particular? 

Rui: I love interacting with patients and taking part in procedures. In the spring of first year at Duke, you can go into clinic as part of Spring Clinic and basically act like a medical personnel. I was able to interview patients on my own and even write notes for the attending doctor to review. I love that there are so many teaching opportunities, for students to just learn. I was able to meet so many different patients and put a face to all the knowledge that we were learning in the classroom. Everyone in the hospital is so friendly. Even scrub nurses, who have to keep a tight rein on the operating room so the procedure proceeds with order and nothing is contaminated, will help you learn everything you need to know, and remind you if you’re about to make a typical med student mistake.

Accepted: If you could change one thing about the program, what would it be? 

Rui: I think Duke really takes to heart a quote by William Osler, who laid the foundation for modern medicine, that “To study the phenomena of disease without books is to sail an uncharted sea, while to study books without patients is not to go to sea at all.” Duke’s aim is for us to be humanist doctors, who will treat patients as a whole, and not just the disease. Our responsibility is to the patients and their wellbeing. And to do that, the Duke curriculum makes sure that we are never too far from the hospital, physically and mentally. This can sometimes take a toll on the basic science material that we are supposed to learn in the first 2 years of medical school for the first step of the licensing exam.

I’m sure in 20 years, the basic science material that we’re learning in the classroom will only peripherally matter to the patients that we are treating, and some of which will certainly be out of date, but as a student right now it can sometimes be hard to consume all the information in only 1 year. However, there seems to be a trend of medical schools adopting the Duke Model, so there must be something that’s going well with this system. Right?

Accepted: Can you share some advice to incoming first year students, to help make their adjustment to med school easier?

Rui: My number one advice, as numerous other people have told before I started medical school, would certainly be: don’t stress. Things will happen in their own time. Cramming that biochem book before school begins can certainly seems like the right thing to do, but take time to enjoy your summer. It will most likely be one of your last. You will have very little time to do so once everything else starts: residency, fellowship, and establishing a career. Take time and relax at home. Go backpacking in Europe. Spend every single moment you can soaking up the sun at the beach!

Accepted: Did you go straight from college to med school? Or did you take time off?

Rui: I went directly from college to medical school, but there are certainly times when I wished that I had taken a gap year. Senior year of college, while interviewing every other weekend, was absolutely brutal.

Accepted: Looking back, what was the most challenging aspect of the med school admissions process? How did you approach that challenge and overcome it?

Rui: The interview was definitely the most challenging part. Though I enjoy hanging out with friends and meeting people, I am an introvert and need time alone to myself to recuperate. I used to leave Wednesday or Thursday for a 2 day interview, because I was applying for MD/PhD programs, come back on the weekend and just not leave my room until I had to go to class.

Accepted: Can you talk more about your decision to pursue an MD/PhD? What are your long-term goals? What is the structure/timeline of the program?

Rui: I’ve always loved research. My mother is a neuroscientist at Case Western Research University and ever since I was in kindergarten, I’ve spent time sitting in labs with her and my father, poking around here and there. I love the lab environment and I ultimately want to run my own lab in the future. I enjoy the intellectual stimulation when discussing science and the idea that there is a limitless possibilities of what we could discover with the tools we could cook up.

At the same time, I am personally committed to finding a therapeutic cure to help patients. I want my research to be as intimately tied to patients as it is possible. I enjoy the clinic, listening to patients, and meet individuals from all walks of life that I would never had the opportunity to otherwise.

The MD/PhD program allows me to combine the two aspects of science and medicine together. The program is 8 years in total and is structured starting with 2 years of medical school, followed by 4-5 years of PhD, and 2 years of medical school. At Duke, this structure is slightly different, because research is also incorporated into the medical school curriculum, so there is only 1 more year of medical school after finishing the PhD.

Accepted: Do you have any other advice for our med school applicant readers?

Rui: Medicine is a marathon and not a sprint. Depending on what you ultimately end up doing, you will most likely be working till your late 60s, if not 70s or 80s. Be sure to love what you’re doing. Medicine is an amazing career, and there’s nothing else I could imagine myself doing, but physician burnout is no secret. The work is hard, the pay does not reflect the time nor the effort required (especially during residency), and not all patients appreciate how much you care. Take care of yourself. Medicine requires many sacrifices, but be sure you don’t sacrifice too much before you realize it’s too late.

Accepted: Can you tell us about your writing for VOICES?

Rui: VOICES is a student-run bi-annual literary magazine for the medical community to express themselves. We have an open policy of no restrictions on the form or format of the submission. Even if it can’t be physically published, we will still accept a photograph of it. The magazine website has pdf and html links to all the published magazines.

For one-on-one guidance on your med school applications, please see our catalog of med school admissions services.

You can read more about Rui’s med school journey by checking out some of her articles here. Thank you Rui for sharing your story with us!

Do you want to be featured in Accepted.com’s blog, Accepted Admissions Blog? If you want to share your med school journey with the world (or at least with our readers), email us at bloggers@accepted.com.

Download your free special report: Navigate the Med School Maze!

Accepted.com

 

Related Resources: 

• Medicine and Engineering: an MD/PhD Student Interview
School-Specific Secondary Application Essay Tips
Journey’s with Joshua: an Inside Look at Med School

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Must-See Residency Tips Webinar: Next Week! http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/10/must-see-residency-tips-webinar-next-week/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/10/must-see-residency-tips-webinar-next-week/#respond Sun, 10 Aug 2014 20:35:50 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24627 ]]> Residency applicants – listen up! We’re hosting an important webinar, Residency Applications: How to Match, that will walk you through the residency application process, next week on Tuesday, August 19th, at 5:00 PM PST/8:00 PM EST.

Residency Applicants: How to Match! Click here to register for the webinar.

During the webinar, you will learn:

• How to choose the BEST program for you.
• 6 common mistakes that trip up most applicants.
• Advice on how to write a memorable, persuasive personal statement.

Match right! Reserve your spot here: Residency Applications: How to Match (P.S. The webinar is free!)

Save my spot!

Accepted.com

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How to Fund Your MBA: On-Demand Webinar Available for Viewing http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/10/how-to-fund-your-mba-on-demand-webinar-available-for-viewing/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/10/how-to-fund-your-mba-on-demand-webinar-available-for-viewing/#respond Sun, 10 Aug 2014 16:55:22 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24223 ]]> Missed last week’s webinar, How to Pay for Your MBA? Still worried those b-school price tags will get the best of you? No problem. Get the facts you need to finance your business degree when you view How to Pay for Your MBA online now. The webinar, which was hosted by guest Matt Levin from CommonBond, was a huge success – loads of tips and suggestions on how YOU can secure the funds needed to pay for b-school.

Join Our Free Webinar to Learn How to Pay for Your MBA!

Don’t let tuition bills stand in your way. Get the MBA you need and deserve and learn how to pay for it with How to Pay for Your MBA. And as always, please be in touch if you have any questions – about paying for your MBA or about any other stage of the admissions process!

Watch the Webinar: How to Pay for Your MBA!

Accepted.com

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6 Tips for Getting Started on Your Application Essays http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/10/6-tips-for-getting-started-on-your-application-essays-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/10/6-tips-for-getting-started-on-your-application-essays-2/#comments Sun, 10 Aug 2014 16:35:11 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24494 ]]> Sit down, think, and start writing!

Sit down, think, and start writing!

Sometimes the hardest part of writing a personal statement or application essay for college or grad school is finding the discipline to sit down and focus. Often, once you accomplish that, the ideas begin to form and the words begin to flow. The following 6 tips will help motivate you to start writing, and then to continue writing until you’ve got some solid material for a compelling essay.

1. Words beget more words. Here’s an important concept to think about when it comes to getting started – one word leads to another. Once you BEGIN writing, your brain will begin to generate ideas that will inspire you to CONTINUE writing. So even if you don’t think you have anything to say, just sit down and write whatever comes to mind. Set a timer for 10 minutes and don’t stop writing until the timer dings. I guarantee that when the buzzer goes off, SOME idea will have surfaced.

2. Write now, edit later. Do NOT get bogged down in the editorial details of your essay during the early writing stages. Now is the time to simply get your ideas out on paper (or computer screen). Write as you think – in fragments, in run-on sentences, or in vivid descriptions of images as they pass before your mind’s eye. Work on making them sound good later on.

3. Use details. During the brainstorming phase of your writing, as well as later on when you’re clarifying your work, you’re going to want to include details that will engage your reader. Think about what attracts someone to a good book – is it boring summaries and abstractions, or a few descriptions of people and places or specific dialog?

4. Include meaning. Description is key, but if you don’t internalize (and then show that you’ve internalized) the MEANING of the scene you’ve described, then the adcoms won’t care much about it. What do your experiences say about YOU?

5. Prove impact. Now that you’ve expressed what your experiences say about your qualifications or characteristics, it’s time to explain how those traits and strengths will contribute to your class. You’ve proven that you are a leader; how do you plan on using those skills?

6. Have faith.
 Maybe you’ve hit a wall and feel like you’ll never spin your ideas into a coherent essay. Have faith – the writing process takes time. Take a break and then return to your computer with a clear mind and a positive attitude to begin the brainstorming process from scratch.

Now, sit down, think, and start writing! Good luck!

5ffgeneric

Accepted.com

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What You Need to Know to Get Accepted to Wharton http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/08/what-you-need-to-know-to-get-accepted-to-wharton/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/08/what-you-need-to-know-to-get-accepted-to-wharton/#respond Fri, 08 Aug 2014 20:45:36 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24584 ]]> You CAN get accepted to Wharton!

We invite all Wharton MBA applicants to attend our upcoming webinar, Get Accepted to the Wharton School, in which Accepted.com CEO and b-school admissions expert, Linda Abraham, will teach you how to create a standout application for this world-class, highly competitive business school.

During the webinar, Linda will discuss:

• The 4 key strategy steps you need to get accepted to Wharton.

• How to ace Wharton’s team-based discussion/interview.

…and more!

The webinar will take place on Tuesday, August 19, 2014 at 10:00 AM PST/1:00 PM EST/5:00 PM GMT.

Click here to reserve your spot!

Spaces are limited! Reserve your spot for Get Accepted to the Wharton School now!

Accepted.com

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18 SAT Lifehacks [An Awesome Infographic] http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/08/18-sat-lifehacks-an-awesome-infographic/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/08/18-sat-lifehacks-an-awesome-infographic/#respond Fri, 08 Aug 2014 17:04:00 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24598 ]]> Thanks to our friends at Magoosh SAT for putting together this SAT lifehack infographic to make sure you safely avoid any test-day nightmares. Take some time to browse this list of SAT prep lifehacks and master the 18 unexpected tips you’ll need for a higher SAT score!

SAT Lifehacks: 18 Unexpected Tips for a Higher SAT Score

Good luck!

 

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Interview with 22 Year Old B-School Applicant, “Pulling That MBA Trigger” http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/08/interview-with-22-year-old-b-school-applicant-pulling-that-mba-trigger/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/08/interview-with-22-year-old-b-school-applicant-pulling-that-mba-trigger/#respond Fri, 08 Aug 2014 16:19:43 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24498 ]]> Check out more MBA applicant interviews!This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with MBA applicant bloggers, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at the MBA application process. And now…introducing our anonymous blogger, “Pulling That MBA Trigger.”

Accepted: Can you tell us a little about yourself – where are you from, where did you go to school, and what is your current job?

Pulling That MBA Trigger: Ah, I never really know how to answer this question. An entire lifetime in a few sentences? I’m way too chatty for that. Anyway, I’m 22 years old, female and fresh out of the college boat. Well, it’s been a year anyway, so I’m still not a jaded adult which is probably why I’m so gung-ho about this whole admissions thing.

I’m from India and I went to a school that is probably not known to the rest of the world, although a recently appointed CEO did go here. It’s doing a lot for our street cred. I graduated as an electronics engineer and I’m working for a tech startup that develops web and mobile applications when we’re not busy working with big data analytics and all that jazz. I also founded my own startup in the education space, so yeah pretty exciting stuff!

Accepted: Which schools do you plan on applying to?

PTMT: I’m glaringly honest with myself and I know that my chances of getting into the top 5 schools are astronomically low. With that said, I’m targeting the lower 10’s and pretty much any school in the 10-20 range. I haven’t narrowed down the names yet, but I’m angling towards MIT Sloan simply because of their focus on entrepreneurship and the fact that they happen to like engineers from the technology space. I’m also considering Yale (Ivy League, ’nuff said) and Booth (quant focused with a soft spot for younger applicants, or so I hear). I’m applying to a maximum of four schools and this is more strategic than anything else simply because if I get dinged from all four of them, I can reapply next year with plenty of options still left open.

Accepted: What would you say is your greatest profile strength? Weakness? How do you plan on overcoming that weakness?

PTMT: I guess my greatest strength lies in the fact that I am an entrepreneur and a leader at heart, and this kind of spills over everywhere in my application. I have only ever worked for startups and I have founded a startup. I never felt the need for an MBA to take that plunge and I guess I would say that I’m ballsy. Not sure how I would put that on my application, but eh.

Weakness is pretty obvious. I am very, very impatient. I can’t wait any longer to get that MBA and so I’m quite stupidly applying after having worked for only a year (or two at the time of matriculation). It’s going to be quite a challenge convincing schools that I’m emotionally and professionally ready to get an MBA.

Accepted: So…how are you going to convince the adcom that you’re a candidate worth paying attention to with only one year of work experience? 

PTMT: Honestly, I’m not even sure I’m convinced just yet! I’m just faking it as I go, maybe eventually I’ll actually believe that I’m someone worth paying attention to. But with that said, my plan is to focus on all that I have managed to achieve in such a short period of time, possibly as much as other people achieved in two years. Impatience has its own rewards, which is why I jam-packed my years in college and post-college with every activity imaginable and that is now paying off. I am mainly going to emphasize the success of my own startup (albeit on a modest scale) and my stint as the secretary of the student body in college.

Accepted: Why do you want an MBA? What are some of your goals and how will an MBA help you achieve them?

PTMT: In my current role as a software engineer, I’m limited to my work as a code monkey and I have no exposure to how the company gets its clients, or how they measure the bottom line and success/failure. I guess this kind of points to a role in consulting post an MBA, simply because it would allow me to look at how different companies across different industries function, without slotting me into a role that is limiting in terms of what I’m able to learn (i.e. software engineer, product manager, marketing manager and so on). Long term though, I’d like to use all the consulting knowledge from watching other companies’ mistakes to set up my own company in the tech space.

Accepted: What has the b-school application process so far taught you about yourself?

PTMT: The b-school process has forced me to thoroughly excavate my head. I had to visit corners I never wanted to revisit. It has been torturous at times and merely annoying at others. It’s taught me that I have a high tolerance for pain and that I should really get a commemorative tattoo when I’m done. Okay, okay. It’s also shown me that I have vast reserves of strength, resolve and motivation. I know I can pull through and even if I don’t, I know I’ll have the energy to do it again next year. I also think I’m a lot more interesting than I thought I was. I actually have interesting stories to write down in my essays. Who knew?!

Accepted: Can you tell us about your blog? Who is your target audience? What do you hope to gain from the blogging experience?

PTMT: My blog is called Pulling That MBA Trigger and it’s no coincidence that I want to shoot myself in the head about once a day during this whole process. It’s basically a place for me to vent and document my thoughts before I go crazy. I hope it provides slight comedic relief to others going through the same thing and perhaps makes them feel better about their own chances of getting in. At the end of it, I want to be able to look back and think, “Ah, I’ve made it so far,” unless of course I get dinged everywhere in which case I’m going to nuke the blog off cyberspace and pretend it never existed.

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages.

You can read more about PTMT’s b-school journey by checking out her blog, Pulling That MBA Trigger. Thank you PTMT for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

Navigating the MBA Maze

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The Top 3 Factors Applicants Overlook in Their Applications http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/07/the-top-3-factors-applicants-overlook-in-their-applications/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/07/the-top-3-factors-applicants-overlook-in-their-applications/#respond Thu, 07 Aug 2014 17:03:48 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24571 ]]> The #1 top factor that trips up med applicants the most is definitely TIME.

Time: the #1 top factor that trips up med applicants.

Note to medical school applicants: be sure to set aside some extra time for these time-consuming factors that you simply may not have considered:

1. Application time. The #1 top factor that trips up med applicants the most is definitely TIME. Applicants just don’t seem to realize (at least not early on) how much time is required to complete each step of the admissions process. Significant time is needed to write strong, persuasive personal statement and to complete the activity descriptions and the most meaningful essays. Then there’s the time needed to work on secondary applications; applicants are often overwhelmed by the number of secondaries they receive and how quickly they need to return them (usually within two weeks of receiving the secondary invitation).

2. Interview time.
Once your AMCAS application and secondaries are complete, applicants generally seem to think that they’re done. But if you think interviewing isn’t a time commitment, then think again! Don’t forget to factor in travel time and interview prep time, not to mention the time that goes into each individual interview.

3. A new writing style.
Writing your personal statement and secondary essays requires a very different style of writing than anything that you’ve probably done before. These are not policy papers or research papers, but personal stories, narratives. Don’t underestimate the importance of this change in style – an essay that reads like a research paper will do nothing to draw the reader in and convince him that you’re an intriguing character worth getting to know better. You need to spend a great deal of time thinking about your experiences as stories and then figuring out how to relate those stories in the most compelling way possible.

The advice in this post is based on a conversation we had in our recent webinar, Ask The Experts: Medical School Admissions Q&A with Cydney Foote and Alicia McNease Nimonkar. Check out the full transcript for more tips on applying to med school successfully!

Download your free special report: Navigate the Med School Maze!
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A Transformational Year: The MIT Sloan Fellows Program http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/07/a-transformational-year-the-mit-sloan-fellows-program/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/07/a-transformational-year-the-mit-sloan-fellows-program/#respond Thu, 07 Aug 2014 16:37:28 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24589 ]]> Listen to the show!What is the solution for a seasoned manager who is too experienced for an MBA, but not so enthusiastic about the idea of a part-time EMBA?

Listen to the recording of our conversation with Stephen Sacca for the low down on an 84 year-old secret that just might change your life: The MIT Sloan Fellows Program in Innovation and Global Leadership.

00:02:44 – What is the MIT Sloan Fellows program?

00:04:32 – Experienced candidates only.

00:05:22 – Overview of an intensive year.

00:07:48 – A great idea: The April orientation.

00:11:10 –The MIT Sloan Fellows Program in Innovation and Global Leadership: What is in a name?

00:15:56 – Integration with the various MIT Sloan programs.

00:17:59 – The common denominator among Sloan fellows.

00:19:52 – Trips: not just for fun.

00:25:41 – Why career changers need not apply.

00:28:55 – The most common feedback from graduates.

00:32:39 – Advice for applicants.

Listen to the full conversation to learn more!*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Related Links:

MIT Sloan Fellows Program in Innovation and Global Leadership
MIT Sloan School of Management
• Ace the EMBA
• Top Executive MBA Program Essay Questions: How to Answer Them Right!

Related Shows:

The Stanford MSx Program for Experienced Leaders
Business, Law and Beyond: An Interview with John Engelman
• Dr. Douglas Stayman Shares the Scoop on Cornell Tech NYC 

Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk:

Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes! Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in Stitcher!

Download your free copy of Ace the EMBA!

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http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/07/a-transformational-year-the-mit-sloan-fellows-program/feed/ 0 EMBA,MIT Sloan,MIT Sloan Fellows,podcast What is the solution for a seasoned manager who is too experienced for an MBA, but not so enthusiastic about the idea of a part-time EMBA? - Listen to the recording of our conversation with Stephen Sacca for the low down on an 84 year-old secret that ... What is the solution for a seasoned manager who is too experienced for an MBA, but not so enthusiastic about the idea of a part-time EMBA? Listen to the recording of our conversation with Stephen Sacca for the low down on an 84 year-old secret that just might change your life: The MIT Sloan Fellows Program in Innovation and Global Leadership. 00:02:44 – What is the MIT Sloan Fellows program? 00:04:32 – Experienced candidates only. 00:05:22 – Overview of an intensive year. 00:07:48 – A great idea: The April orientation. 00:11:10 –The MIT Sloan Fellows Program in Innovation and Global Leadership: What is in a name? 00:15:56 – Integration with the various MIT Sloan programs. 00:17:59 – The common denominator among Sloan fellows. 00:19:52 – Trips: not just for fun. 00:25:41 – Why career changers need not apply. 00:28:55 – The most common feedback from graduates. 00:32:39 – Advice for applicants. *Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com. Related Links: • MIT Sloan Fellows Program in Innovation and Global Leadership • MIT Sloan School of Management • Ace the EMBA • Top Executive MBA Program Essay Questions: How to Answer Them Right! Related Shows: • The Stanford MSx Program for Experienced Leaders • Business, Law and Beyond: An Interview with John Engelman • Dr. Douglas Stayman Shares the Scoop on Cornell Tech NYC  Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk: Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no 38:16
Chicago Booth 2015 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/06/chicago-booth-2015-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/06/chicago-booth-2015-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/#comments Wed, 06 Aug 2014 16:15:22 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24328 ]]> Get more MBA essay tips here!Chicago Booth has always prided itself on valuing applicants who can handle ambiguity and lack of structure. And it’s application reflects that principle. In spades. This year’s Booth also application mirrors the “streamlining” that has taken place throughout the b-school world as well as Chicago’s distinctive culture and love of ambiguity. This essay/presentation question, which is new for this year, is about as open-ended as it gets.

My tips are in blue below.

Presentation/Essay:

Chicago Booth values adventurous inquiry, diverse perspectives, and a collaborative exchange of ideas.  This is us.  Who are you?

This is a really difficult question.

What do you want to tell Booth that reflects your adventurous and curious nature, your distinctive perspective and experience, which will contribute to the class’ diversity, and your ability to contribute to a vigorous but still collaborative exchange of ideas?  And yes it should be genuinely you.

To start make a list of the experiences and achievements that you are most proud of and that best reflect who you are.   Then review the presentation/essay guidelines below as well as the Booth admissions criteria. Next to each item on your list, add the qualities from Booth’s criteria that this experience or achievement reveals.

Also look at the other information you are providing in the application including your resume and those boxes. What about you is absent from these other parts of the application? Write those experiences and attributes down too in a separate list.  Which items on your “absentee” list introduce the qualities Booth seeks?  Are any of them on your first list of achievements?

Focus on the items that are on both lists and that are most important to you and distinctive about you.  As Booth itself instructs “We’ve learned a lot about you throughout the application, but what more should we know?” The answer to that question is a critical part of a effective response to Booth’s essay question.

Presentation/Essay Guidelines

• Be reflective. We’ve learned a lot about you throughout the application, but what more should we know?
• Interpret broadly.  “Who are you?” can be interpreted in many different ways.  We encourage you to think critically and broadly about who you are, and how your values, passions and experiences have influenced you.
• Determine your own length.  There is no prescribed minimum or maximum length.  We trust that you will use your best judgment in determining how long your submission should be, but we recommend that you think strategically about how to best allocate the space.

Don’t give in to temptation. Lack of a word limit or guideline is not a license for verbosity or permission to write the great American novel (or autobiography). Concision is valued in the business world. Show good judgment and consideration for the reader’s time. Keep it short, but tell your story.

• Choose the format that works for you.  You can design your presentation or compose your essay in the format that you feel best captures your response. However, please consider the specific technical restrictions noted below.
• Think about you, not us.  Rather than focusing on what you think we want to hear, focus on what is essential for us to know about you. Simply put, be genuine.

Technical Guidelines

• File Size: Maximum file size is 16 MB.
• Accepted Upload Formats:  Acceptable formats are PDF, Word and Powerpoint.
• Multimedia Restrictions: We will be viewing your submission electronically and in full color, but all submissions will be converted to PDF files, so animation, video, music, etc. will not translate over.
• Preserve Your Formatting: We strongly recommend converting your piece to a PDF file prior to submitting to ensure that everything you see matches what we see.

A few thoughts:

Should you write an essay or use a visual presentation? That depends on you. If you are talented visually and love graphics and powerpoint, use a visual medium as long as it will translate to PDF. If you are a “words person” comfortable expressing your thoughts in writing, write the essay. Do what will make it easiest for you to express your essence.  

Optional Essay: If there is any important information that you were unable to address elsewhere in the application, please share that information here. (300 word maximum)

The instructions are pretty clear. Is there something you want the admissions committee to know about that is not included elsewhere, here’s the spot for it. A gap in employment? A dip in grades caused by illness or family problems? This is the spot.

Reapplicant Essay: Upon reflection, how has your perspective regarding your future, Chicago Booth, and/or getting an MBA changed since the time of your last application? (300 words maximum)

This is a critical essay for MBA reapplicants. Remember, Chicago (and any school you are reapplying to) wants to see growth. Same ol’, same ‘ol got you a ding last time and probably will again this time. Let this brief essay show a maturation and evolution of your goals and reasons for wanting to attend Chicago Booth.  Chicago loves to see critical thinking.

If you would like professional guidance with your Chicago Booth MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our  MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Booth application. 

Chicago Booth 2015 MBA Application Deadlines:

Submission Deadline Final Decision Notification
Round 1 September 25, 2014 December 18, 2014
Round 2 January 6, 2015 March 26, 2015
Round 3 April 7, 2015 May 21, 2015

Are You Misusing the B-School Rankings?

Linda Abraham By , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

 

Related Resources: 

• School-Specific MBA Application Essay Tips 
Chicago Booth B-School Zone
Audio & Video in Admissions, a free guide

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5 Effective Techniques to Improve Your Writing http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/05/5-effective-techniques-to-improve-your-writing-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/05/5-effective-techniques-to-improve-your-writing-2/#respond Tue, 05 Aug 2014 20:46:53 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24121 ]]> Learn how to creating a winning AMCAS essay! Click here to download your complete copy of Ace the AMCAS!

“I think out of the box” isn’t the most creative way of saying I’m creative.

“5 Effective Techniques to Improve Your Writing” is excerpted from the Accepted.com special report, Ace the AMCAS Essay. To download the entire free special report, click here.

So far in this series we’ve talked about the WHO, WHY, WHAT, and HOW of creating an exemplary AMCAS essay. Now we’re going to offer some bonus tips that will help elevate your essay so it’s not just covering the right material in the correct order, but it’s actually written WELL.

1. Use active, lively, vivid verbs. You can “go” somewhere, or you can “meander,” “wander,” “race,” “rush,” etc. Variety enhances your verbiage!

2. Use metaphors and images to enliven your writing. This will help your reader jump into your experience.

3. Avoid clichés. Saying that you “think out of the box” isn’t really the most creative way of stating that you are creative. It’s just too overused.

4. Use suspense and irony. These elements show depth to your writing and to your personality.

5. Be succinct.

Download this special report that will help you ace the AMCAS essay.

Linda Abraham By , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

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Three Reasons to Be Excited about the 2015 MCAT Test Change http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/04/three-reasons-to-be-excited-about-the-2015-mcat-test-change/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/04/three-reasons-to-be-excited-about-the-2015-mcat-test-change/#respond Mon, 04 Aug 2014 17:07:34 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24496 ]]> Click here for MCAT tips and advice!

MCAT2015: Are you excited?

Guest post by Bryan Schnedeker, the National MCAT Director at Next Step Test Preparation.

Change is a scary thing. So understandably, when the AAMC announced sweeping new changes to the MCAT, many were apprehensive. After all, the new test is nearly twice as long and will include subjects that have never before been on the MCAT – psychology, sociology, and biochemistry.

These are not just random changes however.  They are designed to benefit you as a pre-med student and a future doctor.  Here are three reasons to be excited about the upcoming MCAT change.

One: The new MCAT will better prepare you for med school.

Preparing for this new MCAT will go a long way towards preparing you for the experiences you’ll have in med school. On the old exam, it was common to get physics passages that were about entirely abstract situations with no connection to either real physics, or certainly not to medical science.

I used to routinely joke with my students, “Don’t worry, no patient will ever present to the clinic with an inflamed velocity vector.”

Two: The new MCAT understands you as a pre-med student.

The new MCAT will align much more with the experiences of pre-med students. The overwhelming majority of pre-med students major in biology or a closely related field. While the new exam will still have physics, chemistry, and organic chemistry, it will present those topics in the context of biology or biological systems. For example, it may still include the general chemistry classic, “acid-base titrations”, but instead of giving the students a descriptive passage about an experiment in a test tube, the test will discuss the acid-base buffer system in the blood. That will allow students to still apply what they learned during freshman chemistry, but also pull in ideas from physiology. Making connections to biology topics will help ensure that students are rewarded for cross-disciplinary thinking and will make them more comfortable by dealing with content in a more familiar context.

Three: the new MCAT will shake up the test prep landscape.

Prior to 2015, the test hadn’t significantly changed since 1991. This means that a few large players arose over two decades and developed a stranglehold on the MCAT. Students used to be confronted with the feeling that their only option for high quality test prep were expensive books or a prep course.

Today, the AAMC is in the middle of an ambitious project to shake up that situation. They are partnering with Khan Academy to develop a robust free program that will let any student prepare thoroughly for the new exam. While there will still be a need for more robust MCAT preparation services, students will have a great free option when preparing for the MCAT.

All in all, this is an exciting (and a little scary!) time to be a pre-med. You’ll be facing a test that has been designed specifically for a future doctor.  The MCAT has always been a challenging test, now it is just changing a bit.  So have you thought about when you’re going to take your MCAT?  Regardless of what version you take have you thought about how you’re going to prepare?

Download your free special report: Navigate the Med School Maze!

Bryan Schnedeker is the National MCAT Director at Next Step Test Preparation, a company that specializes in 1-on-1 tutoring for the MCAT.  Bryan has taught the MCAT for over a decade and has scored a 44 on the test himself. 

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3 Mistakes Successful MBA Applicants Don’t Make http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/04/3-mistakes-successful-mba-applicants-dont-make/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/04/3-mistakes-successful-mba-applicants-dont-make/#respond Mon, 04 Aug 2014 16:41:26 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24029 ]]> Save yourself the heartbreak of rejection.

Save yourself the heartbreak of rejection.

Don’t make these mistakes when applying to b-school:

1. Applying without a clear idea of what you want to do after you earn the degree.

Having clear career goals is a MUST for successful MBA applicants. You may think you can cover up this lack of direction in your application, but the adcom are trained to see who has focused goals and who does not. Business schools are looking for applicants who will both succeed as students and as businesspeople in the post-MBA career world. If you don’t show direction early on, then there’s a chance you’ll flounder through b-school and won’t smoothly transition back into the workforce. YOU won’t get the most out of your MBA experience, and nor will the school. It’s a lose-lose for everyone.

Instead, solidify (with some degree of flexibility) what you want to do post-degree so that you present yourself as a strong, focused candidate in your applications. Remember, you’ll personally benefit from this research and direction, in addition to it boosting your chances of admission.

2. Writing what you think the admissions committee wants to know as opposed to what you want them to know.

You THINK that by writing what the adcom wants to hear, that your essay will be creative – ingenious even. But what ends up happening, is that everyone thinks the committee wants to hear the same thing and they end up writing something UN-original in order to fit those imagined specifications. Instead, look deep into yourself and think about what you truly would like to share with them – that’s the ONLY way that your final product will be authentically original, and the only way that you’ll really impress the adcom.

3. Applying exclusively to schools based on the rankings and without any sense of your own competitiveness.

If all applicants made this mistake, then Harvard, Stanford, and other top five programs would be even more selective than they are and VERY few people would ever gain admission. Yes, HBS is good for some people, and Stanford is good for others, but they’re certainly not the best schools for everyone. If there’s no possible chance that you’ll get accepted to a top five, top ten, or top fifty program, then start your quest by crossing those off your list. Save yourself the heartbreak of rejection and the costs and setback of reapplication by choosing reasonable programs to apply to.

That being said, so long as you apply to at least one safety and a few on-pars that you’d be thrilled to attend, then it certainly can’t hurt to try for a few reasonable reaches.

MBA 5 Fatal Flaws

Accepted.com

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FYI: Secondary Essay Strategies Webinar Viewable Online! http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/03/fyi-secondary-essay-strategies-webinar-viewable-online/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/03/fyi-secondary-essay-strategies-webinar-viewable-online/#respond Sun, 03 Aug 2014 16:16:59 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=23802 ]]> Med school applicants: You can now review last week’s webinar, Secondary Essay Strategies that Score Interviews on our site for free. Don’t miss the valuable advice from this webinar – you MUST optimize your secondary essays if you want to move forward in the med school admissions game. Your interview invites depend on this information! View Secondary Essay Strategies that Score Interviews today!

Register for the webinar now!

Still have questions? Browse our catalog of medical school admissions services or contact us for more information!

Watch the Secondary Essay Strategies Webinar!

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Which Business School Will Get Me to Wall Street? http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/03/which-business-school-will-get-me-to-wall-street/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/03/which-business-school-will-get-me-to-wall-street/#respond Sun, 03 Aug 2014 15:06:24 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24524 ]]> I want to go into financial services. Which is the best MBA program for me?

Which b-schools are best for finance students? Download our free special report to find out!

Accepted.com

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Snag Your Harvard Business School Class of 2017 Seat http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/01/snag-your-harvard-business-school-class-of-2017-seat/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/01/snag-your-harvard-business-school-class-of-2017-seat/#respond Fri, 01 Aug 2014 16:22:56 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=23493 ]]> If you’re aiming to attend Harvard Business School or another top 10 MBA program in 2015, then you’ll want to view our most recent webinar, Get Accepted to Harvard Business School.

In her presentation, Linda Abraham, CEO & Founder of Accepted.com, offers loads of advice on how to gain a competitive edge to a top b-school in general, and Harvard Business School in particular.

Get_Accepted_HBS_Cover

View Get Accepted to Harvard Business School on-demand now!

Watch 'Get Accepted to Harvard Business School'!

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