Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog http://blog.accepted.com Admissions consulting and application advice Tue, 30 Sep 2014 16:32:33 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0 Admissions consulting and application advice Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no Admissions consulting and application advice Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog http://blog.accepted.com/wp-content/plugins/powerpress/rss_default.jpg http://blog.accepted.com Analyzing Your Skills Before Applying to Graduate School http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/30/analyzing-your-skills-before-applying-to-graduate-school/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/30/analyzing-your-skills-before-applying-to-graduate-school/#respond Tue, 30 Sep 2014 16:32:33 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25345 ]]> Click here to download your copy of Get Your Game On: Prepping for Your Grad School Application!“Analyzing Your Skills” is excerpted from the Accepted.com special report, Get Your Game On: Prepping for Your Grad School Application. To download the entire free special report, click here.

As I’ve been discussing, part of the pre-application thought process involves honest analysis of your achievements and abilities, along with your future interests. Grad school will give you the opportunity for deep, advanced study in your field—including theoretical/methodological approaches undergrads are rarely exposed to. As you prepare to apply, consider how to present your skills/accomplishments effectively, and determine whether you need to shore up any gaps in your record.

First, think about the skills you’ve gained so far, and think about the programs you’re considering.

Do you meet the prerequisites for admission?

Challenges may arise if you don’t have an undergraduate degree in the field you want to pursue. You may have to demonstrate that you have sufficient background if you don’t have the degree to prove it. Does the department require any specific knowledge on entrance (such as statistics or foreign language fluency)? Can gaps be made up during your first semester, or do you need to remedy them before you apply?

Do you have research experience?

If yes, what type of project(s) did you complete? Did you participate in faculty research or conduct your own project? Did your work result in any presentations/publications? What did you learn about your field? What did you learn about the process of doing research/conducting a long-term project? How did this project make you interested in pursuing future research?

Have you done anything special to gain pertinent skills?

Did you take accelerated or grad level courses as an undergrad? Did you participate in an honors program? Are you planning to take any extra coursework before applying? If you’re working, have you gained skills through your job that relate to your proposed program?

In the final post I’ll cover other preparatory topics such as lining up letters of recommendation and searching for fellowships.

Download our free report: GET YOUR GAME ON: Preparing for Your Grad School Application

Rebecca Blustein By , Accepted.com editor and former Student Affairs Officer at UCLA’s Scholarship Resource Center, and author of Financing Your Future: Winning Fellowships, Scholarships and Awards for Grad School. Rebecca will be happy to assist you with your grad school applications.

Related Resources:

What is an Accomplishment?
• Timing & Funding for Grad School Applicants
• Which Graduate Schools Should You Apply To?

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Medical School Applicant: Make an Impact at Your Interview! http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/29/medical-school-applicant-make-an-impact-at-your-interview/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/29/medical-school-applicant-make-an-impact-at-your-interview/#respond Mon, 29 Sep 2014 17:36:17 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25887 ]]> You just got invited to interview at your top choice med school…now what??

Learn how to interview with impact when you attend our upcoming webinar, this Tuesday, September 30th, at 5:00 PM PT / 8:00 PM ET!

Medical School Interview Webinar

Interviewing with Impact: How to Make an Impression in Your Medical School Interviews will teach you key strategies for before, during, and after your interview, including what to wear, what to ask, and how NOT to blow your chances of interview success!

Reserve your spot for Interviewing with Impact: How to Make an Impression in Your Medical School Interviews now!

Click here to reserve your spot!

P.S. It’s free!

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

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4 Tips for Better B-School Visits http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/29/4-tips-for-better-b-school-visits/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/29/4-tips-for-better-b-school-visits/#respond Mon, 29 Sep 2014 17:18:45 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=21745 ]]> Looking for more MBA admissions advice? Check out our MBA Admissions 101 Pages!

Prepare good questions.

First, let me begin by saying that if you have the time and money to visit the schools that you’re thinking about applying to, then you absolutely should. And the reason isn’t because of the imaginary “brownie points”; it is because visiting a school will transform you into a much more informed applicant. There’s so much about a school’s culture, teaching style, and student body that can only be understood fully through experience.

The following 4 tips will help you make the most of your b-school visit.

1) Timing is everything. Visit the school when classes are in session so that you can see the learning in action. Don’t go during finals as students will likely be stressed out and not as eager to leisurely sit and talk with you.

2) Research before you go. You should read up on the school before you pay your visit. Your familiarity will enable you to ask better questions, make deeper connections with student, faculty, and adcom members, and feel more comfortable overall.

3) Prepare good questions. You’ll likely to speaking to lots of students, adcom members, and professors. Come prepared with good questions so you’re not left tongue tied when a good opportunity for a question presents itself. (See below for sample questions.)

4) Participate in visitor activities. Take advantage of all options presented to you, including attending class, a tour, info sessions, one-on-one meetings with students, etc.

Sample questions:

• What is a typical day like for you here?

• What would you like to see improved here?

• What kinds of extracurricular activities are you involved in?

• Is it easy for someone to start their own club or group?

• How do professors balance teaching and research?

• Is there a bidding process for internship and full-time job interviews?

You should also ask questions that are specific to your target program and needs, like about individual professors or classes. Another good, program-specific question for students may be, “Why did you decide to attend this program?” You can also ask about their post-MBA goals and how this program will help them achieve them.

Finally the best questions are those about specific programs at the school that you are interested in because they will help you achieve your post-MBA goals.

Attending an MBA Fair?

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

• What You Must Know Before Meeting Admissions Directors
Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One
• What to Do at an MBA Fair [Podcast Interview]

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Tips for Answering Cornell University Supplemental Essay Prompts http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/29/tips-for-answering-cornell-university-supplemental-essay-prompts/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/29/tips-for-answering-cornell-university-supplemental-essay-prompts/#respond Mon, 29 Sep 2014 16:52:24 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25808 ]]> Want more essay tips? Download your free copy of 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your College Application Essays!

The Goal: Demonstrate that Cornell is the right school for you and that you are the right student for Cornell!

This post about the Cornell supplement to the Common Application is part of a series of posts written to help you complete the 2015 Common Application supplement for Ivy League and other top schools. 

Although the Ivy League schools review the Common Application essay, they also require supplemental essay responses. These help you to convey in greater detail how the specific school is a good fit for you and how you can contribute to the collegiate environment. The additional essays prompts are geared to help these elite schools gain a better understanding of you as a potential student. Think about your future goals and how attending Cornell will help you achieve them!

It is important to familiarize yourself with the specific character of the school before sitting down to write your essays. You can begin by visiting the school website. Whenever possible, a campus visit is also helpful to get a feel for the school and gain a sense of how it supports your interests.

Cornell’s curriculum focuses on the collaborative nature of liberal education and fundamental knowledge through a practical educational approach to impact societal and world problems. As you respond to each prompt, think about your personal objectives, the mission of the school, and why Cornell is the best place for you.

Cornell boasts 14 undergraduate colleges and schools with over 80 majors. Through the broad scope of majors and the individual course of study options, it prides itself on being “a place where any person can find instruction in any study.” It fosters creative collaborations with a bottom-up approach. If you are unsure of which major is right for you, the Courses of Study catalog provides degree requirements for each college.

The Common Application Writing Supplement is based on the undergraduate college(s) or school(s) to which you are applying. Each essay response should be between 250-650 words. These questions are fairly straightforward and the content is somewhat similar between colleges/schools.

Note, if you are utilizing the Primary/Alternate admission option, you must complete an essay for both colleges/schools that correspond to your primary and alternate selections.

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences: How have your interests and related experiences influenced the major you have selected in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences?

College of Architecture, Art, and Planning: Why are you excited to pursue your chosen major in AAP? What specifically about AAP and Cornell University will help you fulfill your academic and creative interests and long-term goals?

College of Arts and Sciences: Describe two or three of your current intellectual interests and why they are exciting to you. Why will Cornell’s College of Arts and Sciences be the right environment in which to pursue your interests?

College of Engineering: Tell us about an engineering idea you have, or about your interest in engineering. Describe how your ideas and interests may be realized by—and linked to—specific resources within the College of Engineering. Finally, explain what a Cornell Engineering education will enable you to accomplish.

School of Hotel Administration: Hospitality is the largest industry in the world and includes sectors such as hotel operations, food and beverage management, real estate, finance, marketing, and law. Considering the breadth of our industry, please describe what work and non-work experiences, academic interests, and career goals influenced your decision to study hospitality management? How will these contribute to your success at the School of Hotel Administration?

College of Human Ecology: What do you value about the College of Human Ecology’s perspective, and the majors that interest you, as you consider your academic goals and plans for the future?

School of Industrial and Labor Relations: Tell us about your intellectual interests, how they sprung from your course, service, work or life experiences, and what makes them exciting to you. Describe how these interests may be realized and linked to the ILR curriculum.

These essay prompts ask you to discuss specific examples from your life experience (academic and otherwise) that support your interest in a particular school/college. In addition, they ask you to look toward your future and how your educational experience at Cornell supports your goals. They also want to know how you can enrich the collegiate environment at the school. These questions allow you to focus on what excites you about certain subjects and how studying at Cornell makes sense for you. Consider academics, campus atmosphere, location in Ithaca, and your long-term objectives. This is your opportunity to convey your passion for Cornell!

Cornell has a highly competitive applicant pool. It received 43,037 undergraduate applications for the class of 2018. Only 6,105 were offered admission and 87% of the students admitted were in the top 10% of their high school class with average SAT scores of 690 in critical reading, 730 in math, and an average ACT score of 32. The best way to distinguish yourself from your peers is through your essays.

Applying to an Ivey League school can seem like a daunting process. It is reassuring to keep in mind that these supplemental essays are a chance for you to share your personal stories and real-life experiences. Pay attention to deadlines and word limits as you craft each response to represent your unique perspectives. Start early to allow time for reflection and revision. Your goal is to demonstrate that Cornell is the right school for you and that you are the right student for Cornell!

Download 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid to learn how to eliminate the most common flaws in your application essays.

Marie Todd By , Accepted’s college admissions specialist. Marie has worked in college admissions for over twenty years. She has both counseled applicants and evaluated applications. Most recently she evaluated 5000+ applications for the University of Michigan’s College of Literature, Science and the Arts; College of Engineering; School of Kinesiology. She is available to assist you (or your child) with your applications.

Related Resources:

Common App Supplemental Essay Tips
What is Passion in Admissions?
• College Application Essays: Writing Tips from the Pros

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Common Myths about Medical School Interviews http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/29/common-myths-about-medical-school-interviews/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/29/common-myths-about-medical-school-interviews/#respond Mon, 29 Sep 2014 16:39:37 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25822 ]]> Learn How to Prep for and Ace Your Medical School Interview! [Free Webinar!]Congratulations if you have received an invitation to interview! You have won the attention of an adcom in submitting essays that have persuaded them to interview you.  In reaching this step in the application process, you will have a new set of challenges to prepare for in order to receive an acceptance.  To help you prepare, I will dispel some of the most common myths.

Myth #1: The Permanent Record

All of us have made mistakes at some point in our lives. In an application process, no concept is more intimidating than the possible threat of an unforgiving “permanent record” that will reveal all of our biggest mistakes. Luckily, there is no such thing as a “permanent record.”  When you attend an interview, you should be prepared to discuss anything you’ve included in primary and secondary applications.  Any information provided in those essays is fair game for discussion.

While a “permanent record” does not exist, there is a criminal record—this includes any misdemeanors or felonies. These have to be disclosed in the primary application and can prevent your application from serious consideration depending on the number and nature of offenses.

Myth #2: The Interviewer is Omnipotent

You may be worried that the interviewer will know everything about you and your application. This is not the case. Often the interviewer will not have time to read your application in detail before meeting you. It’s best to approach each interview as if it is “blind,” meaning that they do not know anything about you. You should introduce yourself and discuss your activities clearly and with careful explanation so that they can easily understand the nature of your experiences and the timeline of events.  If you leave out information or skip details because you assume that they already know this about you, you may be hurting yourself.  Start at the beginning and don’t assume anything.

Myth #3: Clothes Make the Man (or Woman)

While this medieval adage holds true in most circumstances, it’s best to avoid overdressing or under-dressing for your interview. There has been a lot of research on the psychology of clothing.  What you wear matters but be careful not to overdo it.  Wearing Gucci sunglasses or carrying a Brahman bag will not win you any extra points!  In fact, if you make these accessories the focus of your interview, it will provide insight on what you consider important. While you may talk about how much you enjoyed volunteering that summer in Guatemala, your designer style make contradict your statements. Dress simply and professionally. You should be the focus of the interview.

Myth #4: You Are Powerless

Most people believe that the interviewer is the person in charge in an interview. However, you decide what you share about yourself and what the interviewer takes away from the experience. You are actually the most powerful person in the room.  Ultimately, the way you present yourself and the information you choose to focus on will determine whether you are offered an acceptance or not.

In dispelling the common myths about interviews, I hope that you are able to see how much power you actually have in the medical school interview process. Your preparation will be critical to your success.  It’s necessary for you to practice taking on this level of responsibility in representing yourself.  While it is tempting to give your power away by believing that the interviewer has all the answers and control, you now know this isn’t the case.  Hopefully this information will empower you to focus all of your energy on your preparation. Start by scheduling a mock interview!

Free Webinar: Learn How to Prep for and Ace Your Medical School Interview! - Click here to register!

Alicia McNease Nimonkar is an Accepted.com advisor and editor specializing in healthcare admissions. Prior to joining Accepted, Alicia worked for five years as Student Advisor at UC Davis’ postbac program where she both evaluated applications and advised students applying successfully to med school and related programs.

Related Resources:

• The Ultimate Guide to Medical School Interview Success
• The 5 Most Important Tips for Your Medical School Interview
Medical School Admissions 101

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What You Should NOT Include in Your MBA Essays http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/28/what-you-should-not-include-in-your-mba-essays/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/28/what-you-should-not-include-in-your-mba-essays/#respond Sun, 28 Sep 2014 20:13:33 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25478 ]]> Is my personal statement too personal?

Don’t share too much personal information!

Do this. Write that. Include the other. What TO put in your MBA essays is the topic of many discussions. But what NOT to include is a less talked about conversation. Until now…

Check out these three things that you should NEVER include your MBA application essays:

1. Private, intimate details about your life.

You want to provide a personal account that highlights your character, experiences, and achievements; but tread carefully – too much information will cross the line into an inappropriate zone. Topics to steer clear of: sex, divorce, gross medical details, childbirth, bathroom humor, heavy partying etc. Hopefully you’re thinking, “Why on earth would anyone include that in an application!” If, however, you’re thinking, “Wow, I never thought to avoid these subjects – this is good to know,” then I’m glad you’re reading this!

The only time when it may be acceptable to discuss any of the above is to mention it as context for poor performance in the past. And then less is more. Focus on how you have dealt with the issue, overcome it, and moved on.

2. Broad declarative statements unsubstantiated by specific examples.

You probably learned this rule in elementary school, but we’ll review it – each topic sentence you write must be followed by supporting sentences. So if you claim that you are a team leader, you can’t just leave it at that. Instead, follow that with a few examples: What have you done to show your leadership abilities? How many people were on your team? How did you motivate your team members? Did you encounter any obstacles? If so, how did you overcome them? What did you gain from the experience overall?

This is particularly important when talking about work accomplishments. Saying that you developed a new product or organized a huge event begs for more questions. Answer those questions so that the adcom readers don’t need to ask them.

3. Exaggerations and lies.

Fact-checking has become a regular part of an admissions reader’s job. Please don’t exaggerate or lie. It’s unethical and unwise. It’ll only come back to bite you.

So there you have it: three places you don’t want to go in your MBA essays – at least if you do want to go to b-school.

MBA 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid

Accepted.com

 

Related Resources:

The Biggest Application Essay Mistake
• How Personal is Too Personal?
• Weakness, What Weakness?

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I Stink At SAT Math: What Next? http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/28/i-stink-at-sat-math-what-next/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/28/i-stink-at-sat-math-what-next/#respond Sun, 28 Sep 2014 16:56:26 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25854 ]]> Looking for more SAT tips? Check out our SAT blog posts.

Help! I Stink at SAT Math!

It’s pretty much inevitable that at some point during your SAT, you’re going to look at a problem and think, “Nope. Not happening.”

Or maybe it will be a few moments after, which can be even more frustrating—you work through what seems like the best way to attack a problem, but then after a good minute or so of work you’re still nowhere near an answer and don’t know what you’re even trying to do anymore.

What you do at that point is key, because the SAT is timed, after all. Every moment you spend looking blankly at a question is a moment gone to waste.

That’s part of why SAT math isn’t really like the rest of the math you do in school. One of the most important skills in the math section is knowing when to guess. That’s one thing you don’t really get from math class.

The principle is pretty simple: if you’re just starting to answer a question and you don’t know what to do, spend ~15 seconds exploring (don’t worry too much about the exact time, but realize this step has to be quick). Rework any equations you have. Label any measurements of a figure that you can infer. Write out the first elements in a series or look for other patterns.

And if, after exploring, you don’t know what to do next, don’t go back to square one and re-live your frustration. Instead, look first at whether there are any answer choices you can definitely rule out. Then circle the question in your test book, select a your best guess the answer sheet (this is why ruling out any answer choices you can is so important), and move on to the next question. Remember that every question in a section is worth the same, so it’s key that you give yourself enough time to get right every question that you can get right. Only after you’ve done that should you resume chewing your pencil and loathing that roadblock question.

As a side note, though, if you find yourself getting stuck on SAT math questions often but, at the same time, really think you know all the material that you need to for the test, then you might want to take a stab at the ACT instead. There’s a huge overlap between the tests, but there’s also a pretty subtle difference in SAT vs ACT math: the ACT tends to be a little bit more straightforward, so knowing the material is enough to answer most questions—it’s less often that you need to figure out subtle twists like what the SAT might throw at you.

Download 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid to learn how to eliminate the most common flaws in your application essays.

MagooshThis post was written by Lucas Fink, resident SAT expert at Magoosh, a leader in SAT Prep. For more SAT resources, check out Magoosh SAT vocabulary flashcards and the Magoosh SAT Blog!

Related Resources:

• Writing an Interesting SAT Essay in 25 Minutes
• Getting Ready to Apply to College Series
• GMAT, GRE, SAT, and All Things Test Prep

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Hey You – Yeah, You with the Medical School Interview Invite… http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/27/hey-you-yeah-you-with-the-medical-school-interview-invite/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/27/hey-you-yeah-you-with-the-medical-school-interview-invite/#respond Sun, 28 Sep 2014 03:32:19 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25818 ]]> Unless your wife is about to go into labor (or is already IN labor), then you should not under ANY circumstance answer your phone, or even leave your ringer on, during your medical school interview. Seem obvious to you? Then you’re one step ahead of med school applicants who let their phones ring and then wonder why they didn’t get accepted!

Medical School Interview Webinar

Learn additional interview do’s and don’ts during Tuesday’s webinar, Interviewing with Impact: How to Make an Impression in Your Medical School Interviews. You still haven’t signed up? Well it’s not too late (but it’s getting there) – reserve your spot now to get one step closer to putting those precious initials after your name.

The details:

Date: Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Time: 10:00 AM PST/1:00 PM EST (See what time that is for you by clicking here.)

Click here to reserve your spot!

Registration link: Interviewing with Impact: How to Make an Impression in Your Medical School Interviews (Registration is free, but required.)

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

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The 5 Most Important Tips for Your Medical School Interview http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/24/5-important-medical-school-interview-tips/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/24/5-important-medical-school-interview-tips/#respond Wed, 24 Sep 2014 17:33:37 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25834 ]]> Free Webinar: Learn How to Prep for and Ace Your Medical School Interview! - click here to learn more!

You don’t want to draw a blank on the easy stuff.

Looking for med school interview secrets? You’ve come to the right place. Read on to discover the 5 most important tips for acing your medical school interview.

1. Stay informed. It’s important that you know what’s going on in the world of medicine. Stay abreast of issues by reading medical blogs and journals, and take the time to speak to doctors or researchers whom you may encounter during work or volunteer hours. Reading or speaking about current medical issues will help you develop your own opinions. Your interviewer will be impressed with your up-to-date knowledge, as well as the fact that you’ve sat and thought about your personal views on the issues.

2. Read interview feedback. Having some idea of what to expect on the big day will enable you to think in advance about how to answer common questions. The Student Doctor Network offers med school applicants excellent interview feedback that will help you prepare for your interviews and build confidence.

3. Study the school’s website. In order to express your unique fit with your target program, you’ll need to know as much as possible about the program’s mission, teaching methods, student body and faculty, research initiatives, and resident/fellowship placements. The website is the best place to start to find this information, but you should also reach out to current students and alumni to obtain “insider” information on the details of the program.

4. Review your application, especially your AMCAS and secondary essays. Your interviewer will likely ask you some basic questions on information you provided in your application and essays. You don’t want to draw a blank on the easy stuff, so read up on the basics so you’re familiar with all your experiences, including important dates, awards, relevant coursework, etc.

5. Reflect on death. End-of-life issues may make you uncomfortable, but it’s important that you’re able to respond to a question on the subject seriously and with dignity. Questions like, “How will you handle losing a patient?” or “How do you feel about euthanasia or a patient’s right to die?” should not be approached lightly. Your interviewer will want to see that you’ve thought about these tough ethical and emotional questions and that you know where you stand.

Good luck!

Free Webinar: Learn How to Prep for and Ace Your Medical School Interview! - Click here to register!

 

 

 

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

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The Georgetown McDonough MBA: Everything You Need to Know http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/24/the-georgetown-mcdonough-mba-everything-you-need-to-know/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/24/the-georgetown-mcdonough-mba-everything-you-need-to-know/#respond Wed, 24 Sep 2014 17:10:11 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25830 ]]> Shari_HubertGeorgetown McDonough is famous for being the place where business and policy meet, but there is so much more to say about this top MBA Program.

Listen to the recording of our conversation with Shari Hubert, Associate Dean of MBA Admissions at Georgetown McDonough School of Business, for a phenomenal overview of what’s new and exciting at the school.

00:04:38 – About the Full-Time MBA at Georgetown McDonough.

00:08:57 – How the global focus plays out.

00:15:21 – The intersection of Business & Policy.

00:20:15 – Other strengths of the McDonough program.

00:25:14 – The Real Estate Initiative.

00:27:37 – What McDonough is looking for in their one required essay question: “Why You?”

00:29:20 – The admissions office as a resource for applicants and the role of admissions advisors.

00:35:43 – What Shari wishes applicants would think about before applying!

00:39:52 – It’s 10pm and you are reading one last application after a long day: What would make you jump for joy and what would really bother you?

Listen to the full conversation to learn more!*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Related Links:

Georgetown McDonough MBA 
• 
The Real Estate Finance Initiative
• Where Does Wall St. Hire: U.S. B-Schools Sending Grads into Financial Services
• McDonough on Tumblr
• 
McDonough on Twitter
• McDonough on Facebook
• Global Social Enterprise Initiative
 Georgetown McDonough 2015 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
• Georgetown McDonough B-School Zone

Related Shows:

Jeff Reid
• MBA Project Search
• Honing in On the Cornell Johnson MBA
• The Tuck School of Business and the Global Insight Requirement

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http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/24/the-georgetown-mcdonough-mba-everything-you-need-to-know/feed/ 0 Georgetown McDonough,podcast Georgetown McDonough is famous for being the place where business and policy meet, but there is so much more to say about this top MBA Program. - Listen to the recording of our conversation with Shari Hubert, Georgetown McDonough is famous for being the place where business and policy meet, but there is so much more to say about this top MBA Program. Listen to the recording of our conversation with Shari Hubert, Associate Dean of MBA Admissions at Georgetown McDonough School of Business, for a phenomenal overview of what’s new and exciting at the school. 00:04:38 – About the Full-Time MBA at Georgetown McDonough. 00:08:57 – How the global focus plays out. 00:15:21 – The intersection of Business & Policy. 00:20:15 – Other strengths of the McDonough program. 00:25:14 – The Real Estate Initiative. 00:27:37 – What McDonough is looking for in their one required essay question: “Why You?” 00:29:20 – The admissions office as a resource for applicants and the role of admissions advisors. 00:35:43 – What Shari wishes applicants would think about before applying! 00:39:52 – It’s 10pm and you are reading one last application after a long day: What would make you jump for joy and what would really bother you? *Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com. Related Links: • Georgetown McDonough MBA  • The Real Estate Finance Initiative • Where Does Wall St. Hire: U.S. B-Schools Sending Grads into Financial Services • McDonough on Tumblr • McDonough on Twitter • McDonough on Facebook • Global Social Enterprise Initiative • Georgetown McDonough 2015 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines • Georgetown McDonough B-School Zone Related Shows: • Jeff Reid • MBA Project Search • Honing in On the Cornell Johnson MBA • The Tuck School of Business and the Global Insight Requirement Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk: Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no 47:50
MIT Master in Finance – Is It the Right Fit for You (and Vice Versa)? http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/24/mit-master-in-finance-is-it-the-right-fit-for-you-and-vice-versa/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/24/mit-master-in-finance-is-it-the-right-fit-for-you-and-vice-versa/#respond Wed, 24 Sep 2014 16:54:58 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25764 ]]> Listen to our Popular Podcast Episode - Masters in Finance: What You Need to KnowPracticality is the essence of MIT’s Master in Finance program. It’s just one year, as opposed to numerous MFin programs that are 1.5 to 2 years, and, as the website notes, it was developed “as a direct response to demand in the financial industry.” In spite of the short duration, the program offers flexibility to tailor it to your needs. Moreover, it’s an “early career” program – students’ pre-program experience averages 0-4 years, according to the website, with about 50% coming directly from undergrad.

Here are some additional distinguishing elements of the program:

• Its location in the business school deepens its opportunities; you’ll take some courses with MBA, PhD, and Sloan Fellows students, giving you direct access to people with deep experience and networks across many industries and functions. You can also participate in certain clubs such as Venture Capital and Private Equity Club.

• The flexibility extends to the option to take some courses at the School of Engineering and/or School of Science.

• The practical nature of the program includes a Finance Research Practicum, which addresses real-world situations and problems.

• The opportunity to build strong, enduring relationships arises from the extensive small-group work, which also prepares you to succeed in an increasingly interconnected and team-focused work environment.

• Career development is an ongoing focus from the first semester, with a “Career Core” curriculum. There are also career treks and opportunities to explore industry segments.

• About 88% of 2013 graduates received employment offers as of October 2013, notes the Employment Report.

• It’s a truly global program, with 84% of students from outside the US.

Now, what does it take to win access to these delectable resources and opportunities? With an acceptance rate of around 10%, a lot.

• Solid academic achievement and test scores, with average GPA of 3.7 (in programs spanning various disciplines, from economics and math to engineering and business to humanities and science), GMAT mid 80% range 700-770, with quant 48-51; GRE quant mid 80% range 161-170.

• Prerequisite quantitative coursework – if you click on the link, scroll down and take the self-assessment!

• Most desired personal qualities are ability to collaborate, willingness to think/look outside of the proverbial box (a classic MIT value), and high motivation (use your essays to demonstrate these qualities).

• While many students have no official professional experience, the adcom wants to see at least a related internship, so that students come with some practical exposure.

• Interviews are selective (about 30%) and by invitation only; every accepted applicant is interviewed (about 30% of those interviewed are admitted).

• Good news for internationals: a TOEFL score is not required!

By the way, on the program’s website there is an extensive and thorough discussion of recruiting, careers, etc. in the FAQ – I recommend perusing it.

Click here for the lowdown on one of the most up and coming specialized masters programs in the business world.

Cindy Tokumitsu By , author and co-author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports, including Why MBA and Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted.com.

Related Resources:

MIT Sloan B-School Zone
• Princeton University Master in Finance: Is It Right for You, and Are You Right for Princeton?
• The Facts About Financial Services

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How to Write about Your Research Interests http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/23/how-to-write-about-your-research-interests-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/23/how-to-write-about-your-research-interests-2/#respond Tue, 23 Sep 2014 19:23:25 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25341 ]]> Click here to download your copy of Get Your Game On: Prepping for Your Grad School Application!

Set out your plans and goals

“How to Write about Your Research Interests” is excerpted from the Accepted.com special report, Get Your Game On: Prepping for Your Grad School Application. To download the entire free special report, click here.

The most common challenge that my clients face when writing a statement of purpose (SOP) for a Master’s or PhD application is how to describe, in concrete terms, what their research interests and goals are. It’s one thing to express interest in a field, or explain where that interest came from—but when it comes to setting out some plans and goals, people get a bit anxious.

This is understandable— some people worry they’ll be held to their still-evolving ideas as if they were chiseled in stone; and others simply haven’t thought those ideas through very much yet. Take a deep breath! No one’s going to produce your SOP when it’s time for you to start writing your thesis and expect it to correspond exactly—everyone knows your knowledge and ideas will develop throughout your grad program. On the other hand, the SOP is the way for the committee to see that you possess depth of interest and comprehension in your field, and that you understand what goes into research. If you talk about ideas that are too vague or nebulous, or that aren’t addressable by your discipline, then you risk sounding naïve.

Here are some questions/pointers to help you focus and narrow your interests:

• What are the broad research questions/issues that interest you? Can you describe your interests in a sentence? In a paragraph? Try to create a summary of your interests that you can work with.

• Within those broad areas of interest, have you begun to focus on more specific questions? If you’re not sure what the current questions/problems are in your field, now is the time to start catching up—look at recent journal publications, go to conferences if you can, etc. Reading the lit in your field will also give you a sense of how to frame your ideas in the language of your field.

• Have you done any research in this field already? If so, do you intend to build on your previous work in grad school or go in a new direction?

• How will your research contribute to the field?

• Some projects described in SOPs are achievable in the short-term, while others are big enough to last a career. If your interests/goals fall into this latter category, acknowledge the fact that you’re being ambitious—and try to identify some aspect of your interests that you can pursue as a first step.

• Use your SOP to demonstrate your skills (and past experience) in your field, as well as to define the next steps you intend to take.

• Focusing your interests will also involve more detailed research about the programs you plan on applying to. Who might be your research supervisor? How do your interests relate to the work this scholar or scholars are doing now? How would you contribute to the department, and to the discipline?

• Your SOP will also address your longer-term goals (post-degree). Do you plan to pursue a career in research/academia? (For many PhD programs, this remains the department’s formal expectation, even though many PhDs find employment outside the academy.) If you’re applying for your MA/MS, be prepared to discuss what your plans are. How will the degree help you?

 In the next post I’ll talk more about how to show you have the skills to succeed in grad school.

Download our free report: GET YOUR GAME ON: Preparing for Your Grad School Application

Rebecca Blustein By , Accepted.com editor and former Student Affairs Officer at UCLA’s Scholarship Resource Center, and author of Financing Your Future: Winning Fellowships, Scholarships and Awards for Grad School. Rebecca will be happy to assist you with your grad school applications.

Related Resources:

• 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Graduate School SOPs
• Choosing a PhD Program: 3 Tips
• Obtaining Graduate Assistantships

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HEC Paris Launches New MBA-MIF Program http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/23/hec-paris-launches-new-mba-mif-program/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/23/hec-paris-launches-new-mba-mif-program/#respond Tue, 23 Sep 2014 18:22:34 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25710 ]]> Check out our HEC Paris b-school zone!HEC Paris Business School just announced the launch of its new MBA-MIF program in a press release Monday. The 20-month program (16 months for the MBA and 10 months for the Masters in Finance) will provide students with an integrated curriculum, allowing for different tracks for students with different skills and experience levels. Within the MBA component of the program, students will be able specialize in entrepreneurship, strategy, or general management, and combine that with the finance specialization in the MIF component. Students will receive “early intensive training in finance, thereby enhancing preparation for banking and consulting interviews.”

Upon completion of the dual degree program, students will receive an MBA and an MSc in International Finance.

According to Jacques Olivier, HEC Paris Professor of Finance and Program Director, “The financial crisis has challenged business schools to find new ways to equip their graduates with the right set of knowledge, skills and values. HEC Paris has designed the MBA-MIF dual degree for young professionals who wish to acquire not only the general management education and leadership skills from a leading MBA program, but also advanced technical knowledge in finance to differentiate themselves from their peers. This unique combination will allow dual degree students to fast-track onto senior management positions within finance and consulting.”

See the HEC Paris website for more information on the MBA-MIF program.

For advice on how to get accepted to HEC Paris, please see our HEC Paris B-School Zone.

Click here for the lowdown on one of the most up and coming specialized masters programs in the business world.

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

• Which Business School Will Get Me to Wall Street?
• Vault’s 2015 Banking Rankings
• The Facts About Financial Services

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How I Wrote a Personal Statement that Got Me Into Harvard Law School http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/23/how-i-wrote-a-personal-statement-that-got-me-into-harvard-law-school/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/23/how-i-wrote-a-personal-statement-that-got-me-into-harvard-law-school/#respond Tue, 23 Sep 2014 16:35:48 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25440 ]]> Click here for law school admissions tips!

Law schools are looking for deep thinkers.

When I was applying to law school, the advisor at my college told me to intern for a lawyer. Sound advice, and one I might give, but unfortunately my experience was miserable. I was even told by my employer that I was “not law school material.”

So, how did I even get into law school, never mind Harvard Law? There are the general requirements: grades, LSAT scores, recommendation letters, and the elusive element of luck. But, I also managed to write a personal statement that said something about who I was and why I wanted to go to law school, a statement that had nothing to do with my terrible intern experience.

People think that law schools want to hear how much you know about the law or how you’re going to hang your own shingle, go into politics, or become General Counsel at a large corporation. But, law schools actually want to know how your mind works. They are looking for deep thinkers who look at the world around them and are able to establish some critical distance to evaluate both their own experience and the experiences of others. This is the heart of what legal thinking is.

Luckily, I was able to convey the moment when I decided I wanted to go to law school and why I came to that decision in a way that both told a story and gave the admissions committee a good idea of the thinking process that went with it. It’s not enough to give someone a great story – although that’s vital, too. It’s equally important to explain why that story meant something to you. Schools look for the way you process an experience and what unique insight you can write about it. That kind of writing, an articulate explanation of thought, is the same kind of skill that law schools want in their classrooms studying civil procedure.

8 Tips For Law School Admissions Success

JessicaPishko

Jessica Pishko graduated with a J.D. from Harvard Law School and received an M.F.A. from Columbia University. She spent two years guiding students through the medical school application process at Columbia’s PostBacc Program and teaches writing at all levels. 

 

Related Resources:

• 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Law School Personal Statements
• Your Law School Personal Statement…It Needs to Be, Well, Personal!
• 2015 Best Law Schools by U.S. News

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Going Beyond “Because I Want to Help People” http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/23/going-beyond-because-i-want-to-help-people/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/23/going-beyond-because-i-want-to-help-people/#respond Tue, 23 Sep 2014 16:13:39 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25814 ]]> Trust us – your interviewer has already heard the “Because I want to help people” answer. In fact, she’s probably heard it so many times, that if she hears it again, she’ll start to tune out. Learn how to answer questions uniquely – in a way that truly expresses who you are and how you’re different from the throngs of other applicants.

Register for the Medical School Interview Webinar!

Learn succinct tips on how to stand out during your med school interview during our upcoming webinar, Interviewing with Impact: How to Make an Impression in Your Medical School Interviews, a MUST-ATTEND event for anyone who wishes to WOW the med school adcom with a blow-them-away interview.

Date: Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Time: 10:00 AM PST/1:00 PM EST (See what time that is for you by clicking here.)

Click here to reserve your spot!

Registration is required (and free). Reserve your spot for Interviewing with Impact: How to Make an Impression in Your Medical School Interviews now!

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

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Writing About Your Experiences Abroad http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/22/writing-about-your-experiences-abroad/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/22/writing-about-your-experiences-abroad/#respond Mon, 22 Sep 2014 18:25:17 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25755 ]]>
Learn how to use sample essays to create exemplary essays of your own! [Free Downloadable Guide]

Ensure that your study abroad experience serves a role other than window-dressing.

You’ve done it – you studied, worked, or volunteered abroad and now you want to include part of this in your personal statement. Maybe you want to show that you’ve experienced a different culture or that you’ve managed to go outside of your comfort zone. Maybe you’ve had interesting experiences – met people, climbed mountains, or lived without air-conditioning. Or maybe you had the opportunity to help people who genuinely needed it.

But, at this point, you’ve also realized that many other applicants have similar experiences, and you are right. While the experience may have been transformative for you, requiring you to learn how to operate without your usual safety net in a foreign environment, you need to ensure that your study abroad experience serves a role in your essay as something other than window-dressing.

There’s an Onion article which jokes that someone’s short work experience in Africa allowed her to post a better Facebook photo, and, without the proper analysis, descriptions of abroad experiences can feel the same way in an admissions essay. Often, I read essays with lush descriptions of exotic scenery and people who speak different languages, yet you the writer – the most important person – stays the same. Without showing admissions committees why a study abroad experience was transformative, these types of stories simply blend together and give the impression that you were there simply to add another notch to your resume.

So, what should you do? Studying abroad can be a pivotal moment in your personal journey, but a personal statement needs to explain exactly why. If, indeed, gaining experience with other cultures was important to you at that stage, what exactly did you learn? It can’t be enough to just give a story about someone you met while traveling, you have to explain why that person changed you. An admissions committee member once told me that it mattered less what an applicant’s experience was, what mattered was how she talked about it. Even the most seemingly dull experience can be transformative to someone who is really paying attention.

Learn how to use sample essays to create an exemplary essay of your own! Click here to download our free report!

Jessica PishkoCheck out Jessica Pishko's bio! graduated with a J.D. from Harvard Law School and received an M.F.A. from Columbia University. She spent two years guiding students through the medical school application process at Columbia’s PostBacc Program and teaches writing at all levels.

 

Related Resources:

• Two Ways to Reveal Leadership in Your Applications
What is Passion in Admissions?
7 Signs an Experience Belongs in Your Application Essay

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The Most Economically Diverse Colleges in the U.S. http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/22/the-most-economically-diverse-colleges-in-the-u-s/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/22/the-most-economically-diverse-colleges-in-the-u-s/#respond Mon, 22 Sep 2014 17:13:48 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25706 ]]> Check out our College Admissions 101 Pages!According to the New York Times recent diversity rankings, the following colleges and universities have made the greatest efforts to admit students from economically diverse backgrounds, meaning, a larger share of low-income families. The schools were chosen based on the number of students receiving Pell Grants (students must be in the bottom 40% of the income distribution to be eligible) and the net price of attendance for low- and middle-income families.

Top 20 Economically Diverse Colleges

1. Vassar

2. Grinnell

3. UNC – Chapel Hill

4. Smith

5. Amherst

6. Harvard

7. St. Mary’s (Indiana)

8. Pomona

9. Susquehanna

10. Columbia

11. Rice

12. Kalamazoo

13. Wesleyan

14. Denison

15. Barnard

16. Brown

17. Williams

18. Stanford

19. MIT

20. Haverford

The New York Times lead article on these rankings states the importance of the efforts made by these schools:

“This education gap is a problem not only for the teenagers on the wrong end of it. It’s a problem for the American economy. The economic differences between college graduates and everyone else have reached record levels. Yet for many low-income children – even many who get A’s in high school and do well on the SAT – college remains out of reach. No wonder that upward mobility is less common in the United States than in many other rich countries.”

A few more highlights:

 • 23% of students at Vassar’s freshmen received federal Pell grants. In 2007, that number was only at 12%. Lower income students pay roughly $6,000 per year for tuition, much of which is earned through loans and campus jobs.

 • Only 8% of students at Washington University in St. Louis receive Pell grants (compared to 6% and 5% in the last few years), even though this school is ranked as one of the top 25 riches colleges in the U.S. The point: Just because a school has a high endowment, that doesn’t mean that it is more likely to open its doors to lower-income students. In fact, Susquehanna (who has the highest number of Pell-eligible students at 25%) and Wesleyan (at 18%) have relatively small endowments and students from lower-income families make up a rather large part of the student body.

 • In 2008, only one out of three high achieving (top 4%) low-income high school seniors attended a selective college.

An Inside Higher Ed article on the subject offers the following points:

 • To make the list, schools had to have a four-year graduation rate of 75% or higher; therefore, some schools with high Pell-eligible student populations weren’t ranked, in particular, UC Berkeley which has more than 27% of students on Pell Grants. (But only a 71% four year graduation rate.)

 • 46% of students at CUNY Baruch receive Pell Grants, but they too were under the 75% limit (by far, at 39%).

 • The article points out that only three public institutions made it to the list – University of Virginia, the College of William and Mary (also in Virginia), and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Download 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid to learn how to eliminate the most common flaws in your application essays.

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

• Tips for Answering Common Application Essay Prompts
• Preparing for College in High School
College Admissions 101

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Georgetown McDonough 2015 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/22/georgetown-mcdonough-2015-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/22/georgetown-mcdonough-2015-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/#comments Mon, 22 Sep 2014 16:55:31 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24796 ]]> Check out the rest of our 2015 MBA application essay tips!Georgetown McDonough, the top MBA program at the intersection of business and government, takes advantage of its Washington D.C. location, its connections to the greater Georgetown University community, and its Jesuit roots while at the same time time focusing on the global nature of twenty-first century business.  Your application should show that you need the education provided by McDonough to achieve your goals and that you wholeheartedly embrace its values.

Essay:

Essays should all be double-spaced using 12pt. font. Prepare your attachments offline in separate document files and upload them individually. Please follow the instructions regarding length of each attachment, and label each page with your name.

1. Why You? (Hint: We are looking for an answer that cannot be found from research on our website.) (750 words or fewer)

This question is all about fit. It is an attempt by Georgetown to learn about you and why you think you are a good fit for Georgetown and Georgetown is a good fit for you.  Georgetown wants to see how you think and come to a major decision.

There are lots of different ways to approach this essay. Clearly you shouldn’t spit back the McDonough web site. If you can, talk to current students about the culture and distinctive elements of the program to gain a deeper understanding of it. You also need to reflect on the reasons you personally would choose McDonough. Why is it the best program for you?

You could start with a highly influential experience that influence your decision to pursue an MBA, go into more depth about what you hope to achieve and why you believe Georgetown is the best place for you to achieve it.

Alternatively, you could start with a day in the future where you attain your goal and then circle back to discuss the development of that goal and McDonough’s role in helping you achieve it. You can also discuss how you intend to contribute to McDonought’s community.

In short, why should McDonough accept you? How will you make the school proud that they did?

Optional Essays:

1. If you are not currently employed full-time, use this essay to provide information about your current activities. (250 words or fewer)

Show them that you are using this period to acquire new skills, contribute to your community, or grow in some way.

2. Please provide any information that you would like to add to your application that you have not otherwise included. (500 words or fewer)

Please see The Optional Essay: To Be or Not to Be.

Re-Applicant Essay:

How have you strengthened your candidacy since your last application? We are particularly interested in hearing about how you have grown professionally and personally. (500 words or fewer)

This is a key question (whether asked explicitly or not) for all reapplicants to any MBA program. What has changed? How are you “new and improved” since last year — when you were rejected? Georgetown does you the favor of providing this explicit prompt so you can address this question while retaining the ability to address the main essay.

If you would like professional guidance with your Georgetown McDonough School MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our  MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Georgetown McDonough MBA application.

Georgetown McDonough 2015 MBA Application Deadlines:

Application Deadline Decision Notification
 Round 1  October 10, 2014  December 20, 2014
 Round 2  January 5, 2015  March 20, 2015
 Round 3  April 1, 2015  May 15, 2015

Linda Abraham By , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

 

Have our MBA admissions experts critique your Georgetown McDonough application!

Related Resources:

2015 MBA Application Essay Tips
Optional Essays: When and How to Write Them
• 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your MBA Application Essays

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Snag Your Stanford GSB Class of 2017 Seat http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/21/snag-your-stanford-gsb-class-of-2017-seat/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/21/snag-your-stanford-gsb-class-of-2017-seat/#respond Sun, 21 Sep 2014 17:25:38 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25781 ]]> If you’re aiming to attend Stanford GSB or another top 10 MBA program in 2015, then you’ll want to view our most recent webinar, Get Accepted to Stanford Graduate School of Business.

stanford 2014 webinar title

In her presentation, Linda Abraham, CEO & Founder of Accepted.com, offers advice on how to apply successfully to Stanford GSB or another top-ranked MBA program.

View Get Accepted to Stanford Graduate School of Business on-demand now!

Watch the webinar
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Harvard’s School of Public Health Receives $350 Million Gift from Hong Kong Group http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/21/harvards-school-of-public-health-receives-350-million-gift-from-hong-kong-group/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/21/harvards-school-of-public-health-receives-350-million-gift-from-hong-kong-group/#respond Sun, 21 Sep 2014 17:01:52 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25712 ]]> Applying to med school? Download your free copy of Navigate the Med School Maze!On Monday, Harvard announced the largest gift in its history, $350 million to the School of Public Health from the Morningside Foundation, a Hong Kong group run by two Hong Kong brothers, Ronnie and Gerald Chan. The school will be renamed for T. H. Chan, the brothers’ father. (Gerald Chan earned degrees from the School of Public Health in the 1970s – a master’s in medical radiological physics and a doctorate in radiation biology.)

This will be the seventh largest donation ever made to an American institution of higher education.

According to Harvard officials, this gift will be used in the following four areas: pandemics (like cancer and obesity); failing health systems; poverty and humanitarian crises; and harmful environments (like pollution or violence). The Ebola outbreak, for example, would hit three of four areas – it’s a pandemic that relates to poverty and highlights a significant health system problem.

Harvard’s president, Drew Gilpin Faust, says that the gift will give students more financial aid and enable the school to expand its programs. “It’s always been, as the whole field always is, under-resourced,” she said. “It’s overwhelmingly dependent on money from federal grants that are under threat….We’re all realizing how important public health is as we become more global and diseases are shared across boundaries.”

For more info, please check out http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2014/09/largest-gift-to-harvard/.

Download your free special report: Navigate the Med School Maze!

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

• Med School Secondary Essay Handbook: School Specific Tips
Medical School Admissions 101
• Shaping the Evolution of Humanity’s Health: Harvard Medical School Student IV

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Hints for Admission to Combined BS/MD Programs http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/21/hints-for-admission-to-combined-bsmd-programs-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/21/hints-for-admission-to-combined-bsmd-programs-2/#respond Sun, 21 Sep 2014 16:27:19 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25411 ]]> Click here to download your full copy of Are You Cut Out for a Combined BS/MD Program?

Outstanding grades are a must.

“Hints for Admission to Combined BS/MD Programs” is excerpted from the Accepted.com special report, Am I Cut Out for a Combined BS/MD Program? To download the entire free special report, click here

If you are planning to apply to combined BS/MD programs, early planning is essential. These programs vary in their admission requirements and developing the extracurricular resume that will make you a competitive candidate will take advance planning.

• Consider your math and science curriculum. Outstanding grades are a must, as is a commitment to maintaining them in college. Your grades, however should come from many of the more challenging course offerings in your high school. Many BS/MD programs will look carefully at your entire curriculum, but also pay extra attention to your math and science preparation.

• Plan for Standardized Testing. The test requirements for these programs also vary. Some will require SAT II exams, and might specify which ones. As you consider your long-range plans, it is best to take the SAT II exams while the material is fresh in your mind. Are you taking chemistry in school this year? If so, think about taking the chemistry SAT II next spring. For the most selective of the combined programs, successful applicants are presenting excellent test scores as well as grades. If you need time to prepare for the SAT or ACT, then allow for it and research your test prep options.

• Focus on research or health related experiences. Your exposure to the health care field is paramount in confirming your commitment to the field of medicine. Volunteer experience and physician shadowing are two ways that you can gain experience in a health care setting. Scientific research will give you the tools you need as a medical student to understand the changes in the field of medicine. While many science fair projects will guide you through the scientific method, a more complex, longer term project under the mentorship of a local college professor will offer more exposure to the type of scientific study you will undertake in medical school.

If you think these combined and/or accelerated programs interest you, begin planning as early as possible and keep an open mind regarding all of your undergraduate and graduate school options.

Am I Cut Out for a Combined BS/MD Program?

Accepted.com

 

Related Resources:

• How to Select Extracurriculars that will Set Your Medical School App Apart
How to Get the Most out of Shadowing a Doctor
• GMAT, GRE, SAT, and All Things Test Prep

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U.S. News 2015 Best Colleges http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/19/u-s-news-2015-best-colleges/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/19/u-s-news-2015-best-colleges/#respond Fri, 19 Sep 2014 16:22:51 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25762 ]]> Applying to College? Check out our College Admissions 101 Pages!Last week U.S. News released the 30th edition of its college rankings. New information found on school profile pages (but not taken into consideration for rankings) include data on campus crime and security and a summary of three-year federal loan default rates. Interesting categories for ranking include Economic Diversity, Campus Ethnic Diversity, and Best Colleges for Veterans.

Here are some highlights:

Top 10 Best U.S. Universities

1. Princeton University (NJ)
2. Harvard University (MA)
3. Yale University (CT)
4. Columbia University (NY)
4. Stanford University (CA)
4. University of Chicago (IL)
7. Massachusetts Institute of technology (MA)
8. Duke University (NC)
8. University of Pennsylvania (PA)
10. California Institute of Technology (CA)

Top 5 Best Value Universities

1. Harvard University (MA)
2. Princeton University (NJ)
3. Yale University (CT)
4. Stanford University (CA)
5. MIT (MA)

Top 5 Best Value Liberal Arts Colleges

1. Amherst College (MA)
2. Williams College (MA)
3. Pomona College (CA)
4. Wellesley College (MA)
5. Soka University of America (CA)

Top 10 Best Undergraduate Business Programs

1. University of Pennsylvania (PA)
2. MIT (MA)
2. University of California – Berkeley (CA)
4. University of Michigan – Ann Arbor (MI)
5. New York University (NY)
6. University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill
6. University of Virginia (VA)
8. Carnegie Mellon University (PA)
8. Indiana University – Bloomington (IN)
8. University of Texas – Austin

John Byrne from Poets & Quants provides an analysis of these rankings (the undergraduate business ones) and shares additional highlights from the top 50, including the following:

• Within the top 10 and certainly within the top 5, there was little change from last year – just a little switching around here and there, including Cornell and Notre Dame which both fell from the top 10, from 10th place last year to 11th this year.

• Big jumpers in the top 25 include the University of Georgia and Michigan State which both climbed six spots to 21st place (they share this position with six other programs, including University of Maryland, which fell three places this year). In the top 50, University of Pittsburgh took the largest leap, from 49th place last year to 39th this year. Babson jumped five places from 34th to 29th.

• Ohio State University fell four places, finishing in 20th this year; Southern Methodist University dropped seven spots from 38th last year to 45th this year.

• Wharton received the highest score (4.8 out of 5) on the index scale (1 being “marginal” and 5 being “distinguished”).

See the U.S. News Ranking Methodology and the P&Q article for details on how these schools were ranked.

For a critique of the U.S. News rankings (and how the rankings actually hurt students and applicants), see this Vox article.

Download Free: Preparing for College in High School: A To-Do List for Eleventh Graders

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

• Tips for Answering Common Application Essay Prompts
• 3 Mistakes Successful College Applicants Don’t Make
• Getting Ready to Apply to Top Tier Colleges and Universities: A Four Part Series for Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors

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An Indian B-School Hopeful Racking Up the Work Experience http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/19/iv-with-an-indian-b-school-hopeful-racking-up-the-work-experience/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/19/iv-with-an-indian-b-school-hopeful-racking-up-the-work-experience/#respond Fri, 19 Sep 2014 15:32:21 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25635 ]]> MBA Applicant Bloggers

Balaji

This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with MBA applicant bloggers, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at the MBA application process. And now…introducing Balaji.

Accepted: First, can you tell us a little about yourself? Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What is your favorite non-school book? 

Balaji: I’m based on out Bangalore, India. I currently work as a Program Management Analyst in a Fortune 100 company. I did my undergrad in Bachelor of Engineering (Electronics & Instrumentation Engineering) from Anna University, Chennai.

I love reading fictional and history books. My favorite ones have been Dan Brown’s series and my most favorite book related to history is Glimpses of World History by Nehru.

Accepted: What stage of the admissions process are you up to? 

Balaji: I did not start my application process yet. As I currently only have 3 and a half years of experience. And after thorough study, I thought I would require 5 years of experience to have a good chance of getting into top b-schools as the average WE is 5 years.

Last year, I tried applying to one b-school to get some experience in the application process. But I was dinged without interview, and I think it was due to my WE, as I had only 2 years of experience while applying.

Accepted: Do you plan on staying in your current industry post-MBA, or changing to a new field/career?

Balaji: I haven’t decided on that yet. I wanted to stay in my field for sometime post-MBA, as I love Project/Program Management – rather to generalize I love management/operational stuffs.

Also I have a plan to start my own business at some point in future.

Accepted: As an Indian male in the software industry (a highly represented applicant group), you’re going to need to work hard to distinguish yourself from the crowd. What are some things that set you apart from your competition? 

Balaji: Yes, I belong to Indian-Male category but not in software industry any more. My previous employer was a top 15 IT service provider in the world. But as soon I was done with my undergrad, I wanted to pursue an MBA. So I avoided any software related jobs in my previous employer, so I worked as Enterprise Project Management Analyst. After 3 years working with CGI. I moved to Honeywell (here I work for Aero Division). I thought working in Fortune 100 Company will make my profile/application more visible and strong.

Now moving onto distinguishing myself from the highly represented group, below are my extra-curricular activities I presently do/did during my work, undergrad and high school.

A.    Student Coordinator in National Entrepreneurship Network during my last 2 years of my undergrad.

B.    Core Cultural Committee member during my last 2 years of my undergrad – in charge/single point of contact for all technical related activities.

C.    Was a Sergeant of National cadet corps in my high school.

D.    Was a vice-captain of my high school football (soccer) team.

E.    Was core member in corporate social responsibility team at my previous employer. We conducted many charity and fundraiser events for orphanages, etc.

F.    Certified Competent Communicator and Competent leader from Toastmasters International. And also served as Vice President Education for 2 terms.

G.    Finally was a core member in Employee Welfare Association club at my previous employer.

On Entrepreneurship: My in-law runs an event management company. I take care of the business when he is held up with other important works or on travel.

Accepted: Why did you decide to blog about your experience? What have you gained from the experience? What do you hope others will learn?

Balaji: There isn’t a better way than forums and blogs to tell everyone around the world who is currently preparing for the GMAT/MBA application that it is easy to get into top b-school with your efforts and perseverance. I thought, if I start blogging about my experience I can learn my mistakes. (In PM terminology: We always to tend to document our project plan and risks etc., so that it will be helpful for the lessons learnt at the end of the project.)

And for others, there will always be room to improve from one’s own mistakes from others’ mistakes/experiences.

You can read more about Balaji’sb-school journey by checking out his blog, GNPTH: My GMAT/MBA Journey. Thank you Balaji for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages.

MBA admissions tips for Indian applicants! Download Free.

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

GMAT 101 Page
Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One
Entrepreneurship & the MBA

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Is Your MBA Application Ready to Go Live? http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/18/is-your-mba-application-ready-to-go-live/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/18/is-your-mba-application-ready-to-go-live/#respond Thu, 18 Sep 2014 19:58:29 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25741 ]]> FinalCheck1Wait! Are you sure you’re ready to hit submit? Are you certain that your MBA application is in tip-top condition and ready to go live? Don’t you want a definitive stamp of approval? An A+ grade that will enable you to send off your application with confidence?

With Accepted’s new Final Check service, you’ll receive a final review and critique of your essays, resume, and short answer/optional question responses. Our expert consultants will let you know what you can do to further optimize your application to get it ready for submission.

Now’s the time to get your Final Check…especially with the following deadlines right around the corner:

• Sept. 23 – MIT Sloan
• Sept. 24 – INSEAD and Kellogg
• Sept. 26 – Booth
• Oct. 1 – Stanford, Haas, Johnson, and Wharton

Give Your MBA Application that Final Check!

Submit with confidence! Get your Final Check today!

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Tips for Answering Columbia University Supplemental Essay Prompts http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/18/tips-for-answering-columbia-university-supplemental-essay-prompts/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/18/tips-for-answering-columbia-university-supplemental-essay-prompts/#respond Thu, 18 Sep 2014 17:13:41 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25720 ]]> New York CityThis post about the Columbia supplement to the Common Application is part of a series of posts written to help you complete the 2015 Common Application supplement for Ivy League and other top schools.  

In addition to the basic Common Application essay, the Ivy League schools require supplemental essay responses. These extra essays help these elite schools gain a deeper understanding of the applicant. They are your opportunity to explain how the school is a good match for you and vise versa. These schools want to know what is important to you and how they fit into your future goals!

Note that you can apply via the Common Application or the Columbia First-Year Application. The school has no preference; however, applicants can only submit ONE of the applications.

When addressing each prompt, consider the overall character and focus of the school in relationship to your personal objectives. Visit the school website, read about their educational mission, and think about how the school supports your interests. Columbia takes pride in the synergy created between its diverse residential student population and its location in the heart of bustling New York City. It also embraces a rich educational tradition in its interdepartmental Core Curriculum that encourages creative critical thinking by encompassing writing, science, philosophy, literature, art, music, and history.

What single activity listed in the activity section of your Common Application are you most proud of and why? (150 words or less)

This is an opportunity to highlight one of the activities you listed on your Common Application. Select an activity that reveals something important to you. This may be something you have been involved with for years or an experience that exposed you to something novel. Whichever activity you select, make sure to convey your enthusiasm and what it reflects about you. If appropriate, tie your interests to opportunities available at Columbia and in NYC.

Please tell us what you find most appealing about Columbia and why. (300 words or less)

This is a very important question. You need to convince the admissions committee that Columbia is the best school to help you meet your goals. You also have to show them how you can enrich the dynamic educational environment at Columbia. Discuss what excites you most about the Columbia experience. They want to know what kind of student you might be at Columbia.

Columbia University requires additional essay responses for students applying to Columbia College and The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science:

If you are applying to Columbia College, tell us what from your current and past experiences (either academic or personal) attracts you specifically to the field or fields of study that you noted in the Member Questions section. If you are currently undecided, please write about any field or fields in which you may have an interest at this time. (300 words or less)

If you are applying to The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science, please tell us what from your current and past experiences (either academic or personal) attracts you specifically to the field or fields of study that you noted in the Member Questions section. (300 words or less)

Both of these prompts ask you to consider your interests and experiences that helped you determine your specific career path. If you are truly undecided, in the Columbia College response, focus on the areas you are currently interested in, what excites you about those topics, and your hopes for the future. These prompts ask you to think broadly about your life experience as well as provide specific examples of how these experiences affected your interests and propelled you toward a particular area of study. Your discussion should reveal your passion for the subject. Remember to include why the program at Columbia is the best match to help you achieve your goals.

In addition to essay responses, Columbia requests the following lists. As you select required readings, books, and other forms of media, think about the breadth and depth of your interests. Consider how your selections represent your identity, reflect your intellect and curiosity, relate to Columbia’s Core Curriculum requirements, and make you a good match for the overall educational experience at Columbia.

List the titles of the required readings from courses during the school year or summer that you enjoyed most in the past year. (150-words or less)

This is an opportunity to showcase a particular area of interest to you. Consider classes, which you discovered something new and exciting, allowed you to explore a previous area of interest in more depth, or covered a topic that helped you see the world in a different way.

List the titles of the books you read for pleasure that you enjoyed most in the past year. (150-words or less)

The admissions committee wants to know the sorts of topics that you find interesting. What better way than to share your recent favorite books? They are trying to gain a deeper sense of who you are and how you might fit in at Columbia. This list sheds some light on how you spend your spare time.

List the titles of the print, electronic publications and websites you read regularly. (150-words or less)

The sources of information and media you engage with routinely provide insights into how you perceive the world. This list to some degree demonstrates what topics are important to you. It also indicates the modes of information exchange you find most comfortable.

List the titles of the films, concerts, shows, exhibits, lectures and other entertainments you enjoyed most in the past year. (150-words or less)

This list is allows you to tell the admissions committee the sorts of activities you do for fun! Your responses suggest the kinds of activities that may appeal to you at Columbia and provide insight about how you engage the world around you.

The admissions website clearly states Columbia’s commitment to a holistic approach to the admission process: “every single application is given a thorough review, and there is positively no minimum grade point average, class rank, or SAT/ACT score one must obtain in order to secure admission to Columbia.” That said Columbia has a highly competitive applicant pool. It received 32,964 undergraduate applications for the class of 2018. Only 2,291 or 7% were offered admission and over 90% of students admitted were in the top 10% of their high school class with average SAT scores of 2245 and an average ACT score of 33. Your essays make you more than a number.

In this environment it is essential to remain calm and focused. Keep in mind, while adhering to the designated word limits and deadlines, your goal is to distinguish yourself from your peers by sharing your personal examples, anecdotes, and perspectives. In short, by providing sincere insight into what makes you, you! And why you are a good match for Columbia! Be sure to allow yourself appropriate time to reflect on your educational goals and to convey your best self to the admissions committee through your essay responses.

Download 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid to learn how to eliminate the most common flaws in your application essays.

Marie Todd By , Accepted’s college admissions specialist. Marie has worked in college admissions for over twenty years. She has both counseled applicants and evaluated applications. Most recently she evaluated 5000+ applications for the University of Michigan’s College of Literature, Science and the Arts; College of Engineering; School of Kinesiology. She is available to assist you (or your child) with your applications.

Related Resources:

•  Tips for Answering Common Application Essay Prompts
•  Tips for Answering Brown University Supplemental Essay Prompts
•  7 Signs an Experience Belongs in Your Application Essay

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Honing in On the Cornell Johnson MBA http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/18/honing-in-on-the-johnson-at-cornell-university-mba/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/18/honing-in-on-the-johnson-at-cornell-university-mba/#respond Thu, 18 Sep 2014 16:41:31 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25730 ]]> Click here for the full recording of our conversation with Ann Richards. There is no place like Ithaca. And if you don’t know why, you are about to find out.

Listen to the recording of our conversation with Ann Richards, Interim Director of Admissions and Director of Financial Aid at Johnson at Cornell University to learn more.

00:02:06 – A run-down of the Johnson MBA programs.

00:06:34 – Overview of the 2-year MBA program.

00:12:25 – Performance Learning (Is it different from “experiential learning”?) and Immersions.

00:18:17 – The student-run funds at Johnson: not monopoly money.

00:21:41 – The Family Business Initiative.

00:25:27 – The Johnson application! (What you really wanted to hear about)

00:28:54 – Admissions events for subgroups.

00:33:06 – What applicants should think about/do before starting the admissions process.

00:41:48 – What Ann LOVES to see in an MBA application.

00:42:46 – Take note: Advice for all MBA applicants.

Listen to the full conversation to learn more!*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Related Links:

Johnson at Cornell University  
• 
Johnson at Cornell University 2015 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
• 7 Tips for MBA Applicants from Family Businesses
• Smith Family Business Initiative 
• 
The Cayuga Fund 
• Where Does Wall St. Hire: U.S. B-Schools Sending Grads into Financial Services 

Related Shows:

Dr. Douglas Stayman Shares the Scoop on Cornell Tech NYC
• 5 Million to Share: The 43North Competition
• The Tuck School of Business and the Global Insight Requirement

Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk:

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MBA Admissions A-Z: 26 Great Tips - Download your free copy!

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http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/18/honing-in-on-the-johnson-at-cornell-university-mba/feed/ 0 Cornell Johnson,podcast There is no place like Ithaca. And if you don’t know why, you are about to find out. - Listen to the recording of our conversation with Ann Richards, Interim Director of Admissions and Director of Financial Aid at Johnson at Cornell University to le... There is no place like Ithaca. And if you don’t know why, you are about to find out. Listen to the recording of our conversation with Ann Richards, Interim Director of Admissions and Director of Financial Aid at Johnson at Cornell University to learn more. 00:02:06 – A run-down of the Johnson MBA programs. 00:06:34 – Overview of the 2-year MBA program. 00:12:25 – Performance Learning (Is it different from “experiential learning”?) and Immersions. 00:18:17 – The student-run funds at Johnson: not monopoly money. 00:21:41 – The Family Business Initiative. 00:25:27 – The Johnson application! (What you really wanted to hear about) 00:28:54 – Admissions events for subgroups. 00:33:06 – What applicants should think about/do before starting the admissions process. 00:41:48 – What Ann LOVES to see in an MBA application. 00:42:46 – Take note: Advice for all MBA applicants. *Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com. Related Links: • Johnson at Cornell University   • Johnson at Cornell University 2015 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines • 7 Tips for MBA Applicants from Family Businesses • Smith Family Business Initiative  • The Cayuga Fund  • Where Does Wall St. Hire: U.S. B-Schools Sending Grads into Financial Services  Related Shows: • Dr. Douglas Stayman Shares the Scoop on Cornell Tech NYC • 5 Million to Share: The 43North Competition • The Tuck School of Business and the Global Insight Requirement Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk: Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no 47:17
What NOT to Write in Your Medical School Secondary Application Essays http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/17/what-not-to-write-in-your-medical-school-secondary-application-essays/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/17/what-not-to-write-in-your-medical-school-secondary-application-essays/#respond Wed, 17 Sep 2014 16:23:57 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25476 ]]> Getting stressed about application deadlines? Don't let the quality of your work suffer! [Click here for tips]Since the number of secondary applications that you receive can be overwhelming, you may be tempted to take a few shortcuts.  Some shortcuts are warranted while others are just too risky to consider using.  To ensure that you are one of the “lucky” few who receive a medical school interview, avoid the following egregious errors:

1. Cutting and Pasting material from other essays and submitting with the wrong school name.

Almost every secondary application will have a question about why you want to attend their medical school. It may be tempting to cut and paste this essay response over and over again. However, the best essays that respond to this type of question include specific details about the school that you have researched and therefore pertain only to that particular campus. Also, it may be obvious if you provide a generic response that you are recycling it—or worse, if you forget to change the school name before submitting it—you may forfeit an interview. It’s such an easy mistake to prevent by proofreading each application carefully before submission. Having another person review it may be the best way to prevent errors that you may have difficulty seeing yourself.

2. Writing about the same activity for each essay response.

Since most secondary essays have multiple questions, it’s important to be strategic in selecting the content for each response.  Make sure that you cover a wide variety of leadership, community service and clinical experiences in the essays so that you do not find yourself writing about one example or activity over and over again—especially within one secondary.  To avoid this kind of repetition, print a copy of your updated CV or resume and a copy of your AMCAS application activities and review the list.  You will have lots of options right in front of you!

3. Focusing on events or experiences in high school.

Unless an essay specifically requests that you include information about your early life, I don’t recommend focusing on that time period. If you are asked a general question about the most stressful event in your life or a meaningful clinical experience, often, it would be best to cover material from college and after. There are some exceptions—like the serious illness or death of a loved one—but very few. If you focus on high school as being a defining moment in your personal history, the application reviewers may question your maturity level. Ideally, you will have encountered many challenges that culminated in periods of significant personal development during college and after. Keep track of the areas you tend to focus on in the timeline of your life.

4. Going off topic or not answering the prompt.

This is one of the worst mistakes to make because it can be the most time intensive to correct.  Also, it would immediately disqualify you for an interview since you wouldn’t be providing the adcom with the information that they are requesting.  This type of error often occurs from either cutting and pasting material from other essays or completing essays at the last minute.  If you are rushing through your essays, it may be better to slow down and take more breaks to stay focused and on topic.  The best way to avoid this problem is to create outlines for each essay prompt.  A carefully planned and constructed essay will actually take less time to write and you will end up with a better final product.

While these approaches can have the most damaging results on the medical school application process, they are easy to avoid.  Using the simple strategies provided above, you can significantly increase your chances of receiving a medical school interview. Remember to take your time and do your best.

5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid

Alicia McNease Nimonkar is an Accepted.com advisor and editor specializing in healthcare admissions. Prior to joining Accepted, Alicia worked for five years as Student Advisor at UC Davis’ postbac program where she both evaluated applications and advised students applying successfully to med school and related programs.

Related Resources:

Secondary Strategy: Why Do You Want To Go Here?
• Medical School Secondary Essay Handbook: School Specific Tips for Top Programs
7 Signs an Experience Belongs in Your Application Essay

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Exclusive Low Stats MBA Webinar Airing Live on Wed! http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/16/exclusive-low-stats-mba-webinar-airing-live-on-wed/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/16/exclusive-low-stats-mba-webinar-airing-live-on-wed/#respond Tue, 16 Sep 2014 17:44:39 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25700 ]]> You have ONE MORE DAY to clear your schedule and make room for what we promise will be an enlightening, practical, and helpful webinar on how to get into top business schools despite low GMAT/GPA scores.

Got low stats? This webinar is for you!

How to Get Accepted to Top B-Schools with Low Stats

Register ASAP for How to Get Accepted to B-School with Low Stats to reserve your spot. We’ll see you on Wed at 10:00 AM PST/1:00 PM EST!

Save my spot!

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Choosing Graduate Programs to Apply to http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/16/choosing-graduate-programs-to-apply-to/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/16/choosing-graduate-programs-to-apply-to/#respond Tue, 16 Sep 2014 16:58:44 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25338 ]]> Download your free copy of Get Your Game On: Prepping for your Grad school Application“Choosing Graduate Programs to Apply to” is excerpted from the Accepted.com special report, Get Your Game On: Prepping for Your Grad School Application. To download the entire free special report, click here.

As you bring your interests into focus, start to create a list of target programs. Many factors will influence your decision-making process. Here are some things to think about:

• Do you have geographical considerations? (Do you need to be near family, or in a certain city where a spouse works?)

• What are the strengths of the programs that interest you? If you’re looking to work in industry, does the program offer networking/internships/career placement? If you’re considering a PhD, is the program strong in your subfield?

• If you’re planning to apply for a PhD program, is there a faculty member in the department who is doing work in your area of interest, or who could serve as your mentor/research supervisor?

• How many students does the program accept each year? (Some doctoral programs enroll as few as 3-4 students annually, so know that even if your credentials are stellar, you should have more than one plan!)

• Is there funding available?

• For PhD programs: Does the university publish the average time-to-degree of students in the program? (This is sometimes rather different from the stated program length you’ll find in the program catalog.)

• Are there opportunities to work as a teaching or research assistant? If grad students in the department are expected to teach, is there a mentoring program in place? How many semesters do students TA?

• If you’re hoping to work as an academic, inform yourself about the structure/expectations of your discipline. Do the programs you’re looking at have a strong record of placing their PhDs in post-docs and tenure track positions? (Do the professors you’re thinking about working with have such a record?)

• If you have a good relationship with a current or past faculty mentor, ask for advice about programs and potential grad advisers you should consider.

In the next post, I’ll address how to develop a concrete description of your research interests.

Download our free report: GET YOUR GAME ON: Preparing for Your Grad School Application

Rebecca Blustein By , Accepted.com editor and former Student Affairs Officer at UCLA’s Scholarship Resource Center, and author of Financing Your Future: Winning Fellowships, Scholarships and Awards for Grad School. Rebecca will be happy to assist you with your grad school applications.

Related Resources:

Kisses of Death for your Grad School Application
Obtaining Graduate Assistantships
Graduate School Admissions 101

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Stranger Things Have Happened! http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/15/stranger-things-have-happened/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/15/stranger-things-have-happened/#respond Mon, 15 Sep 2014 17:10:53 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25683 ]]> How to Get Accepted to Top B-Schools with Low StatsHBS published their class of 2016 profile and if you look closely, you’ll find something very strange…

Someone was admitted with a 510 GMAT score!

While this probably WON’T happen to you (we need to be realistic!), it sure is nice to know that anything is possible in the world of MBA admissions. You just gotta give it your all!

Learn how to present yourself spectacularly, despite your low scores, when you attend our upcoming webinar, How to Get Accepted to Top B-Schools with Low Stats!

Date: Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Time: 10:00 AM PST/1:00 PM EST

Space is running out! Reserve your spot for How to Get Accepted to B-School with Low Stats now!

Save my spot! Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

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Crowd Funding His Way to Med School: Interview with Charles Lanman http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/15/crowd-funding-his-way-to-med-school-interview-with-charles-lanman/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/15/crowd-funding-his-way-to-med-school-interview-with-charles-lanman/#respond Mon, 15 Sep 2014 16:43:45 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25579 ]]> Click here for more med school applicant interviews!This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with medical school applicants and students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top medical schools and the med school application process. And now, introducing Charles Lanman.

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What’s your favorite flavor ice cream?

Charles: Thank you for taking the time to get to know me! My name is Charles Unger Lanman. I was born in Pensacola, FL and moved to Chattanooga, TN, where I was raised, when I was four years old. I attended Lookout Valley and Red Bank High School each for two years while living in Chattanooga. I then moved to Knoxville and attended the University of Tennessee Knoxville (UTK) as a seventeen-year-old back in August 2006 (Go Vols!). I graduated summa cum laude May 2010 with a BS in Biochemistry. I am a brother and alumnus of Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity and a former member of the Dance Marathon Executive Committee.

Though likely not the most popular opinion, I am an avid lover of Baskin Robbins’ bubblegum summertime flavor. It is delicious and makes for a fantastic milkshake – you should try it sometime!

Accepted: What have you been doing with your time since you graduated college?

Charles: Since graduation, I have been fortunate to be able to work and give back to both my family financially as a first-generation college graduate, as well as those who are impacted through volunteering efforts on the side. In four years since college, I have held positions at a couple of prominent biotech companies in Nashville and San Diego, and have volunteered with St. Jude, Habitat for Humanity, Nashville Rescue Mission, among others.

Most recently, I have been working full-time as a material science engineer (btechcorp.com) and have been selling re-purposed and re-furbished products on eBay (ebay.com/usr/lanman1422), giving back 25% of those proceeds to UNICEF.

On the volunteering front, I have recently been involved in a close friend’s fundraising campaign (MattRizor.org) as well as constantly trying to find new and innovative ways to give back to the community.

Accepted: What stage of the med school admissions process are you up to so far?

Charles: I have recently submitted secondary applications to multiple schools and now await the interview process!

Accepted: Do you have a dream school, your #1 choice? How did you go about choosing which schools to apply to?

Charles: That is an excellent question! In searching for schools that were aligned with both my credentials and personal mission, I utilized the AAMC’s MSAR e-book. I would highly recommend this investment for those who are deciding which schools best fit their credentials and goals in medicine.

As far as a favorite, I am looking forward to getting a more in-depth perspective on the schools that I am fortunate to receive an interview invitation and decide from there; as it stands right now, I am excited about multiple schools I have submitted applications to. It was very important to me that every school I planned on submitting an application to have a very strong alignment of both academic requirements and mission/vision/values. I wanted to ensure that I was not submitting applications to just any school, because I have been very blessed to receive a helping hand on some of the application fees through the crowd-funding campaign.

Accepted: Can you tell us about your Kickstarter/Rally campaign? How many of your donations have been from total strangers?

Charles: Absolutely. The Rally campaign was borne of an idea that followed shortly after I received my May 2014 MCAT score. I received a 29, and it was definitely not the 34 I worked so hard to achieve. Looking back, I now realize that this test score came as a blessing in disguise because it opened the door for me to move forward with this campaign. I felt strongly that I needed to apply early and broadly to have a chance with that MCAT score, but I also knew that after living paycheck-to-paycheck for nine months while studying, I had not saved the funds to do so.

So I began the Rally in early July, and posted a basic description of what the cost of applying to medical school is. I then went back to work not thinking much about it – initially.

By the end of day one, I remember three selfless supporters backing my cause and then thinking, “Wow, this may actually turn into something.” I am now at nearly 90 supporters, and 1/4 of the goal has been realized. It is truly phenomenal to think there are so many kind and selfless individuals who are willing to stand up and tell me “I believe in your skills as a future physician.” It is both humbling and motivating.

As for the proportion of strangers who have contributed, I would say it is about 10% right now, and I cannot be more thankful for everyone standing up for a kid from Chattanooga who has a dream to serve the less fortunate. I hope to make every supporter aware that their kindness will not be forgotten: I plan on providing updates of my progress throughout both the application/interview process as well as during the journey as a medical student and resident, so that every supporter may see just how much they have affected not just my life, but the lives of patients I will go on to serve.

Accepted: You’ve done the math — how much does it cost just to APPLY to med school?

Charles: The average applicant with, what I will call a “middle-of-the-road” GPA/MCAT of 3.6/30, is going to need to apply to upwards of 30 schools in order to receive a handful of interviews and hopefully that wonderful acceptance. I have run the numbers on this and with variable secondary application fees, it is hard to put an exact number on it, but $10,000 is a safe assumption.

In this calculation, I am assuming the AMCAS primary fees of $160 for the first school and $36 for every school thereafter, as well as the associated secondary fees for each school, ranging from $50-200 per school.

Also remember, for each interview, you are expected to cover your own travel expenses, so assuming just 5 interviews received out of 30 schools, we are looking at over $2,500 in travel costs alone. It is truly daunting when you are either a student without family support or a recent college graduate just trying to find their way in the real world!

I encourage all applicants to look for new and innovative ways to attempt to supplement these costs, and my line is always open if you need a helping hand in trying to find your own voice and message in a crowd-funding campaign. All of my contact information is provided on the Rally page (Rally.org/CharlesLanmanMD).

Accepted: I see you posted your AMCAS personal statement on your Rally page — nice job! Can you walk us through the writing process? Can you share a few tips with our readers? 

Charles: I appreciate your kind words about the essay. The most important factors, in telling your story through a personal statement, are to make it candid, conversational, and compelling. I did not mean for the alliteration, but now that I am explaining, I like the sound of it!

You want a story to be candid for the most obvious reasons, to be truthful and honest with the reader, but also writing candidly is very helpful in establishing your voice in the essay. A conversational essay reads better, it is generally more direct and to-the-point, and will not leave the reader with a migraine after reading through. Admissions teams must read through thousands of essays over the course of a single application cycle, so you cannot go wrong by writing a personal essay with nice flow and diction. Last but not least, make the essay compelling! I believe every applicant has a special set of abilities and everybody possesses a unique story or life experience that adds to the conversation. If this were not the case, they would not be seeking admission to probably the most competitive graduate program.

I encourage everyone to do some soul searching and find what lessons and moments in their lives stuck with them. Remember, our decision to pursue medical training is the result of an accumulation of choices, and each choice has an associated experience that we can draw from if we dig deep enough.

I hope those pointers helped those who may need it! Best of luck to everyone applying and let me know if I can be of assistance in any way.

For one-on-one guidance on your med school applications, please see our catalog of med school admissions services.

You can stay up-to-date with Charles’s journey to med school by checking out his updates on his Rally page. Thank you Charles for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

Do you want to be featured in Accepted.com’s blog, Accepted Admissions Blog? If you want to share your med school journey with the world (or at least with our readers), email us at bloggers@accepted.com.

Download a free Med School Secondary Essay Handbook for the tips you need to write successful secondariness!

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

• Medical School Applicant Interviews
• Medical School Funding
Get Accepted to Medical School with Low Stats

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How to Deal with Deadlines http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/14/how-to-deal-with-deadlines/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/14/how-to-deal-with-deadlines/#respond Sun, 14 Sep 2014 17:07:10 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25510 ]]> Dealing with Deadlines

You don’t want to feel rushed and you don’t want to miss your deadline.

You don’t want to feel rushed (stress can lead to mistakes) and you don’t want to miss your deadline. So what can you do to stay on top of your game and submit your applications before the buzzer?

1. Set yourself a schedule and work backwards from your deadlines. Allow time for holidays, sleep, exercise, and of course work.

2. Focus first on the applications with the earliest deadlines. It wouldn’t make sense to work on the application with the further deadline first when you have a looming deadline for another application right around the corner!

3. Work on applications one at a time. Adapt essays from your first application, when possible, to later applications. However never merely paste in an essay because the question is similar. Customize it for this application and this program. Trying to write more than one application at once will only lead to confusion, not to mention unintentional overlapping of material – forgetting to change just one Harvard to Stanford shows a level of sloppiness that Stanford just won’t stand for!

4. If you fall behind, consider dropping/postponing an application to maintain quality overall. Pushing off an application to a subsequent round or the following year is better than submitting a subpar application.

Good luck!

Learn how to use sample essays to create an exemplary essay of your own! Click here to download our free report!

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

• 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Application Essay & Personal Statements
Resourceful Essay Recycling
• The Biggest Application Essay Mistake [Video]

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Advantages and Disadvantages of Combined BS/MD Programs http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/14/advantages-and-disadvantages-of-combined-bsmd-programs-3/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/14/advantages-and-disadvantages-of-combined-bsmd-programs-3/#respond Sun, 14 Sep 2014 16:23:37 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25409 ]]> Click here to download your copy of Am I Cut Out for a Combined BS/MD Program?

Admissions to many BS/MD programs is more competitive than even the most selective colleges.

“Advantages and Disadvantages of Combined BS/MD Programs” is excerpted from the Accepted.com special report, Am I Cut Out for a Combined BS/MD Program? To download the entire free special report, click here

If you are fully committed to the idea of pursuing a medical career, a combined program may seem like the best of both worlds. In one application process, you can assure yourself of your future medical career, eliminate uncertainty and stress during your undergraduate years, and, without completing a full medical school application process, potentially save yourself thousands of dollars in application costs.

With so many benefits, it is easy to see why the several dozen combined programs are so highly sought after. Admission to many of them is more competitive than even the most selective colleges, easily in the low single digits with extremely talented applicant pools. These programs also do not obligate you to attend medical school, but with such competitive applicant pools, it is easy to understand why universities do not want to waste resources on students who are not committed to a career in medicine.

If you have top notch high school credentials, including GPA, test scores, challenging curriculum, and a demonstrated interest (through volunteer service, research, and clinical shadowing), some of these programs might be a good fit for you.

However, for many other applicants, following the traditional route of pursuing a bachelor’s degree and completing your pre-medical requirements before applying to medical school makes more sense than attending a combined BS/MD program. Consider the following:

The additional few years of undergraduate education and life perspective can truly help you to determine which educational environment is best for you. Is there an area of the country that you prefer? Are you interested in serving a specific population? Some medical schools emphasize family practice while others focus more on scientific research and academic career preparation.

If you choose to pursue a combined program, be certain that you are doing so in an environment that suits you for its undergraduate experience. There is a chance you will find that medicine is not your calling. In some cases, the undergraduate requirements to maintain your medical school space are extremely tough. You are most likely to thrive in an environment that makes you happy.

Am I Cut Out for a Combined BS/MD Program?

Accepted.com

 

Related Resources:

College Admissions 101
• 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your College Application Essays
Interviews with Medical School Applicants

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Defining Her Strengths, Researching Schools and Choosing NYU Stern http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/12/mba-applicant-interview-with-nyu-stern-student-lenore/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/12/mba-applicant-interview-with-nyu-stern-student-lenore/#respond Fri, 12 Sep 2014 17:05:14 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24882 ]]> Click here to read more interviews with current MBA Students!

Be reflective. Make friends. Take full advantage of the opportunity.

This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Lenore, a student at NYU Stern.

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What is your favorite ice cream flavor?

Lenore: I was born in Philadelphia and raised there and in the suburbs of the city. DC was one of my favorite places to visit growing up. Since it was just a short trip from home and my younger siblings, I was really excited to enroll at American University for my undergrad. I went in thinking I’d study international service, but switched to finance and marketing specializations after my first class in the business school.

Ice cream? Probably Ben & Jerry’s Half Baked or S’mores. But sometimes Turkey Hill Chocolate Peanut Butter. I guess it depends on the day. :)

Accepted: What did you do after finishing college?

Lenore: By the time I finished college I had worked in business communications, marketing for a start-up, and nonprofit business development. I didn’t yet understand how I could bring together what I thought were disparate interests in leadership, social impact, and business, so I would take a job and then keep freelancing or consulting or volunteering on the side, always trying to weave together those passions. I would throw myself into projects or jobs, but had a hard time feeling totally satisfied by any one of them. For example: a friend and I were hired to overhaul a local restaurant’s operations; then I was assistant director of an education nonprofit during a strategic redirection. In 2010 I moved to Haiti and worked as a project manager on a program for small businesses and social enterprises. Each of those experiences was enriching and educational for me, and helped me define my strengths and interests.

Accepted: What made you decide to pursue an MBA?

Lenore: Even though I went back and forth on how I would use it, I was always sure I would pursue an MBA. I love solving business problems, and believe that business plays an integral role, potentially a hugely positive one, in our communities and society.

My MBA application journey was an opportunity to identify patterns and common successes in the pieces of my professional background. Specifically, I started to recognize that the moments I was most proud of were those when I partnered with leaders to help shape their work and achieve success in their organizations. Through the admissions process and my own self-discovery, I recognized that working as a business and executive coach would allow me to combine each of the things I was passionate about.

Accepted: How will your MBA help you pursue your entrepreneur goals?

Lenore: An MBA deepens my business acumen, allowing me to support leaders more effectively. It also allows me the time to focus solely on my own professional development, which will make me a much better coach.

Accepted: How did you go about researching schools? Did you participate in any MBA fairs or events?

Lenore: I was first drawn to Stern when, during undergrad, I was looking for MBA programs with real-world opportunities to work in social enterprise. But I kept an open mind, and went to Forte Forums in Washington DC, listened to Forte webinars featuring admissions professionals from several schools, and visited as many of my target programs as I could. I also made a complicated spreadsheet and rating system to track the merits of each school! It was a long process, but I had a great roadmap as a member of the Forte Foundation and the Consortium for Graduate Study in Management.

Accepted: I’m sure MBA applicants reading your interview would be interested in seeing your spreadsheet. Could you share it with us?

Lenore: Unfortunately I no longer have the computer on which I created the spreadsheets, but here’s my suggestion if someone were to want to create one:

Create a spreadsheet to keep track of important details on each program. My rows were school names, and columns were titled with the features I valued most. I was looking for a program with robust social enterprise and entrepreneurship programs, an urban location, opportunities to travel, and flexibility in the curriculum (but of course these will be different for each applicant). I also took business school rankings into account, and I made a column for notes as well. In as many cases as possible, I went to the school and visited the campus. In some cases, I resorted to reading everything I could find online, and then supplemented that with conversations with current students and alum. Each time I learned more about a program, I tracked the information in my spreadsheet–I probably added to it over the course of two years and looked at 12 schools in total. The final addition to my spreadsheet was a column for my own personal rating of each school based all that I had learned. My personal ratings were also reflective of the intangibles, such as how well I connected with students during campus visits, as I think those are just as important.

All things considered, NYU Stern came out on top, validating the assumption I had made even before doing any research. Despite that I came up with the same result, the spreadsheet process was helpful in that I kept an open mind and it supported me in making an informed decision.

Accepted: Can you talk about your experience with the Forte Foundation? How have they helped you in your MBA admissions journey?

Lenore: I visited the Forte Foundation website quite regularly throughout my admissions process. The practical resources and webinars were especially helpful. I also valued the offline community that Forte creates; I met a GMAT study buddy and many friends at Forte events. Maybe most importantly, I draw inspiration from the Forte community, which is comprised of so many women living such full lives, pursuing and accomplishing their dreams.

Accepted: Which other schools did you apply to? Why did you choose NYU Stern?

Lenore: I ultimately applied to only two schools: NYU Stern and Georgetown, and was accepted to both. As I mentioned, I was interested in NYU even during undergrad, as the program offered an ideal match for my values and goals. NYU Stern provides an “education in possible,” and encourages broad and disruptive thinking. That is just the type of approach I planned to take with my degree and in my work.

Accepted: What are your 3 top tips for MBA applicants?

Lenore:

1. Be reflective. Your essays and interviews will be stronger if you know yourself and your goals. This process will give you the opportunity to tell your story often, so take the time reflect on what you would like to say.

2. Make friends. There are SO many resources out there for aspiring MBAs that you won’t be able to keep up with all of them yourself. Find buddies (through Forte and other networks) who are going through the process as well and can encourage and support you.

3. Take full advantage of the opportunity. You are making a significant investment, so get all that you can out of the process and the experience. Ask questions, make connections, visit schools, attend webinars: whatever you need to do to be informed and excited about pursuing your degree.

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages

Thank you Lenore for sharing your story with us!

Attend the Forte Forum 

Accepted.com

 

Related Resources:

• NYU Stern 2015 MBA Questions, Tips, and Deadlines
Forte Helps Women in Business Thrive: Interview with Elissa Sangster
• Interviews with current MBA students

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MBA Admissions Tip: Dealing with a Low GPA http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/12/mba-admissions-tip-dealing-with-a-low-gpa-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/12/mba-admissions-tip-dealing-with-a-low-gpa-2/#respond Fri, 12 Sep 2014 16:11:27 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25583 ]]> How to Get Accepted to Top B-Schools with Low Stats: Free Webinar

Prove that today you have the ability to excel.

Explaining a low GPA can be difficult and it requires you to examine your GPA’s trend. Consider the following scenarios:

• Scenario A – 3.0 GPA, upward trend – You goofed off for your first few semesters and didn’t weigh the consequences. You failed some classes and started out with an embarrassingly low GPA not because of lack of ability, but because of immaturity. Mid-sophomore year you wised up and continuously hit above the 3.8 mark for the rest of your undergraduate career.

• Scenario B – 3.0 GPA, downward trend – Your college experience started out with a motivated streak of genius—three solid 4.0 semesters in a row. But then…things took a turn towards apathy and laziness and your grades began to suffer significantly.

• Scenario C – 3.0 GPA, static – You work hard, but not too hard. You take some classes seriously, and some not so much. You never really cared about school or grades to really put the effort in. A few years out of school and a life-changing career move have motivated you to new heights and you want to apply to b-school. But now you need to deal with a less-than-impressive record.

Let’s interpret each of these scenarios:

• The student in Scenario A doesn’t really have too much to worry about (unless he’s applying to a top MBA program for which a 3.0 GPA is a significant hurdle). Many students early in their college careers have a couple of bad semesters because of immaturity. Your grades went up, proving your capabilities and your increased maturity.

• Scenario B’s student is in a bit more of a bind. She’s proved her abilities by acing those first few semesters, but why the dramatic downturn? Did things get too difficult for her? Does she have trouble performing under pressure? Or does she just not care about improving and perfecting her academic capabilities?

• The problem of mediocrity looms over Scenario C’s student. This student will need to prove his skill level if he wants to be considered for a spot in the next MBA class.

Let’s analyze a recovery plan for each of our students:

• Student A doesn’t need to prove ability as much as motivation and seriousness, which he may have already proven with his last few years of work. He may want to ask one of his recommenders to vouch for his maturity and steadfastness. A high GMAT/GRE score will help.

• Student B will need to enroll in some college courses to prove her verbal and/or quantitative abilities (especially if her test scores weren’t so great). She’ll want to make sure her essays express her newfound motivation as well as her keen writing abilities. Her essays should include clear anecdotes that illustrate how she’s matured since her last few semesters and how her skills should be judged based on recent work experience, rather than past college experience.

• Student C is in a similar boat as Student B. He’ll want to retake some of his math and English courses and he’ll want to get solid A’s this time. B’s and C’s just won’t cut it if he wants to prove he’s b-school material. Strong essays and letters of recommendation will also boost Student C’s chances of acceptance.

Of course many of you will not be like Students A, B, or C. Your grade dive may have resulted from illness or family crisis or circumstances beyond your control. Or perhaps steady, mediocre grades resulted from your working 20-30 hours per week to support yourself through school. There are many other scenarios too. The key is to prove that today you have the ability to excel in your target MBA programs and that the circumstances that contributed to the poor marks in college no longer affect you.

Moral of the story: A single low number can be explained or put in a less damaging context with hard work and a solid application strategy.

Join our upcoming webinar: How to Get Accepted to Top B-Schools with Low Stats!

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

• Low GMAT Score Advice
• How to Handle a Low GMAT Quant Score
• How to Handle a Low GMAT Verbal Score

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Princeton University Master in Finance: Is It Right for You, and Are You Right for Princeton? http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/11/princeton-university-master-in-finance-is-it-right-for-you-and-are-you-right-for-princeton/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/11/princeton-university-master-in-finance-is-it-right-for-you-and-are-you-right-for-princeton/#respond Thu, 11 Sep 2014 17:36:33 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25572 ]]> Click here to listen to our recent podcast episode, Masters in Finance: What You Need to Know!

So what’s the ticket to heaven?

Being amazing is just a qualification for the Princeton University Master in Finance program. But if you qualify, get admitted (about 30 out of 600 applicants do), and choose to attend (about 25 out of that 30), I believe you enter heaven.

 • All your classmates are not just extremely bright and passionate about finance; they also represent experience from across the industry – and they are chosen in part because they can communicate their insights from that experience.

• There is 100% recruitment for summer internships at the most desirable institutions, and almost 100% post-graduation employment (2014). These internships/jobs span the globe—Mexico City, Singapore, Hong Kong, London, and various cities in the US as well as NYC.

• A curriculum that is intensive and deep; following the core you can either develop your own study program or pursue 1of 3 course tracks: Financial Engineering and Risk Management, Quantitative Asset Management and Macroeconomic Forecasting, and Financial Technologies.

• Career “boot camps” where alumni, industry experts, and academics help you formulate a career path that is meaningful to you and productively employs your skills, talents, interests.

• World-renowned faculty (think Alan Blinder, Paul Krugman) from multiple disciplines who don’t just teach sophisticated skills but who engage passionately in ideas, thereby helping you become a thought leader in the field.

So what’s the ticket to heaven?

Academics – A high GPA and a transcript that reflects a strong quantitative component – many applicants have degrees in subjects such as mathematics, economics, and engineering, but it is not required and they have admitted people from a range of disciplines (though there are certain math requirements). A grad degree is “a plus but not required.”

Standardized tests – Both GMAT and GRE are accepted; the median quant GRE score is 167 and the average quant GMAT score is 49.5. That said, a high quant score doesn’t make up for weak quant coursework. If your undergrad school was not taught in English (or if it was taught in English in a non-English speaking country), either the TOEFL or IELTS is also required.

Interviews are by invitation only, and selected applicants will be notified. Others are discouraged from seeking interviews.

Experience – Professional experience is not required; however the adcom wants to see some practical industry exposure via internships at least – they note that potential employers look for this experience. So the program is open to new graduates who have had an internship or two – but make sure you have something substantive to say based on your experience; your competition will.

Qualitative factors – You may be surprised that in the adcom’s eyes it is the qualitative factors that “set applicants apart”! The adcom specifically looks for strong communication ability, expecting its students to contribute within a highly intelligent cohort and to become leaders in the industry. More than anything, it seeks passion for finance. Even if you’re a quant geek, don’t think there’s a formula for this passion – it must be expressed through application contents holistically. The adcom members will know it when they see it.

Finally, be sure this is the right degree for you. As the website states, it’s not the right program for people pursuing corporate finance or investment bank M&A; but the MiF “is becoming the preferred degree in the trading and asset management areas of the I-bank.”

 Click here for the lowdown on one of the most up and coming specialized masters programs in the business world.

Cindy Tokumitsu By , author and co-author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports, including Why MBA and Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted.com.

Related Resources:

• The Facts About Financial Services
• Where Does Wall St. Hire: U.S. B-Schools Sending Grads into Financial Services
What is Passion in Admissions?

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Medical School Funding http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/11/medical-school-funding/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/11/medical-school-funding/#respond Thu, 11 Sep 2014 16:55:37 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25388 ]]> Learn how to navigate the med school maze! Click here to download your free guide!

It’s no secret that medical school is expensive!

It’s no secret that medical school is expensive! There are several types of funding to help you with the expense—for most people, loans are the primary source of support, but it’s also worth applying for grants and scholarships. If you demonstrate financial need, you can sometimes qualify for low-interest or no-interest loans from various sources, which can also be a help.

Here are some resources and advice for medical and pre-med students applying for scholarships and financial aid:

•  First, make sure you file your FAFSA every year, by your state’s deadline. (If you are not a US citizen or permanent resident, consult the financial aid office at your institution for the appropriate forms to demonstrate your financial need.)

• Carefully review the financial aid information for each school you’re interested in. The med school’s financial aid office website is an important resource. If you have questions, contact someone there, or ask a financial aid representative in person when you visit campus.

• Many medical schools offer scholarships. When you apply for admission, check to see whether your application will automatically be considered for any scholarships the school offers, or whether you need to submit any additional materials.

• Consult lists of scholarships, and search online. If you find awards that you are not eligible for yet, but will be in a year, bookmark them. Keep a file of funding opportunities.

• When looking for funding opportunities, think BROAD: you might find scholarships based on your hobbies, your community service, your religious involvement, minority status, work experience, etc. Some foundations fund scholarships for people with disabilities or illnesses, often covering the cost of equipment you may need for school. Local organizations often fund small scholarships for people from their hometowns. You get the idea– a little research can pay off!

Here are some helpful resources to guide you:

AAMC Grants & Awards

American Osteopathic Foundation Grants Awards

General Financial Aid Info for MD Programs

General Financial Aid Info for DO Programs

Medical Scholarships

DO Scholarships

Free searchable databases: scholarships.com; schoolsoup.com

Careful budgeting can also save you a lot. It can be very helpful to meet with a financial aid counselor at your school. Good luck!

Download your free special report: Navigate the Med School Maze!

Rebecca Blustein By , Accepted.com editor and former Student Affairs Officer at UCLA’s Scholarship Resource Center, and author of Financing Your Future: Winning Fellowships, Scholarships and Awards for Grad School. Rebecca will be happy to assist you with your grad school applications.

Related Resources:

• How to Write the Statement of Disadvantage
• Financial Aid and Health Insurance for International Students
• Ask the Experts: Medical School Admissions Q&A [Transcript/Recording]

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The Tuck School of Business and the Global Insight Requirement http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/11/tuck-school-of-business-the-global-insight-requirement/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/11/tuck-school-of-business-the-global-insight-requirement/#respond Thu, 11 Sep 2014 16:14:54 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25651 ]]> Click here to listen to the full conversation with Dr. Phillip Stocken!

On September 3, 2014, the Tuck School of Business introduced the new and exciting Global Insight Requirement.

Listen to the recording of our conversation with Dr. Phillip Stocken, the Associate Dean for the MBA Program at Tuck, for the scoop on the new requirement and more info about the b-school.

00:02:33 – The structure of the Tuck MBA Program.

00:05:15 – What is the Tuck Global Insight Requirement?

00:13:32 – About the first year project and where it meets the new program.

00:17:26 – What will define the Global Insight requirement as a success.

00:19:38 – Tuck alum are by far the most loyal MBA grads: What is the secret?

00:24:14 – The faculty cooperation that makes Tuck unique.

00:28:06 – What do Tuck students have in common?

00:30:10 – What Dr. Stocken wishes MBA students would know before starting b-school.

00:34:07 – Important advice for MBA applicants.

Listen to the full conversation to learn more!*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Related Links:

Tuck Announces New Global Insight Requirement 
• 
Tuck School of Business 
How to Get Accepted to Top B-Schools with Low Stats

Related Shows:

A B-School Professor on Main Street, USA 
• A Transformational Year: The MIT Sloan Fellows Program
Global Business Leadership at Wharton’s Lauder Institute

Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk:

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MBA Admissions A-Z: 26 Great Tips - Download your free copy!

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http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/11/tuck-school-of-business-the-global-insight-requirement/feed/ 0 Dartmouth Tuck,podcast On September 3, 2014, the Tuck School of Business introduced the new and exciting Global Insight Requirement. - Listen to the recording of our conversation with Dr. Phillip Stocken, the Associate Dean for the MBA Program at Tuck, On September 3, 2014, the Tuck School of Business introduced the new and exciting Global Insight Requirement. Listen to the recording of our conversation with Dr. Phillip Stocken, the Associate Dean for the MBA Program at Tuck, for the scoop on the new requirement and more info about the b-school. 00:02:33 – The structure of the Tuck MBA Program. 00:05:15 – What is the Tuck Global Insight Requirement? 00:13:32 – About the first year project and where it meets the new program. 00:17:26 – What will define the Global Insight requirement as a success. 00:19:38 – Tuck alum are by far the most loyal MBA grads: What is the secret? 00:24:14 – The faculty cooperation that makes Tuck unique. 00:28:06 – What do Tuck students have in common? 00:30:10 – What Dr. Stocken wishes MBA students would know before starting b-school. 00:34:07 – Important advice for MBA applicants. *Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com. Related Links: • Tuck Announces New Global Insight Requirement  • Tuck School of Business  • How to Get Accepted to Top B-Schools with Low Stats Related Shows: • A B-School Professor on Main Street, USA  • A Transformational Year: The MIT Sloan Fellows Program • Global Business Leadership at Wharton’s Lauder Institute Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk: Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no 37:49
Tips for Answering Brown University Supplemental Essay Prompts http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/10/tips-for-answering-brown-university-supplemental-essay-prompts/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/10/tips-for-answering-brown-university-supplemental-essay-prompts/#respond Wed, 10 Sep 2014 19:27:42 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25570 ]]> Get tips for answering the Common Application prompts. This post about the Brown supplement to the Common Application is the first in a series of posts written to help you complete the 2015 Common Application supplement for Ivy League and other top schools.  

In addition to the basic Common Application essay, the Ivy League schools require supplemental essay responses. These extra essays help these elite schools gain a deeper understanding of you, the applicant. They are your opportunity to explain how the school is a good match for you and vice versa. These schools want to know what is important to you and how they fit into your future goals!

When addressing each prompt, consider the overall character and focus of the school in relationship to your personal objectives. Visit the school website, read about their educational mission, and think about how the school supports your interests. Brown University is committed to undergraduate freedom and the process of free inquiry. For students this means that while you are guided by specific departmental concentration requirements, you must take responsibility as an “architect of your courses of study.” Take a close look at the distinctive Brown Curriculum on the school’s website.

Why are you drawn to the area(s) of study you indicated in our Member Section, earlier in this application? If you are “undecided” or not sure which Brown concentrations match your interests, consider describing more generally the academic topics or modes of thought that engage you currently. (150-word limit)

Begin by discussing the subject areas you are interested in studying. Then discuss what specifically attracts your interest. You can include examples from previous coursework, volunteer experience, personal research, or any other factors that influence your interests. How you respond to this question demonstrates your potential to succeed in Brown’s independent academic framework. Don’t panic if you are truly undecided. This is a great opportunity to reflect on how you approach learning and discuss which subjects engage you. You are providing insight into how you navigate the academic world.

Tell us where you have lived – and for how long – since you were born; whether you’ve always lived in the same place, or perhaps in a variety of places. (100-word limit)

Your response to this question provides context regarding your life experience. You can also include your impressions about where you lived. Were there specific cultural ties? Was it a diverse or homogeneous community? Did you feel comfortable there? Did your family move for job opportunities?

We all exist within communities or groups of various sizes, origins, and purposes; pick one and tell us why it is important to you, and how it has shaped you. (150-word limit)

Briefly describe your selected community/group and your place within it. Then focus your discussion on how the group affects you. This is about how you view yourself in relation to others. This prompt touches on the impact of groups on individual thinking and vise versa. What does your membership within this community reveal about you? Discuss how you are similar or different from the larger group.

Why Brown? (200-word limit)

This is a direct and powerful question. This is your opportunity to communicate how the college fits with you now and potentially in the future. It also allows you to discuss how you can contribute to the intellectual and social environment at the school. What specifically draws you to Brown that you cannot find anywhere else? What does Brown offer that you are passionate about? What are your thoughts about its educational approach? You might want to consider how the Brown Curriculum meshes with your learning style. Think about why you are attending college and how Brown supports your goals.

Note: If you are interested in Chemistry, Computer Science, Engineering, Geology, Mathematics or Physics, you must complete additional Science/Engineering statements. Likewise, if you are applying to the 8-year Program in Liberal Medical Education (PLME) or the 5-year Brown/RISD Dual Degree Program (BRDD), you must also complete additional special programs statements.

Brown has a highly competitive applicant pool. It received 28,919 undergraduate applications for the class of 2017. Only 2,654 or 9.2% were offered admission and 94% of the students admitted were in the top 10% of their high school class. Your essays make you more than a number.

In this environment it is essential to remain calm and focused. Keep in mind, while adhering to the designated word limits, your goal is to distinguish yourself from your peers by sharing your personal examples, anecdotes, and perspectives. In short, by providing sincere insight into what makes you, you! And why you are a good match for Brown! Be sure to allow yourself appropriate time to reflect on your educational goals and to convey your best self to the admissions committee through your essay responses.

The 5 Fatal Flaws of College Application Essays

Marie Todd By , Accepted’s college admissions specialist. Marie has worked in college admissions for over twenty years. She has both counseled applicants and evaluated applications. Most recently she evaluated 5000+ applications for the University of Michigan’s College of Literature, Science and the Arts; College of Engineering; School of Kinesiology. She is available to assist you (or your child) with your applications.

Related Resources:

• Tips for Answering Common Application Essay Prompts
• Beyond Tests Scores and GPA: How to Wow College Application Readers
7 Signs an Experience Belongs in Your Application Essay

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MBA Essays That Earn an Automatic Rejection http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/10/mba-essays-that-earn-an-automatic-rejection/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/10/mba-essays-that-earn-an-automatic-rejection/#respond Wed, 10 Sep 2014 18:56:05 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25393 ]]> Download your free copy of 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your MBA Application Essays!

Don’t make these 3 mistakes!

You could have a perfect GMAT score, a 4.0 from Yale, and a list of extracurriculars as long as your leg, and still end up in the reject pile for transgressing any one of the following three MBA application sins:

1. Lying or lacking credibility

Lying on your application is literally one of the dumbest things you can do – it’s up there with shooting yourself in the foot. And when I say lying, I mean large scale hoaxes all the way down to the smallest, whitest lie, or even an exaggeration. Stick to the facts. Play it safe. If you worked at a job for six months, don’t say you were there for nine. If your job was assistant manager, don’t say you were manager. If you raised $5000 for a fundraiser, don’t make it $10K. If you have a criminal record – no matter how big or small – own up to it; not mentioning it, won’t make it disappear from your record. I’m not sure why people think they can get away with lying – it frequently comes back to haunt them.

2. Revealing arrogance

Nobody likes a showoff, so when you’re applying to b-school, I suggest you ditch your know-it-all, arrogant attitude at the door. Saying things like “I’m the only one who…” when you couldn’t possibly know if you are the only one, or “Thanks to my efforts, my team succeeded…” when more likely your team succeeded due to team collaboration, show that you think you deserve all the credit. That’s not a very nice attitude, and while schools do want high achievers, movers and shakers, they also want nice, and modest, people. If your essays reflect an attitude of “You’ll be lucky to have me because I’m just so great” or “I deserve to be accepted,” you’re dinged.

3. Sloppiness

A single typo won’t look good, but it won’t give you the automatic axe. When I say sloppiness, I’m talking about serious, messy writing, like writing Harvard when you mean Booth, or just littering your essay with grammatical errors, extra words that don’t belong, and misspellings. Forgetting to submit a section of the application is an obvious no-no, as is just writing very generically or superficially – clearly without much thought or attention. This latter type of carelessness reveals sloppy thinking more than sloppy writing; it is equally damaging.

Rule of thumb: Be honest, be modest, be neat! And of course, a perfect GMAT score won’t hurt.

For more sure-fire ways to get rejected, please see “The MBA Admissions Directors’ Recipe for Rejection.”

MBA 5 Fatal Flaws

Accepted.com

 

Related Resources:

Can You Get Accepted After Doing Something Stupid?
Important Admissions Tip: Be Yourself!
How to Edit Your MBA Application Essays

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5 Personal Statement Tips for Residency Applicants http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/10/5-personal-statement-tips-for-residency-applicants-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/10/5-personal-statement-tips-for-residency-applicants-2/#respond Wed, 10 Sep 2014 16:41:34 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25313 ]]> Make sure you know the 5 fatal flaws of residency applications! Click here to learn more.

Proofread!

You want to write a residency personal statement that will get you noticed – and matched! – at your top choice residency program. Not sure how to turn your boring draft into an application best-seller? Follow these 5 tips:

1. Focus on what attracts you to this particular specialty. This isn’t the place to tell your full life story, or to rehash the story of why you decided to become a doctor. Instead, explain how you became interested in your specialty, and show you have the skills and personal qualities to succeed in the residency you’re seeking.

2. Be specific. Draw on concrete examples from your experiences to illustrate your points. Was there a particular experience during a rotation that made you realize this specialty was for you? Did you have an especially memorable interaction with a patient or a mentor? What skills have you developed that will help you succeed?

3.  …But don’t just put your CV into prose! Your residency personal statement is not the place to simply list accomplishments from your CV. (Let your CV do that job!) This is your opportunity to tell a coherent story about your experience and goals—a story that provides context for the rest of your application.

4. Be alert to your tone. You don’t want to sound arrogant (after all, your readers are considering you as a potential colleague). Describe your skills confidently, but be aware of the line between confidence and arrogance. For example, it can be very off-putting to a reader if you talk about how work was too easy for you (in a way that makes it sound like you think you’re more accomplished than everyone you worked with!) or if you claim to be the “best” or the “only.” Likewise, be careful of presenting your chosen specialty as the BEST one, or the only one a really smart or accomplished person would pursue– it’s the best choice for you! It’s a good idea to ask someone else to read your essay—ask them if you sound enthusiastic and confident, or if you’ve crossed the line into arrogance.

5. Proofread! Make sure you avoid careless mistakes. One way to catch errors: take a step back and then return to your essay after a short break. You’ll be more likely to see things that you might miss when you’re tired. Another tip: read your essay aloud. This forces you to slow down, and you’re more likely to catch awkward phrases, typos, etc. Your ear will pick up what your eye previously missed on the screen.

There you have it — your 5 ingredient recipe for residency application success! For more guidance on cooking up the perfect personal statement, please be in touch!

Download your free copy of 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid In Your Residency Personal Statements!

Rebecca Blustein By , Accepted.com editor and former Student Affairs Officer at UCLA’s Scholarship Resource Center, and author of Financing Your Future: Winning Fellowships, Scholarships and Awards for Grad School. Rebecca will be happy to assist you with your grad school applications.

 

Related Resources:

Residency Admissions 101
Residency Applications: How to Match
• 7 Don’t Do’s for Your Residency Personal Statement

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Vault’s 2015 Banking Rankings http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/09/vaults-2015-banking-rankings/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/09/vaults-2015-banking-rankings/#respond Tue, 09 Sep 2014 17:07:53 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25575 ]]> The following banks were rated based on the issues that matter to bankers: prestige, hours, compensation, work-life balance, firm culture, overall satisfaction, business outlook, and other “quality of life” categories. For each of these parameters, other than prestige, the banking professionals rated their own place of work. They rated other intuitions and not their own for prestige.

And here are the rankings!

Where Does Wall St. Hire: U.S. B-Schools Sending Grads into Financial Services

Vault Bank Rankings 2015

(See the full rankings here.)

Here are some highlights from the rankings:

• Goldman Sachs ranks in 1st place for prestige, but for quality of life issues, specifically hours and work-life balance, it ranks in 15th place. Blackstone, on the other hand, ranked in the top 5 for each of the quality of life categories.

• Overall, work-life balance ratings are on the rise within these top companies, as are diversity ratings.

• Two years ago, J.P. Morgan ranked in 1st place; this year they’ve dropped to 4th place.

• Big jumpers include Moelis & Company (23rd last year to 12th this year) and UBS AG (26th last year to 19th this year), as well as Canaccord Genuity and Guggenheim Securities, LLC which both made it to top 25 (17th and 24th place respectively) this year and were not ranked at all last year.

• For more analysis, please see “Vault’s 2015 Banking Rankings are Live.”

Source: Vault Banking Rankings

MBA in Sight: Focus on Finance

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

• Which Business School Will Get Me to Wall Street?
• The Facts About Financial Services
• Where Does Wall St. Hire: U.S. B-Schools Sending Grads into Financial Services

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Should You Apply to Graduate School? http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/09/should-you-apply-to-grad-school/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/09/should-you-apply-to-grad-school/#respond Tue, 09 Sep 2014 16:51:21 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25330 ]]> Click here to download your complete copy of Get Your Game On: Prepping for Your Grad School Application!

“Is this degree for me?”

“Should You Apply to Graduate School?” is excerpted from the Accepted.com special report, Get Your Game On: Prepping for Your Grad School Application. To download the entire free special report, click here

It’s not too early to start training for next year’s application marathon. If you’re considering a Master’s or PhD program, you can reduce stress later by putting in some serious mind work up front—now, before you start the actual application process.

The first question you need to ask, and it’s a big one, is: “Is this degree for me?”

How can you evaluate whether a degree program is for you? First, ask yourself why you want to go to grad school. Is it because you need a particular credential to pursue (or advance in) your chosen career? Is it because you envision a career in research (whether in academia or industry) and this program is the way to gain those advanced skills? Or is it because you’ve been in school all along and aren’t sure what else to do? Is your reason simply that grad school feels like the “next step” you ought to take? Can you think ahead to your longer term goals? Be honest with yourself, and if your reasons for pursuing advanced study don’t ultimately seem compelling—in other words, if graduate study would just be a time-filler or a way of putting off thinking about your goals–you might want to reconsider.

If you have clear post-graduate goals, think critically about the financial impact of your decision. We’ve posted on the Accepted.com blog some discussion about the advisability of grad school in the Humanities; while that’s not a topic we’ll get into here, if your goal is to be a professor, you’ll probably want to take into account the health of the academic job market in your chosen field.

Now is also the time to make an honest evaluation of your credentials and preparation. Do you have the training you need to begin a grad program in your field, or will you need to shore up your skills in certain areas (such as languages or statistics) before applying?

As for deciding whether to pursue a PhD versus a Master’s degree: Are you the kind of person who thrives in the environment you’ll likely encounter in a PhD program? That is, do you enjoy research, and do you work well on your own? Are you organized and self-motivated? Are you prepared for the number of years that PhD study entails? Do your long-term goals require a PhD?

In the next post I’ll discuss how to focus your school search­­­­­­­­­­­­. What makes a program right for you?

Download our free report: GET YOUR GAME ON: Preparing for Your Grad School Application

Rebecca Blustein By , Accepted.com editor and former Student Affairs Officer at UCLA’s Scholarship Resource Center, and author of Financing Your Future: Winning Fellowships, Scholarships and Awards for Grad School. Rebecca will be happy to assist you with your grad school applications.

Related Resources:

Graduate School Admissions 101
• Is a PhD a Good Idea?: A Conversation with Dr. Karen Kelsky
• 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Graduate School Statement of Purpose

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Med School Admissions Strategies for Different Groups http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/09/med-school-admissions-strategies-for-different-groups/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/09/med-school-admissions-strategies-for-different-groups/#respond Tue, 09 Sep 2014 16:27:13 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25115 ]]> For more tips for writing your essays, check out our Med essay tips pages!Your med school strategy is to make it successfully from one step to the next, up to the point where you’re invited for the interview and then accepted. Minorities have the same goal as everyone else, but because of their (sometimes unique) circumstances, they may have a slightly different focus.

During the pre-interview writing stages of your application, what you need to do is come up with the most compelling story that you can. You need to get the adcom’s attention. You need to let them know that even though you’re from a minority origin/background, you have what it takes to plough your way through med school!

Underrepresented in Medicine

If you are from a group that is underrepresented in medicine and you struggled to make the decision to go into medicine, then you should definitely highlight those difficulties. The adcom wants to know the path you took to get to where you are.  Once you get to your secondaries and go through your activities, you’ll show more about how you put your thoughts into action, your life’s path to medicine.

Overrepresented Groups

If you are coming from an overrepresented group, you will need to do a better job mining your experiences and coming up with the ones that confirm your unique desire to go to medical school. The best thing you can do is start your writing and your strategizing by looking at all the different stories that you can potentially tell and then plucking out that you think are the most persuasive and the most impactful.  One other possible avenue for overrepresented groups is to apply to osteopathic medicine programs – you might have a better chance at something like that. They are a bit less competitive, and you might be able to tell your story in a way that emphasizes your life experience.

Final word: You are so much more than your numbers. Make sure the adcom see these other parts of who you are!

The advice in this post is based on a conversation we had in our recent webinar, Ask The Experts: Medical School Admissions Q&A with Cydney Foote and Alicia McNease Nimonkar. Check out the full transcript for more tips on applying to med school successfully!

Download a free Med School Secondary Essay Handbook for the tips you need to write successful secondariness!

Accepted.com

 

Related Resources:

• 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Med School Essays
• Writing About Overcoming Obstacles in Your Application Essays
Approaching the Diversity Essay Question

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Hey You – Yeah, You With the Not Quite 780 GMAT Score… http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/08/hey-you-yeah-you-with-the-not-quite-780-gmat-score/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/08/hey-you-yeah-you-with-the-not-quite-780-gmat-score/#respond Mon, 08 Sep 2014 16:40:13 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25550 ]]> How to Get Accepted to Top B-Schools with Low Stats: Click here to register!What?! You have a low GMAT/GPA score and still haven’t signed up for our upcoming webinar, How to Get Accepted to B-School with Low Stats?

Well consider this post your personal reminder to reserve an hour of your time and attend THE webinar that will help you overcome your less-than-desirable GPA or GMAT score and apply successfully to your top choice MBA programs!

The details:

Date: September 17, 2014

Time: 10:00 AM PT/1:00 PM ET

Registration link: How to Get Accepted to B-School with Low Stats (Registration is free, but required.)

Save my spot!

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

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Preparing to Reapply to Medical School: IV with MedSchoolApplicant http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/08/preparing-to-reapply-to-medical-school-iv-with-medschoolapplicant/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/08/preparing-to-reapply-to-medical-school-iv-with-medschoolapplicant/#respond Mon, 08 Sep 2014 16:22:50 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25119 ]]> Download your free special report: Medical School Reapplicant Advice - 6 Tips for Success

MedSchoolApplicant

This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with medical school applicants and students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at the med school application process. And now for a follow up interview with our anonymous video blogger, MedSchoolApplicant. (We first met MSA last year – you can read our first interview with her here.)

Accepted: Last we spoke, you were evaluating your med school dings and preparing to reapply. What stage of the application process are you now up to as a reapplicant?

MedSchoolApplicant: I have yet to actually reapply. After evaluating my application, I realized there were some things I needed to fix before submitting it a second time. Otherwise my application would look practically identical to my first one, which is something I want to avoid. As of right now, I’m taking a “break” to get those things in top shape.

Accepted: What would you say went wrong the first time around, and what steps are you taking this time to ensure your acceptance?

MedSchoolApplicant: Honestly, I think the biggest flaw in my application was my undergraduate GPA. It’s not terrible, but by medical school standards, it’s certainly not great. Since I cannot go back and retake those classes, I was advised to look into options for graduate school and that’s exactly what I’ve done. The goal is to focus and do really well so that my graduate GPA will show admissions committees that I am capable of handling the course load in medical school. I am currently pursuing a master’s degree in public health and it’s been really great! I am excited to combine the knowledge I am learning now with all that will come during medical school.

Accepted: How’s your vlogging going? Any new favorites that you want to share with us?

MedSchoolApplicant: I have a bit of a confession: I haven’t made a new video in about a year. AH! I know that’s terrible, but life has just been a bit crazy. With graduate school and some personal things, it’s been difficult. However, I have a list of ideas and I hope to be back in front of the camera very soon! Stay tuned!

Accepted: What else have you been up to in the last year?

MedSchoolApplicant: Since I have finished college, I actually work full time in clinical research. I feel fortunate to have been able to find a job in a relevant field. For the longest time I always viewed research as something that only happened in a lab, but I am finding that is not the case. My job requires me to manage patients enrolled on clinical trials, which can be very involved. It has given me tangible experience that will be invaluable as I move forward in the process of applying to medical school.

Accepted: Do you have any reapplication tips you can share with our readers?

MedSchoolApplicant: Reapplying can be tough for many reasons, but it’s important to keep perspective. Just because things did not work out exactly as you planned does not mean they will not work out at all. Some schools receive so many applications that it can be hard to make yours stand out from the crowd. Set yourself up for success by applying to more schools than you did the first time around.

Most importantly, don’t be afraid of criticism. The only way to improve your application is to really examine its flaws. Ask for advice from advisors, peers, or even friends and family. Take the MCAT again. Look into graduate school programs. If being a physician is truly what you want, be willing to go that extra mile to achieve your goals. You’ll be glad you did!

For one-on-one guidance on your med school applications, please see our catalog of med school admissions services.

Do you want to be featured in Accepted.com’s blog, Accepted Admissions Blog? If you want to share your med school journey with the world (or at least with our readers), email us at bloggers@accepted.com.

Thank you MedSchoolApplicant for sharing your story with us! Check out MedSchoolApplicant’s YouTube channel here and her Tumblr here.

Download your free special report: Medical School Reapplicant Advice - 6 Tips for Success

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Related Resources:

• Why Consider Participating in a Special Masters Program (SMP)?
Med School Applicant Interviews
Dealing with a Low MCAT Score or GPA

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So You Think You’d Like to Become a Doctor http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/07/so-you-think-youd-like-to-become-a-doctor-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/07/so-you-think-youd-like-to-become-a-doctor-2/#respond Sun, 07 Sep 2014 17:10:33 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25385 ]]> Download your complete copy of Am I Cut Out for a Combined BS/MD Program? “So You Think You’d Like to Become a Doctor” is excerpted from the Accepted.com special report, Am I Cut Out for a Combined BS/MD Program? To download the entire free special report, click here.

If you’d like to become a doctor, you are like thousands of high school students as they begin their college search each year. Medicine is one of the relatively few careers that high school students have direct exposure to. For some students, this exposure comes from a parent or sibling who practices medicine; but for almost all students applying to college, they themselves have been to the doctor.

If you are a student who has met with academic success, has an interest in science, and has a desire to help others, then medicine probably seems like a natural fit for you. As you talk about it with others, the path seems more and more appropriate. It’s an easy answer to one of the tough questions that adults ask during this process: “What are you going to major in?” Your reply is simple and met with satisfaction: “I’m going to be pre-med.”

At many colleges, however, pre-med is not a major. It is a series of courses that students must take in order to sit for the MCAT (Medical College Admissions Test) and apply to medical school. Many of these classes dovetail with university requirements for a biology-related major, but at this point, you need not major in science to be a successful applicant to medical school.

If you are considering a pre-med path through college, your opportunities to explore start in high school. Spend time shadowing a physician. Gain bench research experience. Enroll in demanding science courses in your high school. Participate in health-related volunteer work. Each of these activities will further enhance your profile in the future and help you to understand and articulate your own desire to become a physician.

Coming up next in this series: Advantages and Disadvantages of Combined BS/MD Programs.

Am I Cut Out for a Combined BS/MD Program?

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

• Identity, Community, and the World of Med School Admissions
Navigating the Med School Maze
How to Shadow a Doctor

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Get Accepted to the Wharton School Webinar Recording Available! http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/07/get-accepted-to-the-wharton-school-webinar-recording-available/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/07/get-accepted-to-the-wharton-school-webinar-recording-available/#respond Sun, 07 Sep 2014 16:35:30 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25536 ]]> Wharton hopefuls – this one’s for you! Our recent webinar, Get Accepted to the Wharton School, is now available on our website for instant downloading or on-demand viewing.

GetAcceptedToWharton

Who is the webinar for?

Get Accepted to the Wharton School is geared towards all Wharton applicants – U.S. applicants, international applicants, reapplicants, young applicants, older applicants…anyone with their eye on the Wharton prize.

The webinar is loaded with specific, concrete tips that will guide applicants through the Wharton admissions process, from creating a stand-out application to acing the Wharton group interview…and everything in between!

Watch the webinar

View Get Accepted to the Wharton School now!

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

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TexasWannaBeCali: 24 Year Old MBA Applicant Dreaming of the Beach http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/05/texaswannabecali-24-year-old-mba-applicant-dreaming-of-the-beach/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/05/texaswannabecali-24-year-old-mba-applicant-dreaming-of-the-beach/#respond Fri, 05 Sep 2014 16:22:51 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24572 ]]> Click here for more MBA applicant interviews. This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with MBA applicant bloggers, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at the MBA application process. And now…introducing our anonymous blogger, TexasWannaBeCali.

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What is your current job?

TexasWannaBeCali: I am from the great state of Texas. Dallas to be exact (Go Cowboys!). I went to college out of state to a nearby SEC school and graduated with a BS in Finance in 2012. After graduation, I joined a corporate tax advisory firm that was headquartered back in Dallas, and have been there ever since, working as a tax consultant on a team that specializes in the healthcare industry with a client base that includes most Fortune 500 healthcare services companies/hospitals and medical device vendors.

Accepted: Do you plan on staying in your current industry post-MBA, or changing to a new field/career?

TexasWannaBeCali: Post MBA, I would like to move into a corporate finance role at a big pharma/biotech company. I want to use my knowledge of the healthcare industry that I have gained from tax consulting on the provider side to be a valuable asset on the industry side of things.

Accepted: What stage of the application process are you up to so far? What has been the most challenging step and how did you work to overcome it?

TexasWannaBeCali: Right now, I am entering my last month of GMAT studying as well as drafting outlines to start essay writing. I would honestly say the most challenging part of the application process is not necessarily completing a certain requirement, they all take a little blood, sweat and tears, but more so being able to balance everything while still working 45+ hours a week.

I’ve found that determination, organization, and not being afraid to ask questions can alleviate a lot of the struggles.

Accepted: Where do you plan on applying to b-school? Will you be applying to any safety schools? Why or why not?

TexasWannaBeCali: I am applying to Anderson, Haas, Fuqua and McCombs. After a lot of thought, I decided not to apply to any safety schools this time around. I am only 24 years old, if I don’t get into one of my top schools, I’d rather take time to reflect on what I could’ve done better and try ten times harder the next time around than go somewhere just to go.

Accepted: So…why California? What’s the draw to California in general and to UCLA and Haas in particular?

TexasWannaBeCali: Yes I have been kind of obsessed with idea of living in California lately. I’ve lived in the South my whole life, and would love the opportunity to explore a new place…and be close to the beach. I love the culture, weather, lifestyle, and just the abundance of things to do there.

The fact that California is home to some of the top companies in the rapidly growing biotech and life sciences industry has made UCLA and Haas front runners in my school wish list. Both programs offer substantial post-MBA opportunities in healthcare because of brand name, proximity and an outstanding curriculum targeted at excelling in the industry and I would love to be a part of either one.

Accepted: As someone on the younger side of the applicant age spectrum, how do you plan on making up for what you lack in years of work experience?

TexasWannaBeCali: The age aspect has been one of my biggest internal struggles. I know adcoms will want to know more than usual why an MBA is necessary for me right now, and not 1 or 2 years down the road and then if I am admitted, what knowledge I can bring. I think that emphasizing that not only is the quality of my work experience high despite the quantity, but also the fact that at matriculation I will have 3+ years of consistent on the job learning from the same firm. My job has enabled me to take on a lot of responsibility and leadership roles at such a young stage of my career and I have learned so much from being able to build upon my knowledge with every new project and/or client I take on.

Accepted: Why did you decide to blog about your experience? What have you gained from the experience? What do you hope others will learn?

TexasWannaBeCali: I initially started blogging to organize my thoughts and ideas as I made my way through the b-school application process. I can get overwhelmed rather easily so being able to track my progress in one place would keep me somewhat sane.

Blogging has been a great outlet for giving and receiving feedback whether it’s from other first time applicants, re-applicants, or students that have successfully been accepted into their dream schools. At first I was honestly shocked people even took the time to read what I had to say, but I’m glad they did because I love reading their stories too. It’s like a little network of people wholeheartedly supporting each other and I am so happy I made the decision to start blogging. I would recommend it to anyone making the lofty decision to go back to school, you won’t regret it.

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages.

You can read more about TexasWannaBeCali’s b-school journey by checking out her blog, TexasWannaBeCali. Thank you TexasWannaBeCali for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

How to Choose the Best MBA Program for You

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

School Specific 2015 MBA Application Essay Tips
• IV with a Duke MBA Pursuing a Career in Healthcare
MBA Applicant Interviews

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See Jane Get into B-School with Low Stats http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/04/see-jane-get-into-b-school-with-low-stats/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/04/see-jane-get-into-b-school-with-low-stats/#respond Thu, 04 Sep 2014 20:56:42 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25463 ]]> See Jane.
See Jane Study.
See Jane sit for GMAT.
See Jane sad with low score.
See Jane attend Accepted.com webinar.

See Jane jump.
See Jane go to dream b-school!

We want to see you go to your dream school too.

Low stats cover SEPT2014 PROOF2

Join us live on Wednesday, September 17, 2014 at 10:00 AM PST/1:00 PM EST for How to Get Accepted to B-School with Low Stats – a webinar that will help you, like Jane, learn how to overcome a low GMAT/GPA and apply successfully to b-school.

Registration is required (and free). Reserve your spot for How to Get Accepted to B-School with Low Stats now!

Save my spot!

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