Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog http://blog.accepted.com Admissions consulting and application advice Sun, 25 Jan 2015 20:31:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1 Admissions consulting and application advice Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no Admissions consulting and application advice Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog http://blog.accepted.com/wp-content/plugins/powerpress/rss_default.jpg http://blog.accepted.com Cornell Tech Student Interview: Where CS Meets the MBA http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/25/cornell-tech-student-interview-cs-meets-mba/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/25/cornell-tech-student-interview-cs-meets-mba/#respond Sun, 25 Jan 2015 20:31:21 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28322 This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Will Hester, an M. Eng. Cornell Tech student in NYC. Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did […]

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Want to read more student interviews?  Click here!This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Will Hester, an M. Eng. Cornell Tech student in NYC.

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What’s your favorite non-school book?

Will: I was born and raised in Austin, Texas. I went to the University of Texas at Austin and was conferred two degrees: A Bachelor of Science in Electrical and Computer Engineering with a focus on Software Engineering, and a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science.

My favorite non-school book is Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes (never read it for school, believe it or not).

Accepted: Can you tell us about the new program you’re in? How did you choose Cornell Tech? Why was it the best match for you?

Will: Cornell Tech is a pretty unique graduate program. In addition to the individual MBA and CS curriculum, there is also a co-curriculum led by Greg Pass, former CTO at Twitter. The co-curriculum consists mainly of exercises and projects done in groups of both CS and MBA students. Most notably during the fall semester, we were all split into groups of 4-5 half-MBA, half-CS company project groups, in which we worked closely with companies like AOL, Bloomberg, eBay, Google, LinkedIn, and Microsoft just to name a few. All the while the co-curriculum is conducted in a very fast-paced, startup-like atmosphere (we are constantly encouraged by faculty and guest speakers to follow the startup path, be it start one’s own venture, or join a startup post-graduation).

Cornell Tech was the best match for me because I knew I wanted to pursue my masters in CS, but I also wanted some business education without going all-out trying to get an MBA as well. I always have had an interest in startups, so the faster-paced, smaller nature of the program was extremely attractive. I could not be happier to be at Cornell Tech.

Accepted: If you could change one thing about the program, what would it be? 

Will: If I could change one thing about the program, I wish we were already in the future campus.

Accepted: Can you talk about your program’s relationship on campus with the Cornell Johnson MBA students? Can you explain why some people would choose Cornell Tech and some Cornell Johnson? 

Will: The CS students have a very close relationship with the MBA students. There’s a set time every week for us to work side-by-side on our company projects, and several learning exercises we work together on. The Cornell Tech MBA program is exclusively a 1-year program, whereas the normal Johnson MBA program in Ithaca has both one- and two-year options. The biggest difference between the Ithaca and Cornell Tech programs is that Cornell Tech is much more entrepreneurial/startup-focused. Our guest speakers are mostly serial entrepreneurs, and the projects are fast-paced and you typically build a real product with the CS students.

The Cornell Tech MBA students are in Ithaca for courses with the other Johnson one-year MBAs for three months over the summer before coming to the NYC campus. Additionally, the Cornell Tech MBAs spend a couple of weeks over winter break in Israel, working with Israeli startups.

Accepted: Are you involved in any clubs or competitions on campus? 

Will: Since the program is very new, Cornell Tech doesn’t have many official, established clubs. We are in the process of founding them. The most well-developed club is probably the Disruptive Technology Club.

Accepted: What do you plan on doing once you graduate? 

Will: I accepted a job with a Boston-based fantasy sports company called DraftKings, where I will start in July.

Accepted: Can you tell us about some of the projects you’ve been involved with lately?

Will: At Cornell Tech, I was part of a group with one other M. Eng. CS student and two MBAs in which we spent a semester working on a mobile application for AOL using beacons. At Cornell Tech, we’d meet with the other company project teams every Tuesday to see what everyone else was working on and receive help from industry specialists, entrepreneurs, and each other if we needed it. Once a month, we have a “hack day” on campus. All students participate in a 24-hour hackathon with their company project team and show off what they accomplished at the end. My AOL team developed an Android and iOS messaging application in which users can send messages to a particular user and location combination, so the recipients won’t receive the message until they are physically near where the message was sent to. We placed Bluetooth Low Energy beacons all around campus to provide locations that messages could be sent to.

Outside of school, JustGotGood.com is my most notable project. JustGotGood provides text message alerts for NBA games that are triggered when a particular game is within X points with less than Y time remaining, where the user defines X and Y.

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages.

You can read more about Will’s journey by checking out his About Me page. Thank you Will for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

Download our free report on choosing the best MBA program!

Accepted.com: The Premier Admissions Consultancy

Related Resources:

Honing in On the Cornell Johnson MBA: An Interview with Ann Richards
Leadership, Tech & Forte: IV with a Cornell MBA Student
Johnson at Cornell University 2015 MBA Questions, Deadlines, Tips

 

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2016 IMD Essay Tips http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/25/imd-essay-tips-2016/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/25/imd-essay-tips-2016/#respond Sun, 25 Jan 2015 20:05:01 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28332 IMD, the International Institute for Management Development, in Lausanne, Switzerland, offers a 1-year MBA program focused on general management and leadership. While there are only 90 students in each class, the diversity among that class is wide: students hail from 45 countries: 43% from throughout Europe, 26% from Asia, 11% from the Middle East and […]

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Click here to read other school specific essay tips.IMD, the International Institute for Management Development, in Lausanne, Switzerland, offers a 1-year MBA program focused on general management and leadership. While there are only 90 students in each class, the diversity among that class is wide: students hail from 45 countries: 43% from throughout Europe, 26% from Asia, 11% from the Middle East and Africa, 9% from North America, 8% from South America, and 3% from Oceania (Australia/New Zealand and the surrounding islands). Unlike programs in the US, which tend to build the bulk of their classes from students aged 26-28, IMD’s average student age is 31.

Graduates of IMD tend do very well in their careers after the program: the 3-year average graduate salary is $131,800. 75% of the class join industry (including Consumer Products, Industrial Products, Technology, Healthcare, and Energy) when they graduate, 20% enter Consulting, and 5% pursue Financial Services careers. IMD enjoys a global reputation that affords its graduates some flexibility in their career destinations: while 63% of the class remains in Europe after graduating, 22% find employment in Asia, 6% in the Africa or the Middle East, and 9% in North or South America. IMD is consistently ranked among the top programs in the world: BusinessWeek ranks it #9 among international programs, the Financial Times ranks it #12, and Forbes named it the best 1-year international MBA program.

IMD scaled way back this year, trimming their application from 7 essays to just 3, but there are other areas in the application form that will require additional short answers as well.

IMD was recently buffeted by major changes in administrative personnel and direction. For details, please see “5 Key IMD Officials Resign.” Now, to the IMD essay tips for 2016:

Essay 1:

Describe yourself in two hundred words or less [200 words]

I recommend covering just one or two major attributes in this short essay, sharing two separate anecdotes or one example that demonstrates both traits. Some of the qualities that IMD values in its students are an international outlook, desire to make a difference, commitment to learning from others, a broad understanding and appreciation of moral issues, and effective leadership. While you do not need to use these terms specifically, essays that reveal these qualities will appeal to the admissions committee.

Essay 2:

Give an example of a time when you were confronted with an unrecoverable event. How did it affect you and what were your greatest learnings? [300 words]

“Unrecoverable event” is a euphemism for failure. You need to choose an event in which you could have done better. I often see applicants implicitly or explicitly blame others in their essays for what went wrong. Unfortunately, not accepting responsibility for the failure will indicate to the admissions committee that you are emotionally immature and incapable of owning your role in the failure. Focus instead on what personal and professional insights would have been helpful to you and how you have worked to gain and apply those since this event.

Essay 3:

On your 75th birthday someone close to you presents your laudatio (tribute). It can be a friend, colleague, family member etc. Please describe in detail what this person would say about you and your life. [300 words]

This is your chance to share some of the accomplishments you have achieved in your life so far and others that you aspire to achieve before you turn 75. Instead of dreaming of enormous accomplishments in the future that have no grounding in what you have been doing so far, go ahead and talk about some of your achievements to date and how they set you on the path to the accomplishments you intend to talk about on your 75th birthday. Applicants may also use this essay to describe their long-term career and life goals – describing those goals as if they have come to fruition.

Short answer questions from throughout the application:

What is your career goal post IMD? [200 characters]

200 characters is typically just a bit more than 2 lines of text, so you don’t have much room here to explain the role you would like to secure after graduating from IMD. While one-third of the class changes their function, industry, and geography after graduating from IMD, 93% change only one of these areas and 74% change only two: your short-term goal needs to connect in some way to what you’ve been doing until now to be a credible transition. It should include the function you want to perform, the industry in which you want to perform it, and geographic location if relevant.

What are the skills you need to develop in order to achieve your goal? [200 characters]

Again, this allows only a short response. Successful applicants will research their intended short-term goal to understand the business skills and knowledge they need to succeed and discuss those that the IMD MBA education focuses on.

Is there any additional information that is critical for the Admissions Committee to know which has not been covered elsewhere in this application? If you would like to comment on career gaps, education, GMAT/GRE, a disability or illness, please use this space. (Optional) [300 words]

Now that the IMD application is so short, it seems inevitable that critical experiences have been left out. Even if you have to write about a career/education gap or test score issue, I recommend doing so briefly to allow you to cover another success story in this essay. The goal of using this space is to share another facet of your background and convince the admissions team that you have a wealth of interesting experiences to share with the class.   

Administrative questions:

Your responses to these questions will not be taken into consideration in the admissions process. 

1.  How do you intend to finance your MBA at IMD? What would your budget be?  [300 words]

Funding the MBA is expensive, and IMD wants to know that you have considered this before you embark. 300 words is ample space to elaborate on your financial resources.

2.  Why are you applying to IMD? What other programs have you considered / are you considering? [300 words]

While the header for this section informs applicants that their responses will not be taken into consideration in the admissions process, I highly recommend going into detail about what makes IMD an ideal program for you. Go ahead and share the insight that you have gained from current students and alumni about what makes IMD special. The second element of the question is useful for IMD to know who their peers are, which helps them tweak their own marketing and recruiting efforts.

Application deadlines are at 23:59 pm CET (Switzerland) time in the following order:

Within a maximum of 6 weeks, you will be informed whether you have been selected to be interviewed for further evaluation or if your application has been unsuccessful.

February 1
April 1
June 1
August 1
September 1

If you would like professional guidance with your IMD MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and consulting  or our application package which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the IMD MBA application.

Click here for Must-Know info & Advice for Students Abroad

Jennifer Bloom By Jennifer Bloom who has been helping applicants to the top MBA programs draft their resumes, application forms, letters of recommendation, and essays for 15 years. She is happy to serve as your personal coach and hand-holder throughout the entire process. There’s no time like the present to begin!

Related Resources:

The Quick Guide to Admissions Resumes
Maximizing Your MBA Application: 5 Tips for Succinct Essays
• Business and Science Meet: Insights of an IMD Grad and Former Medical Doctor 

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Michigan Ross Receives $20M Gift to Launch Leadership Center http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/23/michigan-ross-receives-20m-gift-launch-leadership-center/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/23/michigan-ross-receives-20m-gift-launch-leadership-center/#respond Fri, 23 Jan 2015 18:45:06 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28307 Last week, Michigan Ross received a $20 million gift from former General Mills CEO Stephen W. Sanger and his wife, Karen Sanger. The money will go towards the construction of the Sanger Leadership Center. According to the Ross press release, “The Sanger Leadership Center will incorporate and expand on the current activities of the Ross […]

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Visit our Michigan Ross zone page for all things Michigan Ross!Last week, Michigan Ross received a $20 million gift from former General Mills CEO Stephen W. Sanger and his wife, Karen Sanger. The money will go towards the construction of the Sanger Leadership Center. According to the Ross press release, “The Sanger Leadership Center will incorporate and expand on the current activities of the Ross Leadership Initiative – including the annual Impact Challenge and Crisis Challenge, Legacy Lab, Story Lab, skills-based workshops, and a variety of learning communities — as well as the Leaders Academy, where students create, launch and lead actual businesses.”

Stephen W. Sanger received his MBA from Michigan in 1970, joined General Mills in 1974, and then later became CEO of the giant food company. During his tenure, GM sales more than doubled; earnings and market capitalization tripled.

Ross associate dean and faculty director of the Sanger Leadership Center, Scott DeRue, says of the gift: “It will help us create even more high-impact, high-touch leadership development experiences that students can’t get anywhere else but Ross. I envision a future where 50,000 Michigan Ross students – past, present, and future – lead positive change in themselves and around the world. The creation of the Sanger Leadership Center and the generous gift from the Sangers mark a major leap forward in achieving this important vision. It’s an incredible addition to our leadership initiatives, and I am proud to be a part of this school and university at such an exciting time.”

Should you apply Round 3 or wait till next year?

Reserve your spot now

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Related Resources:

Leadership in Admissions
Michigan Ross MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
An Interview with Anne Perigo of University of Michigan’s Master of Entrepreneurship Program

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Which Round Should I Apply to Business School? http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/22/round-apply-business-school/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/22/round-apply-business-school/#respond Thu, 22 Jan 2015 17:29:58 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28134 When speaking with business school adcom members, most will advice that submitting a great application in the second round is far better than submitting a mediocre application in the first round. But what happens when you didn’t manage to submit in either round 1 or round 2. Business school applicants in this category are wondering, […]

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When speaking with business school adcom members, most will advice that submitting a great application in the second round is far better than submitting a mediocre application in the first round. But what happens when you didn’t manage to submit in either round 1 or round 2. Business school applicants in this category are wondering, “Which round should I apply to business school? Should I apply round 3 or just wait till next year?”

Watch my latest Youtube video for the answer on when you should apply to business school.

That was my short answer. For a more in-depth analysis of the round 3 vs. next year application debate, join our live, free webinar where I address the differences between round 3 and earlier rounds, the pros and cons of applying R3, and help you solve your question, “Which round should I apply to business school?”

Which round should you apply to busines school?

Linda AbrahamBy Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

 

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What MBA Applicants Should Do After Submitting Their Application http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/21/mba-applicants-submitting-application/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/21/mba-applicants-submitting-application/#respond Wed, 21 Jan 2015 21:58:13 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28222 Within twelve hours I heard the same question from three clients, so I suppose this question may be on the minds of more than three, “now that I’ve submitted my applications, what should I do?”  The following are a list of suggestions: Continue to learn about each school by speaking with faculty, alumni and students. […]

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Conduct more research on your intended goal in anticipation of an interview invitation

Within twelve hours I heard the same question from three clients, so I suppose this question may be on the minds of more than three, “now that I’ve submitted my applications, what should I do?”  The following are a list of suggestions:

  1. Continue to learn about each school by speaking with faculty, alumni and students.  The more information you have the better.  Be conscious of their limited time, so be thoughtful with the questions you ask. In addition, you may wind up with an unsolicited endorsement of your candidacy.
  2. Conduct more research on your intended goal in anticipation of an MBA interview invitation.  If instance, your intended goal is consulting, read The McKinsey Way or BCG on Strategy.  If you are an up and coming entrepreneur, Back of the Napkin or anything by Peter Drucker or Guy Kawasaki.  If you are transitioning into marketing, check out Communities Dominate Brands or Marketing Strategy: A decision-focused approach.
  3. Attend any events the school may be having (including virtual events).  Stay involved.  Show your interest.
  4. Make up for any gaps you may have in your application (quantitative skills, volunteer work).
  5. Create new opportunities to add revenue, decrease costs, increase efficiency, increase market share, increase shareholder value, increase safety, increase satisfaction (customer or employee) at work.
  6. Use your leadership skills with any opportunity you can imagine.
  7. If you haven’t been doing so yet, begin reading business press.  You need to understand the jargon, the acumen, and what drives business today.
  8. Now sit back and relax.  Schools receive the largest number of apps in the second round and if they use student readers, the students are on vacation until sometime in January leaving a big bottleneck in the review process.  Learn to be patient.  A must-have in this process.

If you have additional questions or concerns about applications, please contact Accepted.com.  My colleagues and I are available to consult with you.

Do you know the 10 commandments of MBA interviews?

Natalie Grinblatt Epstein By , an accomplished Accepted.com consultant/editor (since 2008) and entrepreneur. Natalie is a former MBA Admissions Dean and Director at Ross, Johnson, and Carey.

 

Related Resources:

How to Ace Your Interviews – Download the free guide!
• Help! I’ve Been Waitlisted!
MBA Student Interviews

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Medical School Admissions 2015-2016: A Dean’s Perspective http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/21/medical-school-admissions-2015-2016-deans-perspective/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/21/medical-school-admissions-2015-2016-deans-perspective/#respond Wed, 21 Jan 2015 21:05:18 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28245 It is ‘Medical School’ time of year.  Some of you are getting ready for the interview. Others are dealing with being waitlisted or rejected. And some of you are getting your applications ready to submit this summer for the first time. Now that MCAT 2015 is another and new ingredient in this volatile mix, we […]

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It is ‘Medical School’ time of year.  Some of you are getting ready for the interview. Others are dealing with being waitlisted or rejected. And some of you are getting your applications ready to submit this summer for the first time. Now that MCAT 2015 is another and new ingredient in this volatile mix, we thought it was time to bring a medical school admissions expert, Jennifer Welch, to our podcast.

Jennifer, currently the Associate Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid at SUNY Upstate Medical University, has been a medical school admissions director and dean for over twenty years.

Listen to the recording of our conversation as Jennifer graciously shares her time and insights on medical school admissions 2015-2016.

00:4:07The New MCAT – a different focus.

00:5:35 – MCAT – are high scores still necessary for acceptance?

00:7:00 – New vs old MCAT scores, how to evaluate?

00:8:05 – The goal of the medical school interview.

00:9:25Interview day – time to make sure you are a good fit!

00:11:45 – Speaking with students on campus?  Chatting with a receptionist?  The “interview” isn’t over.

00:12:31 – Be real…feel real…in a suit.

00:13:47MMI Interviews – what is the SUNY Upstate’s approach?

00:17:00 – The student who did not get an interview and why. Suggestions so that you snag the med school interview invitation.

00:19:45 – Great GPA and MCAT but no clinicals – what are your chances?

00:21:35 – Details, details, details!

00:22:50 – How to make shadowing count.

00:26:59 – 2016 Applicants – get the applications in early!

00:28:26 – Took a gap year?  Explain. (It’s to your benefit).

00:29:24Reapplicants – what should your focus be?

00:30:15 – Think being a waitress or camp counselor wasn’t important?  Think again.

00:32:33Waitlisted – When is updated information helpful?

00:33:43 – Jennifer gives advice for college students thinking of med school.

00:35:43 – Final pearl’s of wisdom for all applicants.

 

Listen to the full conversation to learn more!Relevant Links:

• SUNY Upstate Medical School Admissions
 
Navigating the Med School Maze
• A Second Chance at Medical School: The A-Z of Applying to Postbac Programs
• Medical School Reapplicant Advice: 6 Tips for Success

Related Shows:

Getting Into Medical School: Advice from a Pro
Med School Conversation with Cyd Foote
All Things Postbac
MCAT Scores, MCAT Prep, and MCAT2015
MCAT Mania: How to Prepare
• 
A Window into the World and Life of Medical Scribes
 What You Need to Know About Post-bac Programs

Leave a Review for Admissions Straight Talk:

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medical school

*Theme music is courtesy of podcasthemes.com.

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http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/21/medical-school-admissions-2015-2016-deans-perspective/feed/ 0 It is ‘Medical School’ time of year.  Some of you are getting ready for the interview. Others are dealing with being waitlisted or rejected. And some of you are getting your applications ready to submit this summer for the first time. It is ‘Medical School’ time of year.  Some of you are getting ready for the interview. Others are dealing with being waitlisted or rejected. And some of you are getting your applications ready to submit this summer for the first time. Now that MCAT 2015 is another and new ingredient in this volatile mix, we thought it was time to bring a medical school admissions expert, Jennifer Welch, to our podcast. Jennifer, currently the Associate Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid at SUNY Upstate Medical University, has been a medical school admissions director and dean for over twenty years. Listen to the recording of our conversation as Jennifer graciously shares her time and insights on medical school admissions 2015-2016. 00:4:07 - The New MCAT - a different focus. 00:5:35 - MCAT - are high scores still necessary for acceptance? 00:7:00 - New vs old MCAT scores, how to evaluate? 00:8:05 - The goal of the medical school interview. 00:9:25 - Interview day - time to make sure you are a good fit! 00:11:45 - Speaking with students on campus?  Chatting with a receptionist?  The “interview” isn’t over. 00:12:31 - Be real...feel real...in a suit. 00:13:47 - MMI Interviews - what is the SUNY Upstate's approach? 00:17:00 - The student who did not get an interview and why. Suggestions so that you snag the med school interview invitation. 00:19:45 - Great GPA and MCAT but no clinicals - what are your chances? 00:21:35 - Details, details, details! 00:22:50 - How to make shadowing count. 00:26:59 - 2016 Applicants - get the applications in early! 00:28:26 - Took a gap year?  Explain. (It’s to your benefit). 00:29:24 - Reapplicants - what should your focus be? 00:30:15 - Think being a waitress or camp counselor wasn’t important?  Think again. 00:32:33 - Waitlisted - When is updated information helpful? 00:33:43 - Jennifer gives advice for college students thinking of med school. 00:35:43 - Final pearl's of wisdom for all applicants.   Relevant Links: • SUNY Upstate Medical School Admissions • Navigating the Med School Maze • A Second Chance at Medical School: The A-Z of Applying to Postbac Programs • Medical School Reapplicant Advice: 6 Tips for Success Related Shows: • Getting Into Medical School: Advice from a Pro • Med School Conversation with Cyd Foote • All Things Postbac • MCAT Scores, MCAT Prep, and MCAT2015 • MCAT Mania: How to Prepare • A Window into the World and Life of Medical Scribes • What You Need to Know About Post-bac Programs Leave a Review for Admissions Straight Talk: *Theme music is courtesy of podcasthemes.com. Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no 38:20
Parents of Pre-Med Students: How Much Help is Too Much Help? http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/20/parents-pre-med-students-much-help-much-help/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/20/parents-pre-med-students-much-help-much-help/#respond Tue, 20 Jan 2015 18:41:34 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28216 As a parent of a pre-med student dreaming of getting accepted to medical school, you probably wonder “How much help is too much help?” We’re pretty sure we’ve got just the resource for you… Here’s an excerpt from our new guide, Parents of Pre-Meds: How to Help, on respecting boundaries during the admissions process: As […]

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Download our Parents of Pre-Meds guide!As a parent of a pre-med student dreaming of getting accepted to medical school, you probably wonder “How much help is too much help?” We’re pretty sure we’ve got just the resource for you…

Here’s an excerpt from our new guide, Parents of Pre-Meds: How to Help, on respecting boundaries during the admissions process:

As the application season progresses and anxiety is rising, avoid bringing up the topic of medical school admissions or calling medical schools on your son or daughter’s behalf. Most children are thrilled to share good news with their parents – once they get it. To prevent unnecessary stress, allow your child to be the person who gives you regular progress updates. (Rejoice! No need to nag.)

Your children are adults now. And giving them the space that adults deserve will enhance their sense of self-responsibility and independence, not to mention your relationship with them. Applications can become a painful topic for them and bringing it up before exams or while they are focused on other goals can derail their progress in those other activities. You can even have an open and honest conversation with them early in the application process about how they would like to manage the topic. Whatever you agree to do, honor your word.

Are you looking for more spot-on advice on how to help your child achieve their med school dreams without panicking, pushing, or pestering? Download Parents of Pre-Meds: How to Help  today!

Get your free copy of 'Parents of Pre-Meds' now!Accepted.com: The Premier Admissions Consultancy

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2015 London Business School MiM Essay Questions & Tips http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/20/2015-london-business-school-mim-essay-questions-tips/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/20/2015-london-business-school-mim-essay-questions-tips/#respond Tue, 20 Jan 2015 17:51:03 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28185 The LBS MiM adcom seeks two key factors that are essential for MiM students – recent college grads – to make productive use of the program.  They are: (a) self-understanding and (b) a realistic and informed view of the business world and their future role in it, even though they don’t yet have much actual […]

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Learn more about the LBS Masters in Management programThe LBS MiM adcom seeks two key factors that are essential for MiM students – recent college grads – to make productive use of the program.  They are: (a) self-understanding and (b) a realistic and informed view of the business world and their future role in it, even though they don’t yet have much actual experience.  

The London Business School MiM essay questions are designed to elicit this information. They also reflect the program’s requirements for strong communication skills, specifically concision. The word limits are tight; you have to pack a lot of substance into your responses to distinguish yourself.

Question 1 (500 words)
In what company and role will you be working in after completing your Masters in Management and how will your academic, professional, and personal achievements allow you to succeed in this position? What challenges do you foresee in pursuing this goal?

Wait, how can you know what company you’ll be working at after graduating?  Figuring that out was partly why you want to attend the program….

Pretend you know.  Identify the company and role that interests you most now, and build the essay on them.  (Feel free to add that if you don’t end up there, you’ll welcome a similar position at a similar company.)  What the adcom is looking for here is assurance that you have sufficient practical understanding of post-MiM options to make an informed decision about attending the program and using LBS’ extensive career resources.

Discuss the target company and role, including why you want them, what you hope to accomplish, and how your achievements will help you succeed in this role.  While elaborating on the role, also address 2-3 challenges you anticipate in pursuing it.  It would not hurt here to explain how the LBS MiM will prepare you to address those challenges.

Question 2 (300 words)
The MiM study groups will challenge students by testing their ability to work with academically and culturally diverse people and to play different roles within these teams. What strengths will you bring to your team and what qualities will you need to improve in order to be a valued team member? Feel free to use a real example to illustrate your thoughts.

Select 2-3 strengths and illustrate them with brief examples – these examples needn’t be of equal length (given the tight word limit, even a 1-sentence example is okay), but don’t just explain this-and-that is your strength.  Actual examples will make these strengths vivid and credible.  Use different strengths, not things that overlap a lot (as “communication skills” and “interpersonal skills” do).  Briefly note after each strength how it will enable you to contribute to the team.

In discussing qualities (yes, plural) that you need to improve, use an example for at least one – and be sure to present points that are relevant to the team process.

Another straightforward and effective approach is to identify a team work success, describe your role, and then  relate how that success reflects specific strengths as well as what qualities need to be improved upon. Or the weakness part can be a separate paragraph.

Whichever structure you use, with only 300 words, select content that doesn’t require a lot of background explanation.

Question 3 (200 words)
The core values of London Business School challenge individuals to be communal, courageous, ambitious, eclectic, and engaged. Please tell us about a time when you demonstrated one of these values in your personal or professional life.

This essay is essentially a story, so the structure is simple: narrate the story.  Succinctly.  

The challenge comes in selecting the story.  Choose something ideally fairly recent, and that either presents a different dimension that the points you mention in the preceding essay, or elaborates on one of the strengths.  Select something truly meaningful and pivotal in your life.  You can use either professional or personal stories for this essay. And do explicitly state in one sentence why you view the experience as communal, courageous, ambitious, eclectic, or engaged.

Question 4 (400 words)

Please answer this question ONLY if you are applying to the Global Masters in Management.

An exposure to the Western and Eastern way of doing business is a fast-track to succeed in today’s global world. Boeing CEO Jim McNerney has said, “The people who will lead our company in the future have to have personal experience in China.” If you were to interview with Mr. McNerney for a position in his company, how would you demonstrate that you’re the right person for the role?

IF you’ve had personal experience in China, it might seem that you have the easier job – but don’t expect brownie points for that.  You must express something meaningful, insightful, and relevant about your time there.  Use examples and anecdotes as the main content, and draw conclusions in brief reflections.

IF you haven’t had personal experience in China, you must be a bit creative.  DO NOT fall into the trap of explaining why such experience really isn’t necessary.  Remember, the point of the essay is to let the adcom learn more about you, not experience in China.  Therefore, give reasons – backed up by examples – why you are right for the job in spite of lacking the stated experience. And it won’t hurt to explain you intend to get the experience soon, and how.

Deadlines:
The recommended deadlines for the 2015 intake (MiM2016 class) are:

Learn more about the London Business School MiM program

Cindy Tokumitsu By , author and co-author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports, including Why MBA and Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted.com.

Related Resources:

• From Example to Exemplary
• The Scoop on the London Business School Masters in Management Program
• MBA/MMM Interview with Kellogg Student: Using Empathy to Succeed

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Meet PreMedPrince: Getting Back on Track with Hard Work & Strong Support http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/19/meet-premedprince-getting-back-track-hard-work-strong-support/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/19/meet-premedprince-getting-back-track-hard-work-strong-support/#respond Mon, 19 Jan 2015 16:16:14 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28028 This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with medical school applicants and students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top medical schools and the med school application process. And now, introducing Jared Sharza, aka PreMedPrince… Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what are you […]

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Read more interviews with med school applicants!

PreMed Prince

This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with medical school applicants and students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top medical schools and the med school application process. And now, introducing Jared Sharza, aka PreMedPrince…

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what are you studying as an undergrad? When do you plan on graduating?

Jared: I’m a 20 year old 2nd semester Junior, preparing to transfer into my next university for my last 3 semesters. I originally started school at St. Lawrence University, a prestigious institution located in arguably the most frigid area of Upstate New York. I started off as a premed student but couldn’t keep up with the level of work necessary to move on in the premed curriculum, so I was cut from the program for the following semester.

After a brief semester stint with liberal studies, I found a niche in Economics and International Relations. I always had a deep interest in foreign policy and valued other cultures but decided I could express it best in government. My Economics side was harvested during my 2nd semester Freshman year when I started up a sober driving service for students from campus and into the town. The most rudimentary ideas of Economics came into play as I began to understand the lack of supply, yet high demand for a transportation service into the town (after all, the winters got as cold as -20). Towards the end of that semester, I decided to start investing in Penny Stocks and decided to further cultivate my interest in Economics by studying more of it the following semesters.

My last semester at St. Lawrence was filled with Government and advanced Economics. I was delegated as Class President which I began to get very excited about early on. I also was rushing a fraternity at the time. Everything seemed to start off flawless as I began to think my future was going to be promising my last few semesters at St. Lawrence. However, after a major Greek Life scandal that I had lied to the school administration about, I was placed on judiciary probation which later changed to being placed on a semester of suspension.

I was in a dark place for a while afterwards. I didn’t know how to tell my parents I was suspended- so I didn’t for a few weeks until I had a plan to get back on track. Just after New Year’s 2014, on my birthday, January 2nd, I told my parents. They were absolutely distraught that I didn’t ask them for help or had come to them earlier when the situation was going on. It was a very stressful time.

With the support and guidance of my parents, however, I was able to gain admission to a local community college, Finger Lakes Community College, who was willing to look past my imperfections as I explained to them my plan to move forward. I decided that I had become a strong enough student to give the pre-medical curriculum another try, but this time with a goal and direction to take the MCAT at the end of the year. Throughout this past year, including the two summer accelerated semesters, I finished the whole premed curriculum and had been actively studying for the MCAT along the way.

I was lucky enough to get a seat for the January 2015 MCAT, just before the major changes to the exam come. Two days after taking the MCAT, I will move into Nazareth College as a 2nd semester Junior majoring in Anthropology. A lot of people have asked me, “Why Anthropology, don’t you want to be a doctor?” I always try to explain to them that not everybody who goes to medical school has to major in a Science. I further attempt to express how Anthropology is the study of interacting with people and being able to see through diversity, but to learn to interact with people with an understanding of their culture. It’s very profound to me because I am sometimes asked the difference between Sociology and Anthropology.

I have a deeply rooted passion for languages and cultures alike coming from a family with a heavily diverse background. I feel that through studying Anthropology, I will find a way to express my passion to help others of diverse backgrounds through understanding and learning how to relate my studies to enhance my abilities with the proverbial “Doctor-Patient interactions.”

I will also be part of the Men’s Tennis team at Nazareth and the Pre-Health Club, as well as the school’s respective honors society (having gained Phi Theta Kappa honors society membership this past year).

Accepted: Can you tell us about your blog? When and why did you start blogging? What have you gained from the experience?

Jared: Part of my plan to get back on track after having been suspended for a semester was to find the support necessary to succeed. I had no friends at the school so I virtually had no distractions from school other than sports. My parents provided a strong support, but I sought a larger group. I took to Twitter using an anonymous Twitter handle name, PreMedPrince, to join the ever-expansive network of premeds, med students, and doctors alike. I became very comfortable with the network as they supported my plans I had expressed.

Towards the middle of the Spring ‘14 semester, I decided in order to keep up my momentum, I had to lose a few of my ghosts that kept on haunting me. Whenever I had doubted my ability to pursue my endeavors, I could attribute it to being suspended, so I shared my experience in the form of a blog. I like to write, and had been using a journal as a pathway for stress-relief and for planning.

After I put up my tell-all story regarding my suspension and how I had planned to get back on track, I received immediate feedback and strengthened support. From the experience, I gained the ability to reach out for support. It had been something I had been lacking for as long as I can remember. I have always tried to be proud of doing things by myself. I have often been very egotistical until I was humbled by being suspended, it was the first time I hadn’t been able to work my way out of something by myself. Success is a team-driven experience. Without a support group, I find it very difficult to succeed at anything.

Accepted: You have very successfully pulled your GPA from a very low point to a high GPA. How did you do that?

Jared: During my semester of suspension while I was attending Finger Lakes Community College, my main goal was to do as well as I could in my courses. The reason behind this was because I had a lot to prove to not only myself, but to future admissions. I have an outstanding disciplinary punishment that will follow me around whenever I apply for schools; I have to check “yes” on the applications. My main concern was how I was going to secure my future when asked about it by schools. I used my suspension as a reality check, a learning experience and I was hell-bent on proving my worth by excelling in school.

I was always a little inferior when it came to school. I never put my best in, rather I’d focus everything into my athletic career. This past semester has allowed me to realize my potential by staying disciplined, seeking support from online groups, and demonstrating to my professors my zeal to thrive and succeed in their classes. After my first semester getting a 3.87 semester average taking 17 credits, I was proud of myself but wanted more, I was addicted to success. I felt so good knowing my hard work had paid off in and out of the classroom.

During my research into medical schools, I came to realize GPAs were extremely competitive. My goal and thought process was to get as close to an A in every course. I didn’t have room for anything less than an A because, again, I need to prove myself to admissions.

Blog CTA Med Low StatsAccepted: How would you advise other premeds who are struggling to boost their GPAs?

Jared: It’s no secret that the level of work premeds are expected to do in and out of the classroom is becoming more and more competitive. GPAs have to be high, very high. Students cannot afford to get more B’s than A’s in required courses. I’ve pinpointed a few keys that contributed to my success and have worked for others. I found that I wasn’t doing all-nighters anymore, rather, studying smarter.

Figuring out how to actually learn the material is something I found worthwhile. Students tend to rely solely on the word of their professors which may only help in the short-run, but the material won’t likely stick. In order to effectively learn the material, I used YouTube videos for absolutely every topic I had this past year. What this does is it allows you to get another perspective on the subject and could potentially offer tricks to simplify the material. I found this really useful when I was taking Organic Chemistry because we were getting a lot of material to cover.

As a visual-learner, I made use of whiteboards whenever I could. I found it extremely helpful for comprehending metabolic content for Biology, mechanisms for Organic Chemistry, and Physics problems. Actually doing and exploring concepts allowed me to get a more complete understanding which helped me on exams. I also supplemented this with making flash-cards for Biology as I found them to be most useful for this course specifically.

The last piece of insight I can offer is visiting professors. I always read that medical students and doctors suggest to visit professors during their office hours. I finally realized this was necessary to demonstrate my ambition and actual curiosity to learn and figure out ways to enhance my abilities in the classroom. I found this to be extremely helpful as my professors would look over my papers early and offer significant advice that directly contributed to my success on assignments.

The main thing to keep in mind when struggling to boost your GPA is that whatever you try won’t work instantly. Through persistence and dedication, you will get there if you sincerely have the inner drive. Make sure you look at your whole life at school and see if there is anything that is holding you back, or something that could potentially culture your success. Schools have many assistance programs that are just waiting for you to reach out, the thing is you have to reach out for the support; they can’t help you if you don’t inquire.

Accepted: What stage of the med school admissions process are you up to so far?

Jared: I am currently in the final days leading up to my MCAT, so currently studying! This past semester I chose my professors that I wanted to write for me letters of recommendation on behalf of my science proficiency. This past year has been very hectic and everything has been moving very quickly so I will be taking some time to breathe and relax afterwards into the Spring semester. I will be working on writing parts of my personal statement and continue to research into medical schools and may even visit a few. I will also be volunteering at the local hospital on weekends and hopefully be shadowing the athletic trainer during home games for various sports. The reason I want to shadow an athletic trainer is mainly because I have a passion for sports medicine being an athlete, but also because I plan on shadowing physicians during the summer.

Accepted: Can you share some MCAT studying tips with our readers?

Jared: The MCAT is very daunting, intimidating if you will. I found out very early when I first started my pre-medical requirements this year to supplement my course studies with MCAT preparation material. This allowed me to tailor my way of thinking in these courses to the way the MCAT asks questions. I also was able to get a new perspective on the material, which allowed me to further enhance my understanding of a topic at a given time.

The mind-set necessary for the MCAT is one that is very tough and is able to adapt to studying and find outlets to channel stress. For example, my stress reduction outlets include Swimming and working out (alternating every day) and writing a reflection in a personal journal about the previous week and to write goals for the next week. Premeds need to learn early on that since the MCAT is such a big deal with a lot of content, to take things step by step.

Learn one unit of material at a time and move on to the next. Make sure to keep the information in your mind by using flashcards that briefly summarize what you’ve just finished and it will all come together after a while.

The biggest studying piece that I found was on the AAMC website. They list everything that could possibly be tested, content-wise. I will have gone through all of the material over 21 days which at first was very intimidating, but having taken it step by step, I found myself to have retained a lot of it through the practices I listed above.

I have done my MCAT content review without any structured company review. I can see how they are helpful, in virtually every way. Personally, I found that I had all the material, and used the AAMC practice tests to measure my performance throughout my review and was confident in my ability to do this on my own.

Some advice though would be to not allow others opinions sway yours. Everybody has different ways of learning and the silver lining to taking the MCAT  besides successfully completing it, is that there is an abundance of resources out there to help you prepare- from practice tests, practice questions, practice videos, etc. All of these major prep companies offer free trials and free material to try out their services. I advise to try them all, however. Even if you don’t like their questions or the way they deliver their material, at the very least you are getting practice of the same material with a different perspective.

Accepted: Do you have target schools in mind yet? Where do you think you’ll apply? Do you have a “dream” school?

Jared: I don’t have a dream school in mind. I think the reason for that is because of all that I’ve been through, I realize my chances have been harmed. However, I like to think that my continued persistence up until I apply will be worthwhile and some admissions panel will take note.

Being a native of NY, my dream school would most definitely be the Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons. However, I do plan on applying broadly, which is something I think is worth sharing. In this day and age, premeds are entering a very competitive domain and some people would be inclined to argue that applying broadly is important because once you’re in; we all have the similar goals and outcomes. However, don’t let that idea keep you down from shooting for the stars.

For one-on-one guidance on your med school applications, please see our catalog of med school admissions services.

You can read more about Jared’s journey by checking out his blog, PreMedPrince. Thank you Jared for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

Do you want to be featured in Accepted.com’s blog, Accepted Admissions Blog? If you want to share your med school story with the world (or at least with our readers), email us at bloggers@accepted.com.

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Related Resources:

Ace Your AMCAS Essay
GPA Issues when Applying to Med School: What To Do With A “W”
MCAT Scores, MCAT Prep & MCAT2015

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Should You Apply to Business School Round 3? http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/19/apply-business-school-round-3/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/19/apply-business-school-round-3/#respond Mon, 19 Jan 2015 15:31:30 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28160 Still not sure if you should apply to business school Round 3 or next year? We’ll help you make that decision when you tune in to our upcoming webinar, Round 3 vs. Next Year: The MBA Admissions Debate. Join us live on Wednesday, January 28, 2015 at 10:00 AM PST/1:00 PM EST (click here to see […]

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Still not sure if you should apply to business school Round 3 or next year? We’ll help you make that decision when you tune in to our upcoming webinar, Round 3 vs. Next Year: The MBA Admissions Debate.

Applying to business school Round 3?

Join us live on Wednesday, January 28, 2015 at 10:00 AM PST/1:00 PM EST (click here to see what time that is in your time zone).

When the webinar is over, you’ll have a MUCH clearer idea of which option is best for you and which increases your chances of getting accepted to your top choice business school.

Registration is required (and free). Reserve your spot for Round 3 vs. Next Year: The MBA Admissions Debate now!

Save your spot for the webinar, Round 3 vs Next Year!

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Daniel Webster Program Prepares Lawyers with Real Skills http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/18/daniel-webster-program-prepares-lawyers-real-skills/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/18/daniel-webster-program-prepares-lawyers-real-skills/#respond Sun, 18 Jan 2015 21:16:53 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28035 In a highly competitive market, law schools need to prepare their students to be ready to practice law upon graduation. According to the Wall Street Journal article, “Law-School Program Emphasizes Practical Skills” clients are simply no longer interested in paying new lawyers to “learn on the job.” Real, practical litigation experience is necessary (including taking […]

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Need help with your law school applications?

In a highly competitive market, law schools need to prepare their students to be ready to practice law upon graduation. According to the Wall Street Journal article, “Law-School Program Emphasizes Practical Skills” clients are simply no longer interested in paying new lawyers to “learn on the job.” Real, practical litigation experience is necessary (including taking depositions, interviewing clients, dispute resolution, pretrial/trial advocacy, and drafting motions and interrogations) if young lawyers want to compete for fewer job openings.

One school has taken concrete steps to better prepare their lawyers. At the University of New Hampshire School of Law’s Daniel Webster Scholar Honors Program, students are taught practical skills that prepare them for immediate entry into the world of law. The program steers away from traditional lectures and doctrinal education; frequent feedback, courtroom and client simulations, and personal reflections are all important elements to the Daniel Webster program. Students take part in a capstone project on client interviews and complete the program with a standardized assessment – all clients in these simulations are played by actors.

The program, launched in 2005, admits students during their second year of law school. Since 2008, 120 students have graduated from the program.

According to the Wall Street Journal article, “Participation in the program – not scores on the Law School Placement Exam or class rank – was the only predictor of student performance on the standardized client interview.”

A study conducted by the Institute for the Advancement of the American Legal System (IAALS) found that non-Daniel Webster lawyers scored on average 3.11 out of 5 on standardized client interview assessments, compared to an average of 3.76 out of 5 for Daniel Webster scholars.

8 Tips for Law School Admissions - Download your free guide today!

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2015 Best Law Schools by U.S. News
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UVA Darden Names Scott Beardsley Next Dean http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/18/uva-darden-names-scott-beardsley-next-dean/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/18/uva-darden-names-scott-beardsley-next-dean/#respond Sun, 18 Jan 2015 20:45:12 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28107 Starting August 1, 2015, Scott C. Beardsley will assume the role of dean of UVA’s Darden School of Business and occupy the Charles C. Abbott Professorship in Business Administration, reports a Darden press release. Beardsley’s will succeed Robert F. Bruner who will soon complete his tenth year as dean. Beardsley was born in Maine to […]

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Learn more about UVA Darden

Scott C. Beardsley

Starting August 1, 2015, Scott C. Beardsley will assume the role of dean of UVA’s Darden School of Business and occupy the Charles C. Abbott Professorship in Business Administration, reports a Darden press release. Beardsley’s will succeed Robert F. Bruner who will soon complete his tenth year as dean.

Beardsley was born in Maine to a family of educators. He grew up in Vermont and Alaska, and is a citizen of the U.S. and France. Beardsley holds a B.S. in electrical engineering from Tufts University and an MBA from MIT Sloan. He is an executive doctorate candidate at UPenn, with expected completion in May 2015.

Beardsley has led a 26-year career at McKinsey, joining in 1989 and becoming a partner in 1995 and a senior partner just four and a half years later. Beardsley is a global strategy and regulation expert, who has served clients around the world with a “proven track record of impact, entrepreneurship and innovation.” He has done major research that helped incubate McKinsey’s Climate Change Special Initiative and currently leads learning and leadership development for all McKinsey professionals.

According to John D. Simon, UVA Executive VP and Provost, “Scott rose to the top of a highly competitive and global pool of candidates. He brings to Darden a deep and global understanding of business, a successful track record of developing business leaders at all levels and experience in and passion for education, teaching and research. He has the leadership skills required to advance this dynamic, world-class institution, and we’re excited for what’s ahead. We see this as a great opportunity – not just for the University – but for the individuals and organizations who come to Darden to equip themselves as the best-prepared business leaders of the 21st century.”

On being appointed dean, Beardsley says, “I am honored by the opportunity. I believe deeply in Darden’s values and its clear and focused mission to improve the world by developing responsible leaders and advancing knowledge. I am very excited to be part of the University of Virginia family, and its Jeffersonian commitment to excellence. I look forward to working with the school’s outstanding faculty, staff, students and alumni to shape a vision for the future and to ensure that the world is keenly aware of Darden’s exceptional MBA, executive education and Ph.D. offerings, which are personalized for each learner and delivered by a faculty second to none.”

Should you apply Round 3 or wait till next year?

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Get Accepted to Top B-Schools with Low Stats
UVA Darden 2015 MBA Essay Tips
Have an Open Mind, Learn Skills, Build Relationships: Darden MBA Interview

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Admissions Tip: BE YOURSELF! http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/16/admissions-tip/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/16/admissions-tip/#respond Fri, 16 Jan 2015 15:24:40 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28149 Admissions committee members across the board (college, grad school, med school, b-school and law school) want you to do ONE thing in your applications, and one thing only: Introduce yourself. This does NOT include: • Talking about who you WISH you were. • Exaggerating your volunteer achievements. • Making up job titles to boost your […]

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Be Yourself: Everyone Else is Already TakenAdmissions committee members across the board (college, grad school, med school, b-school and law school) want you to do ONE thing in your applications, and one thing only: Introduce yourself. This does NOT include:

• Talking about who you WISH you were.
• Exaggerating your volunteer achievements.
• Making up job titles to boost your employment profile.
Cracking jokes when you’re really not such a funny person.
• Using big words that you found in a thesaurus when you have no idea what they mean.

Instead, when introducing yourself to the adcom, follow these simple tips:

• Use your own, authentic voice in your writing.
• Talk about what’s important to YOU instead of what you think the adcom want to hear.
• Tell things as they are – you don’t want to get the boot because a fact checker shows that you were really an “Office Assistant” instead of an “Office Manager.”
• Use a dictionary/thesaurus to ensure you use words correctly, not to engage in communicative creativity…

In short, if you want to stand out among the throngs of applicants in your field, your goal shouldn’t be to introduce yourself as a superhuman, god-like overachiever; instead introduce yourself as you actually are, with your unique interests, passions, accomplishments, and voice. This will be the most extraordinary, stand-out, note-worthy introduction. Not the introduction that makes the adcom members roll their eyes and say “yeah right.”


Accepted.com: The Premier Admissions Consultancy
Related Resources:

From Example to Exemplary – A Free Guide
6 Tips for Getting Started on Your Application Essays
The Quick Guide to Admissions Resumes

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The Wharton Executive MBA Program: An Insider’s View http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/15/wharton-executive-mba-program-insiders-view/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/15/wharton-executive-mba-program-insiders-view/#respond Thu, 15 Jan 2015 20:40:46 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28064 In this week’s podcast episode of Admissions Straight Talk, Linda Abraham speaks with the Wharton EMBA program admissions directors, Diane Sharp and Kathy Lilygren. Be sure to listen to the full recording to learn what they are looking for in applications, when to apply, and what the EMBA program has to offer. 00:1:00 – You asked. Linda […]

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Click here for Wharton EMBA Essay tips!

Diane Sharp & Kathy Lilygren

In this week’s podcast episode of Admissions Straight Talk, Linda Abraham speaks with the Wharton EMBA program admissions directors, Diane Sharp and Kathy Lilygren.

Be sure to listen to the full recording to learn what they are looking for in applications, when to apply, and what the EMBA program has to offer.

00:1:00 – You asked. Linda answers! She provides 5 key steps to help an MBA applicant prepare to get accepted in next year’s application cycle.

00:07:20 – The Wharton Executive MBA: What is it and whom is it for?

00:8:00 – Enjoy electives? Wharton EMBA has lots to choose from!

00:10:00 – Global Experience Element: What is it? Where will it take you?

00:12:29 – Global Modular Program – What is gained by this program?

00:15:20 – FT MBA vs PT EMBA Wharton programs.

00:19:34 – How much do MBA, EMBA and Wharton alumni network?

00:22:00 – Philadelphia and San Francisco Wharton Programs. Which campus is best for you?

00:24:50 –  Stand out Wharton executive MBA grads: Steve and Don.

00:28:50 – How a Wharton EMBA can facilitate career change.

00:31:50 – Time management: Absolutely critical.

00:34:00 – How to make your Wharton application stand out (in a good way!).

00:40:20 – What NOT to do on your application

00:43:00 – Fact or fiction:  A 700 GMAT is necessary for acceptance?

00:45:00 – The GMAT is your friend?!

00:46:55 – Diane’s and Kathy’s parting words and great advice.

Listen to the full conversation to learn more!

Related Links:

• Liveslow’s comment
• Wharton 2015 EMBA Essay Tips
The Wharton EMBA
• Contact Wharton EMBA

The next (and last for 2015 admission) Wharton EMBA deadline is February 10, 2015. So if Wharton EMBA appeals and you are reading this around the time we post this podcast, you still have time to apply.

Related Shows:

• Wharton’s Health Care Mangement Program with June Kinney
Globla Business Leadership at Wharton’s Lauder Institute
• Nexus of Business & Law: Penn/Wharton’s JD/MBA
• Mike Hochleutner of Stanford’s MSx
A Transformation Year: The MIT Sloan Fellows Program

Leave a Review for Admissions Straight Talk:

Check Out Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes! Check Out Admissions Straight Talk in Stitcher!

Get Accepted to Wharton! Watch the free webinar*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

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http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/15/wharton-executive-mba-program-insiders-view/feed/ 0 In this week’s podcast episode of Admissions Straight Talk, Linda Abraham speaks with the Wharton EMBA program admissions directors, Diane Sharp and Kathy Lilygren. - Be sure to listen to the full recording to learn what they are looking for in ap... In this week’s podcast episode of Admissions Straight Talk, Linda Abraham speaks with the Wharton EMBA program admissions directors, Diane Sharp and Kathy Lilygren. Be sure to listen to the full recording to learn what they are looking for in applications, when to apply, and what the EMBA program has to offer. 00:1:00 - You asked. Linda answers! She provides 5 key steps to help an MBA applicant prepare to get accepted in next year's application cycle. 00:07:20 - The Wharton Executive MBA: What is it and whom is it for? 00:8:00 - Enjoy electives? Wharton EMBA has lots to choose from! 00:10:00 - Global Experience Element: What is it? Where will it take you? 00:12:29 - Global Modular Program - What is gained by this program? 00:15:20 - FT MBA vs PT EMBA Wharton programs. 00:19:34 - How much do MBA, EMBA and Wharton alumni network? 00:22:00 - Philadelphia and San Francisco Wharton Programs. Which campus is best for you? 00:24:50 -  Stand out Wharton executive MBA grads: Steve and Don. 00:28:50 - How a Wharton EMBA can facilitate career change. 00:31:50 - Time management: Absolutely critical. 00:34:00 - How to make your Wharton application stand out (in a good way!). 00:40:20 - What NOT to do on your application 00:43:00 - Fact or fiction:  A 700 GMAT is necessary for acceptance? 00:45:00 - The GMAT is your friend?! 00:46:55 - Diane’s and Kathy’s parting words and great advice. Related Links: • Liveslow’s comment • Wharton 2015 EMBA Essay Tips • The Wharton EMBA • Contact Wharton EMBA The next (and last for 2015 admission) Wharton EMBA deadline is February 10, 2015. So if Wharton EMBA appeals and you are reading this around the time we post this podcast, you still have time to apply. Related Shows: • Wharton’s Health Care Mangement Program with June Kinney • Globla Business Leadership at Wharton's Lauder Institute • Nexus of Business & Law: Penn/Wharton’s JD/MBA • Mike Hochleutner of Stanford’s MSx • A Transformation Year: The MIT Sloan Fellows Program Leave a Review for Admissions Straight Talk: *Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com. Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no 51:04
Got Dinged? You Can Handle It! http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/14/got-dinged-you-can-handle-it/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/14/got-dinged-you-can-handle-it/#respond Wed, 14 Jan 2015 16:59:55 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28055 It may or may not be fair, but many of you are going to get at least a few rejections. What are you going to do about them? First and foremost—if you’ve gotten dinged at your top choice school, that doesn’t mean that you’re never going to get in. It doesn’t even mean that you […]

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Rejected from your top-choice school?It may or may not be fair, but many of you are going to get at least a few rejections. What are you going to do about them?

First and foremost—if you’ve gotten dinged at your top choice school, that doesn’t mean that you’re never going to get in. It doesn’t even mean that you won’t be going to school next year.

And so my first point is: DON’T GIVE UP.

However, you do need to respond constructively. For the Four Reasons for Rejection and tips on how to do exactly that, please see this video.

For more admissions-specific reapplication advice, check-out:

For all of you, if you don’t know why you were rejected or would you like expert advice on improving your next application, please consider an application review:

Subscribe to the Accepted Admissions Blog!

Linda AbrahamBy Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

Related Resources:

5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid
• Help! I’ve Been Waitlisted!
5 Ways to Clean Up & Optimize Your Online Presence Before You Apply

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Jumpstart Your Business Career with a Masters in Management Program http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/13/jumpstart-your-business-career-with-a-master-in-management/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/13/jumpstart-your-business-career-with-a-master-in-management/#respond Tue, 13 Jan 2015 17:52:49 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28071 You’ve seen the light (or maybe just the real world): a career in business is the right path for you. BUT – you’ve just graduated with a degree in materials science.  Or sociology.  Or comparative literature.  Yup – chances of finding a serious management track job are slim for new graduates, even ones with impressive […]

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Applying for a Masters in Management? Learn more here.

Most MiM programs expect – indeed want – you to have little actual business experience

You’ve seen the light (or maybe just the real world): a career in business is the right path for you.

BUT – you’ve just graduated with a degree in materials science.  Or sociology.  Or comparative literature.  Yup – chances of finding a serious management track job are slim for new graduates, even ones with impressive academic records.

And that is exactly why there is the Masters in Management.

What: Masters in Management programs usually are one year. Their purpose is twofold. First and foremost, they provide a basic business education.  Second, they provide career development, guidance, and recruiting.  (At LBS for example, recruiters in 2013 included Google, GE Capital, and Goldman Sachs – that’s just from the “G’s”!)  Business education + extensive corporate connections = smooth, direct path to business career.

Who:  Masters in Management programs target recent or upcoming graduates in the humanities/liberal arts, engineering, and sciences.   Most MiM programs expect – indeed want – you to have little actual business experience (if you have more experience, it puts you in MBA range).  The exact parameters for the target applicant vary a bit program to program (e.g. unlike many MiM programs, LBS’ program will consider applicants with undergrad business degrees).

Where: University business schools that offer MBA and other business programs typically house MiM programs.  However, not all business schools offer MiM programs, e.g., NYU Stern does not; University of Michigan Ross School of Business does.

Is a MiM program right for you?  To make the most of a MiM program, and to be an appealing applicant, you need to:

• Know why you want to pursue a management career.

• Have an idea of how that career will start and take shape over about 5 years.

• Be able to demonstrate the leadership, teamwork, communication, and quantitative ability necessary to succeed in the program.

• Be able to express these points in an essay or statement of purpose.

The goals you discuss needn’t be set in stone – MiM adcoms expect that you will further explore opportunities during the program.  And they understand that your goals may well change as you evolve professionally.  However, they do want to see focus. And they do want some assurance that you are making an informed decision to pursue a management education and career path.

Why not MBA?  MBA is the more famous cousin to MiM.  MBA programs are for people with more developed careers and goals. If you earn a MiM and later want to pursue an MBA, you can.

The Quick Guide to Admissions Resumes: Get your free copy!

Cindy Tokumitsu By , author and co-author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports, including Why MBA and Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One. Right One. Cindy has advised hundreds applicants to a variety of graduate programs in management since joining Accepted in 1998. She is happy to guide you through the Masters in Management application process.

Related Resources:

Get Your Game On: Preparing for Your Grad School Application
The Scoop on the London Business School Masters in Management Program
MBA/MMM Interview with Kellogg Student: Using Empathy to Succeed

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DO Student Interview: Shadowing, Reapplying, Not Being Too Hard on Yourself http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/12/do-student-interview-shadowing-reapplying-not-being-too-hard-on-yourself/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/12/do-student-interview-shadowing-reapplying-not-being-too-hard-on-yourself/#respond Mon, 12 Jan 2015 20:48:08 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28037 This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with medical school applicants and students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top medical schools and the med school application process. And now, introducing our anonymous blogger Med State of Mind… Accepted: First, can you tell us a little about yourself? Where are you from? […]

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Read more medical school student interviews here!

“My first time applying, I wasn’t showing enough interest in healthcare.”

This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with medical school applicants and students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top medical schools and the med school application process. And now, introducing our anonymous blogger Med State of Mind…

Accepted: First, can you tell us a little about yourself? Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What is your favorite flavor ice cream?

Med State of Mind: I am from the Midwest, and I went to a state school for undergrad. I have a B.S. in microbiology. In undergrad I did a bunch of research.

My favorite ice cream flavor is vanilla soft serve with Reese’s peanut butter cups mixed in.

Accepted: Where are you in med school? What year? (If you are keeping this info private, can you please just give us some hints — like that it’s a DO school and maybe the region of the world/country?)

Med State of Mind: I am currently a first year medical student at an osteopathic medical school in the Midwest.

Accepted: Why did you choose a DO school? 

Med State of Mind: I only applied to MD schools my first application cycle. That didn’t work out that year, and in deciding if I should even reapply to medical school, I looked more into DO programs. I didn’t really know much about DO besides that it existed at that point.

I shadowed a DO and did a ton of research on it, and I found out that it actually fit better with how I want to treat my patients in the future. I like that we are taught to look at more than just the patient’s numbers, and we also learn Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment (OMT). I like that as a doctor, I will have extra tools in my tool box to help treat my patients better, including non-pharmaceutical methods. Not that MDs can’t practice like that, but it is definitely emphasized in our training!

Accepted: Did you go straight from college to med school? Or did you take time off? If you took time off, how did you spend your time?

Med State of Mind: I only planned on taking one year off, but ended up taking two. My first application cycle didn’t go well, but I applied to more programs including DO in my 2nd application cycle, and finally got accepted!

Initially I just volunteered at the hospital and shadowed during my time off, but I figured out I could get my CNA and get work experience in a clinical setting. I worked at a hospital for about a year. I also continued to volunteer and shadow during my time off.

I think my first time applying, I wasn’t showing enough interest in healthcare during my time off, so I think it definitely helped once I was able to work in a healthcare setting.

Accepted: What are your thoughts on the importance of clinical experience? How would you advise our pre-med readers on this subject?

Med State of Mind: I think it is one of the most important things you can do! Medicine is not an easy path to take, so I think it is critical that everyone has a clear understanding of what they will be getting themselves into. Shadowing is definitely great to see what doctors do, but I think it is important to also do other activities like volunteering. Shadowing doesn’t necessarily show your work ethic, but being involved with volunteering and other activities does. I would recommend at least 50 hours shadowing, and make sure to include some with a primary care doctor.

Accepted: Can you share some advice to incoming first-year students, to help make their adjustment to med school easier? What do you wish you would have known before you started school?

Med State of Mind: Make sure you take some time before school starts to do absolutely nothing! I took about 2 months off and just went on vacations and did things I enjoyed. Once school starts, you don’t get much time to do things like that. The summer before school starts is a great time to check some things off your bucket list.

It also helps to talk to 2nd years in your program. They know what to expect, what books to buy, how different professors do things, all that good stuff. At my school we are matched with a 2nd year who mentors us, and I definitely go to her whenever I have a question about something!

I wish I would have known it isn’t quite as bad as I was expecting. The long hours of studying suck when you’re stuck in a room by yourself for 14 hours, but I’ve shown to myself that I CAN do it. I had pretty low expectations for myself going in, but I didn’t need to be so hard on myself. Yes, you have to study a lot, but it’s definitely possible to have some sort of a life outside of school and do okay in your classes. You just have to take it all one day at a time, and make sure you take the time to get away from school. I don’t think I would survive if I didn’t take the time to work out, hang out with friends, and be involved with activities outside of school.

It also helps I feel like I’m learning more relevant things to my career most of the time. Medical school can be fun sometimes!

Accepted: Can you talk about your experience as a reapplicant? What do you think went wrong during your first cycle of applications? What did you change the second time around that helped you get accepted?

Med State of Mind: I think I already covered this in another answer, but basically I did not have nearly enough clinical experience applying the first time around. I think schools doubted that I knew what I was getting into. I also don’t think I sold the clinical experience I did have enough. How you word things can definitely make a difference. I’m not saying you should lie or embellish (definitely don’t do that!), but make sure someone who knows nothing about the activity can clearly see what you were doing and what you got out of the experience. So if while you were volunteering at the hospital, you also got to interact with doctors a lot – say it! Don’t just assume the people reading your application will know what you did.

Accepted: Why did you decide to tweet about your experience? What have you gained from the experience? What do you hope others will learn?

Med State of Mind: I started my Twitter because I found some pre-med accounts and liked the community of pre-meds and medical professionals on Twitter. It was a great support system and a way to stay motivated when I got rejected from medical school the first time around. There are so many people on Twitter that are willing to help and give advice! I don’t know if I would have reapplied if I wouldn’t have started my Twitter, to be honest. It was hard getting rejected, but I was able to see other people applying and going through the same thing, and it kept me going! It especially helped me since I was out of school at that point and didn’t get to interact with other pre-meds very often.

I hope that people can learn from my mistakes and that I can help people get through the tough process that is getting into medical school. It is definitely a tough journey, but so far I am so glad I did it. Now I can share my experience in medical school with my followers, as well!

For one-on-one guidance on your med school applications, please see our catalog of med school admissions services.

You can read more about Med State of Mind’s journey by following him on Twitter @med_stateofmind. Thank you for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

Do you want to be featured in Accepted.com’s blog, Accepted Admissions Blog? If you want to share your med school story with the world (or at least with our readers), email us at bloggers@accepted.com.

Download your free copy of 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Med School Application Essays!

Accepted.com: The Premier Admissions Consultancy
Related Resources:

Med School Rankings & Numbers: What You MUST Know, a free downloadable guide
• Medical School Application Strategy: MD vs. DO Programs
5 Questions to Help You Decide Where to Apply to Med School

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MBA/MMM Kellogg Interview with Shriansh: Explaining What Makes Kellogg, Kellogg http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/12/mbammm-kellogg-interview-with-shriansh-explaining-what-makes-kellogg-kellogg/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/12/mbammm-kellogg-interview-with-shriansh-explaining-what-makes-kellogg-kellogg/#comments Mon, 12 Jan 2015 19:29:33 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28039 This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Shriansh Shrivastava, a student at Northwestern Kellogg’s joint MBA/Masters in Design Innovation program. Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where […]

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Read  more MBA student interviews!This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Shriansh Shrivastava, a student at Northwestern Kellogg’s joint MBA/Masters in Design Innovation program.

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What was your most recent job? Where are you currently studying?

Shriansh: I grew up in India, then moved to the UK for undergrad in electronics and communications at the University of Sussex. After graduation, I worked at Ericsson UK, working with mobile phones and broadband, and also worked in the Ericsson Innovation Scheme. After this, I moved to Canada to work with mobile phone innovations in suicide prevention.

I’m currently attending the Kellogg School of Management, due to graduate in June 2016.

Accepted: Can you tell us more about your joint degree? What do you plan on doing with your degrees?

Shriansh: The MMM program at Kellogg has to be the best kept secret in the MBA world. It’s a joint program – you end up with a Kellogg MBA and a Master in Science in Design Innovation from the McCormick/Segal schools at Northwestern.

The biggest misconception about the MMM is that it’s an ‘engineering-y’ program. Not true. Around 50% of my class is from a completely non-technical background! My MS:DI degree is teaching me design thinking: how to approach any problem creatively and differently. So skills I’m going to end up with will be a very creative spin on an already great MBA program. This fits best with my current objective of getting involved with innovation in big tech post graduation.

Accepted: How are you liking Chicago? Do you plan on staying local after you receive your degrees? Any ideas yet where you may be headed?

Shriansh: Chicago’s brilliant. We’re based in Evanston, which is about 20 minutes north of Chicago by the Metra. Evanston’s very self-sufficient, so I actually don’t end up going to Chicago all that much. But it’s an awesome city, of course. The architecture is amazing, the culture’s friendly and the food is awesome. And it’s cold. Very cold. Having spent the last year in Canada, I’m actually comfortable with the weather so far, but my peers from tropical parts of the world are…having fun!

Accepted: Do you have a favorite coffee shop or another nice place where you like to study or hang out with friends? 

Shriansh: We MMMs have our very own exclusive lounge, which is a modern space, well lit, with some sort of creativity always going on. I love hanging out here with my peers. There are actual coffee shops and breakout rooms around campus, of course, but this is the best place to be at, at least for me.

Accepted: Why did you choose Kellogg? Which other programs had you considered? How would you say that you’re a good fit for Kellogg’s program?

Shriansh: For me, it came down to Haas or Kellogg – what both have in common is the extremely cooperative, friendly spirit. Kellogg really embodies this – from day #1, we were thrown into tons of group work – at this time, I’ve completed 9 courses, each with its own team, and have done more coursework in groups than individually. Also a brilliant example: For recruiting, a bunch of us work together on making each other better – we all know we’ll be gunning for the same job, but that ‘competition’ is just not in the picture. For me, it’s important that my peers do well – and vice versa. This lack of any sort of animosity actually makes Kellogg, Kellogg.

Discover free MBA admissions resourcesAccepted: If you could change one thing about the program, what would it be? 

Shriansh: I’d move it to someplace warmer…I’ve heard Hawaii is nice this time of the year…

Accepted: What’s your favorite class so far?

Shriansh: I’d like to say Operations, with Professor Chopra. It’s not my favorite, but it’s the one that’s blown my mind the most. I enjoyed Marketing, really enjoyed Research-Design-Build, and Strategy. But ops is a different beast, and portrays concepts you learn in Marketing in a completely different light (e.g. Selling more can end up ruining your business!!).

Accepted: Can you share your top 3 admissions tips with our readers?

Shriansh:

1. In essays and interviews, be clear why you want the second degree and tie it to your goals. If it brings you new skills, say that. If you have the skills and want to practice them in the real world, say so.

2. Saying ‘what people might want to hear’ rather than what’s real will get you into trouble. An interview is a ‘personality fit’ test as much as a competence test. If you fake it, you might even end up in a program, but probably will end up around the type of people you don’t gel with, instantly diluting the value of the MBA.

3. Network, network, network – talk to alumni – LinkedIn is a great resource for this. When I was applying, I spoke to a lot of alums. All Kellogg alums I reached out to were happy to help, which actually factored a lot into my decision. When approaching an alumni or current student, do ask precise and intelligent question. Asking someone “So tell me what Kellogg does” is horribly vague and will probably irritate the person. A better question could be “I’m interested in photography. What do you think the photography club on campus is like? Did you go to events?

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages

You can read more about Shriansh’s journey by checking out his About Me page. Thank you Shriansh for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

Learn How to Choose the Best MBA Program for You!

Accepted.com: The Premier Admissions Consultancy
Related Resources:

• Kellogg 2015 MBA Questions, Deadlines, Tips
• MBA/MMM Interview with Kellogg Student: Using Empathy to Succeed
Mastering Kellogg’s Changing Brand

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Oh No! A Typo!! http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/09/oh-no-a-typo-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/09/oh-no-a-typo-2/#respond Fri, 09 Jan 2015 18:35:08 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=27988 Will it doom your otherwise perfect application to the great round file in cyberspace, putting the kabosh on years of effort and nixing your attempt to walk through the hallowed halls of your favored institution? No. A single, minor typo will do absolutely nothing. So don’t sweat one minor spelling mistake, a missed comma, or […]

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Worried about writing your application essays? We've got you covered!

If the readers see a lot of mistakes they will assume you are careless and sloppy.

Will it doom your otherwise perfect application to the great round file in cyberspace, putting the kabosh on years of effort and nixing your attempt to walk through the hallowed halls of your favored institution?

No.

A single, minor typo will do absolutely nothing. So don’t sweat one minor spelling mistake, a missed comma, or a couple of transposed letters.

You have cause for worry if you find any of the following after you have hit SUBMIT or put the envelope in the mailbox:

  1. You find several typos or mistakes. If the readers see a lot of mistakes they will assume you are careless and sloppy. Not exactly the impression you are aiming for, and one that will definitely hurt you.
  2. Your typo changes the meaning. For example, a client years ago submitted a draft to me in which he wrote, “Through research I exorcised my mind… ” I have never forgotten this one because I almost fell off my chair laughing. He meant “exercised.” If this only happens once, I don’t think it would necessarily be fatal, but you don’t want to be remembered for rib-splitting typos either. In his case, I just had a good laugh and it was never submitted.
  3.  You forget to change the school’s name somewhere in the essay. Ouch. Adcoms universally hate that. It isn’t really a typo either, and it usually results in rejection.

What should you do if you find any of 1-3 in your application after submitting. It’s a tough spot. If you find the error(s)–especially if you find 1 or 3 — soon after hitting SUBMIT, you can contact the school and say that you accidentally submitted the wrong draft of your essay(s). Maybe, just maybe, someone will have mercy on  you and let you submit the corrected draft.

Download 5 Fatal Flaw to Avoid in Your Application

Linda AbrahamBy Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

Related Resources:

The Quick Guide to Admissions Resumes
5 Ways to Clean Up Your Online Presence for When You Apply
How to Deal with Deadlines

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4 New Year’s Resolutions for Medical School Applicants http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/08/4-new-years-resolutions-for-medical-school-applicants-3/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/08/4-new-years-resolutions-for-medical-school-applicants-3/#respond Thu, 08 Jan 2015 16:17:16 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28011 Do you want to be in medical school in Fall 2016? Then resolve to: Sign up ASAP for an MCAT course so that you are fully prepared to take the test early. Ideally you want to ace it no later than April because then your scores should be released by June 16, 2105. See the 2015 […]

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Get the 411 on Med School Admissions!

Want to be a doctor? Get used to working under pressure.

Do you want to be in medical school in Fall 2016? Then resolve to:

  1. Sign up ASAP for an MCAT course so that you are fully prepared to take the test early. Ideally you want to ace it no later than April because then your scores should be released by June 16, 2105. See the 2015 MCAT Registration Deadline and Score Release Schedule for more information.
  2. Continue or begin clinical exposure If you are going to be a doctor, you need to have experienced the hospital environment – working under pressure, dealing with sick people, responding to family members, and interacting with tired and even more pressured colleagues.
  3. Develop a relationship with faculty members and supervisors who can provide letters of recommendation.  You will want people who know you well to write your recommendations. Nurture relationships with TAs, lab supervisors, research sponsors (who work closely with you) for their intrinsic value, and you will also have strong recommendations.
  4. Clarify what’s important to you in a medical school. Are you primarily interested in primary care? Or do you find research attractive? Do you prefer an urban, suburban, or rural setting? Which approach to medical education appeals to you, and why? Yes, I know that you will be happy to go where you get in, but you really can’t apply to every school in the country.  Once you have determined what would be your ideal, then consider if those schools are feasible. For example, cost is frequently a constraint, or if you aren’t competitive at every medical school, then your qualifications are a constraint. While it’s easy to apply to more rather than fewer schools through AMCAS, it could get pretty expensive. Choose based on what’s important to you. You’ll save time and money.


Learn How to Get Accepted to Med School in 2016!

Accepted.com: The Premier Admissions Consultancy

Related Resources:

Get Ready for the New MCAT
5 Questions to Help You Decide Where To Apply To Medical School
• The Best 4 Things to Do Before Med School

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The Scoop on the London Business School Masters in Management Program http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/08/the-scoop-on-the-london-business-school-masters-in-management-program/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/08/the-scoop-on-the-london-business-school-masters-in-management-program/#respond Thu, 08 Jan 2015 15:28:35 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=27995 Come on over and listen in to the informative conversation between Linda Abraham and Jamie Wright, Senior Recruitment and Admissions Manager for the London Business School Masters in Management program. Check out the full recording for a candid look at a fantastic option for college seniors and new college grads interested in careers in business. 00:02:35 – The background […]

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Insights into London Business SchoolCome on over and listen in to the informative conversation between Linda Abraham and Jamie Wright, Senior Recruitment and Admissions Manager for the London Business School Masters in Management program.

Check out the full recording for a candid look at a fantastic option for college seniors and new college grads interested in careers in business.

00:02:35 – The background of the Masters in Management (MiM) Degree.

00:05:15 – One year MiM at London Business School: What is it?

00:08:04 – How is the MiM different than an MBA?

00:09:30 – The Global MiM! Exciting opportunity for anyone interested in Asian companies.

00:10:40 – Is the MiM for you?  If you want a career in business, it may very well be.

00:12:38 – ‘Soft skills’.  Have them?

00:14:23 – Job placement with a MiM.

00:15:41 – Incubator Program – Alumni students with well developed business plans welcome!

17:00:00 – Average salary for a MiM graduate.

19:04:00 – Post-MiM: Is there a need for an MBA?

21:41:00 – Incubator success story.  MiM graduates coming full circle.

24:50:00 – London Business School MiM vs LBS MBA’s- Does age and experience set them apart?

29:01:00 – How can one get in to the MiM program?

29:20:00 – Besides grades, what else does LBS look for in an MiM applicant?

33:04:00 – Is business experience necessary? The answer may surprise you!

32:44:00 – Anyone interested in the Mim, speak to current students or alumni to give you that real perspective.

Listen to the full conversation to learn more!

Related Links:

• London Business School Masters in Management
• London Business School Global Masters in Management
• London Business School MiM Employment Report
• Grad Degrees That Lead to Jobs
• MBA Hiring 2013 Looking Up – Specialized Master’s on Fire
• GMAC Survey Finds More Employers Eager to Hire
• The Next Best Thing in Business Education from Forbes

Related Shows:

• Duke University’s Masters in Management Science Program
Global Business Leadership at Wharton’s Lauder Institute
HEC Paris: Why to Go and How to Get In
• Business, Law and Beyond: An Interview with John Engelman
• NUS: A Small but Mighty Academic Powerhouse in Asia

*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Leave a Review for Admissions Straight Talk:

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Download our free guide: GET YOUR GAME ON: Preparing for Your Grad School Application

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http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/08/the-scoop-on-the-london-business-school-masters-in-management-program/feed/ 0 Come on over and listen in to the informative conversation between Linda Abraham and Jamie Wright, Senior Recruitment and Admissions Manager for the London Business School Masters in Management program. Come on over and listen in to the informative conversation between Linda Abraham and Jamie Wright, Senior Recruitment and Admissions Manager for the London Business School Masters in Management program. Check out the full recording for a candid look at a fantastic option for college seniors and new college grads interested in careers in business. 00:02:35 – The background of the Masters in Management (MiM) Degree. 00:05:15 – One year MiM at London Business School: What is it? 00:08:04 – How is the MiM different than an MBA? 00:09:30 – The Global MiM! Exciting opportunity for anyone interested in Asian companies. 00:10:40 – Is the MiM for you?  If you want a career in business, it may very well be. 00:12:38 – 'Soft skills'.  Have them? 00:14:23 – Job placement with a MiM. 00:15:41 – Incubator Program - Alumni students with well developed business plans welcome! 17:00:00 – Average salary for a MiM graduate. 19:04:00 – Post-MiM: Is there a need for an MBA? 21:41:00 – Incubator success story.  MiM graduates coming full circle. 24:50:00 – London Business School MiM vs LBS MBA's- Does age and experience set them apart? 29:01:00 - How can one get in to the MiM program? 29:20:00 – Besides grades, what else does LBS look for in an MiM applicant? 33:04:00 - Is business experience necessary? The answer may surprise you! 32:44:00 - Anyone interested in the Mim, speak to current students or alumni to give you that real perspective. Related Links: • London Business School Masters in Management • London Business School Global Masters in Management • London Business School MiM Employment Report • Grad Degrees That Lead to Jobs • MBA Hiring 2013 Looking Up – Specialized Master’s on Fire • GMAC Survey Finds More Employers Eager to Hire • The Next Best Thing in Business Education from Forbes Related Shows: • Duke University’s Masters in Management Science Program • Global Business Leadership at Wharton’s Lauder Institute • HEC Paris: Why to Go and How to Get In • Business, Law and Beyond: An Interview with John Engelman • NUS: A Small but Mighty Academic Powerhouse in Asia *Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com. Leave a Review for Admissions Straight Talk: Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no 42:51
Essay Tip: The Devil is in the Details http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/07/essay-tip-the-devil-is-in-the-details/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/07/essay-tip-the-devil-is-in-the-details/#respond Wed, 07 Jan 2015 15:01:18 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=27983 You can argue about the devil, but certainly the substance, distinctiveness, and success of your essays depends on the details. Many applicants tend to bury their uniqueness and success under vague assertions. You don’t want to hide your achievements; you want to trumpet them loudly and clearly. For instance, if you led a team working […]

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Trumpet your accomplishments loud and clear!

Don’t hide your achievements; trumpet them loudly and clearly!

You can argue about the devil, but certainly the substance, distinctiveness, and success of your essays depends on the details.

Many applicants tend to bury their uniqueness and success under vague assertions. You don’t want to hide your achievements; you want to trumpet them loudly and clearly. For instance, if you led a team working on a software development project, was it a three-member team or a thirty-member, cross-functional team with representatives from five different divisions and two continents? Was the potential market for the product $5 million or $200 million? Did you launch the product on time and in budget? Did it zoom to the top of the market-share charts? The details reveal the level of your responsibility, the confidence others have in your abilities based on their prior experience with you, and the significance of your accomplishment.

What about your volunteer work? Do you simply “volunteer”? If you do, you aren’t saying anything distinctive or substantive. Are you an EMT working five hours per week? Do you volunteer at a legal aid clinic? What have you seen or experienced? What have you learned? Have you launched a bereavement group in a country where such services were previously unheard of? What were the challenges you overcame to establish that group? What did you learn from the experience? How has it influenced you?

You may ask, “How can I fit all these details into a short essay?” Good question. Include many of the specifics in the work history sections — the boxes — of the application or in an attached resume if allowed. Then in the essay, provide enough detail to provide context and create interest. Balance your profound insight and reflection with devilishly dazzling detail.

How can you show the adcom that you will be a leader in the future? Click here to find out!

Linda AbrahamBy Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

Related Resources:

5 Fatal Flaws To Avoid
6 Tips for Getting Started on Your Application Essays
Personal Statement Tip: Story Time

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MBA Interviews: Tell Me About Your Weaknesses http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/06/mba-interviews-tell-me-about-your-weaknesses/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/06/mba-interviews-tell-me-about-your-weaknesses/#respond Tue, 06 Jan 2015 20:52:08 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=27785 Reason for asking the question: To ensure the applicant is humble enough to recognize that nobody is perfect, and to see how introspective he or she can be in an assessment of oneself. How to prepare: This question requires some real reflection. Nobody is perfect, yes, but one can always be striving to be his […]

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How to discuss weaknesses in your applicationsReason for asking the question: To ensure the applicant is humble enough to recognize that nobody is perfect, and to see how introspective he or she can be in an assessment of oneself.

How to prepare: This question requires some real reflection. Nobody is perfect, yes, but one can always be striving to be his or her best self. In a work context, what areas do you need to develop? Where do you find yourself stuck? Is there a consistent theme that comes up in your annual review – something you need to work on? Jot a few things down as you work on answering this question. Sometimes we don’t want to acknowledge our weaknesses to others – a natural thing!

Once you have identified a few areas for improvement, think about how to portray those weaknesses so they could also be considered strengths. For example, being too detail-oriented might bog you down with too much work, but it ensures you are thorough, leaving no stone unturned. In this particular example, you are overworked, BUT you also have a strong work ethic.

Important things to remember: As you detail your weaknesses, be sure you also identify how you are working to improve them.

Additional things to consider: Try to have at least two weaknesses to discuss, and don’t have them be situational, such as, “my network is weak since I am primarily surrounded by IT people.”

Do you know the 10 commandments of MBA interviews?
Jennifer Weld worked as an admissions consultant and Former Asst. Dir. of Admissions at Cornell’s EMBA program (4 years) prior to joining Accepted.com. She has an additional 10 years of experience in higher ed and corporate marketing.

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Mark Your Calendars – Upcoming 2015 MBA Tour Events http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/05/mark-your-calendars-upcoming-2015-mba-tour-events/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/05/mark-your-calendars-upcoming-2015-mba-tour-events/#respond Mon, 05 Jan 2015 15:29:20 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=27823 Looking to learn more about the top MBA programs on your list? Reserve a spot at one of these upcoming MBA Tour events! And while you’re at it, check out What to Do at an MBA Fair, a podcast in which Linda Abraham interviews MBA Tour founder Peter von Loesecke. (Click on the city to […]

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Attending an MBA Fair?

The MBA Tour is coming to a city near you!

Looking to learn more about the top MBA programs on your list? Reserve a spot at one of these upcoming MBA Tour events! And while you’re at it, check out What to Do at an MBA Fair, a podcast in which Linda Abraham interviews MBA Tour founder Peter von Loesecke.

(Click on the city to register.)

INDIA JANUARY 2015

January 17 – Mumbai

January 19 – Bangalore

January 21 – Delhi

AFRICA JANUARY 2015

January 20 – Nairobi

January 24 – Lagos

January 27 – Johannesburg

ASIA JANUARY 2015

January 24 – Shanghai

January 26 – Beijing

January 29 – Seoul

January 31 – Taipei

NORTH AMERICA FEBRUARY 2015

January 31 – New York City

February 4 – Toronto

February 7 – San Francisco

February 8 – Los Angeles

February 10 – Boston

February 12 – Washington, D.C.

LATIN AMERICA MARCH 2015

March 5 – Santiago

March 7 – Sao Paulo

March 9 – Lima

March 12 – Bogotá

March 14 – Mexico City

Attending an MBA Fair?

Accepted.com: The Premier Admissions Consultancy

Related Resources:

Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One
• MBA Program Visits, Fairs, Receptions: 5 Simple Steps to Make Them Productive
MBA Rankings: What You Need to Know

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Med Applicant Interview with Ashley: Premed Mommy Par Excellence http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/05/med-applicant-interview-with-ashley-premed-mommy-par-excellence/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/05/med-applicant-interview-with-ashley-premed-mommy-par-excellence/#respond Mon, 05 Jan 2015 15:07:23 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=27966 This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with medical school applicants and students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top medical schools and the med school application process. And now, introducing Ashley… Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an […]

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Meet more medical school applicantsThis interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with medical school applicants and students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top medical schools and the med school application process. And now, introducing Ashley…

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What’s your favorite non-school book?

Ashley: I am from Miramar, FL. I received my Bachelor’s in Biology from Florida State University. I also have a Masters in Public Health from Florida A&M University. My favorite non-school books are the Twilight books.

Accepted: Can you tell us about your current master’s program? Why did you decide to pursue this degree before applying to med school?

Ashley: I’m currently in a Master of Biomedical Sciences program. The program is specifically designed for pre-meds and pre-dents who desire to improve their stats and be more competitive for applying to medical or dental school. Our classes are similar to subject matter we would see in the first year of medical school. The challenges of the program have definitely made me a better student. I chose to get a Master’s in Biomedical Sciences to strengthen my science GPA after receiving rejections to med school the last time I applied.

Accepted: Motherhood and pre-med — that’s quite the juggling act! Why did you decide to apply to med school at this stage of your life? How do you manage to find the time to get it all done?

Ashley: Being a mother and grad student is very challenging! My daughter is a major motivation to keep me going. I’ve always wanted to be a doctor and I did not want to give up on my dream when I became a parent.

Prioritizing, planning, and support from my family helps me balance school and motherhood. My family is such an amazing support system and they help me with my daughter when I’m in class and studying. I make sure to spend as much time with my daughter as I can. Balancing motherhood and school is challenging, consists of long days and late nights, but it’s all worth it to live out my dreams and be someone who my daughter will be proud of.

Accepted: What stage of the med school application process are you up to?  

Ashley: I am in the application process. All secondary apps have been submitted and I have had one interview so far. So now I’m just waiting. ☺

Accepted: Can you share your top 3 tips on writing secondary applications? 

Ashley: My top 3 tips for answering secondary essays:

 1. First and foremost be honest! Don’t fabricate experiences or activities just to make yourself sound good. I think med schools really want to know who you are, how well you will fit with your classmates, and with the mission of the institution.

2. Don’t rush. The last thing you want to do is rush through a secondary, make grammatical errors, and give a weak response. You want your responses to be well-thought out and demonstrate that you can provide an intelligent answer.

3.  After you answer your essays, step away from it for at least 24 hours, and come back to it later. This allows you to give your essays a second look with a fresh mind and perspective. After you review it, have someone who can be objective review your essays.

Accepted: How did you first interview go? Any advice for our readers there?

Ashley: My first interview went well! The school was nice, the students and faculty were friendly, and I had a great experience there.

My advice for students preparing for interviews is to relax, as much as you can, and just be yourself. The admissions committee invited you to interview for a reason. Be yourself and be personable so that they can get to know you and your motivations for attending their school. Also, make sure to ask questions that are important to you and your future to be sure that the school is a good fit for you.

Accepted: Can you tell us about your blog? Why did you decide to blog/tweet about your pre-med journey?

Ashley: I decided to blog about my journey to share my experiences with other people like myself. I have been rejected from med school in the past, I’m a mother, a grad student, a nontraditional student, and I’ve taken the MCAT multiple times. I want others who don’t have a traditional, straightforward path to medicine to know that there is someone out here who can relate to their situations and support them. I hope my experiences are an inspiration for others to continue to chase their dreams and fight for what they believe in no matter what challenges or circumstances arise in life. I also want to be able to meet other people on this journey so that we can support and inspire each other.

For one-on-one guidance on your med school applications, please see our catalog of med school admissions services.

You can read more about Ashley’s journey by checking out her blog, Premed Mommy. Thank you Ashley for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

Do you want to be featured in Accepted.com’s blog, Accepted Admissions Blog? If you want to share your med school story with the world (or at least with our readers), email us at bloggers@accepted.com.

Click here to download your copy of The Ultimate Guide to Medical School Interview Success!

Accepted.com: The Premier Admissions Consultancy

Related Resources:

• Medical School Reapplicant Advice: 6 Tips for Success
• School Specific Tips for Your Secondary Application Questions
• Med School Application Process: AMCAS, Secondaries, Interviews, Decisions & More! 

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France to Open Giant Global University http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/04/france-to-open-giant-global-university/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/04/france-to-open-giant-global-university/#respond Sun, 04 Jan 2015 18:28:29 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=27724 There were no French universities in the top 20 of the most recent QS World University Rankings, and there were only two in QS’s top 100. According to a recent BBC News article, France plans on changing those stats with the new Paris-Saclay University, a government project that will unite 19 French institutions under the […]

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Traveling abroad to study? Here's the scoop on financial aid & health insurance.

Ariel view of the planned Paris-Saclay University

There were no French universities in the top 20 of the most recent QS World University Rankings, and there were only two in QS’s top 100. According to a recent BBC News article, France plans on changing those stats with the new Paris-Saclay University, a government project that will unite 19 French institutions under the same roof, “with the aim of building a university of a size and scale that can compete with global giants like Harvard or the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).”

This new “hi-tech knowledge hub” is expected to boost the French economy and, according to Paris-Saclay president Dominique Vernay, to become a top-10 institution, if not in the “top two or three.” It will be a meeting point of research, hi-tech businesses, and startups, not unsimilar to how Stanford University served as the launch pad for Silicon Valley.

Here are some highlights from the BBC article:

The university will have 70,000 students, 10,000 researchers, and a 1,300 acre campus. The entire institution will be twice the size of UC Berkeley.

There will be a heavy focus on graduate courses and international recruitment (of students and staff).

The “federal university” model upon which the university will be built will be similar to that of the Oxbridge model.

Some master’s classes will be taught in English and some in French.

See the BBC article for more details.

Get Your Game On: Preparing for Your Grad School Application, a free guide

Accepted.com: The Premier Admissions Consultancy

Related Resources:

The Quick Guide to Admissions Resumes
Financial Aid & Health Insurance for International Students
An Inside Look at INSEAD

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An Indian MBA Applicant Story: Accepted to Top 3 Choices with $$$ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/02/an-indian-mba-applicant-story-accepted-to-top-3-choices-with/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/02/an-indian-mba-applicant-story-accepted-to-top-3-choices-with/#respond Fri, 02 Jan 2015 15:27:28 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=27918 This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with MBA applicant bloggers, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at the MBA application process. And now…introducing Vandana… Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What’s your favorite non-school book? Vandana: I […]

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Click here for more interviews with MBA applicants!This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with MBA applicant bloggers, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at the MBA application process. And now…introducing Vandana…

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What’s your favorite non-school book?

Vandana: I am originally from Hyderabad, India and that was where I completed my undergraduate degree in Computer Science Engineering. I moved to Bangalore around 2 years ago to work on my startup dream and fell in love with the city. I have lived here since then.

I’m a voracious reader and spend a lot of my spare time with my nose buried in a book. I especially love reading fantasy fiction. My favorite book/series is the A Song of Ice and Fire (Game of Thrones series) by George RR Martin.

Accepted: What stage of the application process are you up to so far? Where have you applied to b-school?

Vandana: I applied to 3 schools: Kellogg School of Management, UCLA Anderson and Tepper School of Business. Just last week, I received acceptances from all 3 schools. UCLA and Tepper have offered me generous scholarships as well. It’s very exciting to be accepted to all these wonderful schools, and I have a difficult decision ahead of me in the coming weeks!

Accepted: Congratulations on a triple acceptance! What was the most challenging aspect of the admissions process? How did you approach that challenge and overcome it?

Vandana: I think the most challenging part of the admissions process for me has been managing time. I work at a fast-paced startup and I work 6 days a week. Handling work, writing essays, managing my blog, attending info-sessions by various business schools, reminding my recommenders to work on my recommendations, helping people with their GMAT strategies…while at the same time making sure I had enough time for my family and friends was very challenging. I wanted to ensure that I didn’t alienate any one part of my life to keep up with everything else. I was able to overcome this by planning each day well ahead of time.

I used a day planner to keep track of meetings and important dates, scheduled about 30 minutes a day to check up on my blog and respond to comments, set reminders to call and catch up with friends (especially during the commute to work) and I spent many a sleepless night making sure I was on schedule with my essay drafts and applications. I think this experience has been a great preview of what life at business school will be like, and has helped me prepare myself for the extremely busy (yet fun!) few years ahead.

MBA admissions tips for Indian applicants! Download Free. s

Accepted: A 760 on your first try – amazing! Can you share your top three GMAT tips with our readers?

Vandana: Thanks! I was expecting to hit 730+, but 760 was a surprise for me! These are some GMAT tips for future GMAT takers:

• Study from anywhere, but practice only Official GMAC questions.

 I simply cannot overstate the importance of this! I see people stressing about not scoring enough in MGMAT tests, or not getting questions from Princeton correct. I’d like to stress the fact that ultimately, GMATPrep exams (official tests found on the GMAC website) are the only tests that are true predictors of your progress and what your final score could be. I’d recommend that people study from whatever material they are comfortable with, but ultimately practice practice, practice from the official GMAT guides and any official questions they can get their hands on. I would recommend doing each of these books 2-3 times to get a handle on the different types of questions that could be asked in the actual exam. Especially in the last 3-4 weeks before your exam date, stick to past GMAT questions and official material.

• Practice in timed conditions.

 The GMAT is tough. Not just because of the questions in it, but because a lot of us GMAT-takers haven’t sat for a test in a long time. It is difficult to maintain focus for the 4-4.5 hours it takes to complete the GMAT exam, and to prepare yourself for it, in addition to taking mock tests occasionally, I would recommend people to study and practice for the exam in timed sessions. It doesn’t necessarily have to be that every time you sit down to study, it should be 4 hours. When you practice focus on doing 38-40 Quant questions for 75 minutes (set a timer), then take a quick 5 minute break and immediately sit down and do a practice set of 40-45 Verbal questions in 75 minutes. It’s very helpful to do this as we automatically learn to pace ourselves accordingly and through practice, it is easy to keep your concentration and stay focused during the actual exam.

 • Maintain an Error Log.

 During the first month of preparation, I did not maintain an error log, and I really regret it the most! I found the error log on GMATClub most helpful for keeping track of my progress of OG 12, OG 13 and the GMAT Quantitative Review and GMAT Verbal Review guides. By keeping track of my progress and my mistakes, in just a few weeks, I was able to zero in on problem areas and then come up with a plan of action to tackle them!

Accepted: What is your current job? Do you plan on staying in your current industry post-MBA, or changing to a new field/career? Will you return to India?

Vandana: I currently work as a Product Manager for a global online entertainment portal. I love being a product manager, and I plan to stay in my current role post-MBA, but transition to a larger company in the technology space. I haven’t decided yet if I will return to India post-MBA. I think there are exciting opportunities available all around the world and I intend to travel a lot post-MBA to zero in on the place I’d love to settle down in. If that place is India, so be it :) – but that decision has not been made yet.

Accepted: Why did you decide to blog about your experience? What have you gained from the experience? What do you hope others will learn?

Vandana: When I was studying for the GMAT and thinking about applying to business school, I learnt from people’s experiences on GMATClub and read many, many blogs online from past applicants to get an idea of the applications process. After scoring a 760 on the GMAT, I wanted to help people nail their GMAT and I started answering a lot of preparation-related questions online on GMATClub and Quora. After a certain point, I couldn’t keep up with the volume of people getting in touch with me – so I decided to start a blog that documented my GMAT journey as well as applications progress in real-time. I hoped my blog would help prospective applicants navigate the admissions process better.

Also, the blogger community is simply amazing! Soon after I started my blog, a lot of them added me to their blog roll, started following me online and encouraged me at every step of the applications process. Getting into business school is a marathon – GMAT, applications, etc. take up a lot of time; but time simply flew by since I had so many great people to share the journey with! I know I’ve made many friends in the blogger community and I’m hoping to meet them in person before joining business school.

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages.

You can read more about Vandana’s b-school journey by checking out her blog, My Journey to Business School. Thank you Vandana for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

MBA admissions tips for Indian applicants! Download Free.

Accepted.com: The Premier Admissions Consultancy

Related Resources:

MBA Rankings: What You Need to Know
• International GMAT Test Takers Score Higher than Americans
• Your GMAT Study Plan: Get More Right Answers in Less Time 

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Help! I’ve Been Waitlisted! http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/02/help-ive-been-waitlisted/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/02/help-ive-been-waitlisted/#respond Fri, 02 Jan 2015 14:56:13 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=27855 In honor of New Years we’ve decided to repost one of the most popular episodes of 2014. If you didn’t hear it the first time, or if you just want to review, now is the perfect time to listen to our highly informative podcast with Linda Abraham discussing the timely topic of being waitlisted. *Theme music is […]

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Need waitlist help?In honor of New Years we’ve decided to repost one of the most popular episodes of 2014.

If you didn’t hear it the first time, or if you just want to review, now is the perfect time to listen to our highly informative podcast with Linda Abraham discussing the timely topic of being waitlisted.

Listen to the full conversation to learn more!

*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Relevant Links:

•  MBA Waitlist Advice 101
•  Med School Waitlist Advice 101
•  Grad School Waitlist Advice 101
•  College Waitlist Advice 101 
•  The Nine Mistakes You Don’t Want to Make on an MBA Waitlistan ebook
•  The Nine Mistakes You Don’t Want to Make on a Med School Waitlistan ebook
•  The Nine Mistakes You Don’t Want to Make on a Law School Waitlist, an ebook

Leave a Review for Admissions Straight Talk:

Check Out Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes! Check Out Admissions Straight Talk in Stitcher!

Subscribe to the Accepted Admissions Blog!

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http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/02/help-ive-been-waitlisted/feed/ 0 In honor of New Years we've decided to repost one of the most popular episodes of 2014. - If you didn't hear it the first time, or if you just want to review, now is the perfect time to listen to our highly informative podcast with Linda Abraham disc... In honor of New Years we've decided to repost one of the most popular episodes of 2014. If you didn't hear it the first time, or if you just want to review, now is the perfect time to listen to our highly informative podcast with Linda Abraham discussing the timely topic of being waitlisted. *Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com. Relevant Links: •  MBA Waitlist Advice 101 •  Med School Waitlist Advice 101 •  Grad School Waitlist Advice 101 •  College Waitlist Advice 101  •  The Nine Mistakes You Don’t Want to Make on an MBA Waitlist, an ebook •  The Nine Mistakes You Don’t Want to Make on a Med School Waitlist, an ebook •  The Nine Mistakes You Don’t Want to Make on a Law School Waitlist, an ebook Leave a Review for Admissions Straight Talk: Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no 13:39
Favorites in 2014 at Accepted! http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/31/favorites-in-2014-at-accepted/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/31/favorites-in-2014-at-accepted/#respond Wed, 31 Dec 2014 15:00:59 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=27902 What admissions issues were keeping you up at night? Here are the five articles and posts that you were most interested in this past year. 1. Harvard Business School 2015 MBA Essay Tips and Deadlines 2. Boost Your GPA for Medical School Acceptance 3. Writing Your Graduate Statement of Purpose or Personal Statement 4. Dealing with a Low […]

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Celebrating the best of Accepted in 2014What admissions issues were keeping you up at night? Here are the five articles and posts that you were most interested in this past year.

1. Harvard Business School 2015 MBA Essay Tips and Deadlines

2. Boost Your GPA for Medical School Acceptance

3. Writing Your Graduate Statement of Purpose or Personal Statement

4. Dealing with a Low MCAT or GPA

5. MBA Admissions: Low GMAT or GPA

Conclusion: You’re aiming for Harvard, but worried about low stats. And you’re writing your application essay.

However, Accepted’s most visited pages aren’t even articles. They are sample essays.

Those Sweet Sample Essays

1. Most popular medical school AMCAS essay: The Story

2. Most popular sample college personal statement: While the World Sleeps

3. Most popular sample grad statement of purpose: MPH Essay

4. Most popular sample law school personal statement: Change

5. Most popular sample MBA essay: Goals Essay

Speaking of goals, I wanted to grow Admissions Straight Talk, Accepted’s podcast, this year. Thanks to you, my listeners, and to the wonderful guests whom I’ve been privileged to talk to, it has busted through every goal I had for it. Thank you for listening! And thanks to the remarkable guests who did most of the talking.

The Most Popular Podcasts in 2014

1. GMAT, GRE, SAT, and All Things Test Prep with Magoosh’s CEO and founder, Bhavin Parikh.

2. Waitlisted! What Now? in which I discuss what to do when waitlisted.

3. Is a Ph.D. a Good Idea? with Dr. Karen Kelsky of The Professor is In.

4. The Stanford MSx Program for Experienced Leaders with program director, Mike Hochleutner.

5. What You Need to Know About Post-bac Programs with Dr. Barry Rothman, medical post-bac expert extraordinaire.

6. A bonus: How to Become a Management Consultant with Michael Boricki, currently Managing Partner of Firmsconsulting.

The Greatest Free Admissions Guides of 2014

1. Medical School Secondary Essay Handbook

2. Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One

3. Top MBA Program Essay Questions: How to Answer Them Right!

4. 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Med School Essays

5 . 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your College Application

Now that I’ve revealed your favorites, I’ll tell you a few of mine as I review 2014 and prepare for 2015:

5. The increasing dialogue taking place on this blog. I’m particularly appreciative that the conversation is civil, cordial, and collaborative.

4. The guests who have contributed to this blog, Admissions Straight Talk, and our webinars. What wonderful people have taken the time to share their insights and experience with us all!

3. The people behind the scenes who make this site and this company work: Rachel, Miriam, Sara, Michal, Yael, Sarah, and Lisa.

2. Accepted’s consultants, who generously share their admissions savvy on this site and tirelessly and expertly guide Accepted’s clients.

1. You – our clients, readers, fans, listeners, video viewers, participants, questioners, and commenters. In short, the Accepted community.

Best wishes for a happy, healthy, and prosperous 2015.

A year filled with “Yes! I’m in!”

Subscribe to Our Blog!

Linda AbrahamBy Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

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Detailed Instructions for Getting Accepted To Chicago Booth http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/31/detailed-instructions-for-getting-accepted-to-chicago-booth/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/31/detailed-instructions-for-getting-accepted-to-chicago-booth/#respond Wed, 31 Dec 2014 14:34:21 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=27729 Do you need specific tips about how to approach Booth’s questions efficiently and intelligently? Do you need help taking on the Chicago Booth challenge? Check out the video recording of our most recent webinar, Get Accepted to Chicago Booth, in which Linda Abraham, Accepted’s CEO and founder, teaches the 4 keys to a Booth acceptance. […]

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Do you need specific tips about how to approach Booth’s questions efficiently and intelligently? Do you need help taking on the Chicago Booth challenge?

Learn the 4 key steps to Chicago Booth Acceptance

Check out the video recording of our most recent webinar, Get Accepted to Chicago Booth, in which Linda Abraham, Accepted’s CEO and founder, teaches the 4 keys to a Booth acceptance. Linda has helped thousands of applicants gain acceptance to Booth and other top b-schools around the world – this is a leader you want to follow!

View Get Accepted to Chicago Booth now!

View the webinar!

Accepted.com: The Premier Admissions Consultancy

 

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Boost Your Chances of Getting In To Med School with PSOMER http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/30/boost-your-chances-of-getting-in-to-med-school-with-psomer/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/30/boost-your-chances-of-getting-in-to-med-school-with-psomer/#respond Tue, 30 Dec 2014 16:35:05 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=27871 Are you looking for a way to boost your med school application profile? Seeking new ways to increase your chances of GETTING IN? Check out University of Chicago/Pritzker Medical School’s new PSOMER program, an eight-week on-campus research, education, and mentoring experience for rising college seniors or rising postbac students, focusing on basic science and clinical […]

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Research experience is critical for all premed students

Topics covered include medical & research ethics, statistics, and research tools.

Are you looking for a way to boost your med school application profile? Seeking new ways to increase your chances of GETTING IN? Check out University of Chicago/Pritzker Medical School’s new PSOMER program, an eight-week on-campus research, education, and mentoring experience for rising college seniors or rising postbac students, focusing on basic science and clinical research.

Here are some details about PSOMER:

• Applicants must be U.S. citizens/permanent residents.

• The program is ideal for students from disadvantaged or underrepresented backgrounds in the health/medicine field.

• Housing is provided along with a partial meal subsidy.

• There is a mandatory research presentation forum at the end of the summer.

• Topics covered in weekly “cluster groups” include health care disparities, medical and research ethics, statistics, and research tools.

• Pritzker Medical School students and staff will provide mentorship and guidance to the PSOMER students.

• A $3,200 stipend will be provided to participants.

Important Dates

• Application Deadline: Friday, January 30, 2015, 11:59 PM CST

• Program Dates: Monday, June 15, 2015 – Friday, August 7, 2015

See the Pritzker Medical School site for more details.

Getting into med school is getting more and more competitive each year. Are YOU ready to sharpen your competitive edge and beat the other highly qualified applicants? Do you need help boosting your med school profile and constructing a winning application? Please be in touch – we’d love to help!

View our catalog of medical school application services

Accepted.com: The Premier Admissions Consultancy

Related Resources:

• A Second Chance at Medical School: The A-Z of Applying to Postbac Programs
• Applying to Medical School with Low Stats: What You Need to Know
• To Research or Not to Research is Thy Pre-Med Question 

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MBA Admissions Tip: Explaining Frequent Job Switching http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/30/mba-admissions-tip-explaining-frequent-job-switching-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/30/mba-admissions-tip-explaining-frequent-job-switching-2/#respond Tue, 30 Dec 2014 15:03:14 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=27760 You’ve got a strong transcript, a solid GPA, and you aced the GMAT. You know you’re a strong candidate for pretty much any top MBA program. There’s just one thing standing in your way…your resume. You’ve had some good jobs—that’s not the problem. The problem is that you’ve had too many of them, very close […]

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Click here for more MBA admissions tips!

Explain your case maturely—use reasons that don’t show that you’re afraid of job commitment

You’ve got a strong transcript, a solid GPA, and you aced the GMAT. You know you’re a strong candidate for pretty much any top MBA program. There’s just one thing standing in your way…your resume.

You’ve had some good jobs—that’s not the problem. The problem is that you’ve had too many of them, very close to each other. You’re afraid that your job switching past may make the adcoms write you off as a commitment-phobe. Of course, you know that’s not the case. But how do you convince the adcoms that each time you left a position, you had good reason for doing so? Even if you choose to use a functional resume format, there’s no way adcoms won’t notice your frequent job habit.

Defenses like: “I got bored,” or “It just wasn’t for me,” or “I hated my boss,” won’t really help your case. You’ll need to explain your fast-paced job changing action with a bit more detail.

Valid reasons for switching jobs:

  • You moved. While picking up and moving every few months may require an explanation on its own, it certainly does provide a valid explanation for frequent job changing. Let’s say you had one job during your senior year in Boston, then graduated and moved to D.C. where you landed a second job, and then one of your parents fell ill and you decided to move back home to San Diego to help out, where you got yet another job. While three jobs in the span of a year (or less) is generally frowned upon, your explanation make sense and doesn’t cast any shadow on your abilities to hold down a job.
  • Your schedule changed. You had been working part-time while you were in school, and then, upon graduation switched to a full-time job.
  • You were laid off. You had a job you liked and where you were liked, but were laid off during the recession, found a job to pay the bills, and then found another job that put you back on your desired career path.
  • You had trouble finding a good job match. While this explanation could make you appear a bit wishy-washy, if it’s true, then you should present your case carefully and honestly. While searching for “the one,” you came across some duds that you just didn’t jive with. Maybe they weren’t challenging enough. Maybe they didn’t help you actualize your potential. Maybe you were seeking more of a long-term growth position then these offered. Explain your case maturely—use reasons that don’t show that you’re afraid of job commitment, but that you just wanted more out of a job and were having some bad luck landing the right one.
  • Show growth and increased responsibility either as a motivator for some of the job changes or simply as a constant in your meandering.

If everything else on your application suggests that you should be accepted to the b-school of your choice, then it’s unlikely that a fickle resume will get you dinged…just so long as you explain the multiple positions and convince the adcoms that you are, in fact, an extremely committed person, who, post-graduation hopes to find a job that you’ll accept and keep for the long haul.

 

The Quick Guide to Admissions Resumes: Get your free copy!

Accepted.com: The Premier Admissions Consultancy

Related Resources:

Why MBA?, a free admissions guide
MBA Project Search: Matchmaking for MBAs and Businesses
2014 B-School Grads Flock to Jobs in Tech, Healthcare, and Manufacturing

 

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Why Not Start the Medical School Admissions Process Now… http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/29/why-not-start-the-medical-school-admissions-process-now/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/29/why-not-start-the-medical-school-admissions-process-now/#respond Mon, 29 Dec 2014 18:02:32 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=27776 …when you have the time to get it right? In our Get Accepted to Medical School in 2016 webinar, which aired live two weeks ago, admissions expert Alicia McNease Nimonkar paved the road to med school application success by sharing tried-and-true advice on how and why you should begin the 2016 med school admission process […]

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…when you have the time to get it right? In our Get Accepted to Medical School in 2016 webinar, which aired live two weeks ago, admissions expert Alicia McNease Nimonkar paved the road to med school application success by sharing tried-and-true advice on how and why you should begin the 2016 med school admission process early. And when we say early, we mean NOW!

Click here to learn how to get into med school in 2016!

Missed the webinar? No problem! Take a look at the recording of Get Accepted to Medical School in 2016 for much-needed advice on jump-starting your med school journey today!

View the webinar!

Accepted.com: The Premier Admissions Consultancy

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Top MBA Essay Advice — Free Admissions Guide Available! http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/29/top-mba-essay-advice-free-admissions-guide-available/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/29/top-mba-essay-advice-free-admissions-guide-available/#respond Mon, 29 Dec 2014 15:57:51 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=27746 Looking for MBA essay advice on THIS YEAR’S applications? Grab your copy of Top MBA Program Essay Questions: How to Answer Them Right, an Accepted.com admissions guide updated for 2015, providing school-by-school, question-by-question advice on how to answer this year’s MBA application questions. Free! For the most detailed advice out there for creating the best MBA application […]

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Looking for MBA essay advice on THIS YEAR’S applications?

Grab your copy of Top MBA Program Essay Questions: How to Answer Them Right, an Accepted.com admissions guide updated for 2015, providing school-by-school, question-by-question advice on how to answer this year’s MBA application questions. Free!

Click here to see how Accepted can help you!

For the most detailed advice out there for creating the best MBA application possible, download Top MBA Program Essay Questions: How to Answer Them Right! now!

 
GetTheTips

Accepted.com: The Premier Admissions Consultancy

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2015 Duke MBA—Cross-Continent Essays Tips http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/28/2015-duke-mba-cross-continent-essays-tips/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/28/2015-duke-mba-cross-continent-essays-tips/#respond Sun, 28 Dec 2014 17:11:05 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=27779 The Duke Cross Continent MBA program is unique in its format and mission, and it targets a special segment of the MBA applicant pool: those who intend to continue working during the MBA and whose work and goals have a global focus.  The average age of Cross-Continent students is a couple of years older than […]

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Read more school specific essays tips.The Duke Cross Continent MBA program is unique in its format and mission, and it targets a special segment of the MBA applicant pool: those who intend to continue working during the MBA and whose work and goals have a global focus.  The average age of Cross-Continent students is a couple of years older than that of traditional MBA students.  

Given the above, it’s not surprising to see the essay questions both addressing, directly and indirectly, fit with this one-of-a-kind program.  And that’s exactly what you should keep your eye on as you develop your essays.  While creating essays that answer the questions and also showcase your strengths, spotlight those experiences and elements that demonstrate both your understanding of the program’s specialness and how you align with and will enhance it.  

Required Short Answer Question:

What are your career goalsRespond in a maximum of 100 words.

Give the basic facts – position, company example, industry (if not apparent from the company) and a word about responsibilities and desired impacts. Don’t repeat the question (it wastes space).

Required Essays:

1. How will your skills, training and background enhance your cohort’s experience? Please include both personal and professional insight that may not be apparent through your resume and other application materials. Your response should be a maximum of 250 words.

This question is asking you to look behind your accomplishments and identify what “drives” or enables your success.  The quality of your insight in this regard is the key point.  With only 250 words, focus on 2-4 things; probably 3 would be ideal.   Draw from at least 2 of the 3 categories (skills, training, background) as each category has a different type of influence.

Use examples and anecdotes to make the actual points – it they will make the essay more vivid, memorable, and credible. Obviously you won’t have room for lengthy stories, but you can sometimes convey an anecdote in one sentence, e.g., “When confronted with ABC, I drew on my [specific background/skill/training] and did DEF, resulting in XYZ.”

2. Duke University is embedded in the world’s most important economic regions. As a result, our students experience a unique learning environment in which programs are delivered on 4 different continents, by our world-renowned faculty. Our diverse student cohorts represent a vast array of professional backgrounds, nationalities, interests, and experiences. Serving students who are also working professionals, The Duke MBA—Cross Continent program allows student to apply new skills immediately in the workplace and reap the benefits from their first-hand global experiences.  Explain how you and your organization will benefit from the global education offered at Duke. Your response should be a maximum of 500 words.

There’s a lot of preamble before the actual question, “Explain…”  Don’t gloss over it – this intro encapsulates Duke’s vision for this program, and it can help you focus your goals essay accordingly.

Start with the immediate and short-term – discuss what you want to accomplish while in the program, and how applying the MBA learning “in real time” including its global aspect will enable you to do so.  Be concrete, be specific.  Discuss benefits to you (how you’ll be able to achieve more, grow, strengthen your impact) and to your company – they will connect with your impacts.  Being specific in this discussion will also convey what you’ll bring to the table in terms of issues you’re addressing and working on, your industry and functional perspective, etc. so select points that will be interesting to the adcom and future classmates.

Finally, add a similar discussion for longer term goals, but make it shorter and less detailed.  

Optional Essay: If you feel there are extenuating circumstances of which the admissions committee should be aware, please explain them here (e.g. unexplained gaps in work, choice of recommenders, inconsistent or questionable academic performance, significant weakness in your application). Do NOT upload additional essays nor additional recommendations in this area. The Optional Essay is intended to provide the admissions committee with insight into your extenuating circumstances only.

This optional essay should focus on matters that require explanation; it does not invite you to further market yourself. Only write it if you do indeed have extenuating circumstances to discuss for a full and clear presentation of your candidacy.

 Re-applicant Essay:

An additional essay is required for re-applicants. It is not uncommon for it to take more than one try to achieve a goal. Please share with us the self-reflection process that you underwent after last year’s application and how you have grown as a result. How did it shape your commitment to Fuqua and inspire your decision to reapply?

The reapplicant essay focuses on “how” you approached growth and change as much as “what” that growth was.  They are not just looking for updates on new achievements – they want to know that you have deliberately pursued a path of growth and development, what they results were, and, finally, how it spurs your reapplication to Fuqua.  To avoid the potential pitfall of a lot of explanation in this essay, make the main part of the essay – the self-reflection and the growth – into a story, and conclude with how it incorporates Fuqua.

The deadlines are:
Make sure your applications are ready with a final check!

 

 

 

 

The Quick Guide to Admissions Resumes: Get your free copy!

Cindy Tokumitsu 

By , author and co-author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports, including Why MBA and Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted.com.

Related Resources:

 Top MBA Program Essay Questions: How to Answer Them Right
• 4 Goals of an MBA Application
• 7 Signs an Experience Belongs in Your Application Essays 

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Swoon-Worthy MBA Application Tips Viewable Now! http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/28/swoon-worthy-mba-application-tips-viewable-now/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/28/swoon-worthy-mba-application-tips-viewable-now/#respond Sun, 28 Dec 2014 15:47:57 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=27423 Earlier this month Linda presented an exciting webinar – about how to make top b-school adcom fall in love with you. That webinar, 5 Ways to Make Top B-Schools Love You, is now available for online viewing, anytime and anywhere. Some of the topics that Linda addresses during the webinar include: •  How to prove […]

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Earlier this month Linda presented an exciting webinar – about how to make top b-school adcom fall in love with you. That webinar, 5 Ways to Make Top B-Schools Love You, is now available for online viewing, anytime and anywhere.

Click here to learn how to win the hearts of the adcom (and get admitted to b-school!)

Some of the topics that Linda addresses during the webinar include:

•  How to prove that you will excel at your target program.

•  Ways you can show how you and your target program are MFEO through your shared goals.

•  What to do and what not to do to make sure your MBA application takes the adcom’s breath away.

 …and more!

 View 5 Ways to Make Top B-Schools Love You now!

Watch the Webinar!Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

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Interview with Josh: An Inside Look at the Tepper MBA Family http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/26/interview-with-josh-an-inside-look-at-the-tepper-mba-family/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/26/interview-with-josh-an-inside-look-at-the-tepper-mba-family/#respond Fri, 26 Dec 2014 16:36:30 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=27755 This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a follow up interview with Josh Howatt, a second-year student from CMU Tepper. (We first met Josh last year – you can read our first interview with him here.) […]

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Read more MBA student interviews here!

“Tepper feels like a family”

This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a follow up interview with Josh Howatt, a second-year student from CMU Tepper. (We first met Josh last year – you can read our first interview with him here.)

Accepted: Last we spoke you had just been accepted to Tepper. Can you please bring us up to date? How have you been the last year and a half?

Josh: My time at Tepper has been absolutely fantastic! Currently, I’m pursuing the Management of Innovation and Product Development track, and working with other CMU schools in Engineering, Public Policy, and Design Schools for my Capstone. We’re collaborating on real-life problems with F500 companies and start-ups. It’s great to be putting the tools we’ve learned into practice. Also, I’m concentrating in Marketing, Strategy, and Information Systems – a far cry from where I originally intended in CPG. The curriculum is rigorous and highly quantitative, but also provides its fair share of soft-skill classes, e.g. Managerial Communications, Negotiations. So far, it’s been an amazing (see: challenging) experience.

Accepted: What is your favorite thing about Tepper?

Josh: My favorite thing about Tepper is that it’s a small program, so the feeling is collegial. It’s absolutely true that if you work at it, you can get to know every single person in your class. This also makes for a great teacher to student ratio. Meaning, there is plenty of opportunity to engage in discussion with your professors outside of the classroom. With regard to the student body, everyone has certain expertise and is more than willing to lend a hand or teach what they know. Tepper feels like a family, and I don’t think you fully realize how true that is until you visit and see it firsthand.

Accepted: Where did you intern this past summer? Can you talk about the process by which you secured the position and how Tepper helped along during the process?

Josh: This summer I interned at Autodesk as a Thought Leadership, Content Marketing Intern. Tepper was instrumental to me landing this position. We have a fantastic COC that allows you to meet with as many counselors as often as you like. Fortunately, I loved my originally assigned counselor from the start. She was fantastic at connecting me with alumni in companies I was interested in, and often times would shoot off an email right then and there during our meetings. The COC is also great in preparing students for the recruiting process; everything from developing your STAR stories, to getting your resumes and cover letters into pristine condition. One of the most helpful parts of the process is the month-long BaseCamp before Mini 1. Not only do you get an opportunity to engage with your future classmates, but you get a jumpstart on the recruitment process, because it starts SO EARLY.

Accepted: Do you have a job lined up yet for next year? 

Josh: I do! I will be starting as a Sr. Consultant for Verizon in their Marketing Leadership Development Program. I can’t even tell you how excited I am!

Accepted: Congratulations on your job with Verizon!

Can you tell us about the difference between “concentrations” and “tracks” at Tepper? How early in your studies do you need to declare these specifications? 

Josh: I would equate concentrations and tracks to undergrad minors and majors. Concentrations are specializations that require completion of 3 elective classes within a certain field (so you could essentially have up to 3 or 4 concentrations). Tracks go much deeper in that they involve completing core specialization classes, and then choosing from specified electives. You typically apply to be part of a track, and choose only one.

Accepted: Are you involved in any clubs on campus? How central to student life is club involvement?

Josh: I’m VP of Technology for our Marketing Club and VP of Marketing for Out&Allied (Tepper’s LGBT club). I’m also a member of our Business&Technology Club and the Public Speaking Club. Club involvement in very central to student life at Tepper. Outside of board duties, at least twice a week I’m participating in a club sponsored event, which is great! There’s always something interesting going on, whether it’s a social event, educational series, or recruiting prep.

Accepted: Do you have any tips to incoming Tepper students? What do you wish you would have known when you were starting out?

Josh: My best advice for incoming Tepper students is: realize you are only human and don’t be so hard on yourself! There’s going to be so much interesting stuff to do, and you’ll want to do it all, but that’s just not possible. I was a huge stress case my first two Minis (my friends will attest to this, and is sort of a running joke now). Get used to saying “no” and learn to prioritize what’s most important to you and your Tepper experience. Between classes, recruiting, social events, club events, corporate presentations, career fairs, and everything else in your life, your head is going to spin. Just know that ahead of time. Find a way to balance school and life. Take time for you. And if you find yourself starting to lose it, just know that there is a Tepper family there to help hold you together.

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school applications, please see our MBA Application Packages. For specific advice on how to create the best application for Tepper see:

Thank you Josh for continuing to share your story with us!

Download our free special report: Best MBA Programs

Accepted.com: The Premier Admissions Consultancy
Related Resources:

Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One
MBA Project Search: Matchmaking for MBAs and Businesses
CMU Tepper B-School Zone

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Should You Pursue a PhD? http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/26/should-you-pursue-a-phd/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/26/should-you-pursue-a-phd/#respond Fri, 26 Dec 2014 15:46:41 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=27738 In honor of the holidays we’ve decided to repost one of the most popular podcast episodes of 2014. If you didn’t hear it the first time, or if you just want to review, now is the perfect time to listen to our highly informative (and super-popular) interview with Dr. Karen Kelsky, founder and consultant at The Professor […]

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Important tips on PhD admissionsIn honor of the holidays we’ve decided to repost one of the most popular podcast episodes of 2014.

If you didn’t hear it the first time, or if you just want to review, now is the perfect time to listen to our highly informative (and super-popular) interview with Dr. Karen Kelsky, founder and consultant at The Professor is In for some important insights into the very hot topic: Is a PhD a good path?

Click here to listen to the show!

*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Related Links:

• Choosing a Ph.D. Program: 3 Tips
• Plotting Your Way to a PhD: 6 Topics in PhD Admissions
• 
The Professor is In
Should You Go to Graduate School?
•  Get Your Game On: Prepping for Your Grad School Application
• STEM PhD Job Market is Down

Related Shows:

• Kisses of Death for your Grad School Application
• Non-Academic Careers for PhDs: A Talk with Dr. Paula Chambers

Leave a review for Admissions Straight Talk:

Check Out Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes! Check Out Admissions Straight Talk in Stitcher!

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http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/26/should-you-pursue-a-phd/feed/ 0 In honor of the holidays we've decided to repost one of the most popular podcast episodes of 2014. - If you didn't hear it the first time, or if you just want to review, now is the perfect time to listen to our highly informative (and super-popular) ... In honor of the holidays we've decided to repost one of the most popular podcast episodes of 2014. If you didn't hear it the first time, or if you just want to review, now is the perfect time to listen to our highly informative (and super-popular) interview with Dr. Karen Kelsky, founder and consultant at The Professor is In for some important insights into the very hot topic: Is a PhD a good path? *Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com. Related Links: • Choosing a Ph.D. Program: 3 Tips • Plotting Your Way to a PhD: 6 Topics in PhD Admissions • The Professor is In • Should You Go to Graduate School? •  Get Your Game On: Prepping for Your Grad School Application • STEM PhD Job Market is Down Related Shows: • Kisses of Death for your Grad School Application • Non-Academic Careers for PhDs: A Talk with Dr. Paula Chambers Leave a review for Admissions Straight Talk: Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no 50:05
Happy Holidays from Accepted! http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/24/happy-holidays-from-accepted/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/24/happy-holidays-from-accepted/#respond Wed, 24 Dec 2014 17:03:08 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=27742 Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

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A happy holidays message from Linda Abraham, president of Accepted

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Indiana Kelley 2015 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/24/indiana-kelley-2015-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/24/indiana-kelley-2015-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/#respond Wed, 24 Dec 2014 16:09:15 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=27545 These questions are a straightforward mix of professional and personal.  The adcom wants assurance that you have a clear professional focus and a solid plan for using the Kelley MBA resources.  Beyond that, they’re looking for engaging applicants who are willing to share their life experiences and understand what they have to contribute.  Strive for […]

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Read more school specific essays tips. These questions are a straightforward mix of professional and personal.  The adcom wants assurance that you have a clear professional focus and a solid plan for using the Kelley MBA resources.  Beyond that, they’re looking for engaging applicants who are willing to share their life experiences and understand what they have to contribute.  Strive for balance and coherence among the essays overall: use them to show different facets of your character, while avoiding contradictory qualities (i.e., you can be a vigorous risk-taker in one and a tender-hearted soul in another, but not a vigorous risk-taker in one and tentative or overly cautious person in another).

Questions:

Your essays will give us an idea of your personality, perspectives, and opinions and will let us know how closely your professional objectives match the objectives of the MBA program. We encourage you to be honest, informative, creative, and concise.

Required:

1.  Please discuss your immediate post-MBA professional goals. How will your professional experience, when combined with a Kelley MBA degree, allow you to achieve these goals? Should the short-term goals you have identified not materialize, what alternate career paths might you consider? (500 words)

This question encourages you to present your goals in the context of your experience and to integrate your MBA plans with both.  With only 500 words, be selective and thoughtful about what points from your career to use to contextualize your goals.  Also, the question specifies short-term goals.  While it would be fine to add a sentence or a phrase about longer- term goals or overall career vision, keep your goals discussion focused on the same time frame the question focuses on: immediately post-MBA.  This question is asking for linkages among your experience, your short-term goals, and your anticipated MBA experience, so think about how you will form an integrated message out of these elements.

In answering the last point, continue the linkage approach: the alternatives you identify should build on your experience in some way and be consistent with your expressed career interests.  Show that you are adaptable and strategic, informed about the options, and resourceful in your thinking.

2.  Please respond to one of the following short essay prompts. (300 words)
a) My greatest memory is…
b)  I’m most afraid of…
c)  My greatest challenge has been…
d)  I’m most proud of…

Consider which question will give you the best avenue to both (a) round out your profile and (b) showcase an interesting and relevant aspect of your life and/or experience.  

Once you decide on a topic and question, write this short essay in mini-story format.  Sometimes the story itself will convey the message and/or insight, sometimes you may want to add a concluding sentence with this information.  And be sensitive to the tone and presentation of the question – it really is asking for something engaging, meaningful, and lively.

3. Please share with the admissions committee an interesting or surprising fact about you. (25 words)

Your topic selection here should balance the topic in essay 2 and reflect another aspect of you.  Also, if you choose an older story above, make this one more recent.  (It’s fine to have them both be recent, but not so great to have them both be far in the past.)

4.  Optional: Is there anything else that you think we should know as we evaluate your application? If you believe your credentials and essays represent you fairly, you shouldn’t feel obligated to answer this question. (300 words)

This question first and foremost invites you to explain anything that needs explaining (e.g., gap in employment, choice of recommender if not using a direct supervisor, etc.). As far as non-necessary points, that last phrase is polite warning that anything extra must be pretty darn important.  

Make sure your application is ready for prime time!

Read more school-specific MBA essay tips!

Cindy Tokumitsu By , author and co-author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports, including Why MBA and Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted.com.

Related Resources:

Maximize Your MBA Application: 5 Tips for Succinct Essays
Are MBA Rankings Really Important?
Showing the Adcom That You Can Accept Criticism

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5 Tips to Assess Your MBA Profile http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/23/5-tips-to-assess-your-mba-profile/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/23/5-tips-to-assess-your-mba-profile/#respond Tue, 23 Dec 2014 17:38:26 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=27628 I often tell my clients that an MBA application is like a mosaic. Each element contributes to create a full picture of who you are. Some pieces will be brighter or more colorful than others. Others fail to sparkle. You can either address those weaknesses — polish those dull stones — or decide to re-evaluate […]

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Are your MBA goals clear?

Your goals should draw a clear connection from your past to your future.

I often tell my clients that an MBA application is like a mosaic. Each element contributes to create a full picture of who you are. Some pieces will be brighter or more colorful than others. Others fail to sparkle. You can either address those weaknesses — polish those dull stones — or decide to re-evaluate your school choices to be more competitive.

Here are five tips you can use to assess yourself as you narrow down your list.

1.    GMAT/GPA

Accepted.com’s President Linda Abraham summed it nicely in a post for Poets&Quants:

“If your score is more than 30 points below the average listed at your target school than you’ve got two realistic choices: You can either adjust your list of target schools and aim for MBA programs that have lower GMAT averages, or you can keep your list and retake the GMAT.”

That being said, it’s only one factor in your application. If you scored low on the GMAT, you may be an outlier in another area, which could mitigate your score.

Your undergraduate GPA is another factor the adcom considers. Those with a 3.6 and above are generally fine at top schools. If you had a wobbly semester or two, use the optional essay to provide context and discuss what you’ve done to address those weak areas. Perhaps you retook a few classes, or later enrolled in a continuing ed course to brush up your skill set.

2.    Work Experience

Top business schools are generally looking for folks with between 3-7 years of work experience. Certain professions are highly represented. At Harvard, the top professions pre-MBA are consulting, financial services, VC/PE and “High Tech/Communications.”  At Wharton, it’s consulting and military/gov’t/non-profit. At Stanford it’s consulting, VC/PE and military/gov’t/non-profit.  If you’re not a consultant, in finance, or a government wonk – that doesn’t mean you’re not competitive! MBA programs are also looking for diversity to bring differing viewpoints to class discussions. Take a look at this “fox in the henhouse” admitted to Harvard. What you need to communicate is how your achievements are extraordinary and how your background will add to the school’s diversity. That’s what will stand out.

3.  For international applicants, it’s work experience + international exposure. Or work experience + extraordinary accomplishments.

Take a look at profiles of students who head up international clubs at top US and UK b-schools. More likely than not they have one of two boxes checked.

1.  They have significant international experience working outside of their home country, often with a multinational company or recognized global organization.

2.  They’ve done something truly extraordinary in the context of their profession.

If you have never traveled or worked outside your home country, then your accomplishments should stand out anywhere around the globe. I don’t mean test scores here. I mean introducing significant innovation at work, developing a skill, creating a business, or founding a socially-oriented activity that’s unique and interesting.

Are you networking for international assignments at work? If not, start doing so now.

Would you consider what you’ve done, extraordinary? If not, stop dreaming and start doing it now.

4.   Goals

Your goals need to make sense based on your past experience. They should draw a clear connection from your past to your future.

‘But wait!’ you say. ‘What if I want to switch careers?’ That’s fine – just show the admissions committee that you’ve already gained some exposure to the industry, and why your past experience will be an asset as you move forward.

On the opposite end of the spectrum, the adcom will likely assess your employ-ability. Will your background + an MBA make sense to recruiters? Are you an international student? You may have a harder time getting hired by a firm outside of countries where you are already permitted to work. It’s best to show in your application that you’re flexible – you’re willing to return to your home country, get some more experience, then branch out based on your own networking.

5.   Fit and familiarity

Finally we get down to what I call,”fit and familiarity.” For example, have you taken a summer session course on campus? Are you an alum of the undergraduate program? Have you worked in the city where the school is located? You can then make a better case of being familiar with its curriculum and community.

Another factor is your post-MBA plans. Do you have experience in a school’s specialization? Do you have family in the area, or previous business connections that would lead you to happily settle in the school’s locale after graduation? Are you a big city kind of person, or do you enjoy the strong connections forged in smaller communities?

Be HONEST with yourself. If you don’t know, I strongly recommend a visit to campus if you can afford it. Rankings and name recognition are a place to start, but ultimately—this is a HUGE investment. Don’t make it the worst two-year vacation you went into debt for and will spend a lifetime paying back. Make it a transformative experience. Find an environment where you will thrive.

Yes you CAN get accepted to a top b-school with low stats!

Michelle Stockman Michelle Stockman is a professional journalist, former Columbia Business School admissions insider, and experienced MBA admissions consultant.

 

Related Resources:

MBA Action Plan: 6 Steps for the 6 Months Before You Apply
Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One
MBA Rankings: What You Need To Know

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What Med School Applicants Need to Know About Residency Match http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/23/what-med-school-applicants-need-to-know-about-residency-match/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/23/what-med-school-applicants-need-to-know-about-residency-match/#respond Tue, 23 Dec 2014 17:14:46 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=27672 This fall, a record number of students began medical school, while a record number of medical students failed to match into a specialty. With more medical students vying for residency positions, many students are facing the possibility of not matching into their chosen specialty. A basic understanding of The Match—and its risks—is important for anyone […]

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Applicants and 1st Year Positions in The Match, 1952 - 2013

Applicants and 1st Year Positions in The Match, 1952 – 2013 via NRMP Results and Data 2013.

This fall, a record number of students began medical school, while a record number of medical students failed to match into a specialty. With more medical students vying for residency positions, many students are facing the possibility of not matching into their chosen specialty. A basic understanding of The Match—and its risks—is important for anyone going into medical school.

The residency match program began in 1952 as a way to provide a single clearinghouse for medical residency positions. Using an algorithm, the match program allows candidates and programs to rank each other, then attempts to match applicants to their highest ranked programs, while also working to fill every position. The first match included 6,000 applicants and 10,400 positions. In 2013, 40,335 applicants applied for 26,392 PGY-1 positions. Of these applicants, 17,487 were US Allopathic students (1). The rest of the applicants are osteopathic students and international students, both US and non-US residents.

In 2006, the Association of American Medical Colleges began approving new medical schools across the country, adding seventeen new schools with seven more coming in the near future. These new schools, and expansion of class sizes at other schools, has led to a 30% increase in enrollment since 2006 (2). While the AAMC has been increasing medical school numbers, the residency positions have not increased.  Unlike medical student spots, residency positions are controlled both by available funding and approval by private organizations, called Residency Review Committees (RRCs). Residency positions are approved by RRCs for each specialty, and the vast majority are funded by Medicare funding through Direct Medical Education (DME) payments (3). Since 1996, medicare funding for residencies has remained frozen, preventing any viable expansion of residency positions, since it costs approximately $145,000 a year to train a new resident (4). Although some hospitals have begun funding their own residency positions, this is a difficult and expensive proposition for most organizations.

So what does this mean for students currently entering medical school? Although the vast majority of US allopathic medical students will still match, roughly 500 each year will find themselves unmatched. In 2013, 17,487 US allopathic students matched at a rate of 93.7%, so the odds are still on your side. The growing competition from international medical students, osteopathic students, and US students who train overseas, along with a growing allopathic class size, means more students will find themselves unmatched each year. Until more residency positions are made available, the most important take away is that students must become increasingly competitive to secure their chosen specialty.

(1)  “Results and Data; 2013 Main Residency Match.” NRMP. 1 Jan. 2013. Web. 23 Nov. 2014
(2)  Doctor Shortage May Swell to 130,000 With Cap
(3) Nicholson, Sean. “Barriers to Entering Medical Specialties.” NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH 1 Jan. 2003. Web. 23 Nov. 2014.
(4) Innovative funding opens new residency slots

Are you misusing the med school rankings? Click here to find out!

By Evan Kuhl, a fourth-year medical student wanting to match in emergency medicine. Evan is interested in the intersection of sports and medicine, and is an avid cyclist. His website, www.evankuhl.com, includes helpful tips for pre-med and current medical students.

Accepted.com: The Premier Admissions Consultancy

Related Resources:

Med School Rankings and Numbers: What You Must Know
Medical School Application Strategy: MD vs. DO Programs
Is My Profile Competitive?

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Your Holiday Gift Awaits! http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/23/your-holiday-gift-awaits/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/23/your-holiday-gift-awaits/#respond Tue, 23 Dec 2014 15:53:19 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=27674 We’d like to wish you a joyous holiday season by offering you a gift – a free copy of The Quick Guide to Admissions Resumes, a guide that will teach you how to create a stand-out resume that will help you get accepted! In The Quick Guide to Admissions Resumes, you’ll learn important tips and […]

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Get your free admissions gift!

Grab your holiday gift!

We’d like to wish you a joyous holiday season by offering you a gift – a free copy of The Quick Guide to Admissions Resumes, a guide that will teach you how to create a stand-out resume that will help you get accepted! In The Quick Guide to Admissions Resumes, you’ll learn important tips and tricks for marketing yourself in your resume – putting your most impressive experiences and qualifications front and center so that when the adcoms take that initial glance at your resume, they’ll want to immediately read on to learn more about who you are and what you’ll contribute to their next class.

Get your free resume admissions guide!

Grab your gift of The Quick Guide to Admissions Resumes now and have a very happy holiday!

Accepted.com: The Premier Admissions Consultancy

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5-Step Checklist Before Submitting Your Applications http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/22/5-step-checklist-before-submitting-your-applications/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/22/5-step-checklist-before-submitting-your-applications/#respond Mon, 22 Dec 2014 20:41:03 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=27664 Whether you’re applying to b-school, law school, med school, grad school, or college, this checklist will be the same. Don’t hit that “submit” button until you’ve completed the following 5 steps: 1.  You’ve made sure that your application presents a holistic, multi-dimensional picture of you. Each section of your application should not just present you as a strong candidate on its own, but should complement the other application components as well. […]

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Have a professional give your application a final check before you submit.

Give your application a final check before submitting

Whether you’re applying to b-school, law school, med school, grad school, or college, this checklist will be the same. Don’t hit that “submit” button until you’ve completed the following 5 steps:

1.  You’ve made sure that your application presents a holistic, multi-dimensional picture of you.

Each section of your application should not just present you as a strong candidate on its own, but should complement the other application components as well. When the admissions readers have finished reading your entire application, they should have a clear picture of who you are as a well-rounded and unique individual.

2. You’ve demonstrated fit with the program.

To demonstrate that tight fit that adcoms are seeking, you’ll need to have done some serious thinking about who you are and about how that person is compatible with the school’s mission, ideals, and culture.

3. You have selected the best recommenders.

The best recommenders are those people who really know you well and who will be able to draw from their unique experiences with you in composing their LOR. If your recommender doesn’t know you well, then his or her assessment of you may end up sounding generic and superficial. Plus, it may not be accurate.

4. Proofread, edit, and then proof some more!

Read your essay, as well as all other application components, aloud to make sure that you hear mistakes that your eyes may have glossed over. You may also want to recruit a friend, colleague or family member, or hire an admissions consultant, to help you edit your essays to perfection.

5. You’ve given yourself some time.

Don’t submit your app at the last minute. Rushing your application will create more room for error, the schools’ servers may be overloaded just before the buzzer, and you may lose your chance to apply on time if you wait until the last minute.

Think you’re ready to submit? Why not run your application by the experts for a final stamp of approval? Our admissions consultants and editors are standing by, ready to help you construct an application that shines, one that shows off your greatest achievements and talents, one that you’re truly excited and ready to submit. Contact us now for more details on how we can help.

Give Your MBA Application that Final Check!
Accepted.com: The Premier Admissions Consultancy
Related Resources:

5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Essays!
The Quick Guide to Admissions Resumes
How To Edit Your Application Essays

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Meet Amanda: A Balanced Brunette Passionate about Hands-On Care http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/22/meet-amanda-a-balanced-brunette-passionate-about-hands-on-care/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/22/meet-amanda-a-balanced-brunette-passionate-about-hands-on-care/#respond Mon, 22 Dec 2014 16:39:40 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=27659 This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with medical school applicants and students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top medical schools and the med school application process. And now, introducing Amanda Miarecki… Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as […]

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Click here to read more med applicant interviews.This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with medical school applicants and students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top medical schools and the med school application process. And now, introducing Amanda Miarecki…

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What’s your favorite non-school book?

Amanda: Hello! I am originally from Michigan but currently living in Boulder, Colorado. I studied at Michigan State University and graduated with a degree in Political Science – Pre-Law. I actually moved to Boulder to attend University of Colorado Law School. My dream job was working abroad with an organization like Amnesty International or UNICEF supporting human rights legislation.

After spending some time working wilderness medicine in the Rockies, I fell in love. I immediately scrapped my plans for Law School and started taking pre-med courses. My love for medicine was further solidified after I spent time abroad in Cambodia on a medical mission trip in 2012 (where I got to deliver a baby!). I traveled abroad again to Thailand in 2013 as a medical supervisor for a gap year program. Both of these experiences made me realize my passion was truly hands-on care. I love medicine, I love people, and I love travel. My dream had evolved into working as a Global Health Physician.

My absolute favorite non-school book is Eat, Pray, Love. I think the story is a fantastic combination of travel, personal growth, and following your dreams (certainly something I can relate to).

Accepted: Can you tell us about your website/company? When did you start Toned & Fit Balanced Brunette? What was your motivation behind starting it? What services do you offer?

Amanda: I officially launched Balanced Brunette (formerly Toned & Fit) in 2012. I had been posting my favorite new foods and workouts on my personal Facebook page and my friends kept asking for my recipes and tips. After answering the same questions multiple times I decided to store all that information in one place and Balanced Brunette was born. Shortly after, I had an opportunity to get a Health Coach certification and I took it. I felt like it was the perfect complement to my new healthy lifestyle and would benefit me as a doctor later on. We all know nutritional counseling and education is lacking in a doctor’s training and I want to be as well-rounded as possible.

My blog offers free articles and advice for women. I also offer personalized coaching for women with more specific health goals. I focus on overall health and wellness. I don’t promote macro counting, calorie counting, or any other method of food tracking. Counting can very quickly lead to eating disorders in women and I truly want every woman to be as healthy and happy as possible! It’s all about balance. I focus exclusively on clean eating (80/20 split), portion control, and enjoying treats in moderation. (I have a serious froyo addiction.)

Accepted: How has this experience led you to want to go to med school?

Amanda: All of my experiences over the past 4 years since graduating from MSU have shaped my decision to go to medical school. Health Coaching and providing nutritional advice through Balanced Brunette is how I plan to round out my medical education. Doctors are really great at diagnosing disease but don’t normally get formal training in nutrition. I was lucky enough to acquire that training and I want to put it to use.

Helping women is also something that is consistent across all aspects of my life. My blog is tailored towards women and I find myself drawn towards women’s health professionally. Through my blog, many women approach me with personal health related questions. I want the credentials to be able to answer their questions instead of responding with “Please ask your doctor.”

Accepted: What stage of the application process are you up to so far?

Amanda: In January, I will be starting my Masters in Public Health. That will take me through 2015 and into the 2016 medical school fall admissions. Because the MCAT is changing in January 2015, I must wait until 2016 to enroll (which was a factor in my decision to “fill my time” with my MPH). I am tying up loose ends with a few remaining prerequisites, focusing on rounding out my education with my MPH, studying for the new MCAT, and beginning my medical school applications.

Accepted: What has been the most challenging aspect of med school admissions so far? What steps have you taken to overcome that challenge? What advice can you share with others who are experiencing the same obstacles?

Amanda: The most challenging part of admissions is keeping track of each program, what types of prerequisites each requires, and when their deadlines are. I highly recommend making an Excel spreadsheet in order to track programs and requirements.

Regarding the new MCAT, I really don’t know what to expect! I have been using the brand new Kaplan 2015 MCAT study material which includes the test prep books (all 7!) and the MCAT flashcards + app. I am excited that the MCAT is changing. The new MCAT seems well rounded and applicable to what medical students are actually learning in school.

I am also very invested in my lifestyle. While medical school will certainly keep me busy, I am determined to stay active in my free time. My top choice is the University of Washington. The program is fantastic and the geographic location offers mountains and ocean, which is very important to me. Definitely choose a place that offers a lifestyle you want.

Accepted: Can you tell us about your experience as a medical assistant? How do you think these experiences will help you along the way as you apply to med school and eventually become a physician?

Amanda: I have been working in health care (in multiple capacities) since 2011. I started in Wilderness Medicine as a WFR (wilderness first responder). Rural or emergency medicine is definitely an adrenaline rush. You have to be able to think and act quickly. I moved into a hospital setting to experience another side of health care. I spent about a year in an outpatient lab. Never underestimate the lab! I learned so much about disease, laboratory tests, chemistry, hematology, cytology, and pathology. I am also an expert phlebotomist, which has been extremely useful as I progress through my professional life.

After the lab, I started at a Women’s Clinic (my absolute favorite!) and, after about 7 months there, moved on to Planned Parenthood. These two experiences really shaped who I think I will be as a provider. I have no problem discussing very personal or sensitive issues with patients. I learned how to remove personal bias and really focus on patient care. One of the top complaints I see from medical students is being uncomfortable taking a sexual history on a patient. My experiences will ensure I won’t be uncomfortable when it comes to clinicals in medical school.

I left Planned Parenthood to join two physicians who were starting a private primary care practice. I was able to set up the clinic from scratch. Everything from ordering initial supplies, to stocking rooms, to developing protocol and procedure guidelines, training new medical assistants, and setting the standard for the practice. This was an invaluable experience and I am grateful I was part of the start up. The only downfall was that I was more in a manager/administrative position as opposed to patient care. I recently left the practice to re-join the hospital in the ICU. I could not be more excited for the next chapter of my professional life.

Real-world experience is crucial for medical students. In a world where everyone can get good grades and pass a test, you absolutely must set yourself apart. Volunteer, shadow a physician, go on a medical mission trip, or get yourself certified as a paramedic. These experiences will ensure you have an amazing admissions essay that is guaranteed to draw attention.

Accepted: Can you share your top 3 clean eating tips with us?

Amanda: My top 3 clean eating tips

1.  Eat 5-6 smaller meals per day. Smaller meals are great because you can really focus on proper serving sizes. They also ensure stable glucose levels throughout the day and keep your metabolism fired up!

2.  Drink 2-3 liters of water per day. The average person walks around mildly dehydrated which can cause fatigue, dry skin, sluggish muscles, and food cravings. Not into plain water? Try NUUN tablets, coconut water, fruit infused water, or Mio Liquid Enhancer.

3.  Increase your protein! Many women are falling painfully short of this important macronutrient. Research has proven that high protein diets increase weight loss and lean muscle building. Incorporate lean meats, legumes, beans, quinoa, fish, eggs, and dairy into each meal. I personally snack on turkey jerky, hard-boiled eggs, steamed edamame, and (if I’m super busy) a quick chocolate protein shake. (Try this amazing Coconut Mocha Protein Shake.)

For one-on-one guidance on your med school applications, please see our catalog of med school admissions services.

You can read more about Amanda’s journey by checking out her blog, Balanced Brunette. Thank you Amanda for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

Do you want to be featured in Accepted.com’s blog, Accepted Admissions Blog? If you want to share your med school story with the world (or at least with our readers), email us at bloggers@accepted.com.

Learn how you can get accepted to med school even with a low MCAT or GPA!
Accepted.com: The Premier Admissions Consultancy

Related Resources:

Med School Rankings & Numbers: What You MUST Know, a free guide
Where Should I Apply to Medical School?
Med School Application Process: AMCAS, Secondaries, Interviews, Decisions & More! 

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Cornell 2015 Executive MBA 2015 Essay Tips http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/22/cornell-2015-executive-mba-2015-essay-tips/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/22/cornell-2015-executive-mba-2015-essay-tips/#respond Mon, 22 Dec 2014 16:14:27 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=27043 The Cornell Executive MBA Program has three required essay questions and one optional question in its application. One of the most important things to keep in mind is brevity. While no one is going to be counting individual words, the guideline of short word count is a clear indicator to work on clarity of thought […]

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Check out some more EMBA application essay tips!The Cornell Executive MBA Program has three required essay questions and one optional question in its application.

One of the most important things to keep in mind is brevity. While no one is going to be counting individual words, the guideline of short word count is a clear indicator to work on clarity of thought with all of your answers. Cornell interviews every applicant to its program, so if you are concerned that your answers are too concise in essay format, rest assured you will have the opportunity to discuss them further in the interview.

1. In a concise statement, indicate why you are seeking admission into an Executive MBA Program. Specifically, what are your short and long-term career goals? And, how will an MBA from Johnson at Cornell University help you achieve your goals? (Please limit your response to 1000 characters.)*

The first part of this question asks “Why EMBA?” By making the choice to go after an EMBA, you are of course signaling you will keep your job while going to school. Therefore, be sure to link your past/current career experience with your short and long term goals in the context of how (and why) this type of format works best for you. When answering the “Why Cornell?” portion of the question, be convincing about the reasons Cornell is the best choice for you, and show you have done your homework – “location” and “reputation” won’t cut it. The admissions committee wants to know what you anticipate the program will be like, what you will get out of it, how the program fits with your career vision, and what the entire experience means to you as a person.

2. A key benefit of being in an Executive MBA Program is having the ability to learn from your classmates, or peers. How will you contribute to this learning environment? Specifically, what unique strengths and experiences will you bring to both the class and your learning team? (Please limit your response to 1000 characters.)*

The admissions committee is looking for students who will enrich the class with their contributions as much as the curriculum taught. Focus on unique experiences you have had either in your professional or personal life, and if possible, link those experiences to how they will contribute to particular courses or topics.

Imagine that the admissions committee is reviewing your application side by side with someone with a similar basic profile to yours (technology consultant, for example) – what will make them choose you?

3. List your participation in civic, business, or professional organizations.

This question is purposely open to interpretation. If you would just like to list what organizations you are affiliated with that is fine, however if you would like to go into some detail about particular activities that are important to you, that is good, too. There is no word limit, however the more succinct, the better.

4. (Optional): Do you believe your academic record is an accurate reflection of your ability? If not, please explain, limiting the response to 1000 characters.

If you are hoping the admissions committee will miss the fact that you flunked algebra three times before passing, or you had to withdraw for a semester, think again. The committee WILL catch whatever that nagging something is that concerns you from your transcript, so here is the opportunity to talk about it. Be as candid as possible! It is much better to be upfront about the situation here than be on the defensive about it in an interview.

Application Timelines:  

Both of Cornell’s Executive MBA Programs operate on a rolling admissions basis. Therefore they do not adhere to strict application deadlines. With that said, they do encourage applicants to move forward at their earliest convenience to avoid potential seat capacity or timing restrictions.

Download your free copy of Ace the EMBA!

Jennifer Weld

worked as an admissions consultant and Former Asst. Dir. of Admissions at Cornell’s EMBA program (4 years) prior to joining Accepted.com. She has an additional 10 years of experience in higher ed and corporate marketing.

Related Resources:

•   EMBA 2015 Essay Tips
•   There is No Place Like Ithaca
•   The GMAT and EMBA Programs

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How the Adcom Views Multiple MCAT Scores http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/21/how-the-adcom-views-multiple-mcat-scores/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/21/how-the-adcom-views-multiple-mcat-scores/#respond Sun, 21 Dec 2014 17:17:55 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=27644 In 2007, the MCAT was first offered electronically.  Prior to this technological shift, the MCAT was only offered a limited number of times a year—as a paper and pencil exam.  There was also a restriction placed on the number of times you could take the exam in one year as well as in your lifetime. […]

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Should you retake the new MCAT?

What really happens with multiple MCAT scores?

In 2007, the MCAT was first offered electronically.  Prior to this technological shift, the MCAT was only offered a limited number of times a year—as a paper and pencil exam.  There was also a restriction placed on the number of times you could take the exam in one year as well as in your lifetime.  Now that the MCAT is offered 37 times, just this year alone, and there is no limit placed on the number of times that you can take the exam in a calendar year or in your lifetime (Oh, joy!), many students take the exam more than once before applying to medical school.

Multiple MCAT Scores! Oh My!

The way that these scores are viewed by adcoms can cause a lot of anxiety, depending on the combination of scores that you have.  Some adcoms prefer to look at your best scores in each section from multiple tests while other schools consider the average of all of your scores.  There are many forums and discussion threads that attempt to identify the schools that rely on each method.  However, adcom members may each have a personal preference for how they rank scores and applicants.  It’s impossible to predict how any one school will view your scores when there are so many different people involved in the review process.  Each committee member will bring his or her unique perspective and opinion to the discussion.

MCAT Average Correlates with Step 1 Score

In an article published in 2010 in Academic Medicine on the “Validity of Four Approaches of Using Repeaters’ MCAT Scores in Medical School Admissions to Predict USMLE Step 1 Total Scores,” the authors encourage adcoms to use the average of the students’ scores because they found that these numbers correspond most closely to the scores students will earn on the USMLE Step 1.

In April 2015, the new MCAT will be introduced. Researchers will need to conduct new studies to examine how students’ scores on the new exam will compare to their performance on Step 1.  If you are applying with scores you’ve received before April 2015, it would be safe, based on the research available, to use the average of your scores to help determine how they will impact your application.

What Really Happens with Multiple MCAT Scores

That being said, based on my experience serving on selection committees, I noted the following trends in our discussion of MCAT scores:

  • The most recent score carried the most weight.
  • As long as there was an increasing trend in the test scores, previous scores—even if they were low—did not hurt an applicant’s chances of acceptance (as long as all other parts of the application were strong).
  • When there was high variability within the scores, the highest score for each section was considered and the average was calculated.

Overall, it demonstrated determination to see that a student had taken the MCAT more than once—this helped applicants especially when they improved their scores each time they took the exam.

Multiple MCATS: Demonstrating Determination

Taking the MCAT more than once will not necessarily hurt your application—unless you receive a lower score than your previous exam(s).  One of my favorite medical students, David, had taken the MCAT six times and completed three or four different postbac programs before he got into medical school.  He was—by far—the most popular mentor for our postbac students because he had the best sense of humor and sense of perspective.  In taking the MCAT multiple times and improving his score, overall, he demonstrated his determination to succeed.  He was able to convince adcoms that there was no other career for him.  While I don’t advocate taking the MCAT six times, I do recommend that you learn from each practice exam and test you take and that you use that knowledge to improve.  Create a strategy that will not only help you get into medical school, but one that will help you in medical school and in your career.

Learn great advice on all things MCAT!

Alicia McNease Nimonkar is an Accepted.com advisor and editor specializing in healthcare admissions. Prior to joining Accepted, Alicia worked for five years as Student Advisor at UC Davis’ postbac program where she both evaluated applications and advised students applying successfully to med school and related programs.

Related Resources:

The New MCAT: What’s Hype and What’s Real
MCAT Scores, MCAT Prep and MCAT2015
Medical School Admissions: Is My Profile Competitive?

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4 Reasons You Got Dinged (And What You Can Do About It) http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/21/4-reasons-you-got-dinged-and-what-you-can-do-about-it-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/21/4-reasons-you-got-dinged-and-what-you-can-do-about-it-2/#respond Sun, 21 Dec 2014 16:08:43 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=27602 Many top MBA programs released decisions in the past several days, including: Chicago Booth, Cornell Johnson, Duke Fuqua, Michigan Ross, MIT Sloan, Northwestern Kellogg, UVA Darden, and Wharton. Did your app hit the chopping block? Here’s why: 1) You didn’t qualify. You gotta call a spade a spade sometimes (or always, really). If you had weak […]

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Check out our MBA Application Evaluation service. You don’t want to repeat the same mistakes again.

The adcom may ding you because you failed to present your qualifications effectively.

Many top MBA programs released decisions in the past several days, including: Chicago Booth, Cornell Johnson, Duke Fuqua, Michigan Ross, MIT Sloan, Northwestern Kellogg, UVA Darden, and Wharton.

Did your app hit the chopping block? Here’s why:

1) You didn’t qualify.

You gotta call a spade a spade sometimes (or always, really). If you had weak test scores, low grades, or inadequate work experience either quantitatively or qualitatively, then you’re just not going to measure up at the top schools. In essence you fail to convince the school that you can handle the work or represent the school well to recruiters…and you’re toast. …and they may be right. (Sorry to be tough here, but not everyone is qualified to attend H/S/W/C.)

TIP: Apply R2/R3 to different, less competitive programs OR reapply next year to the same schools after you’ve strengthened your profile (improved test scores, taken additional coursework, increased work responsibilities, etc.).

2) You didn’t present your qualifications, fit, or goals well.

There are a number of points to be made here. B-schools seek applicants with multiple talents, and you need to demonstrate that you’ve got them. Competitive stats are frequently necessary for admission, but not sufficient. For example, if you have the stats, but didn’t show the soft skills, didn’t show fit, didn’t explain why you need the degree from this particular program, or failed to present your achievements in an authentic, thoughtful, and compelling way, then the answer could easily still be DECLINE. The adcom may ding you for lacking such qualifications, even though you may have them, because you failed to present them effectively.

TIP: Apply R2/R3 or reapply next year with a stronger application that clearly highlights your qualifications, fit, and goals.

3) You were a victim of the numbers at intensely competitive programs that reject more qualified applicants than they can accept.

This is true of most top 15 programs especially if someone comes from an over-represented group in the applicant pool.

TIP: Apply R2/R3 to different programs or reapply next year to the same ones and keep your fingers crossed for better luck!

4) Combination of the above.

Most likely you weren’t rejected for one single reason, but due to a combination of various factors.

For more on understanding your rejection (and then doing something about it!), please see http://www.accepted.com/mba/rejection-acceptance-videos.aspx#2.

And let’s face it, it’s hard to be objective about your application. If you’re unsure why you were rejected or what you can do to change the outcome next time around, check out our MBA Application Review. You really don’t want to repeat the same or similar mistakes again.

Don't make the same mistakes again! Get expert help for when you reapply.

Linda AbrahamBy Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

Related Resources:

The MBA Admissions Directors’ Recipes for Rejection
4 Reasons for Rejection
Tips for Executive MBA Reapplicants

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From Rwandan Advertising to Wharton Entrepreneurship: The Unconventional MBA Path http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/19/from-rwandan-advertising-to-wharton-entrepreneurship-the-unconventional-mba-path/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/19/from-rwandan-advertising-to-wharton-entrepreneurship-the-unconventional-mba-path/#respond Fri, 19 Dec 2014 19:58:13 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=27585 This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Mary Patton S. Davis, a first-year student at Wharton. Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you […]

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Read more MBA student interviewsThis interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Mary Patton S. Davis, a first-year student at Wharton.

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? Where are you in business school and what year?

Mary Patton: I was born and raised in Tampa, Florida, which some may argue is not the South, but I beg to differ. Tampa is culturally Southern in many ways, and most of my family is from Alabama – hence the double name. I moved “up north” to Washington, DC to study French and International Relations at Georgetown University and graduated in 2010. I was always convinced I would work in government and security/intelligence, but life had other plans! That’s how I wound up at Wharton, by way of East Africa, to enter the class of 2016 with a focus on Entrepreneurial Management.

Accepted: Looks like you’ve been doing some really interesting work in Rwanda. Can you tell us about some of your recent jobs and projects there?

Mary Patton: My path to business school has been a very unconventional one. After Georgetown I joined political communications firm GMMB, working on media buying for the 2010 midterm elections and account management for political action committees. In the summer of 2011 I traveled to Rwanda to visit my older sister Elizabeth and the organization she founded in 2009: the Akilah Institute for Women, a three-year college specializing in hospitality, information technology, and entrepreneurship for young women from low-income rural communities. I fell in love with the country and the organization, and Elizabeth asked if I would move there to build their communications and marketing strategy. So I did what any responsible, rational person would do: I quit my job, sold my belongings, and moved to Rwanda in January 2012 for an indefinite period of time. It can take a giant leap of faith outside your comfort zone to discover your true passions, but I believe it’s one worth taking!

I built out Akilah’s marketing and communications throughout that spring and summer. At the same time I had begun teaching horseback riding lessons on the weekends and met the owner of the barn, a well-known expat businessman. One weekend he mentioned he was looking for someone to build a digital marketing department and drive new business development at his advertising agency. My response was, “Interesting, but I can’t think of anyone who fits that description.” He laughed and replied, “No, I want YOU to come in and interview!” You never know where your next job offer will come from…

I began working for the ad agency that summer, and stayed with them for over a year and a half. I became Director of Operations, tackling projects from refining internal processes, to landing new clients, to expanding our digital marketing services. Through this job I realized my passion (and aptitude!) for management, business development, and “intrapreneurship”, which led me to apply for an MBA. Managing a team of twenty-five people at the age of twenty-four impacted me greatly both personally and professionally, and was an opportunity for which I’ll always be grateful.

Accepted: What is your post-MBA career plan? Is it related to your work in Rwanda?

Mary Patton: I came into Wharton with several areas of interest, knowing that my post-MBA career plans would involve some, if not all, of them: Africa, technology, entrepreneurship, and fitness. My passion for fitness and entrepreneurship grew out of a company I co-founded while working at the ad agency: Yego Yoga Rwanda, a chain of yoga studios operating in six locations across Kigali with eleven instructors. I’ve furthered this interest here in the US by continuing to teach yoga and developing several business ideas in that area. For now I’m focused in that direction but who knows, maybe I’ll find a way to pursue all four of these interests!

Accepted: Do you have an internship lined up yet for next summer? If so, what will you be doing and what was the internship application process like at Wharton? If not, what steps are you taking now to plan ahead for the summer? How early does internship recruiting start at Wharton?

Mary Patton: There are many recruiting timelines – it all depends on what industry you’re pursuing. Mature recruiting (mostly for finance and consulting) begins as early as mid-October, while start-up recruiting doesn’t intensify until the spring. I’m personally interested in tech and start-ups so my recruiting hasn’t begun yet, although I’ve had informal offers from tech companies in Africa and start-ups on the West Coast. Right now I’m focused on working on my own business idea, so entrepreneurship is my number one summer internship choice!

Accepted: Can you tell us about your involvement in the Wharton Business Plan Competition?

Mary Patton: I believe it’s important to surround yourself with the type of people and situations that support your long-term goals, so I knew I wanted to immerse myself in the entrepreneurial environment of the WBPC. Given my background, my biggest value-add to the planning committee is in a marketing role. As Director of Marketing my mission is to grow awareness of and engagement with the WBPC both within the Penn community and without. I’m excited to see what this year’s competitors have in store for us, and how the WBPC contributes to future Penn-born businesses! To learn more about the competition, visit us at http://bpc.wharton.upenn.edu/.

Accepted: What is your favorite thing about Wharton so far? Is there anything you’d change about the program?

Mary Patton: My favorite thing about Wharton is how holistic the growth experience has been. Wharton is fully committed to developing students not only academically, but also professionally, personally, emotionally, and socially. All at once, Wharton is exciting and terrifying; rewarding and challenging; social and lonely; invigorating and exhausting; intellectual and obnoxious. Without all of those emotions, you wouldn’t be getting the full experience.

The only thing I would change: I wish there was more interaction between the Penn grad schools. I would love to have more opportunities to meet fellow students from the law, med, engineering, and education schools. I think this would enrich the experience for all of us, and keep us from talking about our econ problem sets and statistics projects all day long!

Accepted: What are your top 3 admissions tips for applicants aiming to go to Wharton?

Mary Patton:

1)  Be unique.

Admissions officers sift through thousands of applications looking for the diamonds in the rough. Imagine them sitting around at the end of the day recalling and discussing hundreds of essays – how will yours be remembered? When I met Wharton’s Director of Admissions at Winter Welcome Weekend, she exclaimed, “Oh, I remember you! You’re the yoga girl from Rwanda who worked in advertising.” How will your application stand out? What interests/projects/talents/experiences make you unique?

2)  Paint a compelling story.

Regardless of whether your career path is streamlined or as unusual as mine, your application should show progress and a desire to grow professionally and personally. Draw a clear thread throughout your jobs and experiences to demonstrate how you’ve arrived at this point where you feel compelled to apply for an MBA. Did you change jobs to follow your newfound passion for that industry? What extracurricular activities support your interests and show your proactive nature to learn more? How have you challenged yourself and stepped outside your comfort zone?

3)  Be clear about your ambitions.

Now that you’ve explained the narrative behind your career path, be clear about what you plan to do post-MBA. Schools want to see direction not only in your actions up to this point, but also in your goals beyond the MBA. Even if you don’t know the exact job you want three years from now, offering examples of what most interests you in a long-term career helps give schools an idea of how you’ll fit into their MBA class. Make sure to also explain WHY – what problem are you most passionate about solving? Which industry are you most intrigued by? What types of jobs most excite you?

Accepted: Can you tell us about your blog? Who is your target audience? What role does social media play in your life?

Mary Patton: I started blogging while backpacking through SE Asia and India, but since starting school I’ve pivoted from travel to business-related topics. I naturally identify and write about topics I find interesting; luckily other people find them interesting too! I like to highlight topics that are relevant to my peers – global and industry-agnostic, but with a focus on entrepreneurship and technology.

For me personally, my blog keeps the creative side of my brain alive during the quantitative and analytical MBA experience – my biggest problem is finding time to blog as much as I’d like! Our generation is increasingly social and transparent, so I think it’s important to confront that issue head-on by taking control of your personal brand. My blog is a “stretch experience” for me and connects me to interesting people and opportunities – such as this interview with Accepted.com!

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages. For specific advice on how to create the best application for Wharton see:

You can read more about Mary Patton’s journey by checking out her blog, MP is for Mary Patton. Thank you MP for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

 

You CAN get accepted to Wharton!

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Related Resources:

Meet Ashley: A Wharton MBA Student Making an Impact
Global Business Leadership at Wharton’s Lauder Institute
Wharton 2016 Class Profile

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The post From Rwandan Advertising to Wharton Entrepreneurship: The Unconventional MBA Path appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

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http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/19/from-rwandan-advertising-to-wharton-entrepreneurship-the-unconventional-mba-path/feed/ 0
Life as an HBS MBA Student http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/18/life-as-an-hbs-mba/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/18/life-as-an-hbs-mba/#respond Thu, 18 Dec 2014 20:23:34 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=27557 Meet Philip Blackett, a proud member of the Harvard Business School Class of 2016, the founder of Magnetic Interviewing, and the host of the podcast Life in the MBA. Listen to the recording of our conversation with Philip. He has a fascinating story! 00:02:35 – Fulfilling an 11 year promise to his mother and grandmother. […]

The post Life as an HBS MBA Student appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

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 Life as an HBS MBA: An Interview with Philip BlackettMeet Philip Blackett, a proud member of the Harvard Business School Class of 2016, the founder of Magnetic Interviewing, and the host of the podcast Life in the MBA.

Listen to the recording of our conversation with Philip. He has a fascinating story!

00:02:35 – Fulfilling an 11 year promise to his mother and grandmother.

00:06:20 – Why HBS?

00:07:23 –  How Philip’s failures in real estate may have helped Philip get accepted to HBS.

00:11:43 – “Whichever school you apply to, make sure you give it your very best so you wont have any room or reason to feel bad about yourself.”

15:10 – The importance of team-work.

17:25 – Becoming a leader. (This is what HBS wants to see!!)

18:34 – What the HBS adcom looks for in your failures.

19:27 – Getting rejected by Harvard Business School. What now?!?!

22:01 – The best parts of life at Harvard Business School.

24:14 – Don’t be intimidated by the size of HBS.

25:23 – The importance of time management and priority management.

29:09 – What Harvard Business School needs to change.

30:15 – The benefits for the case study method.

35:42 – True or false: The competition among HBS students is cut-throat.

39:30 – The feeling of camaraderie among students (and professors.)

41:32 – Case Method – Individually prepare, then share among 5 people, and then share among 90 people.  And after class your perspective will be completely different than it was before.

46:35 – $$$ and social life at HBS.

53:55 – A field project in Mumbai, India.

56:32 – Why start your own podcast?

1:00:41 –  Magnetic Interviewing – The story of Philip’s startup.

1:06:23 – Innovation labs at Harvard Business School.

Listen to the full conversation to learn more!*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Relevant Links:

Related Shows:

Leave a Review for Admissions Straight Talk:

Check Out Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes! Check Out Admissions Straight Talk in Stitcher!

Check out our free webinar: Get Accepted to Harvard Business School!

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http://blog.accepted.com/2014/12/18/life-as-an-hbs-mba/feed/ 0 Meet Philip Blackett, a proud member of the Harvard Business School Class of 2016, the founder of Magnetic Interviewing, and the host of the podcast Life in the MBA. - Listen to the recording of our conversation with Philip. He has a fascinating story! Meet Philip Blackett, a proud member of the Harvard Business School Class of 2016, the founder of Magnetic Interviewing, and the host of the podcast Life in the MBA. Listen to the recording of our conversation with Philip. He has a fascinating story! 00:02:35 – Fulfilling an 11 year promise to his mother and grandmother. 00:06:20 – Why HBS? 00:07:23 –  How Philip's failures in real estate may have helped Philip get accepted to HBS. 00:11:43 - "Whichever school you apply to, make sure you give it your very best so you wont have any room or reason to feel bad about yourself." 15:10 - The importance of team-work. 17:25 - Becoming a leader. (This is what HBS wants to see!!) 18:34 - What the HBS adcom looks for in your failures. 19:27 - Getting rejected by Harvard Business School. What now?!?! 22:01 - The best parts of life at Harvard Business School. 24:14 - Don't be intimidated by the size of HBS. 25:23 - The importance of time management and priority management. 29:09 - What Harvard Business School needs to change. 30:15 - The benefits for the case study method. 35:42 - True or false: The competition among HBS students is cut-throat. 39:30 - The feeling of camaraderie among students (and professors.) 41:32 - Case Method - Individually prepare, then share among 5 people, and then share among 90 people.  And after class your perspective will be completely different than it was before. 46:35 - $$$ and social life at HBS. 53:55 - A field project in Mumbai, India. 56:32 - Why start your own podcast? 1:00:41 -  Magnetic Interviewing - The story of Philip's startup. 1:06:23 - Innovation labs at Harvard Business School. *Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com. Relevant Links: Life in the MBA Magnetic Interviewing Follow Phillip on Twitter What Does Harvard Business School Want? Harvard Business School 2015 Essay Tips Related Shows: Breaking Some HBS Stereotypes: An Interview with Ben Faw MBAs Across America: Entrepreneurs with a Heart From Luxury Marketing to Entrepreneurship: A Talk with Daria Burke Jeff Reid on Entrepreneurship MBAs Across America: The Coolest HBS Internship Leave a Review for Admissions Straight Talk: Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no 1:10:36