Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog http://blog.accepted.com Admissions consulting and application advice Mon, 28 Jul 2014 19:24:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.1 Admissions consulting and application advice Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no Admissions consulting and application advice Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog http://blog.accepted.com/wp-content/plugins/powerpress/rss_default.jpg http://blog.accepted.com Incentivized Learning: A Review of DrSmarts http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/28/incentivized-learning-a-review-of-drsmarts/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/28/incentivized-learning-a-review-of-drsmarts/#respond Mon, 28 Jul 2014 14:47:29 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24446 ]]> DrSmartsLogoI just had a great time playing around (and learning) on the DrSmarts website, a test prep site for pre-med, med school, and veterinary school applicants and students. There are a number of features that I’d like to highlight here:

 • It’s free!

I mentioned this first because I think this will really be a draw for students. Lots of programs make you pay lots of money to access their resources. This one doesn’t – DrSmarts is an entirely free educational resource to help students reinforce what they are learning in the class room as well as to help review materials in advance of exams. And while it may not have some of the feature that the paid sites have (like tutors and practice exams), it certainly has enough features to provide a complete (not to mention fun – I’ll talk about this next) learning experience.

 • It’s fun!

One of my favorite features was the Brain Teasers section of the site. I found it slightly annoying that I couldn’t go from one question straight to the next (I had to go back to the dashboard in between questions), but otherwise, hands down, this was the most enjoyable part of the site.

 • You earn points and win prizes.

Each time you answer a question correctly (like in the daily quiz section or the daily poll – both great features, by the way – or for referring someone to the site), you accrue points (called “eDivs”) to your account balance. At the end of each week, the students with the most points earned will get rewards for their meritocracy. And monthly, DrSmarts will give out more meaningful scholarships to the top point earners. This is why the company calls itself “the first incentivized learning community.” One of the basic tenets of the site is “Learn to Earn.”

 • You earn points for charity.

For each quiz question answered correctly, DrSmarts will donate money on behalf of the students to their pre-selected charity or association. The other basic tenet of the site is “Learn to Give.”

 • There’s a language lab.

This seems slightly out of place among all the science-focused work going on here, but I welcomed it with open arms! It looks like an incredible opportunity to strengthen your language skills. Powered by Mango.

 • There are additional resources.

There are loads of practice materials – quizzes, e-books you can leaf through, and info about upcoming exams. And it’s all free! (Yes, mentioning that again.)

This is definitely a site worth checking out! See it here – https://drsmarts.smartsed.com/

Download your free special report: Navigate the Med School Maze!

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Yale SOM 2015 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/28/yale-som-2015-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/28/yale-som-2015-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/#respond Mon, 28 Jul 2014 14:19:51 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=23882 ]]> Check out the rest of our 2015 MBA essay tips! Yale is down to one essay this year from two last year. 500 words max. What does this shrinkage imply? You need to make the most of that single essay, but you also need to take the time to make every box in the appication a home run.  They are not after-thoughts. Your job descriptions and activity history are increasing in importance. Write and edit them carefully. Focus on achievements. Quantify when possible and keep in mind Yale’s commitment to “educating leaders for business and society.”

My tips are in blue. 

Essay Question:

The Yale School of Management educates individuals who will have deep and lasting impact on the organizations they lead. Describe how you have positively influenced an organization—as an employee, a member, or an outside constituent. (500 words maximum)

This essay would do really well with an anecdotal response telling the story of how you positively affected your department, team, club, company, client or any entity that benefited from your contribution.  You can start with a moment of challenge or triumph. Then go back, provide context, and tell your story of contribution, hurdles overcome, and complexity handled. If your impact has lasted, say so.

If you would like professional guidance with your Yale SOM MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Yale MBA application.  

Yale SOM 2015 Deadlines:

Round 1
September 18, 2014
Decision: December 8, 2014
Round 2
January 8, 2015
Decision: March 27, 2015
Round 3
April 23, 2015
Decision: May 25, 2015

How can you show the adcom that you will be a leader in the future? Click here to find out!

Linda Abraham By , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

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Stanford GSB Applicants: Learn How to Get Accepted! http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/27/stanford-gsb-applicants-tune-in-on-tuesday/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/27/stanford-gsb-applicants-tune-in-on-tuesday/#respond Sun, 27 Jul 2014 17:02:42 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24457 ]]> There is not much time left to register for the Get Accepted to Stanford Graduate School of Business webinar!

If you plan on applying to Stanford GSB or another top-tier MBA program, then you’ll want to make sure you catch the important advice that Linda will cover in Get Accepted to Stanford Graduate School of Business.

Click here to register for Get Accepted to Stanford Graduate School of Business!

The webinar will take place later on  Tuesday July 29th at 10:00 AM PST/1:00 PM EST. See what time that is for you by clicking here.

Click Here to Save Your Spot!

See you on Tuesday!

Accepted.com

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3 Rules for Attending an MBA Fair http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/27/3-rules-for-attending-an-mba-fair/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/27/3-rules-for-attending-an-mba-fair/#respond Sun, 27 Jul 2014 14:35:02 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=22891 ]]> Attending an MBA fair? Download your free copy of "MBA Fairs: Advancing Your MBA Ambitions"

Make sure the reps remember you.

You’ve just booked your first MBA fair – now what? What can you do now to ensure that you’re prepared for the big day? What are some things you can do at the fair to help you get the most out of the event? And lastly, what should you do AFTER the fair to further help your cause?

Don’t go to your next MBA fair without first reading these important tips:

1. Research, research, research. Research the programs that you’re interested in hearing more from at the event. Be sure not just to browse through the material, but to research the programs relative to what they can offer you based on your specific post-MBA career goals. When you’re at the event asking questions, you’ll look foolish asking basic questions whose answers appear on the program’s homepage. Direct, specific questions about how the school will help you fulfill your goals make a great first impression on school reps.

2. Dress and act professionally. Don’t be too casual in dress or in attitude, or school representatives may assume that you’re not serious about your future business education and future career. These schools are looking for sincere, thoughtful candidates. Also, keep in mind that people generally act differently depending on what they’re wearing – dress casually and you’ll act casually, dress professionally and most likely it’ll professionalize your attitude and demeanor.

3. Make personal contact with the reps AND follow up. You attend an MBA fair to learn about the various programs and to meet representatives, but also to make a good impression. Make sure the reps remember you by a) acting courteous and asking interesting questions, and b) following up with the representatives. Appropriate follow up actions includes sending an email in which you identify which event you met at, remind the rep of your goals and some of the key conversation points you discussed, and attach a resume (you can send a resume even if you handed the rep a resume at the fair). Inappropriate follow up moves include calling the rep directly or acting aggressively in any way. Remember, you’re trying to make a good impression – no harassing or stalking please! The reps note who follows up and how they do so.

Keep these best practices in mind and enjoy your next MBA fair!

Attending an MBA Fair? Read this first!

Accepted.com

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Got Low Stats? Learn How You Can Get Accepted to Med School! [Webinar] http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/25/got-low-stats-learn-how-you-can-get-accepted-to-med-school-webinar/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/25/got-low-stats-learn-how-you-can-get-accepted-to-med-school-webinar/#respond Fri, 25 Jul 2014 15:27:36 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24425 ]]> Don’t forget to register for our upcoming webinar, How to Get into Medical School with Low Stats.

Remember – this is a MUST-attend webinar for anyone applying to med school (or thinking about applying) with a less-than-desirable GPA or MCAT score.

GetMedSchoolLowStats

During the webinar, Alicia McNease Nimokar, senior advisor at Accepted.com, will provide loads of advice on how to position oneself for admissions success, despite those low numbers.

Mark your calendars!

Date: July 30, 2014

Time: 5:00 PM PT/8:00 PM ET

Registration link: How to Get into Medical School with Low Stats (Registration is free, but required.)

Save My Spot!

Accepted.com

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Student Body, Recruitment, Location: Future UCLA Anderson MBA Interview http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/25/follow-up-mba-interview-with-future-ucla-anderson-student-piyush/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/25/follow-up-mba-interview-with-future-ucla-anderson-student-piyush/#respond Fri, 25 Jul 2014 14:32:04 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24438 ]]> Click here to learn more about UCLA Anderson!This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a follow up interview with Piyush, who was recently accepted to UCLA Anderson. (We first met Piyush last year – you can read our first interview with him here.)

Accepted: Can you remind us a little about who you are?

Piyush: I am an incoming UCLA Anderson MBA candidate with experience in development consulting, entrepreneurship (retail) and oil and gas. Most of my roles in these industries have been people-orientated and in sales. I am a biotech graduate from London and have lived in 7 countries, mostly in the Middle-East.

Accepted: Which schools did you get accepted to and why did you choose UCLA Anderson? Why do you think that’s the best school for you?

Piyush: I got accepted at number of top-tier business schools in India and the U.S., but choose Anderson mainly for the student body, diversity in recruitment and location. I have expanded this in detail on my Anderson student blog post here.

Based on my interests and past experiences, I will be looking in pharma/biotech marketing and sales at tech companies such as Google or Amazon. Anderson has focused its curriculum around different functional tracks including marketing, allowing me to focus early on. Also the school has a great relationship with companies such as Amgen and Google.

Accepted: Can you talk about your decision to attend a U.S. MBA program over a program in India?

Piyush: It is difficult to compare MBA programs in India and the U.S. because they are serving different markets and addressing different business problems. India scores more on the economy growth front, job placements numbers, and cost. But U.S. schools such as Anderson stand out for job readiness, leadership, exposure, diversity and experience.

It also boils down to where you want to work immediately post-MBA. The schools have the biggest value in their respective regions. Having studied and worked in India, I was looking for a new and diverse experience.

Accepted: What are you most looking forward to with starting b-school in the fall?

Piyush: I am most looking forward to being a student again. The excitement to learn new things, ask questions and at the same time have fun. I am also very excited to meet my classmates at Anderson.

Accepted: Can you talk about your waitlist experience at UNC? What did you do in between getting the news that you were on the waitlist and then getting the acceptance letter? Did you take steps to improve your profile, write a waitlist letter, etc.?

Piyush: I think the term waitlist should be renamed to some actionable term such as reach-out or something. A lot of candidates simply choose to wait, which really does not help their application. I understand that some business schools (such as Ross), only allow you to send one update but most schools are happy to host you on-campus and learn about your progress.

I was waitlisted at a few schools, and the first thing I did was seek feedback. You will be surprised how the admissions team views your application. Since I was not able to improve my profile drastically, I visited the school, networked with current students, and reached out to admissions team frequently.

Patience and persistence is generally rewarded at this stage of application.

Accepted: An MBA is not cheap – do you have any tips for our readers on paying for b-school?

Piyush: There are number of ways to finance an MBA, ranging from company sponsorship to private loans. I believe a strong GMAT score and application certainly helps you land a scholarship.

Apart from customized loan programs for international students, students can ease their financial burden during studies with academic internships and teaching assistant positions.

Accepted: How do you plan on spending the time between now and when you start school in the fall? Are you doing anything to prepare for b-school?

Piyush: I am taking some time off from work and travelling in India. Anderson has kept us busy with weekly emails, which ensure that we are ready with everything. The UCLA Anderson Parker Career Management Center has started working with us closely.

I am also doing a small pre-MBA course at mbamath.com to get ready for the academic rigor of business school.

Accepted: What would you say are your top three MBA admissions tips?

1. Start early – This is very important. I used a number of resources from Accepted.com and Admissionado to kick-start my applications.

2. GMAT score matters, at least for Indian applicants – A couple of business schools asked me to increase my GMAT to 740 during the waitlist period because I was competing with fellow Indian citizens many of whom also presented stellar applications. My GMAT score was already 720.

3. Take the medicine – Spend the time and resource to learn about the business school you are interested it. Your research and interest directly reflect in your essays and interview.

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school applications, please see our MBA Application Packages

You can read more about Piyush by checking out his blog, Piyush Jain: Science, Technology & Sports, and following him on Twitter here. Thank you Piyush for sharing your story with us!

Download our free special report: Best MBA Programs

Accepted.com

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Is a Stanford MBA in Your Future? http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/24/is-a-stanford-mba-in-your-future-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/24/is-a-stanford-mba-in-your-future-2/#respond Thu, 24 Jul 2014 21:46:27 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24421 ]]> Is a Stanford MBA in your future?

If you want to answer that with a resounding “yes” then you need to tune in to our upcoming webinar, Get Accepted to the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

The webinar will take place on Tuesday July 29, 2014 at 10:00 AM PST/1:00 PM EST. You can look up what time that is for you here.

Register for "Steer Your Way to Stanford GSB" now!

Get one step closer to securing your seat in the GSB class of 2016.

 Reserve your spot for the Get Accepted to the Stanford Graduate School of Business webinar today!

 Save My Spot!

Accepted.com

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Wearing My Military Uniform in the Business World http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/24/wearing-my-military-uniform-in-the-business-world/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/24/wearing-my-military-uniform-in-the-business-world/#respond Thu, 24 Jul 2014 14:55:55 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24317 ]]> How can you reveal your leadership impact in your application essays? How should you convey your ability to motivate, persuade, and empower?Ben Faw, a combat veteran and former Army Captain, shares his thoughts on how prior members of the military can use their unique skill sets to battle the dangerously high young-veteran unemployment rate of 21.4%.

Rank never equaled respect in the military, and neither will your title in the private sector

Pinning the 2nd Lieutenant bar on my beret and shoulders as a junior Army officer following graduation from West Point was an incredible moment. However, I already knew any true respect from my subordinates would be earned through actions and care for their needs, not through the rank shown on my uniform. The same principles apply in business. As Theodore Roosevelt once said, “No one cares how much you know until they know how much you care.” In my own case, helping my Soldiers clean bathrooms when they were exhausted from the sweltering heat in Iraq earned more respect than any rank or position ever would. Post military, my experiences in private companies and academic environments have shown this same principle at work. Serving others as a leader has translated into far more credibility and respect than flaunting position, rank, or past accomplishments.

The “Right time, right place, right uniform” still makes a difference

While the peer from the private sector might know Excel modeling and financial statements far better than a veteran, the self-discipline practiced in the military is rarely ingrained as deeply in people from other backgrounds. Malcolm Gladwell writes about the 10,000 hours it takes to become an expert in something; after the first few years of service, many veterans have already completed the 10,000 hours in self-discipline training.  Whether you are going to a platoon meeting or the corporate board room, arriving a few minutes early dressed in the right attire goes a long way in building trust, credibility, and authority. I can still clearly remember an occasion when I was late in Basic Officer Training, and I was the patrol leader for the mission! That terrible feeling in my stomach after my commander woke me up late at 5AM is something I will never let happen again.   

Fitness, health, and wellness create an edge

Those early morning physical training sessions five days a week in the military were not a waste.  Instead, they built a habit and character trait that now becomes an advantage. Maintaining this fitness routine post-military provides more than just a healthy feeling; recent research indicates it may lead to higher wages as well. Even if your health and wellness never directly impacts wages, the self-discipline and work ethic can shine through to potential employers in a positive way. Practicing healthy living can also help reduce stress and build the resilience and stamina needed for the challenges of the future. With long winding and ambiguous career paths for many in today’s workforce, every reasonable way to reduce stress is useful!

Be willing to serve based on the job, not the location

As you can see in the interactive image, veterans tend to take jobs all over the country after business school. This should not come as a huge surprise. In their military careers, veterans have been deployed in locations far off the beaten path, and continuing on this same trend of serving based on the job – and not on the location – is nothing new for them. While it can be neat to live in an energetic city, if you dislike the job itself or the company culture, it is not the right choice for you. Instead, focus on finding something that you love, regardless of location, and you will always do your best work.

Leadership is incredibly transferable

While the functional training received in the military is not always transferable to the private sector, the leadership skills are. When I started my military service, I learned how to follow. As a freshman at West Point, I witnessed my first Platoon Sergeant earn incredible respect by participating alongside the unit in every event, even when he had no obligation to do so. In that same training cycle, another unit leader constantly did the minimum required and lost credibility. When I was eventually given responsibility for subordinates, I made sure I set the example through participation and devotion to duty. In one of my first civilian jobs at Tesla Motors, learning by following again helped me build the skills to lead that I would eventually use when I earned more responsibility within the company. Whether you are leading a military unit into harm’s way or guiding a team though the due diligence process for an investment, many of the same skills apply: communicating and listening to others, leading by example, and treating all parties with respect. These skills were essential in the military, and they are still incredibly important in the private sector.

A special thanks to Matthew Faw, Momchil Filev, Julia Yoo,and Walter Haas: You have each been wonderful editors in this writing process and more importantly dear friends, thanks for everything. 

How can you show the adcom that you will be a leader in the future? Click here to find out!

Accepted.com

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Michigan State University College of Human Medicine 2015 Secondary Application Essay Tips http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/24/michigan-state-university-college-of-human-medicine-2015-secondary-application-essay-tips/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/24/michigan-state-university-college-of-human-medicine-2015-secondary-application-essay-tips/#respond Thu, 24 Jul 2014 14:43:08 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24415 ]]> Check out the rest of our secondary application essay tips!According to a 2010 study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, this school is ranked #6 out of 141 U.S. medical schools for meeting its social mission to educate doctors who are underrepresented in medicine and who will work in underserved communities.  They have six different campuses spread across the state of Michigan so students receive exposure to diverse patient populations, with their headquarters located in Grand Rapids.  Their brand new, state-of-the-art facilities were competed in 2010.

When drafting your responses to their secondary questions it’s important to review the school’s mission statement: “Michigan State University College of Human Medicine is committed to educating exemplary physicians and scholars, discovering and disseminating new knowledge, and providing service at home and abroad. We enhance our communities by providing outstanding primary and specialty care, promoting the dignity and inclusion of all people, and responding to the needs of the medically underserved.”  Since the three short essay questions required in their secondary application are general in nature, what experiences or characteristics can you identify in your life or yourself that align with the schools values?

Michigan State University College of Human Medicine 2015 Essay Questions:

• Three short essays are required with a limit of 350 words.

• Six optional short essays are requested for students interested in the special programs that they offer with word limits of 350.

• Applicants should use single line spacing and 12 point size font.

• Responses should be constructed strategically to highlight an applicant’s strengths.

The following essays are required in the Secondary Application:

1. Discuss a time when you stepped out of your comfort zone. What were the challenges? What did you learn? (350 word limit)

There are many possible ways to approach this response.  Using an experience that covers your exploration of a new language and culture or an example in which you worked with a new group of people as a team or a familiar group of people on a new goal would work, as well.  Choose an experience that allowed you to develop and grow as a person that had a clearly positive outcome.  Journaling may be a helpful way to locate the best example from your life to use.         

2. Describe a personally rewarding experience. What did you learn about yourself through this experience? You are permitted to use an experience included in your AMCAS application, as long as you didn’t go into great detail in your AMCAS application (including personal statement and experiences) or in Essay One, or you discuss a different aspect of the experience. (350 word limit)

The adcom wants to determine what you value by what you find rewarding in your life.  It’s important to be authentic.  I recommend choosing something that is truly fulfilling for you but that also will demonstrate how well you will fit in with the culture of service created at MSUCHM.  A response that focuses on any form of service that you have most enjoyed will fit this response nicely.  Alternatively, any personal achievements that you have worked towards may also work—as long as they benefited more than one person.

3. If you could present yourself to the Committee on Admissions, what would you want to make sure they knew about you? (350 word limit)

For such an open-ended question, I recommend that you review your AMCAS application in detail to see if there is anything that you didn’t cover.  Other important topics to consider discussing may have occurred before college or after you submitted your AMCAS application that you can share with the adcom.  It’s important to take the time and effort to respond to this question as thoughtfully as possible.  If you’re really struggling for a topic, consider any hobbies or talents outside of school that will help you maintain your balance and focus in medical school.    

Application Timeline:

AMCAS Application Due  - November 1, 2014

Secondary Application Due – November 30, 2014       (*Submit within two weeks after receipt.)

If you would like professional guidance with your Michigan State University College of Human Medicine application materials, please consider using Accepted’s Medical School Admissions Consulting and Editing Services, which include advising, editing, and interview coaching for MSUCHM’s application materials.

Check out the rest of our school-specific secondary essay tips!

Alicia McNease Nimonkar is an Accepted.com advisor and editor specializing in healthcare admissions. Prior to joining Accepted, Alicia worked for five years as Student Advisor at UC Davis’ postbac program where she both evaluated applications and advised students applying successfully to med school and related programs.

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Meet the Guy Who Passed 60 out of 61 Case Interviews (You Can Too!) http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/24/meet-the-guy-who-passed-60-out-of-61-case-interviews-you-can-too/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/24/meet-the-guy-who-passed-60-out-of-61-case-interviews-you-can-too/#respond Thu, 24 Jul 2014 14:07:02 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24405 ]]> No time like the present to revisit one of our most popular admissions episodes of all time!

If you missed it the first time around, stop whatever you are doing and listen to our interview with Victor Cheng, former consultant and interviewer at McKinsey and author of Case Interview Secrets.

Click here to listen to the show!

*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Related Links:

• MBA In Sight: Focus on Management Consulting, Accepted’s free guide to b-schools for management consultant wannabes. 
• Case Interview Secrets by Victor Cheng
• 
Case Interview.com 
• Which B-Schools Send Grads Into Consulting?

Related Shows:

• How to Become a Management Consultant
• An Inside Look at INSEAD
• The Facts about Financial Services

Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk:

Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes!     Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in Stitcher!

Are you a future management consultant? Learn how to research & identify the best MBA programs to apply to!

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http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/24/meet-the-guy-who-passed-60-out-of-61-case-interviews-you-can-too/feed/ 0 Management Consulting,podcast No time like the present to revisit one of our most popular admissions episodes of all time! - If you missed it the first time around, stop whatever you are doing and listen to our interview with Victor Cheng, No time like the present to revisit one of our most popular admissions episodes of all time! If you missed it the first time around, stop whatever you are doing and listen to our interview with Victor Cheng, former consultant and interviewer at McKinsey and author of Case Interview Secrets. *Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com. Related Links: • MBA In Sight: Focus on Management Consulting, Accepted’s free guide to b-schools for management consultant wannabes.  • Case Interview Secrets by Victor Cheng • Case Interview.com  • Which B-Schools Send Grads Into Consulting? Related Shows: • How to Become a Management Consultant • An Inside Look at INSEAD • The Facts about Financial Services Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk:       Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no 34:26
Stanford GSB Class of 2015 Profile http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/23/stanford-gsb-class-of-2015-profile/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/23/stanford-gsb-class-of-2015-profile/#respond Wed, 23 Jul 2014 14:54:00 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24394 ]]> Here’s a glance at Stanford GSB’s class of 2015 (from Stanford’s website):

Get Accepted to Stanford Graduate School of Business! Click here to learn more!• Total applicants: 7,108
• Total new students: 406
 Women: 41%
 International students: 35%
 U.S. minorities: 21%
 Range of years of work experience: 0-12
 Average years of work experience: 4
 Average GMAT: 732
 Complete GMAT range (lowest and highest scores): 550-790 (note that there were no perfect scores)
 Advanced degree holders: 15%
 Undergraduate majors:

-  Business (14%)
-  Engineering, math, or natural sciences (35%)
-  Humanities or social sciences (51%)

 Industry experience:

Industry_Experience_StanfordGSB

Are you looking to join the next Stanford GSB class? Join us for our upcoming webinar, Get Accepted to Stanford Graduate School of Business, to learn key strategies to help you get accepted!

Date: Tuesday, July 29, 2014
Time: 10:00 AM PT/1:00 PM ET

Register now: Get Accepted to Stanford Graduate School of Business

Get Accepted to Stanford Graduate School of Business! Click here to learn more!

 

Accepted.com

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The Goals Essay: Writing Nitty-Gritty http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/23/goals-essay-writing-nitty-gritty/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/23/goals-essay-writing-nitty-gritty/#respond Wed, 23 Jul 2014 14:18:57 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=23964 ]]> Click here to download your complete copy of Why MBA!

They key is to “read” not just the words but the tone of the question.

“Goals Essay – Writing Nitty-Gritty” is excerpted from the Accepted.com special report, Why MBA? To download the entire free special report, click here.

Short- and long-term goals

Before you start drafting your goals essays, work out three levels of goals: short-term, intermediate, and long-term.  It helps to have this whole picture in your mind regardless of where you’ll “zoom in” for a particular essay.  Short-term is immediately post MBA to about two years later; intermediate is about two to five years post MBA; and long-term is the rest.  Usually essays ask for short- and long-term goals, but you’ll need intermediate as the bridge between them.

Short-term goals are the most specific, for obvious reasons – they’re closer in time and they’re also the direct link to the MBA program.  As you describe successive steps, use less and less detail in each, because the further out you project, the less certain things are.  Don’t go beyond what’s practical, e.g., describing in detail what you’ll be doing in twenty years.  Adapt each phase to reality too.  If your targeted industry (say, healthcare) is in great flux, that point should be reflected in your goals.

Responding to specific goals questions

Different sets of essay questions will emphasize different aspects of the goals; they’ll require different lengths and have different tones.   Some are open; other are focused and directed.  They key is to “read” not just the words but the tone of the question.  Anecdotally, I’ve noticed a trend toward short, focused goals essay questions; there are fewer 1,000 word goals essays, fewer essays asking for your “vision.”  Most want the facts, straight.

Read the question carefully, and emphasize in your essay what the question emphasizes (e.g., short-term or long-term equal or do they just mention post-MBA goal?).  In other words, be guided by the question.  That doesn’t mean you can’t bring in other elements, but they should support your main points.

Often the question asks why you want an MBA or want to attend the particular program.  Link these points directly to your goals.  If you can weave in your school visit and/or interactions with students and alumni, great!

Get clear, practical guidelines for answering the MBA goals essay question. Click here to download our free report.

Cindy Tokumitsu By , author and co-author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports, including Why MBA and Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted.com.

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UNC Kenan-Flagler Announces New Online Master of Accounting Program http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/22/unc-kenan-flagler-announces-new-online-master-of-accounting-program/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/22/unc-kenan-flagler-announces-new-online-master-of-accounting-program/#respond Tue, 22 Jul 2014 15:13:34 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24324 ]]> Fore more info about UNC Kenan-Flagler click here!

© UNC MBA

UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School just announced its plan to launch Accounting@UNC, an online version of its top-ranked Master of Accounting (MAC) Program. The 15-month online MAC program, which will commence July 2015, will use the same faculty and career placement approach, as well as the same admissions standards and curriculum, as the 12-month residential MAC program. Included in the 15 months is a three-month internship and a number of face-to-face immersion phases, including orientation, recruitment, and leadership development.

“With a long tradition of excellence in accounting education and one of the very best accounting departments in the world, UNC Kenan-Flagler is uniquely positioned to offer the premier online MAC program,” said UNC Kenan-Flagler dean, Douglas A. Shackelford. “Demand for hiring our MAC graduates has never been stronger, with 98 percent having accepted employment offers by graduation. Historically, firms have wanted to hire more of our graduates, but space constraints prevented us from increasing the program’s size. Technology now lets us increase access to a UNC education for even more talented people and meet the demand from companies who want to hire them.”

And according to Jana Raedy, associate dean of the MAC Program, the masters in accounting isn’t just for business majors. “History and English majors, please apply. We value liberal arts education and it benefits our graduates’ long-term career success as they move into positions of leadership,” said Raedy.

UNC Kenan-Flagler already has a successful track record when it comes to online degree programs, in particular with its MBA@UNC program which launched in 2011 with 19 students and currently has 550 enrolled students.

OnlineMBAPodcastCTA

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WHAT Should You Include in Your AMCAS Essay? http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/22/what-should-you-include-in-your-amcas-essay/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/22/what-should-you-include-in-your-amcas-essay/#respond Tue, 22 Jul 2014 14:34:42 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24111 ]]> Learn how to creating a winning AMCAS essay! Click here to download your complete copy of Ace the AMCAS!

But what if you haven’t discovered a cure for cancer while a freshman?

“WHAT Should You Include in Your AMCAS Essay?” is excerpted from the Accepted.com special report, Ace the AMCAS Essay. To download the entire free special report, click here.

As I discussed in the first post of this series, your AMCAS essay serves as your introduction to the med school admissions board. In this way, your essay much more resembles a human interest story than it resembles a report. As a “science person,” you may be more familiar with factual, data-driven, analytical writing, with reports that are based on facts, figures, and statistics. In your application, all of this data will be included in your score reports and your resume…not in your essay.

Your AMCAS essay, your own personal human interest story, needs to be anecdotal and emotional. This is your opportunity to reveal your passion, your humor, your drive, and, in short, your unique personality. Remember, the admissions members reading your essays are human beings. Their job is to wade through a mountain of boring, trite, monotonous essays in search of that compelling gem of a story – the one that you’re going to write.

For that gem to gel, you will need to choose meaningful experiences that show your strength of character, integrity, individuality, and most importantly, your non-academic qualifications and motivation for pursuing medical school and a career as a physician.

Which would be a more interesting essay – one in which you speak generally about how you volunteered in a volunteer setting, or one in which you talk specifically about your experience working in Uganda with Doctors without Borders? Obviously the latter – an experience shared only by a handful, if any, of your competitors, will stand out more than an essay in which you talk about a vague experience that every other applicant shares.

But what if you haven’t worked in Uganda or climbed Mt. Everest or discovered a cure for cancer while a freshman? What if your most notable achievements are a little more pedestrian? Specifics and stories will still make them stand out. Furthermore if you include in your essays, your distinctive motivations, take-aways, and insights from those critical events that are important enough to you to include in your AMCAS essay, you will have a killer essay.

When you choose your essay topic, ask yourself the following questions:

1. Will this topic authentically introduce me to the reader?

2. Is this topic distinctive, or is it just going to come across as one more essay about how a grandparent’s illness directed the author at the age of 10 to medicine?

3. Does this essay reflect positively on my fitness for a career as a physician?

Download this special report that will help you ace the AMCAS essay.

Linda Abraham By , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

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3 Keys to Dominating GMAT Integrated Reasoning http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/22/3-keys-to-dominating-gmat-integrated-reasoning/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/22/3-keys-to-dominating-gmat-integrated-reasoning/#respond Tue, 22 Jul 2014 14:05:47 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24303 ]]> What should you make of the GMAT Integrated Reasoning section? Two years after its introduction, there’s still no great answer to that question. Business school admissions offices still aren’t giving all that much weight to your IR score. And yet, you have to post one. If the first 30 minutes of your GMAT are going to be spent muddling through this challenging section one way or the other, you might as well do as well as possible on it, right? Whether you’re an IR pro or you dread this section like the plague, here are three tips to help you navigate the otherwise murky waters of GMAT Integrated Reasoning:

1. Focus on the Quant and Verbal Sections

I know it may seem a little weird for me to start an article about how to improve your Integrated Reasoning score by telling you to focus most of your study time on the other sections of the test. But hear me out. The reality is that most of core math and verbal concepts you’ll see in Integrated Reasoning questions are the same as what’s tested elsewhere on the GMAT. Granted the questions formats are a bit more convoluted, but the core competencies are the same.

Consider this example from the Veritas Prep website:

GMAT Integrated Reasoning Blog Post - Image 1

What do you notice? Looks like a run-of-the-mill distance/rate/time problem like you’d expect to see on GMAT Problem Solving, doesn’t it? (Here’s an article that shows you a shortcut for solving problems like this). Sure, you have to figure out what all those different answer choices mean with respect to Crew Alpha and Crew Zeta. But solving the actual problem itself isn’t all that hard, and it’s the type of thing you should be studying for the GMAT quant section anyway. Whether a Table Analysis question asks you to calculate a percent increase/decrease or a Two-Part Analysis question asks you to identify an author’s assumption, it’s all stuff you should already know how to do if you’ve adequately prepared for the other sections of the exam.

2. Know When to Cut Your Losses

Let’s be honest: The hardest part about GMAT Integrated Reasoning for most students is time management. You have 30 minutes to answer 12 questions, which only leaves 2.5 minutes per question. But unlike normal GMAT problem solving, each IR question has multiple parts! How can you possibly be expected to finish them all?

Well, the good news is that you don’t have to. When it comes to the Integrated Reasoning section, quality is more important than quantity, meaning that you don’t have to answer every question correctly to get a good score. In fact, you can get quite a few wrong and still get an above-average score. Here’s a short video about the important tradeoff between “time”and “accuracy”that you need to constantly juggle on the GMAT, and it applies just as much to IR as it does to the other sections:

So what does this mean for you? Learn when to cut your losses. Figure out your strengths and weaknesses, and don’t spend much time on questions that give you particular difficulty. If Multi-Source Reasoning questions always take you the longest and you never seem to get them right anyway, for example? Consider skipping one or two of them altogether and save the time for questions you have a better chance of getting right. Learn to speed up when you see questions you can tackle quickly, and slow down when you need extra time to figure something out. And like with GMAT Reading Comprehension, don’t waste time reading every single thing in the prompts. If you truly want to boost your IR score, sometimes less really is more.

3. Reading Comprehension is the Key

GMAT Integrated Reasoning is as much about understanding what the question is asking as it is about actually solving questions. As I mentioned in point #1, the math and verbal concepts tested in IR aren’t all that hard (or, at least, they’re not new). The difficulty is with the way the questions are asked. So take your time. Read the questions for “Big Picture”understanding like you would a Reading Comprehension passage. Don’t get lost in the details, but rather spend some time getting your mind around the interplay among the content in the different tabs and what information each table or chart is presenting. Toward that end, always start by reading titles and captions, because they create the framework within which everything else in the question works. And always, always read the questions closely and look for tricky wording that’s meant to throw you off.

Consider this sample Table Analysis question, also from the Veritas Prep website:

GMAT Integrated Reasoning Blog Post - Image 2 Let’s look specifically at Statement #4. Here it is again in case it’s too small for you to read in the graphic above:

“No orange-scented bathroom cleaner sold more units in 2009 than in 2010.”

Notice that I’ve already taken the liberty of sorting the table by “Fragrance”since the statement is asking about “orange-scented”bathroom cleaner.

So what do you think? Is the statement True or False? At first glance, it would seem to be False. After all, the “Unit Sales”columns for all of the orange fragrance products show positive percent change, meaning they did sell more units. Right? But wait. What do the numbers in the “Unit Sales”columns represent? Upon a closer reading of the caption under the table, it’s clear that the numbers represent 2010 numbers as compared to 2009. And because Statement #4 is expressed in the negative, it’s actually TRUE that “no”orange-scented bathroom cleaners sold more units in 2009 than in 2010 because the positive growth numbers in the table indicate that more were indeed sold across the board in 2010, without exception.

I know it can be tricky, but that’s the point: Pay as much attention to the wording of the questions and prompts as you do to the actual math and verbal being tested, and it will serve you well.

Got GMAT Questions? Visit GMAT 101 for advice.

Brett Ethridge is the founder of Dominate the GMAT, a leading provider of GMAT courses online and topic-specific GMAT video lessons. He has taught the GMAT for 10 years and loves working with students to help them achieve their highest potential. Brett is an entrepreneur, a triathlete, and an avid Duke basketball fan.

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Are You a Med School Applicant with Low Stats? http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/21/are-you-a-med-school-applicant-with-low-stats/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/21/are-you-a-med-school-applicant-with-low-stats/#respond Mon, 21 Jul 2014 21:03:35 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24361 ]]> Applying to med school and worried your stats are too low? Not sure if your numbers will make the cut?

In our upcoming webinar, How to Get into Medical School with Low Stats, you’ll learn tips and strategies for putting together an application that focuses on your strength rather than your weakness – one that convinces the selection committee that you’ve got what it takes to excel in medical school and as a physician!

GetMedSchoolLowStats

Join us live on Wednesday, July 30, 2014 at 5:00 PM PST/8:00 PM EST (click here to see what time that is in your time zone).

Registration is required (and free). Reserve your spot for How to Get into Medical School with Low Stats now!

Save My Spot!

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Work Hard and Stay Positive: Interview with a 2nd Year Med Student http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/21/med-school-interview-with-ryan-matthews/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/21/med-school-interview-with-ryan-matthews/#respond Mon, 21 Jul 2014 14:43:13 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24301 ]]> Click here for more med school student interviews!This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with medical school applicants and students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top medical schools and the med school application process. And now, introducing Ryan Matthews

Accepted: First, can you tell us a little about yourself? Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? 

Ryan: I was born and raised in Indiana, other than a couple years I spent in Georgia when I was around 7-8 years old. I am happily married and have a 9 month old baby girl. We also have 2 dogs, 1 guinea pig, and 3 aquariums. As you might be able to tell, our family loves animals.

My time as an undergraduate student was somewhat atypical. I started off studying biology and psychology at Indiana University, but during my sophomore year decided to transfer to a smaller school. It wasn’t that I didn’t love IU, but I wanted a smaller, more personal learning environment. As a result, I transferred to University of Indianapolis where most classes were 20 students or less and I even had one class with only 8 people. It was there that I decided to major in biology and chemistry, but I’d already taken so much psychology that I received a completed a minor in it as well.

Accepted: Where do you attend medical school? What year are you in?

Ryan: I attend medical school at Indiana University School of Medicine and am currently entering my 2nd year.

Accepted: How did you choose which the best program was for you? 

Ryan: Since I’ve spent most of my life in Indiana, going to IUSM was always my preferred program. I also got married before even applying to medical school so it was easier for my wife’s career to stay near home as well. Add in the fact that we had my baby girl during my first semester of school, and it’s a real blessing that we are close to home where family is able to help us out.

Accepted: Can you share some advice to incoming first year students, to help make their adjustment to med school easier? What do you wish you would’ve known before you started school?

Ryan: The biggest adjustment in my opinion is time management. You have to be really disciplined about studying, which might seem obvious, but it does take some extra effort. I hear most incoming medical students admit they’re nervous about the workload and although it is challenging, it isn’t overbearing as long as you’re disciplined. I recommend a to-do list and a calendar. Personally, I use apps on my phone to keep track of everything I’m involved in and wouldn’t be able to function without them. That being said, there is still plenty of time in medical school to do things you love and take part in extracurriculars. It’s all about time management!

Accepted: Did you go straight from college to med school? Or did you take time off? If you took time off, how did you spend your time?

Ryan: I took 1 year off between undergrad and medical school, which allowed me to work as a biochemist and store up some money. More importantly, I used the time to take things easy and enjoy being with my wife. We got married 1 month after I graduated, so I was able to spend over a year with her without the stresses of medical school on my shoulders.

Accepted: Looking back, what was the most challenging aspect of the med school admissions process? How did you approach that challenge and overcome it?

Ryan: Easily the most challenging aspect of medical school admissions for me was “the waiting game.” It seems like all you do is submit something and then wait a few months for an answer, and unfortunately, I’m a very impatient person. I don’t even like waiting in line at restaurants or the movie theater so waiting for something that would determine my future was definitely not ideal. However, time actually went pretty quickly when I focused on enjoying my time away from school.

Thus, my biggest advice for applicants is to try and stay busy doing things you enjoy. All the years of putting in the hard work for your application are over and everyone needs a break once in a while. Use the application processing time (as well as the summer before 1st year) to enjoy life!

Accepted: Do you have any other advice for our med school applicant readers?

Ryan: Here are a few tips off the top of my head:

1) Work hard and stay positive! This may seem pretty obvious, but trust me when I say that most people are way more capable than they even realize.

2) Apply as early as possible. I was actually a late applicant, and it doesn’t seem like a big deal until you see other people posting online about their acceptances. Do yourself a favor and apply as early as possible.

3) Like I said before, really cherish the time before you start medical school. Yes, you still have a life in school, but your extra time is substantially limited in comparison.

Accepted: Can you tell us about your podcast?

Ryan: I drive a lot to/from school, so I listen to podcasts all the time. I’d always been on the lookout for audio materials that I could use for studying on the go, but couldn’t ever find anything that fit my needs. This sparked the idea of publishing my own podcast, and as they say, the rest is history.

Since I’d already started my blog, I used it as a platform to start “Medical Minded Podcast.” My goal was to create something that other students could use to further their own education, and in doing so, compiling the podcast material would serve as an additional study method for me. I’ve been a little busier than I expected this summer, so I admit I’ve been slacking on uploading new episodes. However, I encourage everyone to check it out and promise I’ll upload more in the near future.

You can read more about Ryan’s med school journey by checking out his blog, Medical Minded, and his podcast. Thank you Ryan for sharing your story with us!

Do you want to be featured on the Accepted Admissions Blog? If you want to share your med school journey with the world (or at least with our readers), email us at bloggers@accepted.com.

Download your free special report: Navigate the Med School Maze!
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MIT Sloan 2015 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/21/mit-sloan-2015-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/21/mit-sloan-2015-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/#respond Mon, 21 Jul 2014 14:16:59 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=23776 ]]> Check out the rest of our school-specific MBA essay tips!

Stata Center at MIT

For years MIT Sloan asked applicants to create a cover letter as part of its application. MIT dropped that requirement last year, but this year the big news is that MIT is asking you to write your own recommendation. And while many of you write your own reviews at work and some of you may have been asked to write recommendations for your recommender’s signature, which the schools hate, this year it’s from you to MIT Sloan. More on that below.

Resume:

Please prepare a business resume that includes your employment history in reverse chronological order, with titles, dates, and whether you worked part-time or full-time. Your educational record should also be in reverse chronological order and should indicate dates of attendance and degree(s) earned. Other information appropriate to a business resume is welcomed and encouraged. The resume should not be more than one page in length (up to 50 lines). We encourage you to use the résumé template provided in the online application. 

Go beyond mere job description to highlight achievement. If your title is “consultant.” Saying that you “consulted on projects” is redundant and uninformative at best. Writing that you “Led a 6-member team working on a biotech outsourcing project to Singapore with a budget of $X; it came in on time and under budget.” conveys infinitely more. Quantify impact as much as possible. You want the reader to come away with a picture of an above average performer on a steep trajectory.

Essays:

We are interested in learning more about you. In each of the essays, please describe in detail what you thought, felt, said, and did. Please draw upon experiences which have occurred in the past three years. 

1: The mission of the MIT Sloan School of Management is to develop principled, innovative leaders who improve the world and to generate ideas that advance management practice.  Discuss how you will contribute toward advancing the mission based on examples of past work and activities.  (500 words or fewer)

First identify examples that illustrate you either “developing others into principled, innovative leaders who improve the world and generate ideas that advance management practice” or practicing your own form of principled leadership.  You can choose professional and non-professional examples. Once you’ve jotted down several example , choose between 1-3 that you want to focus on. What should you focus on? The examples that show you transforming an innovative idea into a reality. Remember MIT Sloan’s “commitment to balancing innovative ideas and theories with hands-on, real-world application.”

Show how your leadership and impact in this experience has improved the world in some small way; you don’t need to have cured cancer or ended starvation in Africa. Then tie those examples to future plans. How will you build on that experience at MIT Sloan and beyond? How will you fulfill MIT Sloan’s mission on the job and off?

 2: Write a professional letter of recommendation on behalf of yourself.  Answer the following questions as if you were your most recent supervisor recommending yourself for admission to the MIT Sloan MBA Program: (750 words or fewer) 

• How long and in what capacity have you known the applicant?
• How does the applicant stand out from others in a similar capacity?
• Please give an example of the applicant’s impact on a person, group, or organization.
• Please give a representative example of how the applicant interacts with other people.
• Which of the applicant’s personal or professional characteristics would you change?
• Please tell us anything else you think we should know about this applicant.

Quite the curve ball! You can have a little fun with the first bullet, but then get serious. And yes you are supposed to write this as if you are your manager.

First of all think about the questions. Reflect, how do you stand out in a positive way from your peer? If possible focus on leadership and interpersonal skills and give an example of your ability to lead, to diffuse tension, to listen, to be entrusted with responsibility or whatever way you feel you stand out. And of course reveal impact. You need to show that your attributed made a difference and perhaps allowed you to contribute more and progress faster than most.

The bullet that will make many of you squirm is the second to the last one. It is asking for a weakness and before you tie yourself up in nervous knots about dealing with that point, please see “Flaws Make You Real.” You don’t have to make your response to this bullet the longest part of the essay, but do respond honestly and effectively. 

Optional Essay

The Admissions Committee invites you to share anything else you would like us to know about you, in any format. If you choose to use a multimedia format, please host the information on a website and provide us the URL.

I discussed this question with someone in MIT Sloan’s admissions office. First of all realize that you can choose an essay or multi-media presentation. The media option is there so you can express yourself in the way you find easiest and most revealing. MIT does not want a recycled essay from another school. The person I spoke to was explicit about that. If you choose the multi-media format, realize it should be something viewable in about a minute — no 20-minute videos or 100-slide expositions or lengthy orations. Keep it short. It’s also fine to link to something you have created for a club, event, or cause that’s important to you.

What’s behind the option? A deep and sincere desire to meet you as a human being. A genuine, animated, real live human being. So don’t regurgitate your resume or spew stuff found in the required elements of your application. Have the confidence to share a special interest or deep commitment. I’m not suggesting Mommy Dearest or True Confessions; use judgment. I am suggesting that you allow the reader to see a good side of you not revealed elsewhere in the application.  Let them see what makes you smile, motivates you to jump out of bed with joy, and gives you a feeling of satisfaction when you turn out the light at the end of the day.

MIT Sloan has an excellent video with advice on its optional essay. Here it is:

MIT Sloan 2015 Application Deadlines:

Application Deadline Decision Notification
Round 1 September 23, 2014 December 17, 2014
Round 2 January 8, 2015 April 6, 2015

If you would like professional guidance with your MIT Sloan MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our  MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the MIT Sloan application.

Linda Abraham By , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

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3 Personal Statement Tips for Non-Traditional Med School Applicants http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/20/3-personal-statement-tips-for-non-traditional-med-school-applicants/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/20/3-personal-statement-tips-for-non-traditional-med-school-applicants/#respond Sun, 20 Jul 2014 14:52:55 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24226 ]]> Q&AAre you a non-traditional med school applicant? How should you approach the personal statement?

Use these 3 tips to help you navigate the med school application personal statement – non-trad style!

1. Look at the app holistically. Don’t launch into your life story before thinking about how your application should look as a whole. Yes – where you’ve been is essential to understanding how you’ve gotten to where you are, especially for the non-traditional applicant; but you will have other places (like your secondary essays and your interview) to delve into your personal history. I’m not saying that you shouldn’t talk history, but your personal statement isn’t where you should cram in your entire memoir. In short, offer a glimpse, not a saga. For non-traditional applicants, it is extremely important to capitalize on the experiences that you have had in your life. You don’t need to tell your entire life story but what you need to do is capture their attention so that you will then be invited for the interview later on.

2. Anticipate the selection committee’s questions about weaknesses.
What you should write about will be different for every applicant because the best essays, especially those in the AMCAS application, anticipate the questions the selection committee may have about you (and their questions often will be about your weaknesses). It’s your job to anticipate those questions and to address them directly in your personal statement – this will give you the strongest, most strategic approach in addressing any weaknesses that you may have. It’s also really important to show your potentials for medical school and the transferrable skills that you bring to it.

3. Answer this:
“What would make you a great doctor?” instead of this: “Why do you want to be a doctor?” I spoke with a client earlier this week and his essay was very theoretical. It was about why he thought he wanted to go to medical school. He was very sincere, very honest and you could tell there was a lot there, but the application is asking for the experiences that you’ve had and the things that have really confirmed the decision for you. That’s what’s going to help people see your real potential and how well you’ll succeed in medical school and in the profession.

The advice in this post is based on a conversation we had in our recent webinar, Ask The Experts: Medical School Admissions Q&A with Cydney Foote and Alicia McNease Nimonkar. Check out the full transcript for more tips on applying to med school successfully!

Learn how you can get accepted to med school even with a low MCAT or GPA!

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Get Accepted to Stanford Graduate School of Business http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/20/get-accepted-to-stanford-graduate-school-of-business/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/20/get-accepted-to-stanford-graduate-school-of-business/#respond Sun, 20 Jul 2014 14:25:33 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24335 ]]> If you’re seeking professional advice on how to gain a competitive edge to top b-schools in general, and Stanford GSB in particular then you’ll want to attend Accepted’s webinar, Get Accepted to Stanford Graduate School of Business.

During the webinar, Accepted’s CEO and founder, Linda Abraham, will present four key strategies for demonstrating that you belong at Stanford, as well as other important tips that apply specifically to Stanford GSB.

stanford 2014 webinar facebook

Mark your calendars! The webinar will air live on Tuesday July 29th at 10:00 AM PST/1:00 PM EST. See what time that is for you by clicking here.

The webinar is free but you must register. Sign up here: Get Accepted to Stanford Graduate School of Business.

Click Here to Save Your Spot!

P.S. At the end of the webinar Linda will be giving away a few copies of her book, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools – a great bonus for attending the webinar!

Accepted.com

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Introducing Johnson at Cornell University’s New LinkedIn-Enhanced MBA Application http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/18/introducing-cornell-johnsons-new-linkedin-enhanced-mba-application/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/18/introducing-cornell-johnsons-new-linkedin-enhanced-mba-application/#respond Fri, 18 Jul 2014 15:07:02 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24310 ]]> Want to learn more about Cornell? Click here to check out

Sage Hall at Johnson at Cornell University

According to an Inside Higher Ed article, “LinkedIn to M.B.A. Admissions,” Cornell Johnson MBA applicants can now fill out parts of their application with information drawn from their LinkedIn profiles. Cornell officials say they are breaking ground with this system of incorporating LI features into their application process.

While using LinkedIn isn’t required for admissions, applicants may find this feature helpful, enabling them to fill out their application faster. When applying with the LI-enhanced feature, students must give Cornell access to their entire LinkedIn profile; they don’t apply directly from LI, but rather from the Cornell-hosted application system.

This application should further encourage applicants to maintain a LinkedIn profile in tip-top condition that’s accurate and consistent with their resumes and the other elements that they’ll be presenting to the admissions committee. Now, Cornell adcom won’t just sometimes glance at LI profiles of applicants as they were accustomed to doing previously, but will make LI profiles a mainstay of the application, at least for those who decide to apply using this method.

The LI-enhanced application was launched on July 1st for Cornell Johnson, after a test run in May for the university’s Cornell Tech program. Officials maintain that the new application offers much more insight into the applicants, enabling adcom to view the students as employers and recruiters view them.

Navigating the MBA Maze

Accepted.com

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Reflections of a Wharton MBA Student and CommonBond Intern http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/18/reflections-of-a-wharton-student-and-commbond-intern/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/18/reflections-of-a-wharton-student-and-commbond-intern/#respond Fri, 18 Jul 2014 14:07:16 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24255 ]]> Applying to Wharton in 2015? Check out our application essay tips!This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Tim Hager, a student at Wharton.

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What is your favorite ice cream flavor?

Tim: I am from a small town outside of Philadelphia, PA called Ivyland. I went to Georgetown University as an undergrad (Class of 2009) where I studied Finance and Management, and played on the golf team. After undergrad, I competed as a professional golfer for 2 years, and then worked in finance for the following 3 years. My favorite ice cream is, hands down, Ben & Jerry’s Chocolate Chip Brownie.

Accepted: Where and what year are you in business school? 

Tim: I am in the MBA class of 2015 at The Wharton School (UPenn).

Accepted: In what ways would you say that you’re a good fit with Wharton? 

Tim: The great thing about Wharton is that there is no “normal.” Our class represents such a diverse group of backgrounds, professions, and cultures; so everyone’s fit with Wharton is what they make it! For me, my fit is with the day to day culture: I go to school with over 800 incredibly smart and accomplished people and we all take the curriculum, studying, and recruiting very seriously.

But, equally important is that we are also good about compartmentalizing the stress of recruiting and academics and at not taking ourselves too seriously at times. We make sure we capitalize on the other benefit that b-school offers: growing your social network, traveling the world, building friendships, and just plain old having fun with your classmates.

Accepted: If you could change one thing about the program, what would it be?

Tim: Have it not be so darn expensive! But no, in all seriousness, Wharton is an incredible place and the friendships, networks, learning, job prospects, and just genuine fun that it provides us is more than I ever imagined. Wharton is a remarkable place of opportunity, and I wouldn’t change that at all.

Accepted: Can you tell us about your internship at CommonBond? In what ways did Wharton help you secure that internship? What’s the internship recruiting process like at Wharton? 

Tim: The internship recruiting process at Wharton means different things for different people. It really starts in early fall for first year students looking to get into mature industries like Investment Banking, Investment Management, and Consulting. In these industries, students are networking and preparing for interviews really starting a few months after they arrive at school in the fall. Recruiting for business roles (Management, Marketing, Operations, Sales, etc) at many of the Corporate, F100 Brands occurs a bit later (Jan-March). Finally, recruiting for early stage companies and startups typically happens last, but can range anytime from February to May. Sometimes startups will recruit on Wharton’s Campus, and other times students identify a startup they are interested in and secure the internship on their own. It really ranges.

Wharton was key in allowing me to get my internship with CommonBond. CommonBond was one of the early stage firms that recruits via Wharton’s internal career website, and that was the first time I was introduced to David Klein and the rest of the awesome team at CommonBond.

My internship at CommonBond has been tremendous thus far. A big reason I came here was to be a part of an innovative firm disrupting the industry in which they compete. CommonBond is doing just that. I had worked in venture (on the financing side) for three years before coming to b-school, and wanted to experience being on the operations and execution side of the equation. I have experienced just that and then some! The challenges facing any early stage firm are more than most people imagine; and when you identify an opportunity or need to get something done, it falls directly on you to do it. That is the coolest part. I’ll give you an example. Although my job role is business development here at CommonBond, I have spent time building website landing pages, running social media marketing campaigns, writing industry content, and analyzing new markets, in addition to my core BD functions.

Accepted: B-school’s not cheap (as you mentioned) — do you have any tips for us on how to finance your business degree? 

Tim: Be smart about it. Do your research. Look, the cost of education is high, we all know it. But the cost of money to buy that education is equally high. There are a lot of places to go for loans. My advice? Look to a lender who is going to provide value above and beyond the check that they write. Look for one that tries to understand who you are, helps grow your personal and professional network for you, and supports your career goals. Commonbond.co is the lender doing it the best.

Accepted: And finally, do you have additional tips you can share on how to get into a top business school like Wharton? What are some things applicants can do to optimize their chances of acceptance?

Tim: I’d love to tell you there were a specific formula (trust me, I really would), but there just isn’t. Being your genuine self is truly the best chance that you have. That said, I do have a few tips:

1. Don’t wait until the last minute to take your GMAT. Use whatever free time you have to study NOW, and take the test. Your scores are good for 5 years, and it takes the pressure off of you the 6 months before applications are due, when you should be focusing on essays, recommendations, and your personal narrative; NOT figuring out how long it will take for a cylindrical barrel to fill up with 4 hoses in it all running at different speeds. Many of the prep courses out there are good- I used Manhattan GMAT – but 80% of the prep is still going to be on your own, outside of the prep class in order for you to really nail the GMAT. Take practice tests; I took 8!

2. Apply in round 1 or round 2….don’t wait for round 3 unless you’ve won an Olympic gold medal, walked on the moon, or are fluent in 10 different languages.

3. Be YOU in your essays, and not who you think the admissions office wants you to be.
Seriously. If you think admissions directors haven’t heard every line in the book, your mistaken. Insincerity is unmistakable. And so is vanity; be proud of who you are but there’s no need to boast…I promise you, your classmates-to-be are equally as cool and accomplished. Finally, do some hard thinking about what is truly unique about you. I’m not talking about how you were the only one of your PE associates to get asked back by your PE firm for a third year (Let your boss say that in his recommendation!). You focus on what truly matters to you in life. Answer that and let it come out in your writing.

4. Apply everything in point #3 to your in-person interview as well.


5. Have a cocktail [or 3] after your last in-person interview, and celebrate!
You just went through a grueling process. The work is done at that point and stressing more will only take hair off of your head and years off of your life – it won’t change your admissions decision. :)

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school applications, please see our MBA Application Packages. For specific advice on how to create the best application for Wharton see:

• What’s Right with Wharton (and How to Get In), a free webinar.
• Wharton 2015 MBA Questions, Deadlines, Tips
• Wharton Executive MBA 2015 Essay Tips

Thank you Tim for sharing your stories with us!

Wharton Tips CTA

Accepted.com

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Top MBA Programs Using Shared Letter of Recommendation Questions http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/17/top-mba-programs-using-shared-letter-of-recommendation-questions/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/17/top-mba-programs-using-shared-letter-of-recommendation-questions/#respond Thu, 17 Jul 2014 14:49:08 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24228 ]]> Looking for application essay tips? Click here!

A Shared LOR = Good News for Applicants, Recommenders, and B-Schools

The number of top-ranked MBA programs now asking the exact same questions for the letters of recommendation is growing, which is good news both for recommenders and for candidates. LORs are very important to an applicant’s case, providing an objective assessment from a supervisor, former manager, or other professional that helps affirm (or not) what the applicant has stated about her own skills, traits and abilities. But different questions with different word limits were onerous for both applicants, who had to ask the same people to write varying assessments for their multiple applications, as well as the recommenders.

This year, Harvard, Darden, Yale, Stanford, Columbia and Wharton are asking these questions:

 • How do the candidate’s performance, potential, or personal qualities compare to those of other well-qualified individuals in similar roles? Please provide specific examples. 

 • Please describe the most important piece of constructive feedback you have given the applicant. Please detail the circumstances and the applicant’s response.

Harvard, Wharton, and Yale have word limits for both questions, though the other programs do not. Not all schools had released their LOR questions for the 2015 application season as of this writing, so this list is not comprehensive, and other schools may be added to the list. Stanford has a helpful link to a transcript of a podcast on what elements make for successful and effective LORs. This advice is certainly applicable to LORs for any other MBA program as well.

Some schools also ask recommenders to fill out a personal qualities and skills grid form, evaluating applicants in a variety of areas. Currently, there is no unity among the schools on the use of a grid, so carefully check each school’s requirements.

Graduate school admissions consultants have lobbied to streamline this LOR process for years, and this convergence around shared questions is a direct outgrowth of those efforts. Last year, at the annual conference of the Association of International Graduate School Consultants (AIGAC), the topic of LORs became unexpectedly lively, with school admissions directors expressing concern over the integrity of what they were reading in LORs, and AIGAC members arguing that using shared questions would enhance the integrity of the process because it would take pressure off both applicant and recommender.

Anna Ivey, president of AIGAC, is pleased with the development of more schools converging around shared LOR questions. “Applicants have for years found themselves in quite a pickle because they have had to dump so much work on their recommenders. In some cases, their recommenders have had to write more words than the applicants do in their essays. That has created all kinds of distortions, despite good intentions.

“As AIGAC’s MBA Applicant Survey has shown since its inception, a sizable minority of recommenders ask applicants to write their own letters, and we suspect that’s because there’s only so much bandwidth they can dedicate to someone else’s application, let alone for multiple people for whom they might be writing letters. That multiplier effect makes for a daunting amount of work. Any convergence around common recommendation questions not only makes the application process easier for applicants and their recommenders, but also helps preserve the integrity of those recommendations and the application process. Cutting down on the duplication and extra work for recommenders will make it more likely that recommenders write their letters themselves, and that’s a great outcome.”

Download our free special report: Best MBA Programs

Judy Gruen By , MBA admissions consultant since 1996 and author (with Linda Abraham) of MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

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The Consortium: Diversifying B-School and Corporate Management http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/17/the-consortium-diversifying-b-school-and-corporate-management/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/17/the-consortium-diversifying-b-school-and-corporate-management/#respond Thu, 17 Jul 2014 14:14:14 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24286 ]]> Click here to listen to the interview!At the forefront of increasing diversity in business school and the business world, stands The Consortium for Graduate Study in Management.

Listen to the recording of our conversation with Corey Webb, Director of Recruiting for the CGSM to learn about what the wonderful work of the Consortium and how you can join the team.

00:04:31 – How the Consortium started.

00:05:38 – The Consortium Common Application: What it is and who is eligible to use it.

00:13:00 – Why the deadline changed?

00:14:51 – The Fellowships: criteria and responsibilities.

00:18:37 – About the Orientation Program.

00:25:52 – It doesn’t end after graduation: a lifelong relationship.

00:29:02 – Why the Consortium asks applicants to rank schools by preference.

00:33:32 – Advice for current and future Consortium applicants.

Listen to the full conversation to learn more!

*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Related Links:

• The Consortium 
• Accepted Services
• 
The Consortium Zone Page

Related Shows:

• Forte Helps Women in Business Thrive: Interview with Elissa Sangster 
• From Luxury Marketing to Entrepreneurship: A Talk with Daria Burke
• The Facts about Financial Services
• How to Become a Management Consultant

Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk:

Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes!     Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in Stitcher!

Download our free special report: Best MBA Programs

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http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/17/the-consortium-diversifying-b-school-and-corporate-management/feed/ 0 Consortium,podcast At the forefront of increasing diversity in business school and the business world, stands The Consortium for Graduate Study in Management. - Listen to the recording of our conversation with Corey Webb, Director of Recruiting for the CGSM to learn abo... At the forefront of increasing diversity in business school and the business world, stands The Consortium for Graduate Study in Management. Listen to the recording of our conversation with Corey Webb, Director of Recruiting for the CGSM to learn about what the wonderful work of the Consortium and how you can join the team. 00:04:31 – How the Consortium started. 00:05:38 – The Consortium Common Application: What it is and who is eligible to use it. 00:13:00 – Why the deadline changed? 00:14:51 – The Fellowships: criteria and responsibilities. 00:18:37 – About the Orientation Program. 00:25:52 – It doesn’t end after graduation: a lifelong relationship. 00:29:02 – Why the Consortium asks applicants to rank schools by preference. 00:33:32 – Advice for current and future Consortium applicants. *Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com. Related Links: • The Consortium  • Accepted Services • The Consortium Zone Page Related Shows: • Forte Helps Women in Business Thrive: Interview with Elissa Sangster  • From Luxury Marketing to Entrepreneurship: A Talk with Daria Burke • The Facts about Financial Services • How to Become a Management Consultant Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk:       Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no 38:28
NYU Stern 2015 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/16/nyu-stern-2015-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/16/nyu-stern-2015-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/#comments Wed, 16 Jul 2014 14:59:45 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24140 ]]> NYU Stern

Your essays will need to highlight your qualities as a successful, leadership-driven, creative thinker and businessperson. For NYU Stern, you’ll want to reveal that you are a perfect fit with the program, the Stern community, and the global business world at large. Keep in mind that Stern is a place the values EQ as much as IQ.

My tips are in blue below.

Our Stern essay questions give you the opportunity to more fully present yourself to the Admissions Committee and to provide insight into your experiences, goals and thought processes.

Please note the following details when completing your essays.

•   All written essays must be typed and submitted using the standard U.S. 8 1/2” x 11” format, double-spaced, in 12-point font.
•   Word limits apply to the total question. For example, your response to Essay 1 should answer all parts of the question with a total maximum of 750 words.
•   Label the top of each essay with the following: Name, Date of Birth (month, day, year), Essay Number and Page Number (e.g.: Joe Applicant, January 1, 1983, Essay 1, Page 1).
•   Your essays should be written entirely by you. An offer of admission will be revoked if you did not write your essays.

Essays:

1. Professional Aspirations (750 word maximum, double-spaced, 12-point font)

• Why pursue an MBA (or dual degree) at this point in your life?
• What actions have you taken to determine that Stern is the best fit for your MBA experience?
• What do you see yourself doing professionally upon graduation?

Stern states explicitly that it seeks students with a “well-articulated plan to achieve their career aspirations.” 

Stern’s #1 is an MBA goals question with a couple of small twists. A and C are fairly typical of this genre, only C doesn’t ask about long-term goals.  At the heart of this question: What do you want to do after you graduate that requires an MBA and A asks why is now the right time to get it?  You should be able to answer Stern’s #1, or you shouldn’t be applying.

Another small twist occurs in B: Have you done your homework about Stern? What have you done to research the program, its curriculum, career opportunities, and student life? What aspects of the program will help you achieve the goals you provide in C?

The part of the question asking about your career goal “upon graduation” is critical. Are you realistic about where your past experience plus a Stern MBA can take you? Stern doesn’t want people in la-la-land who will be impossible to place.

Finally make sure you answer all elements of the question while staying within the word limits (not guidelines). No adcom member sits there and counts words, but the readers can tell when you are significantly over. “Significantly” in my book is more than 10%. Write succinctly. 

2. Choose Option A or Option B (500 word maximum, double-spaced, 12-point font)

Answer the question that will best complement your answer to #1 and the rest of your application.

Option A: Your Two Paths

The mission of the Stern School of Business is to develop people and ideas that transform the challenges of the 21st century into opportunities to create value for business and society. Given today’s ever-changing global landscape, Stern seeks and develops leaders who thrive in ambiguity, embrace a broad perspective and think creatively about the range of ways they can have impact.

• Describe two different and distinct paths you could see your career taking long term. How do you see your two paths unfolding?
• What factors will most determine which path you will take?
• How do your paths tie to the mission of NYU Stern?

This is  a relatively difficult question. It forces you to embrace that broad perspective, ambiguity, and creativity, or you can’t answer the question. Let’s assume you get that first job out of Stern that you describe in Essay 1. What are the two most desirable paths you would take from there? Alternatively, chart two alternatives starting with that first job. In each path, how will you create value for others? for society? Why would you choose one path over the other?

You may have a clearly preferred plan A and a less desirable Plan B that ultimately ties to Plan A. You can have two parallel or divergent paths. I think the feasibility of your path given your past experience and an NYU MBA plus your enthusiasm, dare I say passion, for you goals are going to determine the success of this essay.

If I urged concision for essay 1, it is even more important for essay 2, which has a 500-word maximum.

Option B: Personal Expression

Please describe yourself to your MBA classmates. You may use almost any method to convey your message (e.g. words, illustrations). Feel free to be creative.

If you submit a non-written piece for this essay (i.e., artwork or multimedia) or if you submit this essay via mail, please upload a brief description of your submission with your online application.

Please note the following guidelines and restrictions:

•   Your submission becomes the property of NYU Stern and cannot be returned for any reason.
•   If you submit a written essay, it should be 500 words maximum, double-spaced, 12-point font. If you submit a video or audio file, it should be five minutes maximum.
•   If you prepare a multimedia submission, you may mail a CD, DVD or USB flash drive to the Admissions Office. These are the only acceptable methods of submission. Please do not submit an internet link to any websites or to a video hosting service such as YouTube.
•   The Admissions Committee reserves the right to request an alternate essay if we are unable to view your submission.
•   Do not submit anything perishable (e.g. food), or any item that has been worn (e.g. clothing).
•   Mailed materials must be postmarked by the application deadline date. Please follow our mail and labeling instructions.

Please note that mailed packages are subject to size restrictions. Submissions that exceed the stated size restrictions will not be accepted for review by the Admissions Committee. Please see the table below for the maximum package size guidelines:

Packaging Type                         Dimensions: Metric                            Dimensions: Non-metric                      
Box 36cm x 31cm x 8cm 14” x 12” x 3”
Cylindrical tube 8cm x 91cm 3” x 36”
Triangular tube 97cm x 16cm x 16 cm x 16 cm 38” x 6” x 6” x 6”

Bribes won’t work. Candidates can get very creative with this essay and use different media (other than edibles and worn attire), but many of you will convey your ideas in words. Think of how you describe yourself in a social setting when meeting people for the first time.

If it’s the first day of class or a mixer early in the pre-term, how would you break the ice? Would you try to set up a tennis game or golf match? Would you find someone to explore NYC’s museums? Or do you hate museums and prefer hiking through the woods? What would you say if you were in the campus coffee shop and sat down with some new classmates? Could you create a dialog? A short skit?

NYU Stern also permits the use of multimedia in response to this question. While the medium may vary, the point again is to introduce yourself to friends. Given the other questions, this can be a great venue for hobbies, extra-curricular interests, and community service.

When I visited NYU Stern a few years ago, the admissions officer I met with proudly showed me several “personal expressions.” Her faves. They were incredibly creative, but much less slick than you might imagine. This past May, Stern hosted AIGAC for a day and again presented two of the videos filmed in response to this question.  They were thoughtful introductions to the applicants who created them. But neither one was super-slick or professional. Just revealing, creative, and clever.

 If you want to submit something three-dimensional or multi-media, don’t worry if you aren’t ready for the Louvre or the Academy Awards as long as your creation is authentically yours, introduces you, and sticks to the above requirements. It will be taken seriously and appreciated.

If you are considering video, download Audio/Video in Admissions: Get Ready for Prime Time, a free special report.

3. Additional Information (optional)

Please provide any additional information that you would like to bring to the attention of the Admissions Committee. This may include current or past gaps in employment, further explanation of your undergraduate record or self-reported academic transcript(s), plans to retake the GMAT, GRE and/or TOEFL or any other relevant information.

If you are unable to submit a recommendation from your current supervisor, you must explain your reason, even if you are a re-applicant.

If you are a re-applicant from last year, please explain how your candidacy has improved since your last application.

Obviously if you fit into one of the categories described in the three points above, you need to write this essay. If you don’t fit into the above categories and have something you want the admissions committee to know that isn’t part of the required essays, then you still should write this optional essay.

If you are an MBA reapplicant, please realize that the question posed here by NYU Stern is THE key question you need to answer as a reapplicant. What have you done to improve your candidacy that should change the outcome?

Application Deadlines

Deadline Initial Notification
1st Deadline          October 15, 2014 December 15, 2014
2nd Deadline November 15, 2014 February 15, 2015
3rd Deadline January 15, 2015 April 1, 2015
4th Deadline March 15, 2015 June 1, 2015

If you would like professional guidance with your NYU Stern MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the NUY Stern MBA application. 

Create a 5 Star Multi-Media Admissions Presentation: Download our Free report, "Audio & Video in Admissions!"

Linda Abraham

By , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

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University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences Secondary Application Essay Tips http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/16/university-of-toledo-college-of-medicine-and-life-sciences-secondary-application-essay-tips/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/16/university-of-toledo-college-of-medicine-and-life-sciences-secondary-application-essay-tips/#respond Wed, 16 Jul 2014 14:36:13 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24189 ]]> Click here for more school-specific secondary essay tips!UT College of Medicine and Life Sciences offers an education that emphasizes the importance of treating patients as individuals and incorporating the latest research available in their training.  After the first year, students have the opportunity to participate in paid summer research positions.  Students complete clerkships during their third and fourth years with the option of serving patients abroad in the fourth year.  For more details about their program and campus, you can see the College of Medicine Viewbook, here.

Toledo 2015 Secondary Application Essay Questions:

 • Two essays are requested, no limit required.
 • Applicants should use single line spacing and 10 or 12 point size font.
 • Responses should be constructed strategically to highlight all of an applicant’s strengths.

The following essays are requested in the Secondary Application:

1. Briefly discuss any extenuating circumstances which you feel are pertinent to your application (poor grades, course withdrawals, etc). (No Limit)

To respond effectively to this essay prompt, examine your AMCAS application from an outsider’s perspective.  In reviewing your grades and activities, is there anything that needs to be explained?  Is there anything confusing?  Or is there something that might not be obvious to the reader without providing some emphasis, for example, on the number of hours that you worked per week while attending school full time?  You can explain any reasons for why your application may be less competitive.  State the facts to create the right tone.  

2. The University of Toledo College of Medicine is committed to excellence in education which prepares graduates to deliver quality health care. Developing cultural competence is an important goal in our curriculum. Cultural competence is defined as an awareness, understanding and ability to use specific methods to deal effectively with cultural issues and its role in health and health care. Please discuss a life experience in which you feel you demonstrated cultural competence. (No limit)

I recommend selecting an example in which you played an active role in alleviating language or cultural barriers.  In this essay, you can highlight the interpersonal communication skills that you have and any additional languages that you speak.  Effective examples would include translating for people who don’t speak the same language or communicating religious or cultural differences that could cause confusion for others.  For example, a student from a Hmong or Laotian background who understands this community’s lack of trust for Western Medicine could describe how to s/he successfully helped organize and host free health clinics through a church in the community to provide health check-ups.  There are many different examples that would fit well for this essay question.  The key will be selecting one that demonstrates your level of awareness and sensitivity to others.         

UT College of Medicine and Life Sciences Application Timeline:

AMCAS Application Due                November 1, 2014

Secondary Application                   December 31, 2014

(*Strong recommendation: Submit within two weeks after receipt.)

Interviews Conducted                     September 2014 to April 2015

School Begins                                  August 2015

If you would like professional guidance with your University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences application materials, please consider using Accepted’s Medical School Admissions Consulting and Editing Services, which include advising, editing, and interview coaching for the UTCMLS application materials.

Learn how you can get accepted to med school even with a low MCAT or GPA!
Alicia McNease Nimonkar is an Accepted.com advisor and editor specializing in healthcare admissions. Prior to joining Accepted, Alicia worked for five years as Student Advisor at UC Davis’ postbac program where she both evaluated applications and advised students applying successfully to med school and related programs.

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Goals on Steroids http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/16/goals-on-steroids-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/16/goals-on-steroids-2/#respond Wed, 16 Jul 2014 14:07:59 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=23961 ]]> Click here to download your complete copy of Why MBA!

Make your reader your cheerleader!

“Goals on Steroids” is excerpted from the Accepted.com special report, Why MBA? To download the entire free special report, click here.

First, I must thank Linda Abraham for this wonderful phrase.  I had previously used the blander designation, “goals plus.”

By following the advice in the previous post you can create goals that are clear, credible, and convincing, but they won’t necessarily be exciting.  They won’t make the adcom reader think as she reads, “Wow, it would be great if he could do that!”  And this latter reaction is really what the goals essay should aim for. As all my clients have probably heard me say, you want to make your reader your cheerleader.

To generate such a response, deliver goals plus – show how goals developed from experience, and describe motivation and vision for goals.

  • Experience means when, where, and how your goals developed.
  • Motivation is the pivot point when something gained traction with you; when you became engaged and captivated in some way so that you want to pursue a given path.
  • Vision is the broader impact of achieving the goal, beyond your own immediate efforts.

These three elements are separate words but in actuality will likely be intertwined.  Here is a brief example, slightly modified from an HBS goals essay I wrote for a hypothetical applicant in Consultants’ Guide:

Last year, when I was in Taiwan advising a global financial services company on consolidating its Asia strategy, I found myself thinking what a shame it was that my relationship with the client proved responsive rather than proactive.  With my knowledge of the region’s changing demographic and logistical realities, I could have recommended strategic opportunities a year ago to prevent the client from getting bogged down in redundant acquisitions and incompatible markets.  Following that experience, I envisioned a new consulting paradigm resembling primary care medicine, based on a long-term, prevention focused relationship between the consultant and client.

Adding experience, motivation and vision turns the goals from static to dynamic.  There are three other advantages of “goals plus”:

  1. The experiential basis enhances credibility.
  2. They create a story, which is more engaging and memorable than pure exposition.
  3. Your goals inherently differentiate you, because it’s your story, it’s naturally unique.

Get clear, practical guidelines for answering the MBA goals essay question. Click here to download our free report.

Cindy Tokumitsu By , author and co-author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports, including Why MBA and Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted.com.

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The Biggest Application Essay Mistake [Video] http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/15/the-biggest-application-essay-mistake-video/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/15/the-biggest-application-essay-mistake-video/#respond Tue, 15 Jul 2014 19:54:20 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24261 ]]> What is the very worst thing you could possibly do in your application essays? Watch Linda’s answer and add your own comments below:

Accepted.com

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Why Do We Have Personal Statements? http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/15/why-do-we-have-personal-statements-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/15/why-do-we-have-personal-statements-2/#respond Tue, 15 Jul 2014 16:52:54 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24108 ]]> Learn how to creating a winning AMCAS essay! Click here to download your complete copy of Ace the AMCAS!

Your AMCAS essay will provide a window into who you are…

“Why Do We Have Personal Statements?” is excerpted from the Accepted.com special report, Ace the AMCAS Essay. To download the entire free special report, click here.

Do the essays in your med school applications serve as mere padding for the rest of your application? Or do they have some higher purpose?

I’d like to propose three important reasons WHY the med schools request essays in addition to the all the stats and data that you provide in other sections of your application.

The purpose of the AMCAS essay is to…

 1. Provide a window into who you are. Not just into your grades and scores and impressive awards and experiences, but into the real you. Your AMCAS essay gives you an opportunity for the admissions community to meet you beyond the hard facts. This is your chance to introduce yourself.

2. Add insight and value to your application. Your AMCAS essay will allow you to delve deeper into specific experiences and to discuss your motivation and the lessons you learned. Be careful not to merely repeat info found on other parts of your application; instead, build and add to it with an insightful essay.

3. Demonstrate writing ability. Strong writing skills are indicative of strong communication skills, which are critical in the medical world. Let the adcom readers see that you know how to get your point across.

To sum up, your essays shouldn’t pad your application with meaningless filler material, but should serve as a different kind of PAD – Provide a window, Add value, and Demonstrate writing skills. Include these elements in your AMCAS essay, and you’ll be one step closer to creating a captivating piece of writing and capturing a spot in your dream med school!

Download this special report that will help you ace the AMCAS essay.

Linda Abraham By , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

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Columbia 2015 Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/14/columbia-2015-executive-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/14/columbia-2015-executive-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/#respond Mon, 14 Jul 2014 14:55:54 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24239 ]]> Columbia Business School

Don’t expect to richly portray your personal and/or professional development.

These essay questions focus mostly on the present and future. There’s a little room to discuss relevant past experiences, but not much, so don’t expect to richly portray your personal and/or professional development. Moreover, if the Columbia EMBA adcom wanted this information, they would ask for it. Rather, go with the flow, and give them what they do ask for, in aggregate: a vivid sense of engagement

•  with your career

• with the resources of Manhattan

• with the program itself.

Short Answer Question:

What is your immediate post-MBA professional goal? (100 characters maximum)

Give the basic facts – position, company, or a specific industry, and a word about responsibilities and desired impacts. Don’t repeat the question (it wastes space). 

Essays:

1: Given your individual background, why are you pursuing a Columbia MBA at this time?  (Maximum 500 words)

The initial phrase invites you to present your goals and your MBA plans in the context of your past experience.  Yet, with only 500 words overall, you can’t give a comprehensive, detailed delineation of your life or career to date.  I suggest a simple basic structure, which you can adapt:

1. Start with the key point or two from your past that really animates your goals. Make it straightforward and vivid; ideally including an anecdote.

2. Your career vision fleshed out – some practical discussion of how you’ll achieve it and what “success” will look like in terms of desired impact.

3. Why these factors make now the right time to pursue the EMBA. Also include the main reasons Columbia is the right program for you.    

2: Columbia Business School is located in the heart of the world’s business capital- Manhattan. How do you anticipate that New York City will impact your experience at Columbia? (Maximum 250 words)

Please view the videos below:

New York City – limitless possibilities

New York City – fast paced and adaptable

Your experience at Columbia will have numerous dimensions: academic, professional, social, cultural.  Try to address each of these dimensions in the proportion relevant to you.  Do not just do a travelogue of Manhattan (I’ve already seen this in a draft or two). Rather discuss how the resources of Manhattan relevant to you will inform your time at Columbia – say you have a passion for jazz.  Of course you can hear great jazz all over town, but will you also look to share this passion with classmates?  Start an informal jazz appreciation group?  Audit music courses at Columbia or nearby Manhattan School of Music?

3: What will the people in your cluster be pleasantly surprised to learn about you? (Maximum 250 words)

The key to answering this short essay effectively is to understand the phrase “pleasantly surprised.”  Let’s break it down:

• First, don’t repeat a resume point – “surprised” means something not obvious from the available information.

• “Pleasantly” means something that will generate positive interest.  It doesn’t have to be directly applicable or “useful” to your cluster mates.

It can be something from work or outside work.  If it’s far in the past, it should be something of continuing relevance.  DON’T present a boring explanation.  DO root your response in actual experience.

Most important: DO select a topic that will add something to your profile, something that lets the adcom know you better as a person.

If your answer puts a smile on the reader’s face, or even better elicits a happy, surprised laugh, high five!

Optional Essay

An optional fourth essay will allow you to discuss any issues that do not fall within the purview of the required essays.

This question invites you to present new material that will enhance your application, as well as to explain anything that needs explaining (e.g., gap in employment, choice of recommender if not using a direct supervisor, etc.). As far as non-necessary points, since you are making the adcom read more than is required, there should be a clear value to the information you’re sharing. Finally, keep it short.

Columbia EMBA 2015 Application Deadlines:

EMBA-Americas: January 2015 Entry

Regular Decision: October 29, 2014

EMBA-NY Saturday: May 2015 Entry

Early Decision: January 15, 2015

Regular Decision: March 2, 2015

EMBA-NY Friday/Saturday: August 2015 Entry

Early Decision: March 18, 2015

Regular Decision: June 3, 2015

Download your free copy of Ace the EMBA!

Cindy Tokumitsu By , co-author of The EMBA Edge, and author of the free special report, Ace the EMBA. Cindy has helped MBA applicants get accepted to top EMBA programs around the world. She is delighted to help you too! 

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How to Pay for Your MBA: Free Webinar on Wednesday! http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/14/how-to-pay-for-your-mba-free-webinar-on-wednesday/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/14/how-to-pay-for-your-mba-free-webinar-on-wednesday/#respond Mon, 14 Jul 2014 14:23:55 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24217 ]]> B-school applicants stressed by future tuition bills…listen up: We’ll be hosting a webinar loaded with tips on how to pay for business school on Wednesday, July 16, 2014 at 10:00 AM PT/1:00 PM ET (see what time that is for you here).

During the webinar, guest Matt Levin, Head of Business Development at CommonBond, will discuss:

 • Getting started – budgeting and understanding your true cost of attendance.
 • Funding options – sources you should use and sources you shouldn’t use.
 • The mechanics of lending – the terms and calculations you need to know.
 • Timelines – understanding all the different deadlines and stages of applying for funding.
 • Picking a lender – questions you need to ask.

Join Our Free Webinar to Learn How to Pay for Your MBA!

The webinar is free to the public, but registration is required – click here to register: How to Pay for Your MBA.

Reserve Your Spot to Learn How to Pay for Your MBA!

Accepted.com

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USC Lets Students Fast Track to Law School http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/14/usc-lets-students-fast-track-to-law-school/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/14/usc-lets-students-fast-track-to-law-school/#respond Mon, 14 Jul 2014 14:07:08 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24196 ]]> Need law school admissions advice?

The country’s second-largest legal market.

Last week USC announced the launch of its new 3+3 program which will allow select USC students to begin law school (at USC’s Gould School of Law) during their senior year. The program lasts a total of six years – three years of undergraduate studies and three years of law school. Students apply to the program during their junior year; if accepted they’ll enroll in law school the following year and then receive their bachelor’s degree upon completion of that year. Then, two years later, they’ll receive their law degree.

To apply to the program, students must have:

 • A minimum GPA of 3.8.
 • Completed the coursework for their majors by junior year.
 • Strong faculty recommendations, writing samples, and a personal statement.
 • An interview.

The LSAT is not required for admission to the program.

“The 3+3 program will enable the best USC undergraduates to stay at USC for law school and take advantage of being in Los Angeles, the country’s second-largest legal market,” says USC Gould’s associate dean for admissions and financial aid, Chloe Reid. “It is a highly selective program for those students who can tackle the rigors of academic life at one of the country’s leading law schools. Students who are set on the legal profession will find these aspects very appealing.”

See the USC press release for more details.

View our catalog of law school admissions consulting and editing services for more information on how we can help YOU get accepted!

8_Tips_for_Law_School_Admissions_CTA
Accepted.com

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3 Days Left to Save 10% on Law, Grad, and MBA Services! http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/13/3-days-left-to-save-10-of-law-grad-and-mba-services/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/13/3-days-left-to-save-10-of-law-grad-and-mba-services/#respond Sun, 13 Jul 2014 18:51:57 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=23745 ]]> Three Days Left to Save! Click here to check out our services!

Only three days left to enjoy big summer savings!

Use coupon code SUMMER at checkout in the NEXT THREE DAYS ONLY (through Tuesday, July 15th) to save 10% on non-rush law, grad, and MBA services! (Offer may not be combined with other discounts.)

The following services will be most helpful to you at this stage of the admissions process:

Top Law School Admissions Services:

Top Graduate School Admissions Services:

Top MBA Admissions Services:

Still have questions? No problem. Contact us and we’ll help you choose the service that’s best for you.

Click here to check out our admissions services!
Accepted.com

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6 Ways to Save More Money Once School Starts http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/11/6-ways-to-save-more-money-once-school-starts/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/11/6-ways-to-save-more-money-once-school-starts/#respond Fri, 11 Jul 2014 18:34:24 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24165 ]]> Check out our College 101 Tips!

If you don’t have a university debit card, don’t sign up for one.

If you’ve opted to attend an in-state school or get your core courses knocked out at a community college, you’re well on your way to cutting the cost of your education. Once the semester begins, however, expenses can really add up, and it’s easy to stray from a frugal mindset. Thankfully, there are plenty of money-saving opportunities at your disposal and taking advantage of all of them is in your best short- and long-term interest. To learn how to cut your costs after you crack open that first textbook, read on.

1. Resell Textbooks
If you bought your textbooks online from eBay or Amazon to save money, congrats. Once the semester is done, or even a few days before, be sure to list those textbooks for sale to get some of your money back. Check out eBay and Amazon for details on pricing, and if you don’t like what you see check a local storefront in your area where you may be able to get a better deal. Competition is high, so the sooner you get your textbooks listed the better off you’re going to be.

2. Make Full Use of Your Student ID Card
Your student ID card is good for free sporting events, lectures, and even concerts and discounts at local eateries and shops – so be sure to make full use of it. If you take in a hockey game for free one Friday night instead of bar-hopping with your friends, you could save yourself $50 or more. Anytime you reach for your wallet off-campus, be sure to ask if there’s a student discount for the purchase you’re about to make. Often, there is.

3. Get a Job
Most students don’t consider working during school because of the time commitment required for studies. If you manage your schedule well, though, you can certainly find the room to take on a part-time job. For all those hours you’re working, you won’t be out spending money. Check in with your campus employment office or do a targeted search on a career website like SimplyHired. Search using the keyword “part-time,” and include your location. There should be plenty of positions available either on or near campus, and you might be able to walk to work.

4. Get Stuff for Free
Did you know that there are plenty of computer software titles available for free download at the website CNET? You also don’t need to pay for antivirus software because the programs Avast and AVG give you all the protection you need. If you’re looking for a couch to round out your dorm room, skip the local furniture outlet and check out Freecycle or Craigslist. You can get countless items for free – you just have to know where to look.

5. Find Low-Cost Entertainment
Instead of heading to the movie theater where you might drop $30 or more, invite some friends over for Trivial Pursuit, Cranium, or another classic board game like Pictionary. You can find them at a local retailer like Target for about $15, or at thrift stores for just $1 or $2 – just make sure all the game cards and pieces are still in the box. Also, think about joining an intramural sports league where your out-of-pocket costs are low and you can improve your health at the same time.

6. Cut Up the University Debit Card
If you don’t have a university debit card, don’t sign up for one. If you do, cut it up. The pros are far outweighed by the cons. It typically comes with hefty withdrawal and transfer fees. Also, since these cards are often linked to your financial aid, it can be far too easy to blow that money on unimportant purchases. Avoid temptation entirely and rely on cash for your time in school.

Final Thoughts
College is typically a four-year stretch, and the money decisions you make during that time go a long way toward shaping your finances post-graduation. If you enter the workforce with a boatload of student loan debt, it becomes that much harder to start setting aside for other important financial considerations, like retirement savings, a down payment for a home, and an emergency fund. Do your best to shave costs during school and you’re going to thank yourself once that first paycheck comes in.

What are your plans for saving money during school?

Download 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid to learn how to eliminate the most common flaws in your application essays.

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 Tom Bailey writes about money saving strategies, including ways to cut college expenses and survive as a student.

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The GMAT and EMBA Programs http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/11/the-gmat-and-emba-programs/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/11/the-gmat-and-emba-programs/#respond Fri, 11 Jul 2014 14:28:40 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24010 ]]> Need GMAT Advice?

There is no substitute for real world experience.

With fulltime MBA programs, it is fairly obvious why the GMAT is such an important component to one’s application – with less work experience, admissions committees need to find other measurements to gauge potential success in a program. Academic preparedness can clearly be evidenced with a strong undergraduate GPA coupled with a strong GMAT score. With Executive MBA programs, a GMAT score’s relation to the rest of one’s application is less obvious, since other factors seem to be of more importance.

Criteria for admission to an Executive MBA program (often in this order) include work experience and the type of insight an applicant can bring to the classroom, future potential, and academic preparedness. During my time at Cornell, I would often say we were looking for students who could teach just as much to their fellow classmates as the faculty who taught in the program. There is no substitute for real world experience to ingrain concepts presented in the classroom.

Once the box is checked for work experience, it is necessary to ensure an applicant can handle the rigorous work in a program. Admissions committees evaluate this in a variety of ways, primarily through undergraduate performance. Not all Executive MBA programs require the GMAT, but for those that do, the GMAT score also is an indicator of potential academic success while in a program. There is less emphasis placed on it than in full-time MBA admissions, however, since an applicant is typically much further removed from standardized testing than a full-time applicant.

If an applicant has strong work experience and a strong undergraduate record, but a weak GMAT score, the undergraduate record usually “trumps” the GMAT score. If an applicant has strong work experience and a strong GMAT score, but a weak undergraduate record, there will probably be further investigation on the part of an admissions committee to see if there were any mitigating circumstances leading to a low GPA. If not, it’s possible an admissions committee might ask for some additional evidence to indicate academic preparedness – for example, suggesting an additional quant course either online or from a local college. Bottom line, an EMBA admissions committee wants to admit individuals who are fully prepared to hit the ground running when a program starts, and the GMAT is one indication of an applicant’s ability to do just that.

Got GMAT Questions? Visit GMAT 101 for advice.

Jennifer Weld worked as an admissions consultant and Former Asst. Dir. of Admissions at Cornell’s EMBA program (4 years) prior to joining Accepted.com. She has an additional 10 years of experience in higher ed and corporate marketing.

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Masters in Finance: What You Need to Know http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/10/masters-in-finance-what-you-need-to-know/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/10/masters-in-finance-what-you-need-to-know/#respond Thu, 10 Jul 2014 15:20:07 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24175 ]]> Listen to the interview!The Masters in Finance degree is one of the most up and coming specialized masters programs in the business world.

Listen to the recording of our conversation with Anthony DeAngelis, owner and founder of Masters in Finance HQ, for the low-down on his company, the MSF degree, and the world of finance.

00:03:35 – The bored (but not boring!) beginnings of MSFHQ .

00:06:03 – What do financial analysts really do?

00:13:37 – Different types of MSF/MiF programs and what kind of candidates they are looking for.

00:16:40 – Can liberal arts grads go the finance route?

00:19:30 – A word about the schools that require work experience.

00:21:28 – Plenty of work to go around in the finance industry.

00:23:47 – Guidelines for the MSF vs. MBA vs. Financial Engineering Degree decision.

00:27:58 –Financial services are rebounding. What does the future hold?

00:34:56 – What’s changed the most at MSFHQ.

00:36:45 – Advice for people considering the MSF.

Listen to the full conversation to learn more!*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Related Links:

MSFHQ
Accepted.com Services Section (SUMMER Sale ends on July 15!)
• What is a Masters in Finance?

Related Shows:

The Facts About Financial Services
Which Schools are Good for PE/VC and VC-Backed Entrepreneurship 
Business, Law and Beyond: An Interview with John Engelman
• Case Interview Secrets and More with Victor Cheng

Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk:

Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes! Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in Stitcher! Focus on Finance

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http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/10/masters-in-finance-what-you-need-to-know/feed/ 0 finance,podcast The Masters in Finance degree is one of the most up and coming specialized masters programs in the business world. - Listen to the recording of our conversation with Anthony DeAngelis, owner and founder of Masters in Finance HQ, The Masters in Finance degree is one of the most up and coming specialized masters programs in the business world. Listen to the recording of our conversation with Anthony DeAngelis, owner and founder of Masters in Finance HQ, for the low-down on his company, the MSF degree, and the world of finance. 00:03:35 – The bored (but not boring!) beginnings of MSFHQ . 00:06:03 – What do financial analysts really do? 00:13:37 – Different types of MSF/MiF programs and what kind of candidates they are looking for. 00:16:40 – Can liberal arts grads go the finance route? 00:19:30 – A word about the schools that require work experience. 00:21:28 – Plenty of work to go around in the finance industry. 00:23:47 – Guidelines for the MSF vs. MBA vs. Financial Engineering Degree decision. 00:27:58 –Financial services are rebounding. What does the future hold? 00:34:56 – What’s changed the most at MSFHQ. 00:36:45 – Advice for people considering the MSF. *Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com. Related Links: • MSFHQ • Accepted.com Services Section (SUMMER Sale ends on July 15!) • What is a Masters in Finance? Related Shows: • The Facts About Financial Services • Which Schools are Good for PE/VC and VC-Backed Entrepreneurship  • Business, Law and Beyond: An Interview with John Engelman • Case Interview Secrets and More with Victor Cheng Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk: Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no 41:35
3 Mistakes Successful College Applicants Don’t Make http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/10/3-mistakes-successful-college-applicants-dont-make/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/10/3-mistakes-successful-college-applicants-dont-make/#respond Thu, 10 Jul 2014 14:42:49 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24019 ]]> Successful college applicants don't blow off senior year!

Successful college applicants don’t blow off senior year!

The preparation for successful college application does not happen overnight. In fact, it is the culmination of years of work throughout high school. The most successful college applicants take a number of components into consideration as they approach the application process. Here are three mistakes they don’t make:

1. Blow off essay responses. They know a strong GPA and test scores are not enough. They invest time and thought in their essay responses and they don’t wait until the last minute to submit their applications. They keep deadlines in mind. They request letters of recommendation in a timely manner to allow a teacher/counselor time to reflect before writing a recommendation. They use their essays as an opportunity to demonstrate their specific interests, life experience, and aspirations not just to repeat information found elsewhere in their application. They share something that helps fill in the overall picture of who they are and how they can contribute to the overall college environment.

2. Neglect to consider appropriate college fit. Their initial list might begin with colleges that family members or friends recommend but it doesn’t stop there. They apply to a range of schools that are a good fit for them- they include fallback and dream school options. They invest time to research which schools are the best fits for them on many levels (consider: size of student population, distance from home, financial obligations, academic interests, special programs, alumni ties). They use on-line resources to provide information and insight into the sorts of programs and activities available at a college. They schedule campus tours and reach out to college counselors whenever possible. They speak with current students and recent graduates. They ask their tour guides/hosts questions about how they selected a specific college and about experiences at the college that matched their expectations, as well as, what they might do anything differently in hindsight. Successful applicants can articulate why each school they apply to is a good fit for them.

3. Take it easy in senior year. They take a rigorous curriculum throughout high school, demonstrate an upward trend in academic demands, and maintain extracurricular involvement with increasing leadership responsibility. They don’t blow off senior year. Yes, of course they have fun but they keep future goals in mind as well. They make sure to stay on top of assignments and prepare well for exams.

Although this discussion seems logical, nonetheless, these are common oversights. Successful college applicants don’t make these mistakes.

Download 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid to learn how to eliminate the most common flaws in your application essays.
Marie Todd By Accepted college admissions consultant who has worked in college admissions for over twenty years. She has both counseled applicants and evaluated applications. Most recently she evaluated 5000+ applications for the University of Michigan’s College of Literature, Science and the Arts; College of Engineering; School of Kinesiology; School of Nursing; and Taubman College of Architecture. She is available to assist your child with his or her applications.

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MBA Scholarships: How Do I Apply and What Should I Emphasize? http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/10/mba-scholarships-how-do-i-apply-and-what-should-i-emphasize/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/10/mba-scholarships-how-do-i-apply-and-what-should-i-emphasize/#respond Thu, 10 Jul 2014 14:17:42 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24094 ]]> Which b-schools offer the most scholarships?

Scholarship dollars are designated by a donor for specific reasons.

While each school has its own unique scholarship offerings (merit only, merit and need, need only), they do so for a variety of reasons.  Similar to admissions, a director will consider your academic indicators, your work experience, your extra-curricular activities, your goals and your community service.  They also consider socio-economic factors for need-based and outstanding accomplishments for merit-need-based scholarships.

Merit-based general scholarships give the schools an opportunity to attract a candidate that they may not have the opportunity to enroll without the scholarship.  For schools with deep pockets, it helps the admissions office attract and maintain individuals that without the scholarship, the school could easily lose to other schools.  It also helps some schools fill their enrollment requirements.  Regardless, scholarships enable the admissions director to create his or her mosaic.

In addition to general scholarships, each school may also have specialized scholarships.   Those scholarships often will be given to students that diversify the population through their goals or their backgrounds.  In addition to school scholarships, outside organizations may partner with the school to offer scholarships or offer scholarships autonomously. Many organizations offer scholarships for students with disabilities (National MS Society, Setoma, SBA), women (Forte, AAUW) under-represented minorities (Consortium, Tiogo, American Association of Indian Affairs, The Congressional Hispanic Caucus, NSHMBA, NBMBA, Pfizer, Hispanic College Fund, and international students (Fulbright).  Specialized scholarships can be found on a national level (GFAO, Peace Corps, GI Bill, Fisher House), state level (New York State Scholarship Fund) and local level (Shanghai municipal scholarship) as well as through charitable and religious organizations.

Each school also has scholarship dollars that are designated by a corporate donor, alumnus or friend of the school for specific reasons.  Ernst and Young gave one school for whom I worked an endowment to distribute to candidates with accounting backgrounds, and another school for whom I worked had an alumnus who offered the school a fund designated for incoming Brazilian student scholarships.

I had the most difficulty distributing scholarships to local students with very specific backgrounds.  For example at one school, an alumnus gave us a generous fund to offer scholarships to students with accounting backgrounds from a specific county in the state in which the alumnus grew up.  The county was quite small and we rarely had applicants that applied to our school from that county with accounting backgrounds.  We couldn’t distribute that scholarship for several years in a row and when we did find a candidate that matched the criteria, that candidate received the scholarship regardless of need or merit.

Your best sources for scholarships are Fastweb.org, Scholarships.com, and the school you plan to attend.  However, check with each school’s scholarship policy before applying for admission.  Some schools may have you write an essay or check a box to show interest in scholarships.  Others distribute scholarships based on your admissions application and you don’t need to indicate an interest in scholarship at all.

Regardless of how you piece together your school funding, don’t pay for a scholarship search.  The information is free on the Internet or through your school’s admissions and/or financial aid office. Also, keep in mind that you must complete the FAFSA for U.S. scholarships and loans or the international equivalent through your country’s ministry of education.  And if you have multiple offers with scholarships, you have some negotiating power. If you need additional information, please contact me.

Join our upcoming webinar: How to Pay for Your MBA!
Natalie Grinblatt Epstein By , an accomplished Accepted.com consultant/editor (since 2008) and entrepreneur. Natalie is a former MBA Admissions Dean and Director at Ross, Johnson, and Carey.

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Secondaries Webinar is Back Due to Popular Demand! http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/09/secondaries-webinar-is-back-due-to-popular-demand/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/09/secondaries-webinar-is-back-due-to-popular-demand/#respond Wed, 09 Jul 2014 21:36:14 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24156 ]]> Did you miss our Secondary Essay Strategies that Score Interviews webinar? Fear not! We will be hosting the webinar once again on Monday, July 14.

Click here to find out more & register for the webinar!

You need to know how to craft secondary essays that will make you stand out from the crowd – and we want to tell you how to do just that. Join us live on Monday to learn the secrets of successful secondaries!

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Introducing Consultant Lisa Gruenbaum http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/09/introducing-consultant-lisa-gruenbaum/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/09/introducing-consultant-lisa-gruenbaum/#respond Wed, 09 Jul 2014 14:39:32 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24004 ]]> Lisa GruenbaumWe warmly welcome Lisa Gruenbaum to the Accepted.com consulting family! Lisa brings with her vast experiences as an admissions reader at UPenn’s undergraduate schools and at Wharton’s MBA Program. She has reviewed literally thousands of essays, transcripts, resumes, and recommendations, along the way learning what works and what doesn’t work when it comes to getting accepted to a top school.

Additionally, her experience as a journalist has helped her develop her skills as a master-storyteller.

She looks forward to advising you as you weave your triumphs and dreams into the amazing story that will help YOU get accepted.

Check out Lisa’s full profile here.

Check out Lisa's Profile!

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Exactly What Are Goals? http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/09/exactly-what-are-goals-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/09/exactly-what-are-goals-2/#respond Wed, 09 Jul 2014 14:12:40 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=23957 ]]> Click here to download your complete copy of Why MBA!

A third key component for many people is geography, if it is integral to the goal.

“Exactly What Are Goals?” is excerpted from the Accepted.com special report, Why MBA? To download the entire free special report, click here.

“I want to move from the buy side to the sell side.”

“I want to shift from technology consulting to investment banking.”

Not goals.

An engineer once really said to me, “I want to go into either finance or consulting.”  Not goals.

A goal isn’t something you want, it’s something you do, something you want to achieve, an impact you want to have, and the process of getting there.  Therefore, it needs to be specific.  Start with two key components:

1. Industry

2. Function

A third key component for many people is geography, if it is integral to the goal (e.g., developing solar energy in northern Africa).

Then add the “do” part – what the work will actually consist of, and what you hope to accomplish.

Here are some examples that incorporate the above elements:

•  I plan to return to operations but work at a higher, decision making level, such as Senior Operations Manager in an East Asian semiconductor firm or a related industry.  In this role I would, for example, oversee $XXX operations, a global high-tech supply chain, and manage a diverse range of technical and business professionals.

•  Currently I’m a BPR consultant; I plan to shift to strategy consulting at a top global firm such as Bain or McKinsey, ideally focusing on clients in the pharma/biomedical space, and help them setup operations in Eastern Europe.

To wrap up this section, I’ll add a couple of cautions about this phase of the process, developing core goals:

1.   Your short-term goals are naturally a stepping stone, and hence people often focus solely on what they will learn, understand; experience they will gain; people they will meet.  Short-term goals should also include the elements noted above – what you want to do and accomplish, contribute.

2.   Ensure that your goals really require the MBA education.  Of course any learning is helpful for almost any endeavor; but the adcoms want to see that you really need the resources they offer, which they view as precious and not to be squandered.  (And they’re right!)

Get clear, practical guidelines for answering the MBA goals essay question. Click here to download our free report.

Cindy Tokumitsu By , author and co-author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports, including Why MBA and Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted.com.

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Who Should Write Your AMCAS Essays? http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/08/who-should-write-your-amcas-essays/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/08/who-should-write-your-amcas-essays/#respond Tue, 08 Jul 2014 14:38:00 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24104 ]]> Learn how to creating a winning AMCAS essay! Click here to download your complete copy of Ace the AMCAS!

Don’t needlessly air your dirty laundry.

“Who Should Write Your AMCAS Essays?” is excerpted from the Accepted.com special report, Ace the AMCAS Essay. To download the entire free special report, click here.

The obvious answer here is that YOU should (and if anyone else does for you, then you can expect to be found out and rejected). But there’s a bigger question here – Which YOU will be writing your essay?

I’d like to present two important principles here:

Principle #1: To Thine Own Self Be True

One of the purposes of the AMCAS essay is to provide a snapshot – a quick and accurate introduction – of yourself to the med school admissions board. If the application were to ask you to attach a photo, you wouldn’t include a picture of someone else, and I hope that you wouldn’t Photoshop or alter your photo to create an image of who you WISH you were, rather than of who you actually ARE.

Your essays should serve that same purpose. The stories that you tell in your AMCAS essay should be authentic and honest so that the YOU in your essay would be recognizable to anyone who actually knows you.

Principle #2: Put Your Best Foot Forward

While you want to be as authentic as possible, you also want to be sure that you’re not a) offering too much personal or private information and b) dwelling on your weaknesses. Yes, you want to portray your true self (Principle #1), but you don’t want to needlessly air your dirty laundry. Nobody wants to read about your most recent breakup or how devastated you were when you woke up with a huge zit on the day of your high school prom. Furthermore, if you have difficulty juggling tasks or following directions, don’t be “too honest” and rant and complain about how you have so much trouble getting things done. Of course you should never ever EVER lie, but you also don’t need to volunteer irrelevant or inappropriate information or details that will make you look unqualified.

Download this special report that will help you ace the AMCAS essay.

Linda Abraham By , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

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Wharton 2015 Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/08/wharton-2015-executive-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/08/wharton-2015-executive-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/#respond Tue, 08 Jul 2014 14:05:23 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24062 ]]> Click here for more school-specific EMBA essay tips!

Wharton

The Wharton EMBA adcom, through its three required questions, expresses its values and its interest in a relationship with students who share those values. Each of the questions highlights a different facet of this relationship. Respecting, recognizing, and responding to that vision through your essays will be the key to a successful application.

 • Essay question 1 focuses on your goals and Wharton’s role in helping you achieve them.

 • Essay question 2 invites you to share your understanding of qualities that Wharton values.

 • Essay question 3 seeks confirmation that you understand in practical terms what a commitment to attending the program involves.

My tips for answering Wharton’s EMBA essay questions are in blue below.

Essays:

1. What is your career objective and how will the Wharton MBA Program for Executives contribute to your attainment of these objectives? (750 word limit)

You may want to start by discussing your current career situation to set the context, and clarify how the MBA education will enable you to achieve your immediate goals in your current role.  You can then naturally move on to your future goals.  In describing your goals at any given point, indicate why you are taking that step or pursuing that role. Put more detail on the roles you plan immediately post-MBA and the several years following; longer-term goals need less detail, but they still should present a clear direction.

In discussing how the program will benefit you, be specific: describe what skills and knowledge you need, and how the program meets those needs.  Also refer to the structure and special features of the program, detailing how they will support you and your goals.

2. In his book, Winners Never Cheat: Even in Difficult Times, Jon M. Huntsman, Sr. (W’59), writes: “A crisis creates the opportunity to dip deep into the reservoirs of our very being, to rise to levels of confidence, strength, and resolve that otherwise we didn’t think we possessed.” Describe a time when you were faced with a challenge and how you responded. (500 word limit)

This question clearly expresses certain qualities that Wharton seeks: ethics, resolve, fortitude, courage, self-awareness, clear-sightedness, ability to grow.  Showing through an appropriate experience that you possess some of these qualities (one to three will suffice; trying to address all of them would just create a blur) will convey fit with the program.  Given the gravity of the words in the quote, discuss a true crisis, not a mere problem or disappointment.  Since you cover work in essay 1, you can select a topic for this essay either from or outside work.

I suggest a relatively recent experience if possible – if it’s beyond a few years in the past, it must be a truly life-changing experience to work for this essay.  Hopefully you haven’t had so many recent crises that you have a hard time choosing among them, but if there are some different options, choose one that strategically works to your advantage by showcasing something desirable and/or interesting and/or impressive about your background or work life.

In writing the essay, keep it simple.  Tell the story, then briefly reflect on it considering the factors mentioned in the question.

3. Given your already demanding job and the desire to remain committed to important family and personal obligations, how do you plan to handle this additional demand on your time once you enroll? (500 word limit)

This straightforward question deserves a straightforward answer. Discuss the accommodations you will make at work, such as delegating more, adjusting travel schedules, etc.  You don’t have to tell them every single thing you can think of – focus on the most significant two or three adjustments.

Also address your personal responsibilities and how you will meet them with this additional significant demand on your time and energy; even acknowledging that you’ll have less time at the playground with your toddler or mentioning the support of your significant other will show that you’re facing this issue squarely.  If you’ve already successfully balanced school and working full time, by all means mention it.

Optional Essay:

Please explain any extenuating circumstances you feel the Admissions Committee should be aware of (e.g., unexplained gaps in your work experience, choice of recommenders, inconsistent academic performance).  You may also take this opportunity to share other aspects of your life that you feel have shaped you that the Admissions Committee would not otherwise have learned from your application or resume. (500 word limit)

You can use the optional essay not just to explain a problem (low GMAT, employment gap) but also to present new material that you think will enhance your application.  However, if you are making the adcom read more than is required, there had better be a darn good reason — not just that something is nice to know. First, succinctly explain any points that need explaining.  Then, if there is something you feel is important that you haven’t had a chance to discuss elsewhere, write about it, noting why it’s important for the adcom to know.

Wharton 2015 Application Deadlines:

Round 1: December 2, 2014; decision release date if application is complete by December 2 – January 16, 2015

Round 2: February 10, 2015; decision release date if application is complete by March 31 – March 31, 2015

If you would like professional guidance with your Wharton EMBA application, please consider Accepted’s EMBA essay editing and EMBA admissions consulting or our EMBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Wharton EMBA application.  

Download our free special report

Cindy Tokumitsu By co-author of The EMBA Edge, and author of the free special report, “Ace the EMBA.” Cindy has helped MBA applicants get accepted to top EMBA programs around the world. She is delighted to help you too! 

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Solutions to the MBA Money Questions http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/07/solutions-to-the-mba-money-questions/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/07/solutions-to-the-mba-money-questions/#respond Mon, 07 Jul 2014 15:21:26 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24097 ]]> How_to_Pay_for_Your_MBA_TMPB-school’s not cheap. Okay, now that you’ve said it aloud, what are you going to do about it? How are you going to collect the funds needed to pay for the degree that’ll fast track your career?

Join us next week on Wednesday, July 16, 2014 at 10:00 AM PT/1:00 PM ET for How to Pay for Your MBA – a webinar that will walk you through the process of budgeting, searching, securing, and fully understanding the funds you need to pay for business school.

The webinar will be presented by Matt Levin, Head of Business Development at CommonBond and an expert on helping b-school students budget and pay for their MBAs.

Isn’t it time you get rid of your money-induced headache with some solid facts and tips about b-school funding? Cheaper than ibuprofen, and longer lasting – register for How to Pay for Your MBA now!

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What if I Need to Retake the SAT? http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/07/what-if-i-need-to-retake-the-sat/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/07/what-if-i-need-to-retake-the-sat/#respond Mon, 07 Jul 2014 15:02:38 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24032 ]]> Need College Admissions Tips?

SAT: Take 2 (or 3 or 4)

Some treat taking the SAT over again as though it were the same thing as walking down the aisle to take one’s marriage vows for the second time. If stigma should be attached anywhere, it should be on not re-taking the SAT—a second time, third time, and a fourth time. I’m not saying become an SAT test-taking junkie. Rather, you should feel utterly at ease with retaking the SAT. Here’s why!

1. Colleges only see the scores you decide to send them

The colleges aren’t like Big Brother (the all-knowing presence from Orwell’s 1984). That is, they won’t know your scores unless you submit them. You have the option of doing so, for free, during the test. However, you can also send them any time after the test (for a small fee). Unless, you send a specific college your score report, it will never know what you got.

2. You can send your best score in any one section

You can pick and choose your best performance, section-wise, from any test. So your total score can come from as many as three different tests.

Let’s say you scored 750 in math and were surprised at how well you did. However, you bombed the verbal because you didn’t study vocab. For the next test, you go into agro vocab mode and you end up with an amazing 680 on verbal (but you end up doing not so well on math and writing). On a third take you could just focus on the writing section and essay so as to get your best score. If you don’t do so well on the third test, take it again.

3. Knowing that you can retake the SAT multiple times should make it less stressful

All of this is good news because it makes taking the SAT much less stressful. So even if you think taking the test four times is ludicrous, because, hey, you have better things to do with your Saturday, that’s fine. Knowing that you can retake the test will, if nothing else, make the experience a little less stressful.

4. Just because you take the SAT again doesn’t mean you’ll do better

It’s important to note that taking the SAT again doesn’t mean you’re going to score better. Only retake the test if you feel you’ve prepped more than before and are going into the test with more knowledge and better strategies. You might also want to use different prep materials than you did the first time around. For suggestions, check out the Magoosh book reviews in our SAT eBook.

5. There is more to life than taking the SAT

For those of you at the very other end of the spectrum—those who know you can and should retake the test—don’t keep doing so just for those extra few points. There are other things that colleges look at—things you could be doing instead of learning more esoteric SAT vocabulary (do you really need to know the difference between the words “venal” and “venial”?). Volunteering at a hospital, working on that special talent, or studying for one of the SAT subject tests (I know—it’s hard to truly get away from the SAT) might make you seem a little more well-rounded.

Download 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid to learn how to eliminate the most common flaws in your application essays.

Magoosh SAT This post was written by Chris Lele, resident SAT expert at Magoosh. For more advice on SAT prep, check out Magoosh’s SAT blog.

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How to Interpret the Med School Rankings http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/07/how-to-interpret-the-med-school-rankings/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/07/how-to-interpret-the-med-school-rankings/#respond Mon, 07 Jul 2014 14:14:34 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24024 ]]> For many, the first step towards choosing which med schools to apply to begins with an investigation into the published med school rankings. But do you really know what all those numbers and data mean? Do you really understand how you should be utilizing this information best? How much value should you place on the rankings? How can they really help YOU?

Answers to these questions (plus more) can be found in our new special report, Med School Rankings and Numbers: What You MUST Know, in which we’ll walk you through a detailed and down-to-earth analysis of the med school rankings.

Med Ranking Report Cover

Download your FREE copy of Med School Rankings and Numbers: What You MUST Know now!

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Are You an Older Pre-med? http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/06/are-you-an-older-pre-med/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/06/are-you-an-older-pre-med/#respond Sun, 06 Jul 2014 15:02:01 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24076 ]]> In this short video, Linda Abraham shares the key to med school admissions for older applicants:

For more advice on applying as an older applicant, check out this article.

Have any questions about your medical school admissions profile? Just drop us a note in the comments section.

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25 Top MBA Employers According to MBA Students http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/06/25-top-mba-employers-according-to-mba-students/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/06/25-top-mba-employers-according-to-mba-students/#respond Sun, 06 Jul 2014 14:09:53 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24013 ]]> B-school students were surveyed on where they want to work most by the Universum USA research firm. Let’s see how this year’s results varied from last year’s and the year before:

Looking for MBA Admissions Advice? Check out Our MBA Admissions 101 Pages!

Much as with school rankings the rankings of top employers change slowly. #1 and #2 are unchanged for the last three years with Google claiming the top spot and McKinsey #2. For most of the top fifteen, these rankings mostly move around the deck chairs, but the players stay on the same deck.

Still there were a few winners and losers in the Universum ranking. The winners include Price Waterhouse, which jumped a whopping 13 spots from 2013 to 2014 (27 to 14) and that was on top of a two-spot jump from 2012 to 2013. Ernst & Young soared from 33 in 2013 to 23 in 2014, also following up a two-point gain the preceding year; Accenture climbed from 29 to 22; and Deloitte skipped up from 9 to 7 after moving up from 11 in 2012. Apparently the consulting and accounting firms are becoming more popular among MBAs. In fact the only consulting firm that dropped was BCG which went down an insignificant one notch from 5 to 6. Another noticeable gainer is Morgan Stanley which flew from 31 to 19, but that change was really just a reversal of its equal drop the preceding year.

The losers? Starbucks sank from 15 to 24. IBM dropped from 19 to 25. BMW declined a whopping 13 spots from 23 in 2013 to 36 in 2014.

Join our upcoming webinar: How to Pay for Your MBA!

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Happy July 4th! http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/04/happy-july-4th/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/04/happy-july-4th/#respond Fri, 04 Jul 2014 15:34:08 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24047 ]]> Happy July 4th from Linda Abraham and the Accetped Team!

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Insights, Advice and Experiences of a Non-Traditional Med Student http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/03/insights-advice-and-experiences-of-a-non-traditional-med-student/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/03/insights-advice-and-experiences-of-a-non-traditional-med-student/#respond Thu, 03 Jul 2014 14:43:45 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24052 ]]> Click here to listen to the interview!Former songwriter, future doctor, Joshua Wienczkowski has a thing or two to say about the med school admissions process and the med school experience.

Listen to the recording of our entertaining and informative conversation for excellent advice and insights from a medical school insider.

00:02:56 – Joshua’s journey to Tennessee and medical school.

00:06:23 – Parallels between medicine & music (this is great).

00:08:38 – Benefits of being a non-traditional applicant.

00:14:16 – Why East Tennessee?

00:18:39 – Enjoying life in the process of getting into med school.

00:22:16 – ‘Its not as bad as everybody made it out to be’ and other surprises about medical school.

00:25:49 – Is gross anatomy gross?

00:29:56 – Interacting with patients as an M1.

00:41:08 – Advice for admitted med students.

00:43:25 – Tips for med school applicants.

Listen to the full conversation to learn more!*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Relevant Links:

• Journeys with Joshua
• Med School Blogger Interview: Joshua’s Journey 
 “I’m Pre-Med, and I’m Going to be a Surgeon” – How to Not be THAT Guy. 
Create a Compelling AMCAS Application, a webinar
• A Second Chance at Medical School: The A-Z of Applying to Postbac Programs
• Ace Your AMCAS Essay
• Secondary Essay Strategies that Score Interviews, a webinar
• @mtnmedstudent on Twitter

Related Shows:

MCAT Mania: How to Prepare
• MCAT Scores, MCAT Prep, and MCAT2015
• What You Need to Know About Post-bac Programs
• A Window into the World and Life of Medical Scribes
• Med School Application Process: AMCAS, Secondaries, Interviews, Decisions & More!
• All About AMSA and the Premed Journey

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http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/03/insights-advice-and-experiences-of-a-non-traditional-med-student/feed/ 0 Journeys with Joshua,podcast Former songwriter, future doctor, Joshua Wienczkowski has a thing or two to say about the med school admissions process and the med school experience. - Listen to the recording of our entertaining and informative conversation for excellent advice and ... Former songwriter, future doctor, Joshua Wienczkowski has a thing or two to say about the med school admissions process and the med school experience. Listen to the recording of our entertaining and informative conversation for excellent advice and insights from a medical school insider. 00:02:56 – Joshua’s journey to Tennessee and medical school. 00:06:23 – Parallels between medicine & music (this is great). 00:08:38 – Benefits of being a non-traditional applicant. 00:14:16 – Why East Tennessee? 00:18:39 – Enjoying life in the process of getting into med school. 00:22:16 – 'Its not as bad as everybody made it out to be' and other surprises about medical school. 00:25:49 – Is gross anatomy gross? 00:29:56 – Interacting with patients as an M1. 00:41:08 – Advice for admitted med students. 00:43:25 – Tips for med school applicants. *Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com. Relevant Links: • Journeys with Joshua • Med School Blogger Interview: Joshua’s Journey  • “I’m Pre-Med, and I’m Going to be a Surgeon” – How to Not be THAT Guy.  • Create a Compelling AMCAS Application, a webinar • A Second Chance at Medical School: The A-Z of Applying to Postbac Programs • Ace Your AMCAS Essay • Secondary Essay Strategies that Score Interviews, a webinar • @mtnmedstudent on Twitter Related Shows: • MCAT Mania: How to Prepare • MCAT Scores, MCAT Prep, and MCAT2015 • What You Need to Know About Post-bac Programs • A Window into the World and Life of Medical Scribes • Med School Application Process: AMCAS, Secondaries, Interviews, Decisions & More! • All About AMSA and the Premed Journey Subscribe: Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no 49:00