Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog http://blog.accepted.com Admissions consulting and application advice Tue, 04 Aug 2015 19:14:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.4 What Does The AAMC Post-MCAT Questionnaire Tell Us About Premeds? http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/04/what-does-the-aamc-post-mcat-questionnaire-pmq-tell-us-about-premeds/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/04/what-does-the-aamc-post-mcat-questionnaire-pmq-tell-us-about-premeds/#respond Tue, 04 Aug 2015 18:02:56 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32995 AAMC has published its summary report of the Post-MCAT Questionnaire (PMQ), a survey that collects information from MCAT test-takers in order to help med schools and medical educators better understand their prospective students. Here are some highlights from the PMQ, from questionnaires filled out in 2013-2014. •  There were 40,820 PMQ respondents in 2013 and […]

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Over 70% of respondents said they had used an MCAT prep book.

AAMC has published its summary report of the Post-MCAT Questionnaire (PMQ), a survey that collects information from MCAT test-takers in order to help med schools and medical educators better understand their prospective students. Here are some highlights from the PMQ, from questionnaires filled out in 2013-2014.

•  There were 40,820 PMQ respondents in 2013 and 37,677 respondents in 2014.

•  In both years, the most commonly reported native/functionally native/advanced proficiency language other than English was Spanish (29.7% in 2013 and 30.3% in 2014). This is followed by Chinese (11.7% both years), French (10.9% in 2013 and 10.3% in 2014), Hindi (6.5% in 2013 and 7.1% in 2014), and then Arabic (5.7% in 2013 and 5.9% in 2014).

•  Just under one-third of respondents (30.2% in 2013 and 31.3% in 2014) reported that they had decided to study medicine during high school or before college.

•  More than one-half of respondents (54.7% in 2013 and 56.5% in 2014) were taking college courses at the time that they took the MCAT.

•  Most respondents (93.0% in 2013 and 93.3% in 2014) were full-time students while undergraduates.

•  More than two-thirds of respondents (71.5% in 2013 and 70.3% in 2014) said they had used an MCAT prep book (hard copy) to prep for the MCAT. In both years, 42.1% of respondents who had used an MCAT prep book said that it was “Very useful.”

•  Nearly half of respondents (46.3% in 2013 and 47.4% in 2014) indicated that no one helped them prepare for the MCAT.

•  85% of respondents in 2014 and 85.1% in 2013 reported that they were “Very likely” to apply to an MD-granting medical school.

•  In both years, “Finding a medical school where I will feel comfortable” was most often cited as the thing that would encourage applicants to apply to med school. “Grades, MCAT scores, and other academic qualifications” was the most commonly cited concern that would discourage respondents from applying to med school.

•  56.2% in 2013 and 56.4% in 2014 reported having no college/pre-med debt.

•  For those who reported undergraduate loan debt, $25,000 was the median education debt in 2013 and 2014.

See the full PMQ report for more details.

View our med school resource library for valuable tips on every stage of the application process!

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Related Resources:

• The New MCAT: What’s Hype, What’s Real, and What You Can Do Today
• First Scores From The New MCAT
• What You Need To Know About The New MCAT

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Innovative Leadership Learning: The “Wharton Difference” And Fit With The Program http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/04/innovative-leadership-learning-the-wharton-difference-and-fit-with-the-program/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/04/innovative-leadership-learning-the-wharton-difference-and-fit-with-the-program/#respond Tue, 04 Aug 2015 16:22:38 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32991 My previous post on defining your fit with Wharton addressed two of the four components of “The Wharton Difference” (Largest Global Network and Culture of Engagement).  Here I’ll look at the third component: Innovative Leadership Learning. On the Wharton website, the short paragraph introducing this component contains the keys to unlocking its real meaning and […]

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Register for our webinar!My previous post on defining your fit with Wharton addressed two of the four components of “The Wharton Difference” (Largest Global Network and Culture of Engagement).  Here I’ll look at the third component: Innovative Leadership Learning.

On the Wharton website, the short paragraph introducing this component contains the keys to unlocking its real meaning and import.  Let’s look at those keys – literally, the key words and phrases.  They reveal the adcom’s core interests and values.

•  “You’ll find your leadership style…”  Leadership isn’t the pivotal word here, but rather find.  Of course MBAs are about leadership.  But “find” indicates that the adcom wants people who are “in process” – seeking, growing, and changing in response to what they learn.

•  “…by participating in unmatched entrepreneurship and leadership activities.”  What’s the pivotal word here?  Yeah, participating.  It means active involvement.  The little word by is important too, because it indicates that this participation is the way through which you grow, change (including finding your leadership style).

•  “You’ll take risks, try new roles…”  Wharton adcom equates risk-taking with action; putting yourself out there; opening up not just intellectually but personally.  Wharton’s leadership and entrepreneurship (and other) resources offer avenues for risk-takers to try new roles. And note the word try: you don’t have to follow a straight, smooth path to a goal; the adcom recognizes the growth value in varied experiences, which you internalize and synthesize along the way.

 “…inspire others, and work with peers to shape your experience.”  In a word, collaboration.  In Wharton’s culture, it’s the magic through which the alchemy of growth happens.  The verbs inspire and shape imply deep experience and profound, transforming outcomes.  Innovative Leadership Learning clearly is more than “gaining skills” and “building networks”…

Here’s how you can portray the “Innovative Leadership Learning” component to demonstrate fit with Wharton in your application:

•  Throughout your essay(s), weave in anecdotes and examples that show you participating, taking risks through collaboration, inspiring others in the process – and growing as a leader as a result.  Given the tight word counts, you can even do this within 1-2 sentences, e.g., “When I [did some activity/initiative], it challenged me to [think differently in some way; be specific], which proved valuable when I subsequently [led in a new capacity].

•  The Wharton interview process is a natural extension of this component – develop a strategy for portraying these qualities in a way that is natural to you.

•  In your resume and application form, mention activities where you took initiative and/or drew others in and/or “stretched” beyond your comfort zone.  These won’t be as in-depth as the essays, but they’ll enhance the related points elsewhere in the application.

Register to learn how to get accepted to Wharton!

Cindy Tokumitsu By , author and co-author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports, including Why MBA and Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted.com.

Related Resources:

• Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One [Free Guide]
• Wharton 2016 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
• The “Wharton Difference” And Fit With The Program

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Catching Up With Columbia P&S Med Student Ashley http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/04/catching-up-with-columbia-ps-med-student-ashley/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/04/catching-up-with-columbia-ps-med-student-ashley/#respond Tue, 04 Aug 2015 16:04:19 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32950 This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with med school applicants and students. And now for a follow up interview with Ashley Paige White-Stern, who just completed her first year of medical school at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. We first met Ashley two years ago – you can […]

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Ashley White - SternThis interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with med school applicants and students. And now for a follow up interview with Ashley Paige White-Stern, who just completed her first year of medical school at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. We first met Ashley two years ago – you can read our first interview with her here.

Accepted: Last time we spoke, you were in the middle of your postbac program. Can you bring us up to speed? Where did you end up applying to med school? Where do you currently attend med school and what year are you?

Ashley: Happy to! I ended up finishing my postbac program and applying to medical school through its linkage program. This effectively eliminated the “glide” or “gap” year – and the months-long application cycle that I would have otherwise had after finishing the program. In my second year of the postbac, I visited a number of medical schools and one really stood out to me: Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. I felt like I would be a great fit in the community there, and really fell in love with the student body. This is why I applied to Columbia through linkage. I was lucky that it ended up working out for me, and I’m now preparing to start my second year in medical school here! Time really flies.

Accepted: Do you think Columbia is the best med school for you? How do you think you’re a good fit for the program?

Ashley: So, I alluded to this question in the previous answer, but yes, I do. I remember coming up to the medical campus from the undergrad campus for a tour: I just instinctively felt like I “fit” here. There is a vibrancy to the student body.

In medical schools all over the U.S., students are incredibly smart and really motivated. What I loved about Columbia is that everyone is smart and motivated and also really involved in extracurricular activities. In my class, students are musicians, actors, athletes and teachers. One classmate of mine competes in heavy lifting outside of school. Other peers used to perform on Broadway or act on television. It’s really an incredibly diverse range of talent.

I have my own strengths that I can lend to the group – here at Columbia, for example, I have begun to find my voice in public health and in fighting structural racism through and in medicine. I’m also really passionate about medical education and interested in how we train medical educators.

The nice thing about Columbia is that as different as we all are, all of our passions and talents are welcome, and brought to bear on our training. It’s incredibly enriching.

Accepted: Now that you’ve completed your first year, you must have some good advice for our readers – is there anything you wish you would’ve known before starting med school? Were there any surprises during your first year?

Ashley: My biggest two pieces of advice may seem in tension with each other, but I think they’re both important.

First, I think it’s important for medical students to be brave. Not to be cocky or arrogant, but be brave and stretch yourself in medical school. Don’t be afraid to take a risk – sign up for a class that you wouldn’t otherwise take, volunteer in a clinic as a medical student. Remove the pressure of trying to be perfect (which can be hard to let go of after a competitive premed experience) and just try to learn.

The second piece of advice I have is to be kind to yourself – medicine is such a long road. As a premed it can be easy to believe that the finish line is entrance to medical school, when in fact nothing could be further from the truth. Starting medical school is the first step to residency, to fellowship, to a long and demanding career. Setting up good habits of self care – knowing when to take a break, when to give yourself a rest from studying, making time for friends and family, keeping up with interests outside of medicine, and getting enough sleep – is imperative to staying effective as a clinician and not burning out.

Accepted: What’s your favorite thing about med school? Least favorite thing? 

Ashley: I love all the challenges and the wide range of skills we start to acquire – interpersonal skills, skills in physical diagnosis, scientific inquiry, learning how to be part of a care team, recognizing patterns of disease and health, thinking about improving health care delivery.

I will say that even the parts of medical school that can be more mundane – like long lectures and PowerPoint slide decks – have redeeming qualities. For example, even though our lectures are recorded so that students can watch them at home rather than going to class, I actually prefer to go to class for many reasons: I get to see my friends and learn in a more socially engaged way; I get to meet truly brilliant clinicians and scientists; and I get a chance to engage with questions after the lecture. So there’s usually always a way to reframe the less amazing parts of med school!

Accepted: Are you involved in any clubs or associations on campus? How central to student life is club involvement? 

Ashley: Extracurricular life is HUGE here at P&S – I actually can’t think of anyone in my class who “just” goes to school. Even though the material is challenging, our exams are pass/fail, which really liberates us to pursue a range of activities outside of the library.

I am the President of the Black and Latino Student Organization (BALSO), a club that unites our Student National Medical Association (SNMA) chapter and our Latino Medical Student Association (LMSA), founded in the 1970s by former P&S student Dr. Mary Bassett, who is currently the Commissioner of the NYC Health Department. We’ve been very involved in the work of national group White Coats for Black Lives, one initiative that medicals students have undertaken to support Black Lives Matter.

I am a Curricular Representative for my class, working with two other medical students on increasing communication and transparency between faculty and students, and taking part in the ongoing conversations about curricular reform. I am also a co-leader of the Emergency Medicine Interest Group, which connects students with shadowing opportunities in the Emergency Department and also provides workshops on suturing, splinting, and venipuncture.

One highlight about P&S is that there is incredible student-to-student academic support, and second-year students lead review sessions and make study sheets for first-year students through a program called the Student Success Network (SSN). This fall, I will be working as an SSN teacher, helping give review lectures on first-year biochem classes – I’m really looking forward to that!

Accepted: Looking back at the medical schools admissions process, what would you say your greatest challenge was? What steps did you take to overcome that challenge?

Ashley: I think the biggest challenge for me was really forcing myself not to compare myself to others. I knew that I was smart – so are the other applicants. I knew that I wanted to go into medicine – so do the other applicants. I felt I would make a great doctor – so will the other applicants.

At a certain point, I really had to put others out of my mind and just focus on myself and what I could control. What I could control was my preparation, my studying, my attitude, and my outlook. It’s really human to want to size yourself up to others, but medicine is so full of brilliant, talented people that it can also be really depressing to do that. Once I decided to accept myself – to work on my flaws but not fear them – I felt a lot more comfortable in the application process. I think it helped me be more confident when interview day came, because I was genuinely excited to be in the interview suite and felt really curious to meet the other wonderful applicants in the room.

Accepted: Can you share your top 3 med school admissions tips with our readers?

Ashley:

1.  Habits are behaviors that are practiced over time. Don’t expect that new habits will spontaneously form in medical school or residency: lay the groundwork for your future success. Practice self care (whatever that means to you), eat well, stay involved in a passion of yours that is outside of medicine (playing an instrument, athletics, painting, tutoring others, volunteering in a park or soup kitchen, etc.). Yes, you can list it as an extracurricular on your application, but more importantly it will continue to shape your development as a person contribute to your ability to care for others.

2.  Don’t go it alone. No one becomes successful in medicine in a vacuum. Gather your support system early and check in with them often. Have a range of different supporters – you parents or caregivers or that one friend who you can tell everything to, a more objective person with a perspective like an academic adviser or premed counselor who can read your personal statement and give you editing tips, another premed friend who you can commiserate about studying for the MCAT with, and also try to keep some friends outside of the premed world – someone who wants to go into business, or who plans to get an MFA and teach art – these people can enrich your life by telling you their passions and will help you keep things in perspective.

3.  Be curious about medicine itself – it’s a profession that has complex roots and continues to evolve in complex ways. Ask questions and learn its history. Read up on the Flexner Report and how that shaped medical education. Find out how health care delivery has changed since health insurance. Be curious about health inequities and how they are shaped by other structural inequities in this country. Understand the gravity of medical research and experimentation, and be sensitive to the fact that the culture of medicine was not always as deferential to informed consent as it is today. There isn’t always time to learn the history of medicine in medical school, but if you can dig in before you get there, you will be a resource to your peers and you will be able to frame our contemporary dialogues about medical care in a much more sophisticated light.

To read more about Ashley’s journey, you can follow her on Twitter @A_P_W_S. Thank you Ashley for continuing to share your story with us and we wish you lots of luck!

For one-on-one guidance on your med school applications, please see our catalog of med school admissions services. Do you want to be featured in Accepted.com’s blog, Accepted Admissions Blog? If you want to share your med school journey with the world (or at least with our readers), email us at bloggers@accepted.com.

View the 9 Keys to Postbac Acceptance in 2015 webinar today!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Related Resources:

• Navigating the Med School Maze [Free Guide]
• Why I Chose B’s In Medical School
• Insights, Advice and Experiences of a Non-Traditional Med Student

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Cooper Medical School Receives $1.75 Million Grant http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/03/cooper-medical-school-receives-1-75-million-grant/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/03/cooper-medical-school-receives-1-75-million-grant/#respond Mon, 03 Aug 2015 17:10:24 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32973 The Cooper Medical School of Rowan University received a five-year $1.75 million federal grant to be used to address the primary care doctor shortage in the U.S. The school plans on putting the money towards its primary care training enhancement project, an initiative to transform primary care education for all medical professionals, including medical students, residents, nursing […]

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Cooper University Hospital

The Cooper Medical School of Rowan University received a five-year $1.75 million federal grant to be used to address the primary care doctor shortage in the U.S.

The school plans on putting the money towards its primary care training enhancement project, an initiative to transform primary care education for all medical professionals, including medical students, residents, nursing students, nurse practitioner students, and PA students.

According to Dr. Annette Reboli, vice dean at Cooper, the focus of the program is to help build a “larger and better equipped” primary care workforce with a goal of developing an accelerated primary care track for those students who wish to pursue careers in pediatrics or internal medicine. The program will also encourage greater diversity among primary care practitioners.

“We hope to build a prototype training environment that can serve as a model [for other medical schools],” says Reboli.

Source: “Medical school gets $1.75M grant to target primary-care doctor shortage

Navigate the Med Maze - Download your free guide today!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Related Resources:

• 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Med School Essay [Free Guide]
• City College In NYC To Open Med School
• Medical School Admissions 2015-2016: A Dean’s Perspective [Podcast]

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So These Two Grad School Applicants Walk Into A Bar . . . http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/03/so-these-two-grad-school-applicants-walk-into-a-bar-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/03/so-these-two-grad-school-applicants-walk-into-a-bar-2/#respond Mon, 03 Aug 2015 16:51:57 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32348 This might be a great opening line for a comedy night at a university student center, but can you use humor in a graduate school application essay? Should you even try? The answer is . . . maybe. If you can use humor effectively, it will help you stand out from your competitors in an […]

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Learn the 5 fatal flaws to avoid in your grad school application

If used right, humor can help you stand out from your competitors in an unexpected way.

This might be a great opening line for a comedy night at a university student center, but can you use humor in a graduate school application essay? Should you even try?

The answer is . . . maybe. If you can use humor effectively, it will help you stand out from your competitors in an unexpected way.  (“Oh, is she the one who joked about her first time playing jazz in a live audience?”, an adcom member might ask while reviewing the season’s applicants.)  Humor can make us appear more human and relatable, especially with the most popular form of humor: the gently self-deprecating remark. For example, “My single New Year’s resolution this year is to buy a new bathroom scale, and, perhaps, one day, use it.” Or, “I discovered that I had a textbook case of ‘Congenital Fraidy Cat Syndrome.’  I knew it: my expanding medical knowledge was slowly killing me.”

This kind of humor reveals a writer’s vulnerabilities, making her sympathetic. However, as a grad school applicant, your goal is to show yourself as a focused, qualified, intelligent, and capable individual. If you lack the confidence to show that vulnerability, or the confidence to try to get a laugh, do not try. It is far more important to speak with your authentic voice. But if you have a track record of getting laughs among friends, don’t be afraid to use humor — judiciously — in a personal essay.

Here are a few examples of how – and how not – to use humor:

Good: “In all my travels, I had never before sipped anything called Toadstool Brew. After I was finished, I hoped never to have to sip it again.” This works because it is gently self-deprecating; you are poking fun at your own lack of appreciation for an exotic tea.

Not good: “In all my travels, I had never seen a more bizarre-looking individual. My first thought was, ‘This guy could get a gig on a reality TV show in the States.’” This doesn’t work because poking fun at someone else looks petty.

Never force humor into your writing. Use it when it feels natural, and perhaps try it out on another reader first. Adcom members will surely appreciate a laughter break while reading through all those serious essays!

From Example to Exemplary - Download your guide today!

Judy Gruen By , MBA admissions consultant since 1996 and author (with Linda Abraham) of MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

 
Related Resources:

• From Example to Exemplary [Free Guide]
Can I Use Humor In My Application Essays?
• How To Think Like A Dean Of Admissions

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George Washington School Of Medicine And Health Sciences 2016 Secondary Application Essay Tips http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/03/george-washington-school-of-medicine-and-health-sciences-2016-secondary-application-essay-tips-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/03/george-washington-school-of-medicine-and-health-sciences-2016-secondary-application-essay-tips-2/#respond Mon, 03 Aug 2015 16:15:07 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32789 The curriculum and goals of George Washington SMHS center on its ability to graduate “Physician Citizens.” Since the school is located in the most powerful city in the U.S., Washington D.C., GW emphasizes the opportunities to treat the area’s diverse communities. It is essential to have years of service, either clinical or nonclinical, with diverse […]

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The curriculum and goals of George Washington SMHS center on its ability to Check out the rest of our school specific secondary tips and deadlinesgraduate “Physician Citizens.” Since the school is located in the most powerful city in the U.S., Washington D.C., GW emphasizes the opportunities to treat the area’s diverse communities. It is essential to have years of service, either clinical or nonclinical, with diverse populations and to have a demonstrated record of long-term leadership experience.

In addition you need to know about GW’s educational approach. It is initiating a brand new curriculum in Fall 2014 that incorporates more technology, independent study time, active learning models and clinical exposure. It also offers a Track System that allows students to gain special training in the following areas: Community/Urban Health, Emergency Management, Global Health, Health Policy, Integrative Medicine, Medical Education Leadership, Medical Humanities and Research. The Track System will influence the direction of a students’ education throughout their four years at George Washington SMHS.   

George Washington 2016 School of Medicine and Health Sciences Essay Questions:

• Four essays total requested: two essays with 750-character limits, one essay with a 1,000-character limit and one essay with a 2,000-character limit.

• Applicants should use single line spacing and 12 point size font.

• Responses should be constructed strategically to highlight an applicant’s strengths.

Secondary Application Essays:

1. Please provide the Admissions Committee with a brief summary of your activities, academics, employment or other occupations to account for full-time activity (approx. 30-40 hours/week) for the 2015-2016 application cycle, or from the point of application through matriculation in 2016. (750 characters)

The best way to approach this type of question is to create a list of the commitments you have made for the next year. Only include those activities that you have already started or plan to definitely complete. It will not be helpful to list things that you end up not participating in because you could be asked about them in an interview, and it will not help your application if you have to explain why you are not completing the activities you listed on the secondary. Ideally, you will be able to bring an updated CV or resume to the interview with the new experiences you have completed.

2. What is your most meaningful community service experience to date? (350 characters)

Based on the fact that they emphasize leadership, community service and a commitment to life-long learning, you can select an achievement that 1) was truly meaningful for you and that 2) allows you to share your dedication to helping others through leadership and/or education. It’s essential to be authentic so do select something that is important to you. Situations that reveal creative leadership will be most effective.

3. What is your most meaningful clinical experience to date, involving direct patient contact? (350 characters)

For this question, consider the range of your experience and the level of responsibility that you’ve taken on in a clinical setting.  Choose the one that required you to provide the most support or hands-on assistance.  Effective examples would be if you’ve traveled to another country for a medical mission or translated at a free clinic.  Educating patients on any aspect of preventative health or taking a patient’s medical history would also work.  The most important part of this essay will be providing successful outcomes for your work.  What was the end result or patient reaction?  Did you receive an award for your service or recognition for excellence in patient care?  Highlight any outcomes from your clinical experience.

4. What makes you a unique individual? What challenges have you faced? How will these factors help you contribute to the diversity of the student body at GW? (1000 characters)

In responding to this essay prompt, it will be important for you to select a challenge that you have overcome that will allow you to demonstrate by showing, rather than telling, how you are a “unique individual.” For example, if you came up with a unique way to approach an issue that provided a successful resolution for everyone involved, this would be an effective choice.

Creating an outline will help you ensure that you respond to all three questions in the prompt. In identifying what was unique about your approach to the challenge, you will be answering the third question listed. Many different challenges would work well for this essay, just be sure to select one that highlights your approach to problem solving.

5. What is your specific interest in the MD Program at GW? What opportunities would you take advantage of as a student here? Why? (2000 characters)

Do your research for this question. There are lots of wonderful special programs at GW. Create a list as you read through their website. After you’ve read through all of their webpages, rank your list in the order of importance to you. Create an outline based on these rankings. Again, it’s essential to be authentic in your response and to demonstrate how you have used similar opportunities in the past. It’s even more helpful if you have visited the school or spoken with representatives or students.

George Washington SMHS Application Timeline:

Check out the rest of our school specific secondary tips and deadlines

*Strong recommendation: Submit within two weeks after receipt.

If you would like professional guidance with your George Washington School of Medicine and Health Sciences application materials, please consider using Accepted’s Medical School Admissions Consulting and Editing Services, which include advising, editing, and interview coaching for the GWSMHS application materials.

Register for our upcoming webinar: Writing Secondary Essays That Get You Accepted!

Alicia McNease Nimonkar is an Accepted.com advisor and editor specializing in healthcare admissions. Prior to joining Accepted, Alicia worked for five years as Student Advisor at UC Davis’ postbac program where she both evaluated applications and advised students applying successfully to med school and related programs.

Related Resources:

• Med School Rankings & Numbers: What You Must Know [Free Guide]
• EMBA Blogger Interview: Vit’s Journey
The 6 Commandments For A Successful CV

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5 Tips For Spectacular Secondaries http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/02/5-tips-for-spectacular-secondaries/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/02/5-tips-for-spectacular-secondaries/#respond Sun, 02 Aug 2015 17:53:52 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32915 At this point, most schools have already sent out secondary applications – so let’s jump right into the important advice you need to tackle them! The following 5 tips will help you write spectacular secondary essays: 1. Create complementary content. The stories that you choose to tell in your secondary essays should complement the material you […]

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5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid on Your Med School Application Essays - download today!

 Read the questions very carefully to make sure your answers are on target.

At this point, most schools have already sent out secondary applications – so let’s jump right into the important advice you need to tackle them!

The following 5 tips will help you write spectacular secondary essays:

1. Create complementary content. The stories that you choose to tell in your secondary essays should complement the material you already provided in the AMCAS essay, not repeat it. You are a unique individual with loads to say; don’t waste space by saying the same thing twice.

2. Say something school-specific. Research the school’s strengths, values, mission, method, and philosophy, and then slant your secondaries towards the program by using your life experiences to show that you are a perfect fit for the school based on those things.

3. Tackle that timing. You should begin work on your secondary essays as soon as they are available. Not only will this give you a more leisurely writing experience (which will likely improve your quality of writing), but it will give you the opportunity to submit early, which med schools like.

4. Answer accurately. Seems obvious, I know, but many applicants need the reminder: Answer the questions as they are written and not as you wish they were written. You may write a lovely essay about your shadowing stint at your local ER during high school, but if the question was about extracurricular activities in college, then you still haven’t gotten the job done right. This also means that if you’re trying to reuse stories in multiple applications, you need to read the questions very carefully and make sure you’re on target.

5. Edit effectively. You don’t just want to tell your story; you want to tell your story well – this includes choosing the right topic, writing about your experiences with interesting and relevant details, and – last but not least – editing the essay so that it gleams. A successful secondary essay isn’t messy with typos and poor grammar; it’s neat, organized, and error-free. If English is not your first language – and even if it is – you will most definitely benefit from having another set of eyes (or more) look over your essay to ensure that it’s top-notch and ready for send-off.

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy
Related Resources:

Writing Secondary Essays That Get You Accepted [On-Demand Webinar]
• School-Specific Secondary Essay Tips
• Attn Med Applicants: A Class Is Matriculated Every Single Year  [Podcast]

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University Of Chicago Pritzker School Of Medicine 2016 Secondary Application Essay Tips http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/31/university-of-chicago-pritzker-school-of-medicine-2016-secondary-application-essay-tips/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/31/university-of-chicago-pritzker-school-of-medicine-2016-secondary-application-essay-tips/#respond Fri, 31 Jul 2015 16:45:46 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32576 This medical school is looking for student leaders from diverse backgrounds who demonstrate a strong scientific foundation, thrive in team settings, and find solutions to complex issues. In this secondary application, I recommend focusing on what makes you a unique applicant – your love of science or learning and how you’ve pursued that interest, your […]

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Read more med school specific secondary tips!This medical school is looking for student leaders from diverse backgrounds who demonstrate a strong scientific foundation, thrive in team settings, and find solutions to complex issues. In this secondary application, I recommend focusing on what makes you a unique applicant – your love of science or learning and how you’ve pursued that interest, your connection to medically underserved communities and your commitment to providing assistance to those in need, and the qualities and talents that you will share with your classmates and that will enhance your approach to patient care.

University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine 2016 Medical School Essay Questions:

•  Two essays are required; the first essay has a 550-word limit and the second essay has a 400-word limit.

•  An additional optional essay is requested, with no word limit.

•  Applicants should use single line spacing and 12 point size font.

•  Responses should be constructed strategically to highlight an applicant’s strengths.

The following are required in the Secondary Application:

“At the University of Chicago in an atmosphere of interdisciplinary scholarship and discovery, the Pritzker School of Medicine is dedicated to inspiring diverse students of exceptional promise to become leaders and innovators in science and medicine for the betterment of humanity.”

Essay Question 1. Our Mission Statement above is an expression of our core purpose and educational philosophy. In particular, it highlights the value we place on diversity since we regard the diversity of the entering class as essential for educational excellence. Please write an essay on how you would enhance diversity at Pritzker and advance the Pritzker mission. We suggest that you limit your essay to about 550 words.

Create a list of what you would contribute in terms of diversity. Approach this list creatively. You can include anything from your ethnicity, language and cultural background to work experience and hobbies or talents. For example, if you are a talented artist or teacher, how would you share these skills with your classmates? Selecting only the most relevant and important items from your list, use this as your outline.  Explain clearly how each characteristic you cover will benefit your classmates and community.

Essay Question 2. Tell us about a difficult or challenging situation you have encountered and how you dealt with it. In your response, identify both the coping skills you called upon to resolve the dilemma, and the support person(s) from whom you sought advice. We suggest that you limit your essay to about 400 words.

For this response, it would be appropriate to discuss a death in the family or serious illness of a family member or friend. This essay would demonstrate your level of maturity and highlight healthy coping mechanisms you have developed. Or you could use a professional example. In the latter case, be sure to select an example that has a clearly positive outcome as a direct result of your efforts. Once you have selected the situation, explain how you were able to identify a successful approach and create a positive outcome, even if only to gain closure.

Optional Essay: Additional Information. Please feel free to use this space to convey any additional information that you might wish the Committee to know. We suggest that you limit your text to about 200 words.

Use this essay to update the adcom on your recent activities and publications. If you have already covered all significant experiences in your primary application and in the essays above, discuss how you have spent your time since submitting the primary application.

Pritzker SOM Application Timeline:

University of Chicago 2016 Secondary Essay Timeline

*At 11:59 PM CST (Strong recommendation: Submit within two weeks after receipt.)

If you would like professional guidance with your Pritzker School of Medicine application materials, please consider using Accepted’s Medical School Admissions Consulting and Editing Services, which include advising, editing, and interview coaching for the Pritzker SOM application materials.

View our med school resource library for valuable tips on every stage of the application process!

 

Alicia Nimonkar is an Accepted.com advisor and editor specializing in healthcare admissions. Prior to joining Accepted, Alicia worked for five years as Student Advisor at UC Davis’ postbac program where she both evaluated applications and advised students applying successfully to med school and related programs.

Related Resources:

• The Ultimate Guide to Medical School Interview Success [Free guide]
Medical School Admissions 2015-2016: A Dean’s Perspective [Podcast]
Boost Your GPA for Medical School Acceptance

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Should You Retake The GMAT? [Short Video] http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/31/should-you-retake-the-gmat-short-video/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/31/should-you-retake-the-gmat-short-video/#respond Fri, 31 Jul 2015 15:52:09 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32836 Not sure if you should retake the GMAT? Check out this video for the three key factors to examine when evaluating your GMAT score: Related Resources: • That GMAT Score: Implications for Your MBA Application [webinar] • Low GMAT Score? Don’t Panic…Yet. • GMAT, GRE, SAT, and All Things Test Prep  Tags: GMAT, MBA Admissions, MBA Video Tips

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Not sure if you should retake the GMAT? Check out this video for the three key factors to examine when evaluating your GMAT score:

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Related Resources:

• That GMAT Score: Implications for Your MBA Application [webinar]
• Low GMAT Score? Don’t Panic…Yet.
• GMAT, GRE, SAT, and All Things Test Prep 

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What You Need To Know To Get Accepted To Wharton http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/30/what-you-need-to-know-to-get-accepted-to-wharton-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/30/what-you-need-to-know-to-get-accepted-to-wharton-2/#respond Thu, 30 Jul 2015 18:35:53 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32811 Applying to Wharton? You are invited to attend our upcoming webinar! On Aug 19th, Accepted CEO and b-school admissions expert, Linda Abraham, will share the secret to creating a standout application including: • The 4 ingredients of a successful Wharton application. • Insights into what the adcom is looking for. • How to ace Wharton’s […]

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Applying to Wharton? You are invited to attend our upcoming webinar!

Get Accepted to Wharton! Register for the webinar today!

On Aug 19th, Accepted CEO and b-school admissions expert, Linda Abraham, will share the secret to creating a standout application including:

• The 4 ingredients of a successful Wharton application.

• Insights into what the adcom is looking for.

• How to ace Wharton’s TBD/interview.

Save your spot!

Spaces are limited! Reserve your spot for Get Accepted to Wharton today!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

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Duke Fuqua 2016 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/30/duke-fuqua-2016-mba-essay-tips-and-deadlines/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/30/duke-fuqua-2016-mba-essay-tips-and-deadlines/#respond Thu, 30 Jul 2015 16:38:54 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32724 Leadership, teamwork, ethics, and a global approach to business are essential elements of the Duke Fuqua MBA, which is why you’ll need to make sure you express your passion for these ideals in your application essays. Impress the Fuqua adcom by positioning yourself as an innovative leader and team player, as someone who can see the big picture, work […]

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Check out more school specific MBA Essay TipsLeadership, teamwork, ethics, and a global approach to business are essential elements of the Duke Fuqua MBA, which is why you’ll need to make sure you express your passion for these ideals in your application essays. Impress the Fuqua adcom by positioning yourself as an innovative leader and team player, as someone who can see the big picture, work collaboratively, and shape global business.

My tips are in blue below. 

Three short answer questions and 2 essays are required from all applicants.

• Responses should use 1.5 line spacing and a font size no smaller than 10-point.
• Respond fully and concisely.
• Responses must be completed before submitting your application.
• Prepare your responses carefully. The Admissions Committee considers your answers important in the selection process.
• All essays are scanned using plagiarism detection software. Plagiarism is considered a cheating violation within the Honor Code and will not be tolerated in the admissions process.

Application Tip: Check out Fuqua’s section criteria.

Required Short Answers Questions

Instructions: Answer all 3 of the following questions. For each short answer question, respond in 500 characters only (the equivalent of about 100 words).

1. What are your short term goals, post-MBA?

State what you see yourself doing immediately after you earn your MBA in terms of function and industry. If location or geography are important to your goal, include them.  If you know the type of companies you would like to work for, you can include that information too, but don’t say you want to work for Company X, unless Company X is sponsoring you. Without sponsorship, a “Company X” answer is probably too narrow, but saying you would like to work for a firm like Company X would work.

2. What are your long term goals?

Your long term goals should flow logically from your short-term goals. They can be fuzzier and both in terms of direction and timing. But you should have them. They can, but don’t have to, include larger aspirations and present a broader perspective on where you are headed. But please don’t go so general and say something like “I aspire to be a good person” or “I strive to leave a lasting impact on my community.” Nice sentiments, but way too vague.

3. Life is full of uncertainties, and plans and circumstances can change. As a result, navigating a career requires you to be adaptable. Should the short-term goals that you provided above not materialize what alternative directions have you considered?

What’s your Plan B? If you can’t get a job at a leading strategy consulting firm — your first choice — what do you want to do? If Plan A is investment banking, what’s Plan B?

First Required Essay: 25 Random Things About Yourself

Instructions: Answer the following question — present your response in list form, numbered 1 to 25. Some points may be only a few words, while others may be longer. Your complete list should not exceed 2 pages.

1. The “Team Fuqua” spirit and community is one of the things that sets The Duke MBA experience apart, and it is a concept that extends beyond the student body to include faculty, staff, and administration. When a new person joins the Admissions team, we ask that person to share with everyone in the office a list of “25 Random Things About Yourself.” As an Admissions team, we already know the new hire’s professional and academic background, so learning these “25 Random Things” helps us get to know someone’s personality, background, special talents, and more.

In this spirit, the Admissions Committee also wants to get to know you–beyond the professional and academic achievements listed in your resume and transcript. You can share with us important life experiences, your likes/dislikes, hobbies, achievements, fun facts, or anything that helps us understand what makes you who you are. Share with us your list of “25 Random Things” about YOU.

Have some fun with this list. It certainly allows a more creative approach than permitted by most essay prompts. Note that the questions asks you to go “beyond the professional and academic achievements listed in your resume and transcript.”  So you can list your Pez collection or perhaps your brief membership in a rock band or the fact that you took violin from age 6-18 or your membership in a gospel choir or your volunteer work in a hospital, your needlepoint, your favorite recipe or photo. Gosh the list is endless. Just let it reflect you. Think of this list as an introduction to potential friends.   For more insight into this question and the  motivation behind, please read Megan Overbay’s, the former Director of Admissions’, advice. I believe you will find it helpful. And very friendly.

Second Required Essay (choose 1 of 2)

Instructions: Choose only 1 of the following 2 essay questions to answer. Your response should be no more than 2 pages in length, and should reflect your knowledge of the Fuqua program and experience, and the types of activities and leadership you would engage in as a Fuqua student.

Choose to the prompt that will let you reveal something important to you and impressive about you. Write the essay that you will be able to draft most enthusiastically and easily.

1. Why Duke: When asked by your family, friends, and colleagues why you want to go to Duke, what do you tell them? Share the reasons that are most meaningful to you.

Why Duke? But you’re not talking to the admissions committee, whom you just may be a tad less than candid with. You are talking to your family, friends, and colleagues, people you know and like (at least the friends).  The Fuqua admissions staff really wants to get to know you. Authenticity is the goal. The admissions readers want to be able to imagine you as a part of Team Fuqua — their family — as a friend or colleague. Will you be real stiff and formal? Of course not. You will be friendly in a professional way. Don’t take this as an invitation to be inappropriate, coarse, or rude. Just friendly.

What appeals to you at Duke? What about its program, culture, and professional opportunities attracts you and would compel you to accept an offer of admission? Maybe address a letter to a close friend and tell her why you want to go to Duke.  That letter may morph into this essay.

2. The Team Fuqua community is as unique as the individuals who comprise it. Underlying our individuality are a number of shared ideas and principles that we live out in our own ways. Our students have identified and defined 6 “Team Fuqua Principles” that we feel are the guiding philosophies that make our community special. At the end of your 2 years at Fuqua, if you were to receive an award for exemplifying one of the 6 Principles listed below, which one would it be and why? Your response should reflect the research you have done, your knowledge of Fuqua and the Daytime MBA program and experience, and the types of activities and leadership you would engage in as a Fuqua student.

1. Authentic Engagement: We care and we take action. We each make a difference to Team Fuqua by being ourselves and engaging in and supporting activities about which we are passionate.
2. Supportive Ambition: We support each other to achieve great things, because your success is my success. The success of each individual member of Team Fuqua makes the whole of Team Fuqua better.
3. Collective Diversity:  We embrace all of our classmates because our individuality is better and stronger together.
4. Impactful Stewardship: We are leaders who focus on solutions to improve our communities both now and in the future. We aren’t satisfied with just maintaining the status quo.
5. Loyal Community: We are a family who looks out for each other. Team Fuqua supports you when you need it the most.
6. Uncompromising Integrity: We internalize and live the honor code in the classroom and beyond. We conduct ourselves with integrity within Fuqua, within Duke, and within all communities of which we are a part.

Do your homework about Fuqua (and yourself) before responding to this question. What activities and groups appeal to you? How do you see yourself participating? Making a difference? Then look at the list of six principles above. Which do you most identify with? Imagine how you would exemplify that principle in your activities. The story of that role and how would see yourself earning an award is your essay.  While you can reference similar activities in the past, keep the focus of this essay on what you would do at Fuqua and why you would earn recognition for exemplifying one of these six principles.

Optional Essay Question:

If you feel there are extenuating circumstances of which the Admissions Committee should be aware, please explain them in an optional essay (e.g. unexplained gaps in work, choice of recommenders, inconsistent or questionable academic performance, or any significant weakness in your application).

• Do NOT upload additional essays nor additional recommendations in this area of the application.
• The Optional Essay is intended to provide the Admissions Committee with insight into your extenuating circumstances only.
• Limit your response to two pages.

Why isn’t your current supervisor writing your rec? Why is there a six-month gap on your resume? Why did your grades dip during the first semester of your senior year? What are your responsibilities while working for a family business after having left a prestigious investment bank, and why did you make the change? Answering any of those questions (but not all) could be the topic of your optional essay.

Duke Fuqua 2016 MBA Application Deadlines:

Check out our other school-specific MBA Essay Tips

If you would like professional guidance with your Duke Fuqua MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our  MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Duke application. 

12 Terrific Tips for MBA Applicants - Download your free copy today!

Linda AbrahamBy Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

Related Resources:

How To Earn A Spot On Team Fuqua [Podcast]
• Culture, Location, and Support: A Duke MBA Speaks
• 2016 MBA Application Essay Tips

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University of Pittsburgh Medical School 2016 Secondary Application Essay Tips http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/29/university-of-pittsburgh-medical-school-2016-secondary-application-essay-tips/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/29/university-of-pittsburgh-medical-school-2016-secondary-application-essay-tips/#respond Wed, 29 Jul 2015 16:53:07 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32586 UPSOM places special emphasis on their collaborative problem-based curriculum and the fact that their medical students begin interacting with patients in their first year of medical school.  Providing the best care to patients through research, education, leadership and diversity is central to their mission.  In your own background, how can you demonstrate your commitment to […]

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Secondary Essay tips - download a copy today!UPSOM places special emphasis on their collaborative problem-based curriculum and the fact that their medical students begin interacting with patients in their first year of medical school.  Providing the best care to patients through research, education, leadership and diversity is central to their mission.  In your own background, how can you demonstrate your commitment to service?  Have you experienced the patient side of medicine yourself or through family members?  How have these unique life experiences and the communities you have served contributed to your unique development and identity?

University of Pittsburgh 2016 Secondary Application Essay Questions:

•  Two short essays with 250 word limits are required.

•  Applicants should use single line spacing and 12 point size font.

•  Responses should be constructed strategically to highlight all of an applicant’s strengths and how they relate to the mission and values of UPSOM.

Application Tip: Check out the UPSOM admissions committee procedures and criteria:

Secondary Application Essays:

1. Tell us about a challenging problem you faced and how you resolved it. (Limit your response to 250 words or less.)

Given UPSOM’s focus on one-on-one patient interactions, use an experience in which you were able to resolve a professional conflict.  Emphasize the role that you played in finding a solution and the skills you employed to identify and implement a positive outcome that was mutually beneficial for all parties involved.  I recommend using an issue that has a clear positive resolution and one that is not personal in nature. 

2. UPSOM is a culturally diverse and talented community. How would you enrich/enliven the UPSOM community? The essay should discuss material that is not included in the rest of your application. (Limit your response to 250 words or less.)

To best address this essay, take your time to make a long list of your unique qualities, talents and experiences—the longer the better.  Cross out those items that you have already included in your personal statement.  Identify your top three on the list—as they relate to UPSOM’s mission and goals.  Explain how those three identifiers will allow you to connect with the community and how they represent you an individual.   

UPSOM Application Timeline:

Check out other school specific secondary essay tips

*Strong recommendation: Submit within two weeks after receipt.

If you would like professional guidance with your University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine application materials, please consider using Accepted’s Medical School Admissions Consulting and Editing Services, which include advising, editing, and interview coaching for the UPSOM application materials.

View our med school resource library for valuable tips on every stage of the application process!

 

Alicia McNease Nimonkar is an Accepted.com advisor and editor specializing in healthcare admissions. Prior to joining Accepted, Alicia worked for five years as Student Advisor at UC Davis’ postbac program where she both evaluated applications and advised students applying successfully to med school and related programs.

Related Resources:

Med School Rankings and Numbers: What You MUST Know! [Free Report]
• Attn Med Applicants: A Class Is Matriculated Every Single Year  [Podcast]
• Boost Your GPA For Medical School Acceptance

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The 4 Must-Haves Of A Grad School Application http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/29/the-4-must-haves-of-a-grad-school-application/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/29/the-4-must-haves-of-a-grad-school-application/#respond Wed, 29 Jul 2015 16:12:44 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32831 Linda Abraham has been living and breathing admissions for over 20 years. Does she know the secret to getting accepted to graduate school? Well, since you asked – yes she does. Listen to the show (and takes notes!) for the four things you need to know and do to get admitted to your top choice […]

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Listen to the show!Linda Abraham has been living and breathing admissions for over 20 years. Does she know the secret to getting accepted to graduate school? Well, since you asked – yes she does.

Listen to the show (and takes notes!) for the four things you need to know and do to get admitted to your top choice grad school.

00:00:36 – Obsessed with stats? You may be barking up the wrong tree.

00:03:16 – Linda’s holistic framework for grad school admissions success.

00:04:39 – #1: Show you can excel: the role of grades and test scores.

00:05:30 – #2: Don’t apply to med school to become a financial analyst (but do apply if you want to be a doctor) AKA the importance of goals.

00:06:44 – #3: Can you show fit?

00:08:19 – #4: Climb Mt. Kilimanjaro. Just kidding.

Applying the framework to:

00:12:26 – MBA Admissions.

00:18:47 – Grad School Admissions.

00:21:44 – Med School Admissions.

00:24:29 – Law School Admissions.

Click here to listen to the show!*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com

Related links:

Get Accepted to HBS / Wharton / Stanford CBS
Get Accepted to Medical School in 2016
Writing Secondary Essays that Get You Accepted

Related shows:

How To Think Like A Dean Of Admissions
How to Earn a Spot on Team Fuqua
The Admissions Team at the Very Center of Business
Attn Med Applicants: A Class Is Matriculated Every Single Year
• Baylor College Of Medicine: A Holistic Approach To Admissions

Leave a Review for Admissions Straight Talk:

Check Out Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes! Check Out Admissions Straight Talk in Stitcher!

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Lack Of Substance: Med School Application Flaw #1 http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/28/lack-of-substance-med-school-application-flaw-1/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/28/lack-of-substance-med-school-application-flaw-1/#respond Tue, 28 Jul 2015 16:34:14 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32791 “Lack of Substance” is the first post in our series, 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Med School Essays. Writing about nothing tends to bore, like a trite sitcom or movie with no plot. They lack substance and so will your essay if it isn’t based on: • Substantive self-reflection. • Use of specifics, […]

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Download a copy of Navigate a Med School Maze.

Use good examples to bring your essays to life and engage the reader.

“Lack of Substance” is the first post in our series, 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Med School Essays.

Writing about nothing tends to bore, like a trite sitcom or movie with no plot. They lack substance and so will your essay if it isn’t based on:

• Substantive self-reflection.

• Use of specifics, examples, and anecdotes.

• Willingness to reveal your thought processes and feelings.

So start your writing process with self-knowledge. You don’t have to search the internet or a large library. Start with your experiences and your dreams. Search your head and your heart. That is where the substance of a good personal statement is stored.

Then use anecdotes, specifics, and examples to reveal what’s in your heart and show that your dreams are grounded in experience. Good examples can bring your essays to life and engage the reader.

At the same time, recognize that essays with only examples and anecdotes don’t reveal your thought processes and consequently are also superficial. Make sure you balance your stories with insight and analysis.

Avoid Fatal Flaw #1: Bring your personal statements to life with self-reflection and astute use of examples balanced by analysis.

Navigate the Med Maze - Download your free guide today!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Related Resources:

• Navigating the Med School Maze
• Successful Medical School Secondary Application Strategies
• Nine Ways To Get Rejected From Medical School

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The “Wharton Difference” And Fit With The Program http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/28/the-wharton-difference-and-fit-with-the-program/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/28/the-wharton-difference-and-fit-with-the-program/#respond Tue, 28 Jul 2015 16:04:46 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32801 The Wharton MBA adcom offers you some help in shaping your Wharton application – by clearly and succinctly defining the four core components of “the Wharton difference.”  Understanding these components is a key to conveying your fit with the program. These four components are encompassed in Wharton’s emphasis on “putting knowledge into action.”  This value […]

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The Wharton MBA adcom offers you some help in shaping your Wharton application – by clearly and succinctly defining the four core components of “the Wharton difference.”  Understanding these components is a key to conveying your fit with the program.

These four components are encompassed in Wharton’s emphasis on “putting knowledge into action.”  This value should guide your application approach: action is always specific, anecdotal.  Therefore, keep your resume, essays, and application answers specific, anecdotal, and action focused.

In this post I’ll discuss two of the four components that are tightly correlated, then I’ll do one post each for the remaining two.  In all, I’ll keep on the radar screen the overarching “putting knowledge into action.”

Largest Global Network and Culture of Engagement are the two interconnected components.  They go hand-in-hand:

•  The vast global alumni network is an immense resource, and culture involves a cyclical process of using, synthesizing and creating new resources.

•  A network and a culture are both built on and serve people.

•  The network component uses the phrases “call on” and “tap into” while the culture of engagement component uses the words “join” and “collaborative” – reflecting dynamism, connection, proactivity.

There is another fascinating but perhaps less intuitive point of alignment between these two components: impact.

•  “Increase your impact through the resources of this diverse, connected community” (from Global Network).

•  “…Turning knowledge into impact” (from Culture of Engagement).

What does all this add up to?  PEOPLE TAKING ACTION CREATE IMPACT.  That’s basic.  What you want to demonstrate, and what Wharton seeks, is you being part of PEOPLE TAKING ACTION TOGETHER TO CREATE CONSTRUCTIVE, DESIRED IMPACTS.

Here’s how you can demonstrate fit with Wharton by incorporating these values into your application:

•  Refer specifically in your application and interview to how you will use the global alumni network to advance your goals and/or how you will engage with it (specific actions as opposed to the ubiquitous but bland “contribute to”).

•  Give examples and anecdotes in essays that illustrate your resourcefulness and collaboration leading to concrete outcomes.

•  In discussing how you will achieve your goals, include these elements, which also align with the action orientation.

• Ensure that your resume reflects these values, and start bullet points with verbs to underscore action.

•  If your recommenders are open to your input, ask them to use examples and present strengths that reflect these attributes (and not just “ability to” but also achieving impacts).

•  In your interview frame your answers and points to reflect these elements and even refer specifically to them, if you can do so naturally.

Register to learn how to get accepted to Wharton!

Cindy Tokumitsu By , author and co-author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports, including Why MBA and Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted.com.

Related Resources:

• Global Business Leadership at Wharton’s Lauder Institute
• Wharton 2016 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
• The Wharton Executive MBA Program: An Insider’s View [Podcast]

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Why I Chose B’s In Medical School http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/27/why-i-chose-bs-in-medical-school/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/27/why-i-chose-bs-in-medical-school/#respond Mon, 27 Jul 2015 16:39:04 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32752 Journeys with Joshua: Joshua Wienczkowski walks us through med school at East Tennessee’s College of Medicine with his monthly blog updates. Get an inside look into med school down South and life as a student adcom member through the eyes of a former professional songwriter with a whole lot of clinical experience — thanks Joshua for […]

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Read more of Joshua's journey through med school!Journeys with Joshua: Joshua Wienczkowski walks us through med school at East Tennessee’s College of Medicine with his monthly blog updates. Get an inside look into med school down South and life as a student adcom member through the eyes of a former professional songwriter with a whole lot of clinical experience — thanks Joshua for sharing this journey with us! 

I’m over 50% finished with my MD program in the Appalachian Mountains, done with (and passed!) the first part of my licensing boards, and am finally onto the greener grass of clinical medicine. So, what have I learned, and how have I changed in this process? Through my first year, my clinical research in sepsis taught me so much about the bigger picture of medicine; I began to fine-tune my bedside manner; I was finally able to see and understand the undeniable impact of socioeconomic status on health. The second year of medical school is notoriously the hardest, because while balancing an even more challenging course load, preparation for licensing boards begins simultaneously. Yes, I learned about disease processes, drugs, interventions, and all that, but I learned about my priorities in the process. I was even crazy enough to get married – to another 2nd year medical student! I’m going to share something incredibly personal that I’m hoping you can grow from – my grades, how I got them, and why I chose (and continue to choose) life over numbers.

During my first year, I began to study how I study, the outcomes, and the most effective ways for me, personally. After dozens of exams, countless hours banging my head against my whiteboard, and proverbially throwing mud at the wall for months on end, I made some pretty interesting discoveries about how I learn. Turns out, it takes me personally about an extra 15-20 hours per exam of additional, dedicated study time on top of my normal study habits to achieve a strong A. What did getting that A do for me? Were those hours worth it? Well, also turns out it just means I pounded into my head the additional minutiae to get the detailed questions, but those details didn’t impact my overall understanding of the material or the concepts. Hmm… I found myself at a fork in the road – I could achieve a higher GPA, class rank, and increase my chances of matching somewhere fancy, OR I could invest those hours into something else.

I made the conscious choice and effort to achieve B’s in the first 2 years of medical school, and I don’t have a single regret about it. Here’s why:

With those extra 15-20 hours per exam (there are a lot of exams), I invested in my relationship with my girlfriend, who became my fiancé, and is now my dear wife. Clearing up some hours meant I always had an extra hour per day to take our Great Dane, Wrigley, on a walk or to the dog park with my wife. Those walks meant we had more quality time together every single day. We started taking longer lunches and dinners together. We talked more. We grew more. We went on more dates! We even built strong friendships at the dog park because we made the conscious effort to put ourselves before the books. I actually watched tv shows and kept up with them with my wife, and we had something to look forward to on Monday nights and could laugh about what farmer Chris was going to do next week on The Bachelor.

With more time, I began songwriting again, and recording things for pleasure, which I haven’t done in years. I even performed one for our school where I wrote about the life of my anatomy group’s donor, Winston. I even started brewing more beer while crafting new recipes, and I invested some time to learn about the craft brewing business to see if opening a brewery one day is a feasible option. With more time, my best friend taught me how to paint, and I was able to give my wife a meaningful piece on our wedding day.

Making the conscious effort to focus on myself, the people around me, and investing in the things I care about instead of numbers is one of the greatest decisions I’ve ever made. I noticed that when I did achieve an A, it came at the expense of my relationships with those I love as well my own ability to be introspective. Being introspective and decompressing with hobbies  and life outside of medicine is one of the most important pieces to handling and managing the immense pressure of medical education. Of course I’ve never been perfect in the process, and when I noticed myself turning sour to those around me, like a corked bottle of wine left too long without being enjoyed, it was because I had lost focus on my priorities. It’s a balancing act, and I’m thankful I have those who love me enough to help in this imperfect science.

With two years of medical education and a few weeks of clinical medicine under my belt, I’ve learned that medicine can be a selfish and consuming mistress, if you let her. I’ve learned it is incredibly easy to achieve at the expense of personal growth. However, if you choose day in and day out to love and invest in those around you instead of her, the payback is invaluable. I have also learned that your value can never be measured in numbers or letters, but instead in the depth of relationships you have with loved ones and the impact you make in your community. As a medical student, time is our most valuable asset – be wise with it. Invest it as you would your hard-earned money; buy things with it that will last the longest, and stretch your time-dollar as far as it will go with the things that matter most to you in life. I’m not top of my class. Not even close. But my relationship with my wife has never been better, and because I bought time to work on some humanities, I haven’t noticed any soured wine in quite some time.

Best,

Joshua A. Wienczkowski

MD Candidate, Quillen College of Medicine 2017

Get Accepted to Med School with Low Stats!  Download your guide today!

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Related Resources:

• Dear Diary…: Advice for Third-Year Medical Students 
• Reflections on Being 25% an MD
• Insights, Advice and Experiences of a Non-Traditional Med Student

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Choosing From Multiple Business School Acceptances http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/27/choosing-from-multiple-business-school-acceptances/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/27/choosing-from-multiple-business-school-acceptances/#respond Mon, 27 Jul 2015 16:11:20 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32702 “Choosing From Multiple Business School Acceptances” is the final post in our series Navigate the MBA Maze. You’ve been accepted at two solid schools. Great! Or, you’ve been offered admission to an OK school with a significant scholarship and your #1 choice with no  financial aid. Or, you’ve been admitted to a top-tier program, but you […]

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Multiple acceptances: Congrats! But what now?

Choosing From Multiple Business School Acceptances” is the final post in our series Navigate the MBA Maze.

You’ve been accepted at two solid schools. Great! Or, you’ve been offered admission to an OK school with a significant scholarship and your #1 choice with no  financial aid. Or, you’ve been admitted to a top-tier program, but you really wanted to go to Harvard. You should be celebrating, but instead you’re worrying.

What do you do now? What criteria do you use in making your decision? Here are the factors that should guide you:

1. Which institution best supports your future goals and most likely career path? This criterion is paramount when you have clear, well-defined goals, for instance, “I want to run an IT consultancy serving financial services firms.” If financial aid is an issue, calculate whether the full tuition program will increase your earning power by more than the amount of the scholarship, or whether your preference for the more expensive school is worth the difference in cost.

2. Which educational approach do you prefer?  Do you prefer to learn through case study or analysis, or a combination of the two?

3. Where would you rather live for X years? Do you want to live in a big city or small college town? What region do you want to live in? Do you prefer a big university or a small college? Religious or secular? Liberal or conservative?

Enjoy your great options and use these criteria to guide you as you make your decision.

Navigating the MBA Maze - Download your free guide today!

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Related Resources:

• How To Pay For Your MBA [webinar]
Show Me The Money
• MBA Choices: Dream School vs. Scholarship School?

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UCSF Medical School 2016 Secondary Application Essay Tips http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/26/ucsf-2016-medical-school-secondary-application-essay-tips/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/26/ucsf-2016-medical-school-secondary-application-essay-tips/#respond Sun, 26 Jul 2015 20:21:22 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32571 It is important to focus on your leadership roles and the diversity of your experiences and activities in this secondary application.  UCSF accepts students with highly competitive GPA’s and MCAT scores so it would be to your advantage to explain any decreases or irregularities in your academic records or test scores, if you have not […]

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Click here for more school specific secondary essay tips!It is important to focus on your leadership roles and the diversity of your experiences and activities in this secondary application.  UCSF accepts students with highly competitive GPA’s and MCAT scores so it would be to your advantage to explain any decreases or irregularities in your academic records or test scores, if you have not already done so in your primary application.  Be sure to highlight the qualities, experiences, awards and scholarships that set you apart from other applicants.   

UCSF 2016 Secondary Application Essay Questions:

•  One 500-word essay with additional information

•  Two additional 500-word essays for students interested in applying to the Joint Medical Program, described below.

•  Applicants should use single line spacing and 12 point size font.

•  Responses should be constructed strategically to highlight all of an applicant’s strengths and research interests.

Secondary Application Essay:

If you wish to update or expand upon your activities, you may provide additional information below. (500 word limit)

Use this essay as an opportunity to update the adcom on your current activities.  Focus on the diversity of your commitments—in leadership, volunteering, tutoring, mentoring, as well as your academic, cultural, musical, athletic and professional interests.  If you have long-term commitments to organizations, discuss your years of service and continued commitment.  What sets you apart as an applicant?  Strategically bring their attention on the strengths that you have not covered in the primary application.        

JMP Program Only:

1. Please describe the basis for your interest in and your preparations for the MS with research thesis. Given the opportunity to pursue such a degree, what topics, questions or areas of research might you be interested in addressing? (500 word limit)

The Joint Medical Program is hosted by UC Berkeley School of Public Health and UCSF.  It is a five-year program that allows participants to earn a Master’s Degree in health and medical sciences (HMS) as well as a medical degree.  Students are expected to complete at least 20 units of coursework and to write a thesis in addition to their medical education requirements.  To see a list of recent research topics, please see the invitation to the sixth annual UC Berkeley—UCSF Joint Medical Program Research Symposium.

Be sure to discuss in detail any research experience that you have.  Explain the projects that you participated in and the outcomes of your contributions—publications, poster discussions, panels, or workshops.  What was the level of your responsibility in the lab?  How long did you work on each project?  What issues did you encounter in your research and how did you find solutions these problems either individually and/or collaboratively?  If any of the topics that you covered are health-related, how could you further develop your ideas into a research project?   

2. Please describe the basis for your interest and experience with small group, case-based problem oriented learning. (500 word limit)

You should focus on any experiences that you have working successfully in small groups in this essay response.  This could range from athletics to clinical experiences.  Describe the roles that you played within the teams you have participated on.  What were you able to accomplish as a team?  What did you as an individual contribute?  How would you benefit from a program that uses a case-based learning model? 

UCSF Application Timeline:

Check out the rest of our school specific secondary tips and deadlines

If you would like professional guidance with your UCSF application materials, please consider using Accepted’s Medical School Admissions Consulting and Editing Services, which include advising, editing, and interview coaching for the UCSF application materials.

Navigate the Med Maze - Download your free guide today!

Alicia Nimonkar is an Accepted.com advisor and editor specializing in healthcare admissions. Prior to joining Accepted, Alicia worked for five years as Student Advisor at UC Davis’ postbac program where she both evaluated applications and advised students applying successfully to med school and related programs. Explore Accepted.com’s services to see how Alicia can help you achieve your professional dreams in healthcare.

Related Resources:

• Applying to Medical School with Low Stats [Free Report]
• Getting Into Medical School: Advice from a Pro [Podcast]
Successful Medical School Secondary Application Strategies

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MBA Admissions Decisions: Should You Go Full-Time Or Part-Time? http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/24/mba-admissions-decisions-should-you-go-full-time-or-part-time-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/24/mba-admissions-decisions-should-you-go-full-time-or-part-time-2/#respond Fri, 24 Jul 2015 16:40:38 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32704 When I was applying to b-school, I contemplated part-time vs. full-time, and one of my best friends, Colleen, had to make the same decision at the same time. Ultimately, I decided to attend the full-time program at the University of Michigan. Colleen decided to attend a part-time program at the University of Michigan. We shared […]

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Full-time or Part-time?

When I was applying to b-school, I contemplated part-time vs. full-time, and one of my best friends, Colleen, had to make the same decision at the same time.

Ultimately, I decided to attend the full-time program at the University of Michigan. Colleen decided to attend a part-time program at the University of Michigan. We shared 60% of the same classes, 40% of the same professors and even had a class together (Michigan offered, at the time, courses where they reserved half the registrations for full-time students and half the registrations for part-time students). Since that time, they dramatically changed the full-time curriculum and it is unlikely that we would overlap now like we did then. However, I graduated two years before Colleen with a unique internship, an opportunity to begin a new career and a lot of debt. Colleen advanced quickly with the company that hired her upon our graduation from college and graduated without debt because her company sponsored her education. We both have the same degree.

Now as an Accepted.com consultant and as a former Admissions Director and Dean of full-time, part-time and EMBA programs, I lend you my insight and guidance from the other side of the table in this brief analysis of programs.

Full-time programs: Traditional full-time programs are the media darlings of MBA programs. A school’s reputation relies mostly on its full-time program rankings. They consume the largest portion of the school’s budget, and they rarely make revenue for a school. More than 90% of all scholarships and fellowships are dedicated to full-time students. Full-time programs are perfect for career-changers in the 23-30 year old age range that can afford the opportunity cost of leaving work to immerse themselves in education and experience. If you choose this experience, you will feel like you are an undergraduate again with clubs and activities, but the workload will be greater. You will have access to on-campus recruiting (I always recommend you conduct your own off-campus job search in parallel with on-campus recruiting), company presentations, fellowships and scholarships and a lot of fun. Full-time students prioritize the job search and school. Family often gets the short stick, but there are typically resources to support a spouse. If you are single, it’s a great opportunity to form a romantic relationship. My grad school roommate found the love of her life in our core operations course.

Part-time programs: Part-time programs are the cash cow of MBA programs and have to live in the shadow of their smaller full-time counterpart. They take very few resources, but they often share the same faculty as the full-time program. Many professors would rather teach at night or on the weekend to lighten their teaching load and dedicate their days to research. Schools will also complement the faculty with adjuncts in part-time programs. Aggregated, the part-time applicant pool is not as competitive or as diverse in terms of admissions as schools typically receive fewer applications, and they are limited to their immediate region and the industries that dominate that industry. Furthermore, schools have the capacity to serve at least as many and often more students than their full-time counterpart.

As much as schools say the quality of the full-time students and the part-time students are the same, the quality is dependent on location and how that location generates applications. Bigger cities have an easier time of attracting great applicants to their part-time program and can maintain higher quality standards, but full-time programs generate applications from around the globe and it’s much easier to pick and choose candidates for admission.

Part-time programs are perfect for the 24-35 year old career enhancer, but rarely serve the career changer. Part-timers typically do not have the same access to comprehensive career services as full-time programs because company presentations and interviews are typically held during the day. At one school for whom I worked, we dedicated one career services staff member to all of our professional programs (part-time, EMBA, on-line) serving over 1000 students and 5 career services staff to the small 200-student full-time program.

Part-time students can often get full or partial sponsorship from their company lessening the financial burden, but do not typically have access to fellowships or scholarships from the school. It typically takes students longer than 2 years to complete a part-time program and part-time students prioritize work first, school second and again, family gets the short end stick. Part-time students often feel like the stepchild of the full-time counterparts.

EMBA programs: EMBA programs are also lucrative for schools, but they typically are not as large as full-time programs, and schools charge a premium to attend an EMBA program. They are perfect for students in the 30-year-old to 42-year-old age range that have been supervising employees and that have the support of their executive management to attend a program because executives view these students as fast-trackers in their company. These programs are typically held every other weekend and offer no fellowships or scholarships because schools expect the student’s company to sponsor the student partially or completely. EMBA students typically prioritize work first, family second and school last. While EMBA students may cross from technical supervisory roles to business supervisory roles in their companies, EMBA programs do not cater to the career changer only the career enhancer. Schools take care of their EMBA students for their tuition premium. However, these students rarely interact with either the part-time or full-time students, but bond well with their cohort and the faculty.

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Natalie Grinblatt Epstein By , an accomplished Accepted.com consultant/editor (since 2008) and entrepreneur. Natalie is a former MBA Admissions Dean and Director at Ross, Johnson, and Carey.

Related Resources:

• Ace the EMBA
Tips for Applying to Part Time MBA Programs
• The MBA Family: A Roundup and Overview

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UC Berkeley Haas 2016 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/24/uc-berkeley-haas-2016-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/24/uc-berkeley-haas-2016-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/#respond Fri, 24 Jul 2015 16:12:08 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31574 The supplemental information that Haas requests is almost unchanged. The essays are different from last years. For #1 they have an essay question very similar to one from two years ago. And for #2, they give you a choice of prompts. My tips are in blue below. Essays: At Berkeley-Haas, we seek candidates from a broad […]

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Check out other school specific essay tips!

UC Berkeley Haas

The supplemental information that Haas requests is almost unchanged. The essays are different from last years. For #1 they have an essay question very similar to one from two years ago. And for #2, they give you a choice of prompts.

My tips are in blue below.

Essays:

At Berkeley-Haas, we seek candidates from a broad range of cultures, backgrounds, and industries who demonstrate a strong cultural fit with our program and defining principles. Our distinctive culture is defined by four key principles — Question the Status Quo, Confidence Without Attitude, Students Always, and Beyond Yourself. Please use the following essays as an opportunity to reflect on and share with us the values, experiences, and accomplishments that have helped shape who you are.

(Learn more about Berkeley-Haas’ Defining Principles)

Please use the following essays as opportunities to reflect on and share with us the values, experiences, and accomplishments that have helped shape who you are.

As you are answering the following four questions really think about Haas’ defining principles and when possible tie your answer and experiences to those principles. As I frequently do, I want to warn you against simply repeating the principles or stuffing them into your essays. That’s a waste of time and space. Use your essays to reveal that you share those values and have those qualities.

1. If you could choose one song that expresses who you are, what is it and why? (250 word maximum)

If it’s heavy metal, go for it. And if it’s a Beethoven Sonata, let it sing forth. And if it’s a classic folk song that you learned as a child in a non-Western country, don’t hesitate to share that information too. The “what” isn’t nearly as important as the “why.” Be authentic and tell them which song best expresses your essence, whatever it is. And then tell them why you believe it reflects the true you.  

2.  Please respond to one of the following prompts: (250 word max)

• Describe an experience that has fundamentally changed the way you see the world and how it transformed you.

• Describe a significant accomplishment and why it makes you proud.

• Describe a difficult decision you have made and why it was challenging.

First question: Which to choose? Select the one that you can answer most easily and enthusiastically and that complements the other essays and information found elsewhere. 

Please note that each option is asking for one experience or one accomplishment, or one difficult decision. Haas seeks an example that you find meaningful and illustrative of how you approach situations and events. they want a window into how you act and think. Whatever option you choose, don’t omit answering what comes after the “and.”

Try to choose an event that illustrates you identifying with at least one of Haas’ 4 Principles.

3. Tell us about your path to business school and your future plans. How will the Berkeley-Haas experience help you along this journey? (500 words max)

This is a connect-the-dots goals question.  What do you want to do after you earn your MBA? How has what you have done in the past convinced you this is the right path for you? How will the Haas MBA experience prepare you to achieve your goals for your MBA? 

You don’t have to answer the questions I posed in the order I posed them, but the strong answer to this question will answer all three questions if you want to answer Haas’ question. And to answer the about the Berkeley-Haas experience, you must thoroughly understand Haas program and culture.  How will take advantage of its strengths?

Supplemental Information:

1.  If you have not provided a letter of recommendation from your current supervisor, please explain. If not applicable, enter N/A.

Keep it short and sweet. This is primarily for those of you who don’t want to tell your boss yet that you plan to leave.

2. List in order of importance all community and professional organizations and extracurricular activities in which you have been involved during or after university studies. Include the following information for each organization or activity using the format below:

• Name of organization or activity
• Nature of organization or activity
• Size of organization
• Dates of involvement
• Offices held
• Average number of hours spent per month

Whenever possible, quantify your impact or contribution. Please note that Haas is not interested in high school grades or activities. Note also that they want the list not in chronological order, but in order of importance — however you define “importance.”

3. List full-time and part-time jobs held during undergraduate or graduate studies, indicating the employer, job title, employment dates, location, and the number of hours worked per week for each position held prior to the completion of your degree.

Again, quantify as much as possible your responsibilities and impact. Focus on achievements. Avoid  job descriptions that are obvious from your job title.

4. If you have ever been subject to academic discipline, placed on probation, suspended, or required to withdraw from any college or university, please explain. If not, please enter N/A. (An affirmative response to this question does not automatically disqualify you from admission.)

Please, please, please don’t “forget” to answer this question if it applies to you. It’s far worse to ignore it than to answer it.

Optional Essay: Is there any other information you would like to share that is not presented elsewhere in the application? You may also use this essay to provide further explanation of employment gaps or your quantitative abilities. (500 word maximum)

A bonus! If there is an element in your background, be it personal, academic or professional, that you have not revealed elsewhere and would like the adcom to know about, this is the spot. Give them another reason to admit you, but don’t submit the grand summary, appeal, or closing statement. Keep it succinct and focused.

Obviously, you could use this essay to explain a weakness, but that would leave your application ending on a weakness, which is less than optimal. Try to fit the explanation in somewhere else in the app or if necessary tuck the weakness into this essay, but have the main focus of this essay be something positive. For example: Your pride in working your way through undergrad, the challenges, and the ultimate satisfaction of learning to manage your time. 

If you would like professional guidance with your UC Berkeley Haas MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Haas MBA application. 

UC Berkeley Haas 2016 MBA Application Deadlines:

UC Berkeley Haas 2016 MBA Timeline

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Linda Abraham By , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

Related Resources:

• 2016 MBA Application Essay Tips
• UC Berkeley Haas Zone Page
Why MBA? [Free Guide]

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Money’s 2015-2016 Top 25 Best Value Colleges In The U.S. http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/24/moneys-2015-2016-top-25-best-value-colleges-in-the-u-s/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/24/moneys-2015-2016-top-25-best-value-colleges-in-the-u-s/#respond Fri, 24 Jul 2015 16:11:40 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32669 Which schools will give you the best bang for your tuition buck? Money ranks 736 four-year colleges based on 21 factors in three categories: affordability, educational quality, and alumni earnings. In terms of affordability the following factors were taken into account: tuition increases, parent and student loans, merit aid, and the length of time it […]

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Click here for tips on how to get accepted to college.

Stanford University ranks 1 on Money’s list.

Which schools will give you the best bang for your tuition buck? Money ranks 736 four-year colleges based on 21 factors in three categories: affordability, educational quality, and alumni earnings.

In terms of affordability the following factors were taken into account: tuition increases, parent and student loans, merit aid, and the length of time it takes to graduate. (See more on this below under About Price.)

Another consideration was the “value added” grade that takes into account how well students are expected to perform based on their academic and economic backgrounds.

You can read more about Money’s methodology here.

According to a Washington Post article, Money’s list should be getting much more attention than it actually receives. The subject of ROI, the article explains, should be one of the biggest questions prospective students ask, and it’s practically missing from other, better known rankings. The article states:

“Unlike U.S. News, which focuses on several measures that really shouldn’t matter to students – percentage of alumni who donate, for example – Money magazine tries to answer the questions that prospective students should be asking on their college tours this summer: What is the graduation rate, net price (what’s the real tuition they’ll pay), how much do they and their parents have to borrow in loans, and will they learn any marketable skills that will help them get a job in order to pay back those loans?”

[Click here to see the full table.]

About Price

Money provides a more accurate look at school price tags by multiplying the net one-year cost times the average number of years it takes a student to complete their studies. “An expensive college is fine,” the Washington Post article states, “but not if it takes you eight years instead of four years to complete your degree.” According to Money, it takes students on average 4.3 years to graduate college. Student loans and federal PLUS loans (no borrowing limit) are also taken into consideration.

The last, and perhaps most important factor Money measures, is the “outcomes” category. How much will a graduate’s post-degree job pay? (This is measured by using Payscale data and LinkedIn information.)

You can read more commentary by the Washington Post here.

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Related Resources:

The Quick Guide to Admissions Resume
• Colleges Use Rejections to Raise Rankings
• PayScale: How Much Can You Earn, and How to Earn It?

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The 6 Commandments For A Successful CV http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/23/the-6-commandments-for-a-successful-cv/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/23/the-6-commandments-for-a-successful-cv/#respond Thu, 23 Jul 2015 16:52:24 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32315 Your resume is a key part of your application materials for med school or residency. You may think that because you’re uploading all your materials through the AMCAS or ERAS system, you won’t need a stellar paper CV. Not so. Here’s why: A CV is a vital précis of your achievements. It can help you […]

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Click here for tools on how to navigate the Med maze!

Make sure your CV is polished and makes you shine!

Your resume is a key part of your application materials for med school or residency. You may think that because you’re uploading all your materials through the AMCAS or ERAS system, you won’t need a stellar paper CV. Not so. Here’s why:

A CV is a vital précis of your achievements. It can help you as you complete the ERAS CV section (or the AMCAS activities section).

Having a polished resume to provide to your recommenders (and later, to residency directors) is also helpful. In addition, it’s a good idea to maintain your CV as an evolving document as your career evolves.

How can you create an effective medical resume?

1. Keep the time period relevant. For a resume for medical school, keep the focus on work and activities during college; only look back to high school in case of really significant honors (such as a major scholarship that extended into college). For a CV for your residency, focus primarily on experiences during medical school.

2. Carefully consider the sections you want to include. You’ll tailor this to your needs, but examples are: Education; Honors/Awards; Training; Publications; Presentations; Research; Teaching Experience; Work Experience; Licensure; Professional Memberships; Volunteer Activities. Within each section, list your activities in reverse chronological order.

3. Include concise, clear descriptions of your accomplishments in each section. Use strong verbs wherever possible. Use consistent formatting. Avoid vague or unexplained acronyms and abbreviations—you want your reader to know what you’re talking about immediately.

4. Be concise and direct. Keep the length of your CV reasonable at 1-2 pages. Your CV will grow as your career does—CV length limits aren’t as constrained as resume lengths. For example, if you’ve had a career prior to entering medicine, or if you have extensive research experience and publications, your CV may exceed this 2 page guideline.

5. Leave out sensitive personal information (such as marital status, social security number, etc). Also, needless to say, leave out anything fabricated or exaggerated.

6. Proofread, proofread, proofread! It’s helpful to have someone else look over your CV to spot errors and inconsistencies.

The Quick Guide To Admissions Resumes - Download your free guide today!

Rebecca BlusteinBy Dr. Rebecca BlusteinAccepted.com consultant since 2008, former Student Affairs Officer at UCLA’s Scholarship Resource Center, and author of the ebook, Financing Your Future: Winning Fellowships, Scholarships and Awards for Grad School. Dr. Blustein, who earned her Ph.D. at UCLA, assists our clients applying to MS, MA, and Ph.D. programs. She is happy to assist you with your med school applications.

Related Resources:

• Navigating the Med School Maze
• Attn Med Applicants: A Class Is Matriculated Every Single Year 
• Do’s and Don’ts for Writing Your Resume – Part 1: The 9 Do’s

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Short And Sweet: Tips For Writing “Mini” MBA Essays http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/23/short-and-sweet-tips-for-writing-mini-mba-essays-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/23/short-and-sweet-tips-for-writing-mini-mba-essays-2/#respond Thu, 23 Jul 2015 16:15:28 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32638 What is an admission committee’s message, intent, behind limiting an “essay” answer to 100, 200, or 300 characters? Just the facts, please. In fact, just the key facts. No adornment, no backstory, no extended rationale. Columbia Business School has had such a goals question for a few years, Darden has had a 140-character Tweet question, […]

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Click here for school specific MBA essay tips and deadlines!

Make sure you’re answering the exact question asked.

What is an admission committee’s message, intent, behind limiting an “essay” answer to 100, 200, or 300 characters? Just the facts, please. In fact, just the key facts.

No adornment, no backstory, no extended rationale.

Columbia Business School has had such a goals question for a few years, Darden has had a 140-character Tweet question, and now HBS has a couple of these mini-essay questions. Yes, it’s a trend.

In working with clients on such questions, I’ve been struck by how hard providing “just the facts” really is – it’s counterintuitive, it’s letting go. It makes the writer feel, well, a little naked out there. Adornment, backstory, rationale – those are the comfortable “clothes” now in a heap on the floor.

OK, but how do you give them what they want – while simultaneously serving your goal of creating a compelling application that differentiates and distinguishes you?

Here are some unadorned tips to answer that question.

• Read the question carefully and weigh each word, to make sure you’re answering the exact question. (Seems obvious? I’ve witnessed many very smart people misread the question, with predictable results.)

 Short doesn’t mean easy. The opposite is often true. Allocate and devote some up-front thinking time to what you’ll say. The fewer words you have, the greater weight each word has.

• In this thinking process, decide the 1-3 key points you must convey. Don’t even consider anything else.

• Also in this thinking process, consider the application overall. These mini-essays must work within a larger whole. For example, if you only have 200 characters to write about your goals, and you’re planning to shift careers, look for other places in the application to indicate that you have relevant skill sets, understand the industry/function, etc.

• In drafting, write a little over the limit and pare down.

• Make sure each word is meaningful. Stick to nouns and verbs. Use short, direct sentences, which allow you to “squeeze” the most out of the limited characters.

• Avoid repeating the question (if it’s about post-MBA goals, the reader will know what you’re referring to, you don’t have to say, “Post-MBA I plan to…).

You know the expression “short and sweet.” Turn brevity to your advantage. A short statement can have great power, propulsion. The key is to do it right.

5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid In Your MBA Application Essays - Download your free guide!

 

Cindy Tokumitsu By , Cindy Tokumitsu, co-author of The Finance Professional’s Guide to MBA Admissions Success, and author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her last fifteen years with Accepted.com.

Related Resources:

• Twelve Terrific Tips for MBA Applicants [Free Guide]
School-Specific MBA Application Essay Tips
• Choosing Topics For The B-School Essay

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Boston University Medical School 2016 Secondary Application Essay Tips http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/23/boston-university-medical-school-2016-secondary-application-essay-tips/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/23/boston-university-medical-school-2016-secondary-application-essay-tips/#respond Thu, 23 Jul 2015 15:54:09 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32549 BUSM’s MD Program offers students the opportunity to work with patients beginning in their first year of medical school.  Students will receive their clinical training at the prestigious Boston Medical Center, which has the largest trauma center in the Northeast.  Students also have the option of pursuing a Master’s Degree in Public Health.  The secondary […]

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BUSMBUSM’s MD Program offers students the opportunity to work with patients beginning in their first year of medical school.  Students will receive their clinical training at the prestigious Boston Medical Center, which has the largest trauma center in the Northeast.  Students also have the option of pursuing a Master’s Degree in Public Health.  The secondary application consists of five optional essays.

Boston University 2016 Secondary Application Essay Questions:

• Five optional short essays with varied word limits are requested.

• Applicants should use single line spacing and 12 point size font.

• Responses should be constructed strategically to highlight an applicant’s strengths.

Application Tip: Check out the BUSM Viewbook with admissions information:

Secondary Application Essays:

1. If you did not go to college directly after high school, please explain: (1400 character limit, approximately 280 words)

Medical schools love non-traditional applicants who have life experience.  If this essay prompt applies to you, provide a brief explanation of how you spent your time before enrolling in college—detailing any awards or accomplishments you earned before entering higher education.  If you worked to help support your family, this is admirable and demonstrates that you took on significant responsibility at a young age.  Responding to this prompt will only help your application. 

2. If you are not expecting to go directly to medical school after completing your undergraduate work, please explain. (1400 character limit, approximately 280 words)

Be honest in this response.  If you need to take a break before applying to medical school, write about how you will use your time.  Discuss all volunteer work, extracurricular interests or clinical experience that you plan to participate in. If you have a goal for this period, provide it.  If you need to work to save up money to apply—state this in your response.  Explain where you intend to work and anticipated responsibilities.    

3. If you have spent more than 4 years as an undergraduate, please explain below. (You may skip this question if you have graduated within 4 years.)

If applicable, create a list of all the reasons why you were not able to graduate in four years.  After ranking your list in order of importance, use this as your outline.  Having multiple interests or double majors will only help your application, as the reader will have the opportunity to learn more about your unique talents and interests. 

4. Please provide a narrative or timeline to describe any features of your educational history that you think may be of particular interest to us. For example, have you lived in another country or experienced a culture unlike your own, or worked in a field that contributed to your understanding of people unlike yourself? Or, have you experienced advanced training in any area, including the fields of art, music, or sports? This is an opportunity to describe learning experiences that may not be covered in other areas of this application. It is not necessary to write anything in this section. (2000 character limit, approximately 400 words)

Though this essay is also optional, I would strongly recommend responding to it.  Using an updated copy of your resume or CV, work backwards from the most current to oldest experiences.  What are your other interests, outside of medicine?  Have you lived or worked in another country?  Did you win any science or non-science awards or fairs in your early education?  Focus this response on educational experiences—talents or skills you developed through training or learning opportunities (formal education or self-taught).   

5. We have found that for most applicants, an extra essay written expressly for Boston University adds little to the information content of the portfolio. While we no longer require an essay, some applicants feel that additional information is necessary in order to provide us with a comprehensive understanding of their strengths as a candidate for a career in medicine. If you wish, use the space below to offer an essay or any other information, addressing any issue you feel is of importance. If you choose to use the space, please do not duplicate information provided elsewhere in this Supplemental Application or in material you have submitted to AMCAS.

For most applicants, no supplementary essay will be necessary and this space can be left blank.

In this response, you could focus on any clinical, research or science related experiences that you have not already covered in detail in your personal statement that would reveal your commitment to a career in medicine.  Again, this essay is also optional, but by responding to it you will be demonstrating your interest in the BUSM Program.  Using a copy of your resume/CV or a timeline of your life experiences could assist you in deciding what to write about in this response.  Be strategic in your selection—covering information that you have not yet discussed that will highlight your strengths as an applicant.  

BUSM Application Timeline:

Come read other School Specific Secondary Essay Tips

*(Strong recommendation: Submit within two weeks after receipt.)

If you would like professional guidance with your Boston University School of Medicine application materials, please consider using Accepted’s Medical School Admissions Consulting and Editing Services, which include advising, editing, and interview coaching for the BUSM application materials.

Navigate the Med Maze - Download your free guide today!

 

Alicia McNease Nimonkar is an Accepted.com advisor and editor specializing in healthcare admissions. Prior to joining Accepted, Alicia worked for five years as Student Advisor at UC Davis’ postbac program where she both evaluated applications and advised students applying successfully to med school and related programs.

Related Resources:

• 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid In Your Med School Essays, [Free Report]
• An Inside Look at the Medical School Journey [Podcast]
• Successful Medical School Secondary Application Strategies

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Kellogg 2016 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/22/kellogg-2016-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/22/kellogg-2016-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/#respond Wed, 22 Jul 2015 17:07:52 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32294 In September 2014, Kellogg “rebranded” itself and adopted a more concrete (and in my opinion better) mission statement: “Inspiring growth.” The video below explores and clarifies this mission as well as the values Kellogg holds dear. I highly recommend that you watch it to grasp Kellogg’s fundamental principles.  A couple of key takeaways from the video: Kellogg seeks individuals […]

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In September 2014, Kellogg “rebranded” itself and adopted a more concrete (and in my opinion better) mission statement: “Inspiring growth.” The video below explores and clarifies this mission as well as the values Kellogg holds dear. I highly recommend that you watch it to grasp Kellogg’s fundamental principles. 

A couple of key takeaways from the video: Kellogg seeks individuals who:

Have a growth mindset (for details, please see Caroline Dweck’s Mindset: The New Psychology of Success, one of my favorite books).

Work well in a collaborative environment while striving to grow individually and at the same time inspiring growth in individuals, organizations, and markets.

Kellogg also changed both its questions this year and #2 certainly reflects the new emphasis on growth.

My tips are in blue below.

Essays:

1.
 Leadership and teamwork are integral parts of the Kellogg experience. Describe a recent and meaningful time you were a leader. What challenges did you face, and what did you learn? (450 words)

First things first: Kellogg is asking for ONE experience. Not more. It also reflects Kellogg’s belief that teamwork and leadership go hand-in-hand. Unlike last year’s similar essay question, Kellogg is not limiting your professional settings. You do have the option to use a non-professional leadership experience.

 You can use a STAR framework for this response (Situation, Task, Action, Results). Start with the situation and simply describe what was situation/problem/opportunity you were asked to respond to. Then relate your group’s task and your responsibility. How did you motivate the others to move in one direction? How did you influence and persuade? Finally what were the results for the group? And what did you learn about leadership, collaboration, and influence?

While it isn’t a requirement, and I can imagine instances where this may not be true, examples where you led by virtue of your stature and others’ respect for you will be more compelling than those where you led by virtue of station and title. 

2.
 Pursuing an MBA is a catalyst for personal and professional growth. How have you grown in the past? How do you intend to grow at Kellogg? (450 words)

This is a difficult question that should provide Kellogg with real insight into the individuals applying to its MBA program. Before responding do your homework on the Kellogg program and what you want to do after you leave Kellogg. The latter will tell you how you want to grow and the former will tell you how you will do so at Kellogg.

First think about the times you have grown either professionally or personally. Which of those instances would you like Kellogg to know about? Ideally the event you choose to focus on will relate in some way to the growth you want to have at Kellogg.

Then reflect on how you intend to grow while at Kellogg. I think this the strong answer to this question will really go beyond mere skill acquisition, although that can be part of your response. How are you going to take advantage of what Kellogg offers to become more like the people in the video: able to see opportunity when faced with challenge, to envision a beautiful finished structure when staring at a bare shell, and to harness your emotional intelligence and acquired skills to lead collaboratively and with clarity of purpose? 

Certain applicants will respond to additional questions:

Dual-degree applicants: For applicants to the MMM or JD-MBA dual degree programs, please explain why that program is right for you. (250 words)

A straight-forward response is required here.  What do you want to do that requires both degrees? Why is this joint program the right one to fill in the gaps in your education and take you to a point where you can go down your desired professional path.

Re-applicants: Since your previous application, what steps have you taken to strengthen your candidacy? (250 word limit)

No trick questions here. How are you a better candidate today than when Kellogg rejected you? Have you addressed weaknesses in your previous application? Check out MBA Reapplicant 101 — a lot of (free) resources. 

All applicants have the opportunity to provide explanations or clarification in Additional Information:

If needed, use this section to briefly describe any extenuating circumstances (e.g. unexplained gaps in work experience, choice of recommenders, inconsistent or questionable academic performance, etc.) (no word count)

This is a true optional question If necessary, use it to provide context for possible negatives. Take responsibility for mistakes if necessary and discuss what you have changed so that you don’t err in the same way again.

Keep this section short and to-the-point. Don’t be fooled by “No word count.”

Video Essay: 

The Video Essays provide applicants with an additional opportunity to demonstrate what they will bring to our vibrant Kellogg community – in an interactive way. Each applicant will complete two short video essay questions. The questions are designed to bring to life the person we have learned about on paper.

After submitting a completed application, each applicant will be asked to complete two Video Essay Questions. One will be about the candidate’s interest in Kellogg and the other will be a “getting to know you” type of question.

There are 10 practice questions which candidates can complete as many times as they like to get comfortable with the format and technology. The practice questions and experience will simulate the actual video essay experience, so this is meant to be a useful tool and help applicants feel prepared.

There is not an opportunity to re-do the answer to the official video essay questions. We encourage applicants to practice so they are comfortable with the format once it is time to complete the official questions.

Candidates will have 20 seconds to think about their question and up to 1 minute to give their response.

We estimate the Video Essays will take 15-20 minutes to complete – which includes time for set-up and answering all the practice questions.

To prepare for your webcam session, you need to practice for the experience of talking to a video camera with no responses from another human being. For tips on how to prepare and behave during the webcam session, please see Kellogg’s “Video Essay” on its Application Components page as well as my Tips for Video MBA Essay Questions.

If you would like professional guidance with your Kellogg MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our  MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Kellogg application. 

Kellogg 2016 MBA Application Deadlines:

Check out our other school-specific MBA Essay Tips

*Your application must be received by Kellogg no later than 5p.m. CT on the deadline for the round in which you are applying.

MBA Admissions A-Z: 26 Great Tips - Download your free copy!

Linda Abraham By , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

Related Resources:

• 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your MBA Application Essays [Free Guide]
• 2016 School-Specific MBA Application Essay Tips
• Optional Essays: When and How to Write Them [Short Video]

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Train The Brain, Nail The GMAT [Or GRE] http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/22/train-the-brain-nail-the-gmat-or-gre/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/22/train-the-brain-nail-the-gmat-or-gre/#respond Wed, 22 Jul 2015 16:34:08 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32618 What do sports and graduate admissions test have in common? More than you’ve ever imagined. Have a GMAT or GRE coming up? Listen to our talk with Brett Ethridge, founder and CEO of Dominate the GMAT and Dominate the GRE for invaluable test prep insights and advice – – and a healthy dosage of sports […]

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Listen to the show!What do sports and graduate admissions test have in common? More than you’ve ever imagined.

Have a GMAT or GRE coming up? Listen to our talk with Brett Ethridge, founder and CEO of Dominate the GMAT and Dominate the GRE for invaluable test prep insights and advice – – and a healthy dosage of sports allegories.

00:02:45 – How Brett got involved in test prep. (The honest answer.)

00:05:51 – The online education style at Dominate the GMAT.

00:08:23 – What happens when a student at Dominate the GMAT is just not picking up the info.

00:10:27 – Looking for test prep? Dominate the GMAT’s unique value.

00:14:44 – Comparing the GRE and GMAT.

00:17:20 – GMAT vs. GRE: Which test to pick!

00:28:21 – Brett’s top test prep advice. Prepare to un-teach.

00:33:44 – A surprising tip for raising your GMAT score.

00:39:13 – How much time to do you need to study to increase your score by 50 points?

00:43:18 – “Get dressed up” and other final words of advice.

Click here to listen to the show!*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com

Related links:

• dominatethegmat.com
• Preparing for the GMAT: Video Tips to Live By
• Your 3-Part Game Plan to Dominate the GMAT

Related shows:

• How To Think Like A Dean Of Admissions
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• The GMAC, the GMAT, and the MBA Degree
• The GMAT, the GRE, and the Guy Who Knows them Well
Chris Ryan of Manhattan GMAT on What MBA Applicants Need to Know

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Secondary Strategy: Why Do You Want To Go Here? http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/22/secondary-strategy-why-our-program/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/22/secondary-strategy-why-our-program/#respond Wed, 22 Jul 2015 16:08:51 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32487 One of the most popular secondary questions asked by medical schools is “why our program?” Saying why you’re attracted to a particular school can be hard thing to explain, especially when you’ve looked at so many programs that they seem to blur. I think that’s why I so often see the same answer: “early clinical […]

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Medical School Secondary Essay Handbook: School Specific Tips for Top Programs - Download today!

Location is important, but don’t make geography the main focus of this essay.

One of the most popular secondary questions asked by medical schools is “why our program?” Saying why you’re attracted to a particular school can be hard thing to explain, especially when you’ve looked at so many programs that they seem to blur. I think that’s why I so often see the same answer: “early clinical exposure, great faculty and learning environment, and opportunities to work overseas and/or in the student-run clinic.” These reasons may all be true, but they come across as if all medical schools are similar. And just like you want them to differentiate you from your competition, they want to know that you’ve taken the time to learn about them.

Here are a few ways you can go beyond the cookie-cutter response to show that you’ve researched the school and discuss the program’s distinctive appeal for you:

1. Highlight the unique fit: What about this program, and this program alone, matches with your particular interests? If you have been volunteering in an oncology lab and know that Vanderbilt is investigating patient responses to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, then discuss your interest in that field and the special opportunities the school provides. Perhaps even bring up the work of a particular professor or researcher you admire, particularly if you’ve read one of their works. If you want to explore opportunities for medical publishing, then you’ll want to mention Stanford’s interdisciplinary studies and highlight your interest in their other faculties.

2. Explain why “where” is important: Sometimes you might also want to bring in the school’s locale and explain why it’s important to your education. For instance, George Washington University‘s proximity to Washington DC makes it great for people interested in community health promotion and policy; a busy urban center like Tulane or SUNY Downstate will expose you to diverse patient populations found nowhere else, and are special draws for those interested in fields like infectious disease; and the University of Washington gives students access to rural medicine that few programs can offer. Support systems – family members living nearby, for instance – can also be mentioned (in fact, some schools specifically ask for this information) but in general, don’t make accidents of geography the main focus of this essay.

3. Align your philosophies: Finally, I find that one of the best ways to approach the “Why _____?” question is to try to discover the school’s philosophy and then shape your answers around that. For instance, Yale is renowned for the “Yale System” and takes a lot of pride in their interdisciplinary, non-competitive, self-directed learning approach. Each program is going to have its own philosophy that you’ll discover by exploring their website (as well as talking with alumni, if you have the chance to do that).

Identifying why each school is special is definitely a time-consuming task. However, it might be one of the best ways you spend your time in the application process. While you’re ensuring that you attract the attention of multiple schools, you’re also gaining information you need about them. And when you have to choose between multiple acceptances, you’ll know exactly where you fit.

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Cydney Foote By , Accepted consultant and author of Write Your Way to Medical School, who has helped future physicians craft winning applications since 2001.

 

Related Resources:

• Medical School Secondary Essay Handbook: School Specific Tips for Top Programs [Free Guide]
• Successful Medical School Secondary Application Strategies
• How to Get the Most Out of Your Experience Working With A Medical School Consultant

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Catching Up With Recent Stanford GSB Graduate Tim Eisenman http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/21/catching-up-with-recent-stanford-gsb-graduate-tim-eisenman/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/21/catching-up-with-recent-stanford-gsb-graduate-tim-eisenman/#respond Tue, 21 Jul 2015 18:11:31 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32603 This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a follow up interview with Tim Eisenman, who just completed the MBA program at Stanford GSB. We first met Tim last year – you can read our first interview […]

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Read more MBA student interviewsThis interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a follow up interview with Tim Eisenman, who just completed the MBA program at Stanford GSB. We first met Tim last year – you can read our first interview with him here.)

Accepted: Last we spoke you were in the middle of your first year at Stanford GSB, and now you’ve just received your MBA — congrats! Can you bring us up to speed? How was your last year and a half?

Tim: Sure, it is so scary to think that the last time we talked is already 1.5 years ago. As you said, I graduated about a month ago and was fortunate enough to have my parents and my sister from Germany with me.

Right now I am in New York looking for an apartment and getting to know the city before I start my job at McKinsey in fall. I am also volunteering at a kids soccer camp in Manhattan three days a week and am thinking about writing a book. As you can see – I can’t just do nothing.

Highlights from last year are moving off-campus into a house with classmates from Austria, Japan, Turkey, Brasil and Argentina and having amazing BBQ parties as well as developing really close friendships to some GSBers through 1:1s or runs along the Bay. On the academic side, developing the first ever GSB “Travel and Hospitality Industry” elective with a former co-worker of mine was amazing. We will teach the class again this fall.

Accepted: Which clubs or activities were you involved with on campus? How central to student life is club involvement?

Tim: Club involvement was crucial to my GSB experience – both from a professional perspective, but also as a way to get to know likeminded classmates. I was heavily involved in the “Travel & Hospitality Club” and the “Stanford Africa Business Forum.” The Travel Club gave me the opportunity to network with high-profile execs in the airline industry, who also come and speak at our travel class.

At the GSB, it is not only what the school can give to you, but also what you can give back through your background. Aviation was a great example for that and I believe that we really strengthened the industry exposure of the school for years to come. Working on the “Africa Business Forum” was amazing, because I was the only non-African on the team and therefore learnt a lot about different cultural working styles. That team really came together strong at the end and we created an amazing conference.

Accepted: Looking back, what would you say was the most challenging aspect of business school? How would you advise others who may be facing that challenge?

Tim: Figuring out what you want to get out of school was most challenging. I remember double- or even triple-booking my lunch breaks for the first couple of weeks. Everything sounds interesting and you do not want to miss out. What I came to realize though is that I can’t be fully present for several things at the same time and that I needed to prioritize. At the end I was fine taking a 2 hour walk with a classmate and missing Mitt Romney speak – that classmate is going to turn into a lifelong friend and I am totally fine not having a picture with Mitt on my Facebook wall.

If you have time before going off to school make a list with things that are important to you – don’t forget to include sleep, healthy food, exercise and so on. If business school helps you get into the habit of exercising daily then this is a great achievement. Not everything has to be career related.

Accepted: What did you end up doing for your summer internship last year? Can you talk about the process by which you obtained your internship? How does it work at Stanford?

Tim: I worked for McKinsey in London and went through very straightforward on-campus recruiting. A lot of classmates got their internship less formally through networking and knocking on doors of interesting companies. Stanford helps with that process through events (such as the “Fewer than 300 Employees Event”) targeting smaller companies that might not want to set up a booth right next to GE and BCG.

I also did a one-month GMIX, a social impact immersion, working for a mushroom company in Kigali that was founded by a GSBer and that I had worked for before school already. The founder and I have become close friends and this January he offered me to join his board. He graduated twenty years ago and stayed at my house for his reunion this spring. It’s amazing how tight so many of the Stanford connections can get.

Accepted: What’s next for you? Where will your MBA bring you?

Tim: As I said, I will join McKinsey in their New York office this fall working mostly on airline and transportation topics. Eventually I will go back into the industry and hope to take on a leadership role someday. Aviation is not a traditional post-MBA industry, but given that there are no real low-cost airlines in Africa, that there are very few ultra-low-cost long haul carriers and that there is huge room for consolidation, I believe that industry dynamics will continue to shift. I want to be a part of that and feel that the out-of-the-box thinking at Stanford is a great asset for me to have when the time comes.

On the side I will continue to engage in the for-profit social impact sphere in Africa and who knows? Maybe I will get bored in the developed world and take a big leap to work in an underdeveloped African country. I like to have options as I see that traditional picture of a ladder of success being antiquated. It is much rather a climbing wall of success. Instead of going up, going sideways might actually make more sense sometimes.

Accepted: Are you still blogging?

Tim: I am still blogging, but I have slowed down and it is on my to-do list to get back into it again. Everyone talks about the power of journaling at Stanford. It is nice to sometimes just reflect about a topic through writing about it.

To read more about Tim’s journey, please check out his blog, From PA to the World. Thank you Tim for sharing your story with us and we wish you lots of luck!

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school applications, please see our MBA Application Packages.

Register for our free webinar: Get Accepted to Stanford GSB!

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Related Resources:

• Stanford GSB 2016 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
• Understanding Stanford GSB’s Interest In Personal Qualities And Contributions
• 4 Ways to Show How You’ll Contribute in the Future

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City College In NYC To Open Med School http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/21/city-college-in-nyc-to-open-med-school/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/21/city-college-in-nyc-to-open-med-school/#respond Tue, 21 Jul 2015 16:48:16 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32527 In partnership with St. Barnabas Hospital in the Bronx, New York’s City College will be opening the Harlem-based CUNY School of Medicine in the fall of 2016, the first and only medical school in the CUNY’s 168-year history. The med school will be an expansion of City College’s Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education which already […]

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Learn how to navigate the med school maze!In partnership with St. Barnabas Hospital in the Bronx, New York’s City College will be opening the Harlem-based CUNY School of Medicine in the fall of 2016, the first and only medical school in the CUNY’s 168-year history. The med school will be an expansion of City College’s Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education which already offers a seven-year BS/MD program which, according to the recent CUNY news release, focuses on “recruiting underrepresented minorities into medicine, increasing medical care in historically underserved communities, and boosting the number of primary care physicians.”

The CUNY School of Medicine will have the same mission – to train physicians with diverse backgrounds to work in underserved communities, particularly those in close proximity to City College and around New York State.

Maurizio Trevisan, City College Provost, explains that “in doing so, the school remains true to the mission of City College founder Townsend Harris, who stated, ‘… Let the children of the rich and the poor take their seats together and know of no distinction….’ ”

According to Capital New York, the inaugural class will consist of about 70 students.

Two additional medical schools are also in the process of becoming accredited and joining the AAMC: California Northstate University College of Medicine in Elk Grove, California and the University of Texas at Austin Dell Medical School in Austin, Texas. According to an AAMC article, the first will focus on training primary care physicians and the latter on “leadership, interprofessional, and transdisciplinary education as part of a research-intensive health system.” The AAMC article mentions the CUNY School of Medicine as the third to join the record 144 accredited medical schools in the U.S., stating that it will emphasize “commitment to increasing diversity in medical education…[and] concentrate on primary care training.”

Darrell G. Kirch, AAMC President and CEO, says: “At a time when the nation faces a doctor shortage, these schools and their diverse missions will help ensure greater access to care for a growing, aging population. We look forward to the outstanding contributions that will be made by the excellent physicians who train at these and all of our medical school programs. The nation’s medical schools and teaching hospitals have committed to expanding medical student enrollment by 30 percent by 2019 to address the coming shortage. These new institutions are part of that effort. Now Congress must act to lift the cap on Medicare support for graduate medical education so that all new physicians can complete their residency training and serve their communities.”

Navigate the Med Maze - Download your free guide today!

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Related Resources:

• 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Med School Essay [Free Guide]
• 5 Things to Avoid in Your Med School Personal Statement
• An Inside Look at The Medical School Journey [Podcast]

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Georgetown University School Of Medicine 2016 Secondary Application Essay Tips http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/21/georgetown-university-school-of-medicine-2016-secondary-application-essay-tips/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/21/georgetown-university-school-of-medicine-2016-secondary-application-essay-tips/#respond Tue, 21 Jul 2015 15:47:32 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32436 Given the Jesuit influence at Georgetown and its adoption of the Cura Personalis philosophy, I recommend covering your clinical, research and community service experience Georgetown’s secondary application essay. The school places special emphasis on training physicians to treat medically underserved communities.  Highlight your personal connections, volunteer work and leadership roles in medically underserved communities. Georgetown […]

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Click here for more School Specific Secondary Application  Essay TipsGiven the Jesuit influence at Georgetown and its adoption of the Cura Personalis philosophy, I recommend covering your clinical, research and community service experience Georgetown’s secondary application essay. The school places special emphasis on training physicians to treat medically underserved communities.  Highlight your personal connections, volunteer work and leadership roles in medically underserved communities.

Georgetown University School of Medicine 2016 Essay Questions:

 • Two short essays, with character limits of 1,000, and one long essay, with a character limit of  5,000.
• Applicants should use single line spacing and 12 point size font.
• Responses should be constructed strategically to highlight an applicant’s strengths.

Secondary Application Essays:

Short Essays:

1. Georgetown University School of Medicine strives to ensure that its students become respectful physicians who embrace all dimensions of caring for the whole person. Please describe how your personal characteristics or life experiences will contribute to the Georgetown School of Medicine community and bring educational benefits to our student body. (1,000 characters)

Using an updated draft of your resume or CV as well as a copy of the activities section of your AMCAS application, select those experiences that you feel will be most helpful in sharing with your classmates. Did you learn to speak another language? Have you traveled to other countries to assist medically underserved communities? Do you have experience working with a particular patient population? More personally, what characteristics stand out most about you? How will your particular perspective of the world, based on this individuality, allow you to assist your classmates in becoming better doctors?

2. Is there any further information that you would like the Committee on Admissions to be aware of when reviewing your file that you were not able to notate in another section of this or the AMCAS Application? (1,000 characters)

This would be the best place to cover any academic difficulties that you have overcome whether you’ve retaken courses, created an increasing trend in your GPA or retaken the MCAT for a higher score. Focusing on those areas of the application that you have successfully improved can provide compelling evidence of your academic potential and how you will perform in medical school. If this approach is not relevant to your application, you can use this section to update the committee on new publications, activities or awards that may not be on the AMCAS application. Discuss what you have been doing since you started the application process.

Long Essay:

Why have you chosen to apply to Georgetown University School of Medicine, and how do you think your education at Georgetown will prepare you to become a physician for the future?*(1-2 pages).

Since this is such a long essay, it will be helpful to draw upon your previous experiences to demonstrate why your values align with those of Georgetown. Use concrete, specific examples to explain how and why you will integrate easily into their study body. The second part of this essay prompt requires that you focus on the future. After researching their curriculum and special programs, you can explain how each of these will enhance your medical education. Make a list and use this as an outline to guide your response. Focus on the most important points last; they may be forgotten if you include them at the beginning of such a long essay. For that reason, it will be important to provide a concise summary of what you’ve covered in the conclusion.

Georgetown University Application Timeline:

Georgetown 2016 Secondary Essay Timeline

If you would like professional guidance with your Georgetown University School of Medicine application materials, please consider using Accepted’s Medical School Admissions Consulting and Editing Services, which include advising, editing, and interview coaching for GUSOM’s application materials.

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Alicia McNease Nimonkar is an Accepted.com advisor and editor specializing in healthcare admissions. Prior to joining Accepted, Alicia worked for five years as Student Advisor at UC Davis’ postbac program where she both evaluated applications and advised students applying successfully to med school and related programs.

Related Resources:

Interviewing with Impact: How to Make an Impression in Your Med School IVs [Free Guide]
Medical School Admissions 2015-2016: A Dean’s Perspective [Podcast]
Successful Medical School Secondary Application Strategies

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Don’t Miss Out—Important Secondary Essays Tips http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/20/dont-miss-out-important-secondary-essays-tips/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/20/dont-miss-out-important-secondary-essays-tips/#respond Mon, 20 Jul 2015 19:11:52 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31889 Quick reminder! We’re hosting a free, 1-hour webinar on Writing Secondary Essays that Get You Accepted on Wednesday, July 22nd at 5pm PT/8pm ET. The webinar is free, but registration is required. Don’t miss it! There’s still time to register—sign up today! And if you have any questions you’d like addressed on the webinar, you can […]

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Register for the webinar now!

Quick reminder! We’re hosting a free, 1-hour webinar on Writing Secondary Essays that Get You Accepted on Wednesday, July 22nd at 5pm PT/8pm ET.

The webinar is free, but registration is required. Don’t miss it!

Register now

There’s still time to register—sign up today! And if you have any questions you’d like addressed on the webinar, you can reach out on Twitter using hashtag #PreMDQA.

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Waitlisted – What Now? http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/20/on-the-mba-waitlisted-now-what/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/20/on-the-mba-waitlisted-now-what/#respond Mon, 20 Jul 2015 16:16:15 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32468 “Waitlisted – What Now?” is the latest post in our series Navigate the MBA Maze. First, a word of introduction: Realize that receiving a wait-list letter means you qualify for admission. You pass. You are probably on the wait-list (and not admitted) because they have already admitted applicants with your profile and want diversity in […]

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Listen to Lindas podcast as she discusses how to get off the waitlist!

Being put on the waitlist could mean that your goal is almost within reach!

Waitlisted – What Now?” is the latest post in our series Navigate the MBA Maze.

First, a word of introduction: Realize that receiving a wait-list letter means you qualify for admission. You pass. You are probably on the wait-list (and not admitted) because they have already admitted applicants with your profile and want diversity in the class. Or they find your qualifications impressive, but find someone else’s even more so.

I encourage you to seize the initiative and launch a campaign. Unless the school discourages additional contact, take a proactive approach. You have already shown that you qualify for the school; otherwise you wouldn’t find yourself on the wait-list. They like you. Now give the adcom additional reasons to admit you by writing a succinct wait-list letter.

Your waitlist updates and letters of support from others should focus on three areas:

1. Your qualifications: specifically recent professional achievements, academics, research, increases in responsibilities, initiatives, and community service.

2. Steps you have taken to ameliorate weaknesses.

3. How you fit with the school.

The first two areas demonstrate that you are an even better applicant today than you were when you applied. The third reveals that you belong at that school like a hand fits in a snug glove on a cold winter day, and that you will attend if, or should I say when, accepted.

Suggestions for a Waitlist Update:

1. Briefly thank the school for continuing to consider your application and mention how the school’s philosophy and approach fit your educational preferences and goals. Don’t dwell on your disappointment at not being accepted.

2. Agree to take any additional courses or follow any additional instructions provided.

3. Discuss recent achievements. Did you have a 4.0 during the last quarter? Have you led a project or organization? Volunteered? Have you taken your department, business, or club in a new direction? Have you had an article published? Earned a patent? Launched a business? Received a promotion or assumed additional responsibilities? Succeeded in a particularly demanding class or project? You should bring out any recent accomplishments not discussed in your application and ideally tie them back to some of the themes or experiences you raised in your essays.

4. Discuss how you have addressed shortcomings—without highlighting them. For example, if you enrolled in Toastmasters to improve your communications skills, inform the adcom that you did so two months ago, tell them of any awards you have won, and enlighten them as to how much you are enjoying the experience. BUT don’t say that you are doing all this because you are concerned about your low verbal score or sub-standard grades in social science courses.

5. If you are certain you would attend this school, make it clear that this is your first choice and that you will attend if accepted.

Keep the letter short and sweet — two pages max. Don’t succumb to the temptation to rewrite or even summarize your life history or essays. Stay focused on what you have accomplished since applying.

Accepted.com’s editors are available to help you evaluate your application, advise you on your wait-list strategy, and edit wait-list letters. For more information, please visit our wait-list services for more details.





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Related Resources:

• The Nine Mistakes You Don’t Want to Make on an MBA Waitlist [ebook]
• Waitlisted! What Now? 
• 3 Topics to Discuss in Waitlist Correspondence [Short Video]

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Applying To Stanford GSB? Read This! http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/19/applying-to-stanford-gsb-read-this/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/19/applying-to-stanford-gsb-read-this/#respond Sun, 19 Jul 2015 19:25:15 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31989 Are you applying to Stanford GSB? Our webinar on Tuesday will give you the tools to create a strong application. You don’t want to miss this! Sign up now for Get Accepted to Stanford GSB, airing live on Tuesday, July 21, at 10am PT/1pm ET. Tags: MBA Admissions

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Register for our webinar "Get Accepted to Stanford Graduate School of Business" today!Are you applying to Stanford GSB? Our webinar on Tuesday will give you the tools to create a strong application. You don’t want to miss this!

Sign up now for Get Accepted to Stanford GSB, airing live on Tuesday, July 21, at 10am PT/1pm ET.

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Chicago Booth 2016 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/19/chicago-booth-2016-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/19/chicago-booth-2016-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/#comments Sun, 19 Jul 2015 17:11:05 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32291 Chicago Booth has always prided itself on valuing applicants who can handle ambiguity and lack of structure. And it’s application reflects that principle. In spades. This year’s Booth application also mirrors Chicago’s pride in its distinctive culture. This essay/presentation question, which is new for this year, is about as open-ended and original as it gets. My tips […]

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Check out our webinar: Get Accepted to Chicago Booth!Chicago Booth has always prided itself on valuing applicants who can handle ambiguity and lack of structure. And it’s application reflects that principle. In spades. This year’s Booth application also mirrors Chicago’s pride in its distinctive culture. This essay/presentation question, which is new for this year, is about as open-ended and original as it gets.

My tips are in blue below.

Presentation/Essay:

Chicago Booth values individuality because of what we can learn from the diverse experiences and perspectives of others. This mutual respect creates an open-minded community that supports curiosity, inspires us to think more broadly, take risks, and challenge assumptions. At Booth, community is about collaborative thinking and tapping into each other’s different viewpoints to cultivate new ideas and realize breakthrough moments every day.

Using one of the photos provided, tell us how it resonates with your own viewpoint on why the Booth community is the right fit for you.

This is a really difficult question.

What do you want to tell Booth that reflects your adventurous and curious nature, your distinctive perspective and experience –which will contribute to the class’ diversity–and your ability to contribute to a vigorous but still collaborative exchange of ideas?  And yes it should be genuinely you.

To start make a list of the experiences and achievements that you are most proud of and that best reflect who you are.   Then review the Booth admissions criteria. Next to each item on your list, add the qualities from Booth’s criteria that this experience or achievement reveals.

Next review Booth’s website for insights into its community. If possible, talk to current students and recent alumni. Here is Booth’s succinct description of its community:

“Our community is intensely collaborative. At Booth, ideas compete and people collaborate. We have a culture where we value people who are curious. Whether presented by a classmate or a professor, every idea is examined with a belief in data over dogma. We prefer to let arguments stand and fall on their own merit. Ideas are authentically and rigorously tested and refined through honest and thoughtful discussion and discourse. There are no wrong questions, except the ones that go unasked.

“This experience will take you deeper into an issue, broaden your perspective, and compel you to challenge assumptions. You will uncover new realities and INSIGHTS, crack open seemingly intractable challenges, and develop more valid and useful solutions.”

Now that you have done your research, look at the pictures. Which one resonates with you? Which one will allow you to show fit with Booth’s community, especially the admissions criteria related to community?  

Presentation/Essay Guidelines

Choose the format that works for you. Feel free to submit a traditional essay, slide presentation, or any format that you feel best captures your response. Please use the format you are most comfortable with, the Admissions Committee has no preference.

Determine your own length. There is no prescribed minimum or maximum length. We trust that you will use your best judgment in determining how long your submission should be, but we recommend that you think strategically about how to best allocate the space.

Technical Guidelines

File Size: Maximum file size is 16 MB.

Accepted Upload Formats: Acceptable formats are PDF, Word, and PowerPoint. We strongly recommend converting your piece to a PDF file prior to submitting.

Multimedia Restrictions: We will be viewing your submission electronically and in full color, but all submissions will be converted to PDF files, so animation, video, music, etc. will not translate over.

A few thoughts:

Should you write an essay or use a visual presentation? That depends on you. If you are talented visually and love graphics and powerpoint, use a visual medium as long as it will translate to PDF. If you are a “words person” who prefers expressing your thoughts in writing, write the response. Do what will make it easiest for you to express your essence.  

Don’t take the lack of a word limit as a license to write the great American novel or your culture’s equivalent of War and Peace.  Don’t use more words or take more of their time than necessary. Don’t mistake quantity for quality.  This is a great place for you to show judgment — good or bad. 

Reapplicant Essay: Upon reflection, how has your perspective regarding your future, Chicago Booth, and/or getting an MBA changed since the time of your last application? (300 words maximum)

This answer to this question is critical for MBA reapplicants. Remember, Chicago (and any school you are reapplying to) wants to see growth. Same ol’, same ‘ol got you a ding last time and probably will again this time.

Let this brief essay show a maturation and evolution of your goals and reasons for wanting to attend Chicago Booth.  Let it also reveal that you meet Chicago’s criteria better this year than last. 

If you would like professional guidance with your Chicago Booth MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our  MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Booth application. 

Chicago Booth 2016 MBA Application Deadlines:

Check out our other school-specific MBA Essay Tips

Learn how to get accepted to Chicago Booth!

Linda Abraham By , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

Related Resources: 

• School-Specific MBA Application Essay Tips 
Chicago Booth B-School Zone
Audio & Video in Admissions, a free guide

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Successful Medical School Secondary Application Strategies http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/19/successful-medical-school-secondary-application-strategies-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/19/successful-medical-school-secondary-application-strategies-2/#respond Sun, 19 Jul 2015 16:19:40 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32447 To stay on top of your secondary applications, use the following strategies to get organized and to help you write better essays. Taking the time to think about how you will approach your secondaries can give you the “big picture” perspective you need to do your best work.  If you’re feeling overwhelmed, trying a new […]

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Don’t underestimate the power of organization!

To stay on top of your secondary applications, use the following strategies to get organized and to help you write better essays. Taking the time to think about how you will approach your secondaries can give you the “big picture” perspective you need to do your best work.  If you’re feeling overwhelmed, trying a new approach can make all the difference in your ability to produce higher quality writing.

The most successful students I’ve worked with focus on the following areas:

1. Time Management

Depending on how many medical schools you have applied to this cycle, you may have a large volume of secondary applications to return in a short period of time.  To stay on top of all of your deadlines, create a table with the name of the medical school, date you submitted the primary application, date you received the secondary application and the deadline to submit it.  You can also include space to list the date you submit the secondary.  Creating a table to track your progress with each school will allow you to prioritize application tasks based on your deadlines—to maximize your time management skills.  Given the anxiety inherent in the admissions process, any way that you can minimize unnecessary stress will help you to use your energy more constructively.  Being on top of your deadlines will empower you to excel on the tasks that require your best efforts to help you reach the next level.

2. Research

To demonstrate your interest in each medical school, it is critical to do your research as you complete each secondary—to demonstrate a personal knowledge of their institution.  What is the school’s mission statement?  Does the school have any special programs that you are interested in?  What is the structure of their curriculum?  Where is the school located and do you have personal ties to the area?  It is essential that you draw connections between your interests and the school.  After you have reviewed their web page, what information stands out in your mind?  Create a list of reasons why you are interested in attending the school.  List all of the reasons and then rank them based on their importance to you and your life goals.  Use the ranked items as an outline to draft your response to any questions about why you have applied to their school or how their program will benefit you.

3. Timeline

Create a timeline of your life to consult as a useful tool for completing secondary applications.  Be sure to include all major life events—incorporate all your activities and interests.  The more detailed your timeline is, the more useful it will be.  To avoid repetition, highlight or mark those experiences that you have already included in your primary application.  This demarcation will help you to avoid being repetitive in your secondary applications.  As you review your timeline, ask yourself how each individual event or activity has influenced your life goals or has led you towards a career in medicine.  This comprehensive life history will help you to be creative in your secondary essays and encourage you to draw upon your rich and diverse life experiences to convey your commitment to completing a medical education.

4. Writing Routine

Secondary applications provide an exciting opportunity for self-reflection.  To fully benefit from this period of introspection, journal daily.  The more frequently you practice expressing your ideas and feelings, the more easily you will be able to engage in the process of self-reflection.  It can be helpful to look at pictures of yourself as you were growing up.  Review your yearbooks and awards.  Write about these experiences and what they meant to you.  As you examine your motivations for wanting to become a doctor, it can be powerful to reconnect to your family history, childhood, adolescence, academic and clinical experiences.  Schedule a time of day that you can work on your secondary applications uninterrupted.  Journal for twenty minutes to warm up.  Approach each question one paragraph at a time to avoid becoming overwhelmed.  Use outlines.  During this time, it is also important to read regularly—especially those authors who inspire you.  The time and effort you put into completing your secondary applications will be evident to your reviewers.  Give them the opportunity to get to know you.

5. Proofreading and Editing

To submit your best work, be sure to proofread and edit all materials before you submit them.  Complete each secondary a few days before the deadline to allow yourself time to engage in this essential final step.  It can be especially beneficial to have friends, family or even professional editors, like me or my colleagues from Accepted.com, review your materials and provide feedback.  This will help you gain valuable insight on how to improve the quality of your application materials—which will lead to an interview and eventually an offer of acceptance.

If you would like professional guidance with your secondary application materials, please consider using Accepted’s Medical School Admissions Consulting and Editing Services, which include advising, editing, and interview coaching for application materials.

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Alicia Nimonkar is an Accepted.com advisor and editor specializing in healthcare admissions. Prior to joining Accepted, Alicia worked for five years as Student Advisor at UC Davis’ postbac program where she both evaluated applications and advised students applying successfully to med school and related programs. Explore Accepted.com’s services to see how Alicia can help you achieve your professional dreams in healthcare.

Related Resources:

• Medical School Reapplicant Advice: 6 Tips for Success [Free Guide]
Attn Med Applicants: A Class Is Matriculated Every Single Year  [Podcast]
• School-Specific Med Secondary Essay Tips

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Big Boost For Michigan Ross Entrepreneurship Institute http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/17/big-boost-for-michigan-ross-entrepreneurship-institute/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/17/big-boost-for-michigan-ross-entrepreneurship-institute/#respond Fri, 17 Jul 2015 17:05:01 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32433 The University of Michigan has announced a $60 million gift from the Zell Family Foundation, to support the Samuel Zell and Robert H. Lurie Institute for Entrepreneurial Studies at the Stephen M. Ross School of Business. The funds will support entrepreneurship programs for students, including a $10 million fund for student business ventures. Since its […]

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Check out Michigan Ross's zone page!The University of Michigan has announced a $60 million gift from the Zell Family Foundation, to support the Samuel Zell and Robert H. Lurie Institute for Entrepreneurial Studies at the Stephen M. Ross School of Business.

The funds will support entrepreneurship programs for students, including a $10 million fund for student business ventures.

Since its creation in 1999, the Zell Lurie Institute has fostered entrepreneurship at UM Ross and supported the creation of hundreds of start-up businesses, including more than 100 companies in the 2014-2015 academic year alone. The Zell Lurie Institute has been ranked in the top three programs for entrepreneurship for three years running.

Helen and Sam Zell are both UM alumni, and have supported their alma mater to the tune of over $150 million (including founding a program in entrepreneurship and law at the UM law school and helping to support the university’s creative writing program).




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Related Resources:

• An Interview with Anne Perigo of University of Michigan’s Master of Entrepreneurship Program 
• Michigan Ross Zone Page
• Michigan Ross Receives $20M Gift to Launch Leadership Center

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Do Stanford GSB Grads REALLY “Change Lives. Change Organizations. Change the World.”? http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/17/do-stanford-gsb-grads-really-change-lives-change-organizations-change-the-world/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/17/do-stanford-gsb-grads-really-change-lives-change-organizations-change-the-world/#respond Fri, 17 Jul 2015 15:52:52 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32396 Episode 3 in our Big Brand Theory Series for MBA applicants: Stanford GSB’s motto. Who wouldn’t want to change lives, change organizations, and change the world?  Right? For Episode 3 in our Big Brand Theory series, I set out to prove that Stanford GSB admits, transforms and graduates students who accomplish great feats.  I wanted […]

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Check out Stanford GBS zone page!Episode 3 in our Big Brand Theory Series for MBA applicants: Stanford GSB’s motto.

Who wouldn’t want to change lives, change organizations, and change the world?  Right? For Episode 3 in our Big Brand Theory series, I set out to prove that Stanford GSB admits, transforms and graduates students who accomplish great feats.  I wanted to demonstrate that Stanford GSB students, faculty and graduates lived GSB’s brand.

I’ve always been a big proponent of Stanford GSB (even when they had classrooms and desks that reminded me of my high school).  Regardless of their old environs, the Knight Center makes their facility live up to their students and their program.

I love the vibe when I walk onto Stanford’s campus.  I love the fact that their students have infinite access to Silicon Valley.  I love that the faculty turns their electives over so frequently that the course catalogue reads like a fresh new book each year.  I love the questions Derrick Bolton asks on his application.  In fact, I love Derrick (don’t tell my husband).  I do believe Derrick has done a great job in selecting some of the smartest people I know.  My clients who have gained admission to Stanford surprise me with their intelligence, talent, accomplishments and ideas.  They are futurists who can see beyond the horizon, but they still need me to plant the seed for their ideas to grow into great essays and interviews.  Regardless, I love my clients too (my husband already knows that fact).

Stanford GSB Alumni: Famous and Infamous

However, when I looked at Stanford GSB’s list of “notable” alumni, I only saw a handful of game changers.   The list is similar to those I see at other schools with notable founders, CEOs and investors like GM’s first female CEO, Mary Barra, Acumen Founder Jacqueline Novogratz, Charles Schwab of Charles Schwab, Nike’s Phil Knight, Ultra-investor Vinod Kosla, Atari’s Nolan Bushnell, KPCB’s Brook Byers; notable authors like Tom Peters and Jim Collins; and “famous celebrities” like Alex Michel (Alex Michel, really?  Do “reality” TV participants count as celebrities? More importantly, does anyone really watch The Bachelor?).

Stanford has also has its share of CEOs and a handful of leaders who have been heavily criticized like former BP CEO, Lord John Browne who was forced to resign, not because BP’s Texas City, Texas plant exploded under his watch or because he commissioned Deepwater Horizon that also forced his successor’s resignation, but because a newspaper “outed” him when he lied under oath about his boyfriend/male escort. Lord Brown cut costs for financial gains and as a result, he changed BP and also the Gulf of Mexico.

Go Deep and Authentic for What Matters to You Most

So how can you present the fact that you will change the world for the better?  Stanford asks two questions that I know Derrick and his team really take to heart.  My clients typically struggle with “What matters most to you and why?” The latter part of this question being equally, if not more important that the former.  This question requires a tremendous amount of introspection and if done well should show that you have the heart to change the world.

It requires you to know yourself at a very personal level and share that self-awareness with an admissions committee.  It’s not easy, and the best essays I’ve seen on this topic have knocked the wind out of me.  Several have made me cry. It is a dig deep into your soul question.  Derrick is a very smart and authentic individual, and he wants to get to know what drives you.

I begin brainstorming this question with clients by asking them for what they would give their life.  At that point, you already know it will be an intense brainstorm.  Often I hear, “family” or “helping others,” which can fall into the trap of discussing work. I ask my clients to frame this into a one- word value, and then I begin to peel away the layers until we find something deep and raw and revealing. After this digging, my clients also understand why they feel this value is most important to them.

Most of those clients have gained admission to Stanford GSB.  Some have not. The application is a complete picture and while you have revealed something raw to the committee, you may have other flaws in your application.

Why Stanford: Reveal the Capacity to Effect Change

Or you may not demonstrate in your “Why Stanford?” essay that you have already or have the capacity to change lives, change organizations, and yes, change the world.  If the first question is about heart, the second question is about intent and ability.  Do you intend to initiate change and have the talent to make it happen?

You really do need to think beyond the horizon for Stanford and make certain that you know why you need the Stanford MBA for you to create change: Jacqueline Novogratz did it; Vinod Kosla did it; and of course, Phil Knight did it. You just need to “just do it” like them. Swoosh.





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Natalie Grinblatt Epstein By , an accomplished Accepted.com consultant/editor (since 2008) and entrepreneur. Natalie is a former MBA Admissions Dean and Director at Ross, Johnson, and Carey.

Related Resources:

• Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One
• Understanding Stanford GSB’s Take On Demonstrated Leadership Potential
• Stanford GSB 2016 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

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7 Tips For MBA Applicants From Family Businesses http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/16/7-tips-for-mba-applicants-from-family-businesses/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/16/7-tips-for-mba-applicants-from-family-businesses/#respond Thu, 16 Jul 2015 16:47:47 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32390 You work for the family business and are applying for an MBA. Will this background be a net plus for you, or a minus? How can you make the most of this experience? I have worked with several clients who worked in a family business, including tiny start-ups whose headquarters was the family basement to […]

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12 Terrific Tips for the MBA Applicant - download your copy today!

Show the adcom how you got your voice heard in your family business!

You work for the family business and are applying for an MBA. Will this background be a net plus for you, or a minus? How can you make the most of this experience?

I have worked with several clients who worked in a family business, including tiny start-ups whose headquarters was the family basement to multimillion dollar enterprises with hundreds of employees. No matter the size of the business, I found that my clients had many strengths to offer in their essays based on their experiences. Here are a few of them.

1. You see the forest and the trees. If you’ve grown up in the business, no matter its size, you probably have gained some valuable knowledge about many aspects of it: sales, production, marketing, product innovation, customer service, perhaps even basic finance. Over the years (some applicants will have started working in the business on weekends as teenagers), and especially if the business is small, you will have the same advantage as other applicants who have worked in start-ups or other small businesses, which is the experience of filling different roles and gaining a more holistic view of how the business operates. This allows you to show knowledge of and appreciation for the importance of various business functions working together for a common goal.

2. You have an owner’s mindset, not an employee’s mindset. You can also demonstrate a built-in investment in the success of the business, whether you plan to return to work there post-MBA or not. This added incentive to see the business thrive and grow may have prompted you to work after-hours on projects that you initiated. Additionally, with some level of built-in trust from management, you may also have been given more leeway to innovate, making the potential impact of your contributions that much greater and the lessons learned that much more valuable.

3. You’ve developed communications skills that allow you to influence those senior to you. You are most likely much younger than your relatives who own and manage the company. Therefore, you may have helped to introduce more tech-savvy innovations or a social media presence, which come more naturally to you. Getting “buy-in” from an “old school” mentality is another opportunity to show your communications skills and savvy.

4. You have a job when you graduate, if you want it.. The school won’t need to worry about your employment prospects, if you want to return to the family business. Having said all that, you still need to prove that you’ve enjoyed the level of responsibility that you claim.

The adcom members may be skeptical that your dad/mom/uncle/aunt really held your feet to the fire in meeting deadlines or proving yourself on the job. The dynamics among relatives who work together can also be tricky, and getting letters of recommendation will be a challenge. Here’s how you can deal with these issues:

1. Quantify your achievements and offer as much anecdotal evidence as possible. Yes, this is strategically important even if you are not from a family business background, but it’s especially true here. If you successfully negotiated a new lease agreement for the business saving it $X per month, found a better way to screen job applicants, brought in new customers through the Facebook business page you created that reduced cost per lead by Y%, write about it. The classic rule of “show, don’t tell,” is critical here.

2. Demonstrate your ability to successfully navigate the built-in pitfalls of working with family members. I once had a client where family members fought hard over the succession plans of the business after the business owner and patriarch passed away. Things were getting ugly. My client convinced everyone to work with a skilled mediator whom he had chosen to help reach an understanding. The mediation succeeded, which arguably saved the business from being eaten up by lawsuits. It also managed to preserve family relationships. Another client had ideas to expand sales territory for her family business, but the management resisted change. Through her research, my client was able to prove her idea was a good and calculated risk. She succeeded in selling her fresh thinking to her parents, and the business benefitted from her ideas.

3. Don’t ask relatives, especially those who share your last name, for your letters of recommendation, even if that relative is your direct supervisor and knows your work and capabilities better than anyone. There is simply no way that a letter from a parent, cousin, grandparent or other family member will seem objective enough to be credible. You may need to approach a supervisor from a previous job who can attest to your maturity, quantitative skills and initiative, and other achievements, or someone who supervised you in another organization – perhaps if you were an active volunteer in a community organization or church group. However, you need to have recommenders who can speak about your abilities in the recent past – within the last two years. If you don’t have these options available to you and you’ve only worked in the family business, perhaps someone affiliated with the business might be suitable: an accountant or attorney, or an important customer or supplier. Remember, your interactions with these individuals must be frequent enough and substantial enough for them to comment intelligently and with some specificity on your work and personal character traits.

All in all, working for a family business has probably provided you with extremely valuable experience. It may also have made you nimble in your abilities to work across different departments, and given you a front-row seat in watching your relatives deal with the ongoing challenges of running a business in rapidly changing times. Not a bad set of experiences with which to apply to b-school!

12 Terrific Tips for MBA Applicants - Download your free copy today!

Judy Gruen By , MBA admissions consultant since 1996 and author (with Linda Abraham) of MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

Related Resources:

• MBA Admissions: Letters of Recommendation
• Jon Medved & OurCrowd: The Remarkable Story of an Entrepreneur
• How To Write About Overcoming Challenges Without Sounding Like A Whiner

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Baylor College Of Medicine 2016 Secondary Application Essay Tips http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/16/baylor-college-of-medicine-2016-secondary-application-essay-tips/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/16/baylor-college-of-medicine-2016-secondary-application-essay-tips/#respond Thu, 16 Jul 2015 16:34:45 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32415 Given the mission statement for BCM, I recommend covering your clinical, research and community experience in their secondary application essay.  They place special emphasis on recruiting students from diverse backgrounds and from ethnicities that are underrepresented in medicine.  Highlight your personal connections, volunteer work and leadership roles in medically underserved communities. Baylor College of Medicine […]

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Read other school specific med secondary essay tips! Given the mission statement for BCM, I recommend covering your clinical, research and community experience in their secondary application essay.  They place special emphasis on recruiting students from diverse backgrounds and from ethnicities that are underrepresented in medicine.  Highlight your personal connections, volunteer work and leadership roles in medically underserved communities.

Baylor College of Medicine 2016 Essay Questions:

• One autobiographical essay, with a character limit of 2,000.

• Applicants should use single line spacing and 12 point size font.

• Responses should be constructed strategically to highlight an applicant’s strengths.

Secondary Application Essays:

Indicate any special experiences, unusual factors or other information you feel would be helpful in evaluating you, including, but not limited to, education, employment, extracurricular activities, prevailing over adversity. You may expand upon but not repeat AMCAS application information. (2000 character limit.)

Using a timeline you have created of your life that includes all significant events and/or an updated copy of your resume or CV, check off the items you have already covered in your primary application.  Creating a list from the remaining items that you have not covered, which are related to clinical, research, work, or leadership in community service?  Are there any items that relate to how you have overcome adversity?  Strategically selecting the activities or events that will reveal more about you as a person, create an outline using this short list.  Free-write to cover as much detail as you can from your outline.  After taking a break, edit the material to ensure you have a clear introductory sentence, solid body with explanations and a concise conclusion that sums up your experiences.

BCM Application Timeline:

Baylor 2016 Secondary Essay Timeline

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Alicia McNease Nimonkar is an Accepted.com advisor and editor specializing in healthcare admissions. Prior to joining Accepted, Alicia worked for five years as Student Advisor at UC Davis’ postbac program where she both evaluated applications and advised students applying successfully to med school and related programs.

Related Resources:

• 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid In Your Med School Essays [Free Guide]
• Baylor College Of Medicine: A Holistic Approach To Admissions [Podcast]
• A Med Student/Foodie Extraordinaire at Baylor College of Medicine

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Don’t Forget: Your Secondaries Are Super Important! http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/15/dont-forget-your-secondaries-are-super-important/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/15/dont-forget-your-secondaries-are-super-important/#respond Wed, 15 Jul 2015 20:10:18 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31887 Just a quick reminder that our webinar on secondary essay strategies, Writing Secondary Essays that Get You Accepted, will take place Wednesday, July 22 at 5pm PT/8pm ET. There’s still time to register—sign up today! Who: Med school applicants who want a leg up on their secondaries When: Wednesday, July 22, 5pm PT/8pm ET Presenter: […]

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Just a quick reminder that our webinar on secondary essay strategies, Writing Secondary Essays that Get You Accepted, will take place Wednesday, July 22 at 5pm PT/8pm ET.

There’s still time to register—sign up today!

Register for the webinar before it's too late!

Who: Med school applicants who want a leg up on their secondaries

When: Wednesday, July 22, 5pm PT/8pm ET

Presenter: Alicia McNease Nimonkar, Accepted.com senior consultant and med school admissions expert

Register now!
Reach out to Alicia on twitter with any questions you’d like her to address on the webinar using hashtag #PreMDQA.

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Understanding Stanford GSB’s Interest In Personal Qualities And Contributions http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/15/understanding-stanford-gsbs-interest-in-personal-qualities-and-contributions-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/15/understanding-stanford-gsbs-interest-in-personal-qualities-and-contributions-2/#respond Wed, 15 Jul 2015 19:46:35 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32374 What are the qualities that Stanford GSB is looking for as they build their class? How do successful applicants stand out from the crowd? At a school as competitive as Stanford, it’s a fact that many smart, accomplished applicants won’t get in—so how can you demonstrate that you have that “it” factor? Let us walk […]

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Register for our upcoming webinar on How to Get Accepted to Stanford

Stanford

What are the qualities that Stanford GSB is looking for as they build their class? How do successful applicants stand out from the crowd? At a school as competitive as Stanford, it’s a fact that many smart, accomplished applicants won’t get in—so how can you demonstrate that you have that “it” factor? Let us walk you through Stanford’s evaluation criteria and give you some advice.

Criteria #3: Personal Qualities and Contributions

In an MBA essay on a meaningful personal experience:

• Applicant A describes his ascent of Machu Picchu; we learn that it was awe-inspiring, challenging, required excellent teamwork, and that he was moved on a deep level.

• Applicant B takes us on a walk around her block. We learn about the struggles of her neighbors in the face of gentrification and how she feels as one of the gentrifiers; how she informally refereed an argument among residents about the stop-and-frisk policy; the diversity of canine life on the block and the particular friendship between her pug and a neighbor’s Rottweiler.

We conclude from these essays that Applicant A spends a lot of money on personal fulfillment, lacks imagination, relies on banalities, and relishes physical challenges; and that Applicant B is alive to the richness of daily life, has humor, is compassionate, is attentive and alert, and cares about meaningful issues. Point: our personal qualities flow from and mirror our character. And when it comes to personal qualities, be assured, Stanford will prefer those of Applicant B – even though Applicant A’s topic is superficially more dramatic – because of the quality of character they reflect. There’s not anything different or mind-blowing about Applicant B’s personal qualities – they simply represent an engaged, thoughtful person. And there’s nothing wrong with climbing Machu Picchu – but it’s not the fact of doing it that will impress; rather, what you have to say about it, arising from your personal qualities and reflecting your unique perspective that will catch the thoughtful admissions reader’s eye. Lesson:

• Don’t struggle and strain for “unique” things to say.

• Rather, for Stanford, share your life. Open it up, let it dance or swagger or sashay or skip or march or cartwheel, whatever your style is.

Now the contribution part. Because Applicant B is attentive to and cares about her surroundings, she can respond and contribute to the daily life of her neighborhood. Again, nothing particularly dramatic or unique; mainly interactions with neighbors. But they’re quality interactions. She cares. She has specific questions and concerns and feelings and insights – which become her offering. She can bring this abundance, this world, this humanity “to the table.” You just know this person will be a big contributor wherever she is. She doesn’t have to explain that fact – it’s obvious! Follow her example. Let your personal qualities come alive by sharing what’s meaningful to you in your essays (and elsewhere if/as possible in the application). Don’t explain that you will contribute; show that you do contribute, as a result of these qualities. It’s simply who you are.

Check out the rest of the What Stanford GSB is Looking For series!



Register for our free webinar: Get Accepted to Stanford GSB!



Cindy Tokumitsu By , author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted. She can help you assess your strengths and weaknesses and develop a winning MBA admissions strategy. She is a member of the Association of International Graduate Application Consultants. 

Related Resources:

Stanford School of Business Zone
Stanford GSB 2016 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
4 Ways to Show How You’ll Contribute in the Future

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How To Earn A Spot On Team Fuqua http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/15/how-to-earn-a-spot-on-team-fuqua/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/15/how-to-earn-a-spot-on-team-fuqua/#respond Wed, 15 Jul 2015 17:20:47 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32384 For an extra-strong dose of concrete MBA admissions advice, tune in to our conversation with Liz Riley Hargrove, Associate Dean for Admissions at The Fuqua School of Business. She is the woman responsible for all elements of the applicant evaluation process at one of the world’s top b-schools. In fact, Bloomberg Business ranked Fuqua #1 […]

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Listen to the show!For an extra-strong dose of concrete MBA admissions advice, tune in to our conversation with Liz Riley Hargrove, Associate Dean for Admissions at The Fuqua School of Business. She is the woman responsible for all elements of the applicant evaluation process at one of the world’s top b-schools. In fact, Bloomberg Business ranked Fuqua #1 in its 2014 ranking.

We couldn’t be more excited to have Liz Riley Hargrove as the star of this episode of Admissions Straight Talk.

00:02:02 – A customized b-school experience: The Duke 2-year MBA program.

00:03:30 – No conflict here: the fusion of team culture and consequential leadership.

00:08:49 – Profile of a recent grad who is doing something super exciting.

00:11:33 – Fuqua’s position on GMAT vs GRE.

00:14:47 – One thing not enough people realize about Fuqua.

00:16:35 –  A look at the Energy Finance and Energy and Environment concentrations.

00:18:36 – About Fuqua’s 25 random facts application question (and why its optional).

00:20:41 – Understanding how the open interview season works and what the adcom wants from you.

00:23:13 – What makes Liz excited about an application.

00:24:14 – The Golden Rule for applicants: Tell the story that only you can tell.

Click here to listen to the show!*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com

Related links:

• Duke Fuqua Application Instructions
Why Fuqua and the Leadership
• The MBA Gatekeeper At Duke’s Fuqua School

Related shows:

The Admissions Team at the Very Center of Business
It’s MBA Season: Do You Know Where Your Applications Are?
Bruce DelMonico on The Yale School of Management
• Interview with Sheryl Dirks, Associate Dean for Career Management at Duke Fuqua

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Don’t Miss Out On Stanford Advice! http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/14/dont-miss-out-on-stanford-advice/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/14/dont-miss-out-on-stanford-advice/#respond Tue, 14 Jul 2015 20:10:22 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31986 A quick reminder that our  webinar, Get Accepted to Stanford GSB, is happening next Tuesday, July 21 at 10am PT/1pm ET. There’s still time to sign up. If you’re  applying to Stanford, you won’t want to miss this! The webinar is free, but registration is required. Sign up today and Get Accepted to Stanford GSB! […]

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A quick reminder that our  webinar, Get Accepted to Stanford GSB, is happening next Tuesday, July 21 at 10am PT/1pm ET. Register for the webinar, now!

There’s still time to sign up. If you’re  applying to Stanford, you won’t want to miss this!

Save your spot at the webinar!

The webinar is free, but registration is required. Sign up today and Get Accepted to Stanford GSB!

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Does UCI’s 5+2 For PhDs Add Up? http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/14/does-ucis-52-for-phds-add-up/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/14/does-ucis-52-for-phds-add-up/#respond Tue, 14 Jul 2015 16:16:33 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32345 It’s no secret that the academic job market for humanities PhDs is, euphemistically, challenging— and PhD programs are beginning to make some tough choices, including limiting program sizes at some institutions. With the average time-to-degree in the humanities stretching to nearly a decade (and many students taking much longer than that), UC Irvine has a […]

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Choosing a Ph.D Program: 3 Tips - Download your free copy today!It’s no secret that the academic job market for humanities PhDs is, euphemistically, challenging— and PhD programs are beginning to make some tough choices, including limiting program sizes at some institutions.

With the average time-to-degree in the humanities stretching to nearly a decade (and many students taking much longer than that), UC Irvine has a new proposal to shorten degree times: doctoral study capped at 5 years (with a more generous funding package, including summer support), followed by a two-year, teaching-intensive post-doctoral position.

The 5+2 program will begin in two Irvine departments this fall—philosophy and visual studies. The university anticipates that more departments will follow. (With the new funding structure in place, philosophy experienced an increase in yield from 40 to 75%; visual arts’ yield stayed flat at 40%.)

This move follows an MLA report last year that called for shorter PhD programs and better funding packages, along with stronger career preparation.

Critics of UCI’s plan have voiced concern about both sides of the proposal—the 5-year PhD, because they worry it will put limits on complex dissertation projects and shut out people who might need more time, such as students with families or those from disadvantaged backgrounds; and the 2-year postdoc, because they are concerned that it could contribute to the growing “adjunctification” of the university by creating a new pool of low-paid lecturers (while taking jobs away from experienced non-tenure track lecturers).

While these are certainly valid concerns (particularly the concerns about adjuncts) this seems like a step worth trying— especially the proposal for a better-funded, 5-year doctorate. Given the state of the job market, it does not make much sense to spend 10+ years in a PhD program, amassing debt while writing a dissertation that might never translate to a job. A program that allows students to complete their dissertations faster (with better financial support) and also attempts to provide opportunities for professional development sounds like a step in the right direction. (The problem of universities relying so heavily on contingent faculty will require different solutions!)





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Rebecca BlusteinBy Dr. Rebecca BlusteinAccepted.com consultant since 2008, former Student Affairs Officer at UCLA’s Scholarship Resource Center, and author of the ebook, Financing Your Future: Winning Fellowships, Scholarships and Awards for Grad School. Dr. Blustein, who earned her Ph.D. at UCLA, assists our clients applying to MS, MA, and Ph.D. programs. She is happy to assist you with your grad school applications.

Related Resources:

Choosing a PhD Program: 3 Tips
• PhD Funding Disparities
• Is a PhD a Good Idea?

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UVA Darden 2016 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/13/uva-darden-2016-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/13/uva-darden-2016-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/#respond Mon, 13 Jul 2015 20:14:12 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31869 Darden led the way with a one-essay application.  Some may feel that fewer essays indicate that essays are losing importance. My suspicion is that the remaining essays and short-answers are as important or even more important than they ever were. Especially at a program emphasizing the case method and experiential learning, evidence that you can […]

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UVA_DardenDarden led the way with a one-essay application.  Some may feel that fewer essays indicate that essays are losing importance. My suspicion is that the remaining essays and short-answers are as important or even more important than they ever were. Especially at a program emphasizing the case method and experiential learning, evidence that you can communicate, analyze a problem from multiple perspectives, and handle the rigorous program that Darden is famous for are all critical. 

My tips for answering the Darden application essay are in blue below.

Essay:

Describe the most important professional feedback you have received and how you responded to this feedback. (500 words max)

First of all, I strongly encourage you to watch the video with Darden’s Assistant Dean of MBA Admissions Sarah Neher where she lays out what they’re looking for in this essay:

As Sara Neher says in the video, they want to see how you respond to feedback in the work place. It could be interpersonal or technical feedback, but how did it change your behavior on the job? How did it transform your approach or attitude?   

You could start with the feedback or the event that prompted the evaluation. Then discuss your initial reaction to it and how it influenced your professional performance.

Alternatively, you can start with an event or interaction that reflects you successfully incorporating that feedback into your work. Then flash back to the feedback, perhaps the event the prompted it, and reflection on the importance of that feedback. 

Final tidbit: Make sure you answer all elements of the question. 

If you would like professional guidance with your UVA Darden MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the UVA Darden application. 

UVA Darden 2016 Application Deadlines:

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Linda Abraham By , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

Related Resources:

• School-Specific MBA Application Essay Tips
• UVA Darden Zone Page
• Have an Open Mind, Learn Skills, Build Relationships: Darden MBA Interview

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4 Tips For Team Interviews http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/13/4-tips-for-team-interviews/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/13/4-tips-for-team-interviews/#respond Mon, 13 Jul 2015 16:49:26 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32309 “4 Tips For Team Interviews” is the latest post in our series Navigate the MBA Maze. Since so much of b-school life and learning includes team discussions, the adcom needed a tool for assessing how applicants will fit in the team-based discussion culture of their programs. Thus, the Team-Based Discussion (TBD) was born. In team-based interviews, […]

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Learn the first steps that lead the way to your acceptance!

4 Tips For Team Interviews” is the latest post in our series Navigate the MBA Maze.

Since so much of b-school life and learning includes team discussions, the adcom needed a tool for assessing how applicants will fit in the team-based discussion culture of their programs. Thus, the Team-Based Discussion (TBD) was born.

In team-based interviews, applicants need to use a different set of skills than they use during traditional, individual interviews. Personal interviews require one-on-one presentation, interpersonal skills, and self-awareness, while team interviews require critical thinking, listening, persuasion, and leadership.

Here are four to-do’s to help you win an Academy Award for your performance in an interview:

1. Review school material. This includes the specific materials that the school provides prior to the interview, as well as all other material about the program. As with an individual interview, you need to know the school well – its mission, curriculum, teaching style, etc. Review the school’s website and speak with current students and recent grads so you get a clear picture of what it’s like to be a student at B-School X.

2. Read Case in Point. This is an excellent book by Marc Consentino that will teach you how to state your position during team-based interviews, and then clearly and succinctly support your position.

3. Role-play. Use family, friends, colleagues, and consultants at Accepted.com to role-play with you. The more in-the-know your mock interviewer and peers are, the better idea you’ll get of how the interview will run on the big day.

4. Take notes. You are allowed to bring notes to the interview, and while you don’t want to read off a piece of paper or even refer to it frequently, it may help you feel more confident knowing that some of your key points are written down in case you need them. You never know how performance anxiety may set in, and if your brain freezes and you completely forget your plan, you’ll be glad you jotted some ideas down beforehand.

TIP: Don’t bring a 400-page stack of papers! You don’t want to spend the whole time shuffling through your notes, making noise and ignoring your co-interviewees while they speak. Paperless notes on a tablet may reduce the shuffle, but they won’t reduce the distraction – keep paperless notes to a minimum as well.

Download your copy of Navigating the MBA Maze
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Related Resources:

How to Ace Your MBA Interviews [Free Guide]
7 Tips for MBA Interview Prep
How to Ace Your Team Based Interview: 4 Tips for the Big Day

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Summer Savings Continue – 5 More Days To Save 10% http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/12/summer-savings-continue-5-more-days-to-save-10/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/12/summer-savings-continue-5-more-days-to-save-10/#respond Sun, 12 Jul 2015 17:38:11 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32006 Our super summer 10% off sale continues through Wednesday, July 15, 2015. Ready to get the help you need to whip those applications into tip-top shape? Then NOW is the time to purchase services. 10% off can save you hundreds of dollars!* Our expert admissions consultants and editors are at your service. Please review our […]

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Summer saleOur super summer 10% off sale continues through Wednesday, July 15, 2015.

Ready to get the help you need to whip those applications into tip-top shape? Then NOW is the time to purchase services. 10% off can save you hundreds of dollars!*

Our expert admissions consultants and editors are at your service. Please review our catalog of MBA services  and contact us with any questions you may have.

Shop and save!* Use coupon code SUMMER at checkout to save. Offer valid only on non-rush services. Discount may not be combined with other offers.

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Understanding Stanford GSB’s Take On Demonstrated Leadership Potential http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/12/understanding-stanford-gsbs-take-on-demonstrated-leadership-potential-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/12/understanding-stanford-gsbs-take-on-demonstrated-leadership-potential-2/#respond Sun, 12 Jul 2015 16:09:13 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32270 What are the qualities that Stanford GSB is looking for as they build their class? How do successful applicants stand out from the crowd? At a school as competitive as Stanford, it’s a fact that many smart, accomplished applicants won’t get in—so how can you demonstrate that you have that “it” factor? Let us walk […]

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Applying to Stanford GSB? Join our live webinar for tips on how to get in!

Naturally you’ve got leadership, or you wouldn’t be applying to Stanford.

What are the qualities that Stanford GSB is looking for as they build their class? How do successful applicants stand out from the crowd? At a school as competitive as Stanford, it’s a fact that many smart, accomplished applicants won’t get in—so how can you demonstrate that you have that “it” factor? Let us walk you through Stanford’s evaluation criteria and give you some advice. 

Criteria #2: Demonstrated Leadership Potential

Of course Stanford GSB seeks demonstrated leadership potential – don’t all b-schools? And naturally you’ve got leadership, or you wouldn’t be applying to Stanford.

Wait. There are some unique nuances to Stanford’s conception of leadership that are essential to understand in order to portray it effectively in your application. Let’s break the phrase down word by word, starting with the core principle.

Leadership. Principle? Yes, not just a quality or an activity in Stanford’s eyes, but an actual principle. Whatever change you’re guiding the client to achieve, or whatever vision you’re advocating, or whatever project you’re driving the team through Hades to complete on time – it should be constructive and beneficial according to your own values and ideals. In GSB’s view, leadership isn’t just rallying the troops to achieve a given end – it’s having an end worth achieving (and, conversely, declining to pursue an inappropriate end). Therefore, if you are to provide such leadership, you must have core values or ideals and be guided by them as you lead, both how you lead and where you lead. GSB’s preferred leadership is essentially value- and ideal-driven, what it calls “directed idealism.”

Potential. Even if you are already a leader per the above definition, you’re not satisfied. You know that improving will only enable you to achieve more of what you value – therefore you actively seek growth as a leader. You are open to critique and feedback, you are resourceful, you are humble, and you are hungry to learn.

Demonstrated. Concrete evidence that allows the adcom to conclude that you will grow as a leader and provide leadership in the future. You must demonstrate both leadership and potential to grow as a leader. For the former, provide this evidence by portraying experiences in your application boxes, essays, resume, and recommendations that reflect your leadership to date. For the latter, in these same application components frankly reflect on where you are in your leadership development – you understand what parts are innate to you, and where you need to improve.

So “demonstrated leadership potential” is actually rather complex, at least per GSB’s perspective of leadership. Plan to spend some time and effort on a strategy to integrate these points into your entire application.

Check out the first post in this series, Understanding Stanford GSB’s Core Value Of Intellectual Vitality.





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Cindy Tokumitsu By , author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted. She can help you assess your strengths and weaknesses and develop a winning MBA admissions strategy. She is a member of the Association of International Graduate Application Consultants.

Related Resources:

• Stanford School of Business Zone
• Stanford GSB 2016 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
• What Stanford is Looking for: Personal Qualities and Contributions

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NYU Stern 2016 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/10/nyu-stern-2016-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/10/nyu-stern-2016-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/#comments Fri, 10 Jul 2015 16:15:53 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31860 Last year Stern gave you a choice for its second question. This year all three questions are required and what I call Stern’s “signature question” (#2) is once again required. Your essays will need to highlight your qualities as a successful, leadership-driven, creative thinker and businessperson. For NYU Stern, you’ll want to reveal that you […]

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NYU SternLast year Stern gave you a choice for its second question. This year all three questions are required and what I call Stern’s “signature question” (#2) is once again required.

Your essays will need to highlight your qualities as a successful, leadership-driven, creative thinker and businessperson. For NYU Stern, you’ll want to reveal that you are a perfect fit with the program, the Stern community, and the global business world at large. Keep in mind that Stern is a place that values EQ as much as IQ.

At Accepted, we have advised clients successfully through the NYU Stern application process for approximately twenty years. We would be happy to help you you too. Please explore our services to see how we can guide you.

My tips are in blue below.

Our Stern essay questions give you the opportunity to more fully present yourself to the Admissions Committee and to provide insight into your experiences, goals and thought processes.

Please note the following details when completing your essays.

• All written essays must be typed and submitted using the standard U.S. 8 1/2” x 11” format, double-spaced, in 12-point font.

• Word limits apply to the total question. For example, your response to Essay 1 should answer all parts of the question with a total maximum of 750 words.

• Label the top of each essay with the following: Name, Date of Birth (month, day, year), Essay Number and Page Number (e.g.: Joe Applicant, January 1, 1988, Essay 1, Page 1).

• Your essays should be written entirely by you. An offer of admission will be revoked if you did not write your essays.

Essays:

1. Professional Aspirations (750 word maximum, double-spaced, 12-point font)

• Why pursue an MBA (or dual degree) at this point in your life?
• What actions have you taken to determine that Stern is the best fit for your MBA experience?
• What do you see yourself doing professionally upon graduation?

Stern states explicitly that it seeks students with a “well-articulated plan to achieve their career aspirations.” 

Stern’s #1 is an MBA goals question with a couple of small twists. A and C are fairly typical of this genre, only C doesn’t ask about long-term goals.  At the heart of this question: What do you want to do after you graduate that requires an MBA and A asks why is now the right time to get it?  You should be able to answer Stern’s #1, or you shouldn’t be applying.

Another small twist occurs in B: Have you done your homework about Stern? What have you done to research the program, its curriculum, career opportunities, and student life? What aspects of the program will help you achieve the goals you provide in C?

The part of the question asking about your career goal “upon graduation” is critical. Are you realistic about where your past experience plus a Stern MBA can take you? Stern doesn’t want people in la-la-land who will be impossible to place.

Finally make sure you answer all elements of the question while staying within the word limits (not guidelines). No adcom member sits there and counts words, but the readers can tell when you are significantly over. “Significantly” in my book is more than 10%. Write succinctly. 

2.  Personal Expression

Please describe yourself to your MBA classmates. You may use almost any method to convey your message (e.g. words, illustrations). Feel free to be creative.

If you submit a non-written piece for this essay (i.e., artwork or multimedia) or if you submit this essay via mail, please upload a brief description of your submission with your online application.

Please note the following guidelines and restrictions:

• Your submission becomes the property of NYU Stern and cannot be returned for any reason.
• If you submit a written essay, it should be 500 words maximum, double-spaced, 12-point font.
• If you submit a video or audio file, it should be five minutes maximum. NYU Stern accepts most common video formats.
• The Admissions Committee reserves the right to request an alternate essay if we are unable to view your submission.
• Do not submit anything perishable (e.g. food), or any item that has been worn (e.g. clothing).
• Mailed materials must be postmarked by the application deadline date. Please follow our mail and labeling instructions.

Please note that mailed packages are subject to size restrictions. Submissions that exceed the stated size restrictions will not be accepted for review by the Admissions Committee. Please see the table below for the maximum package size guidelines:

Packaging Type                         Dimensions: Metric                            Dimensions: Non-metric                      
Box 36cm x 31cm x 8cm 14” x 12” x 3”
Cylindrical tube 8cm x 91cm 3” x 36”
Triangular tube 97cm x 16cm x 16 cm x 16 cm 38” x 6” x 6” x 6”

Candidates can get very creative with this essay and use different media (other than edibles and worn attire), but many of you will convey your ideas in words. Think of how you describe yourself in a social setting when meeting people for the first time.

If it’s the first day of class or a mixer early in the pre-term, how would you break the ice? Would you try to set up a tennis game or golf match? Would you find someone to explore NYC’s museums? Or do you hate museums and prefer hiking through the woods? What would you say if you were in the campus coffee shop and sat down with some new classmates? Could you create a dialog? A short skit?

NYU Stern also permits the use of multimedia in response to this question. While the media may vary, the point again is to introduce yourself to friends. Given the other questions, this can be a great venue for hobbies, extra-curricular interests, and community service.

When I visited NYU Stern a few years ago, the admissions officer I met with proudly showed me several “personal expressions.” Her faves. They were incredibly creative, but much less slick than you might imagine. A year ago, Stern hosted AIGAC for a day and again presented two of the videos filmed in response to this question.  They were thoughtful introductions to the applicants who created them. But neither one was super-slick or professional. Just revealing, creative, and clever.

If you want to submit something three-dimensional or multi-media, don’t worry if you aren’t ready for the Louvre or the Academy Awards as long as your creation is authentically yours, introduces you, and sticks to the above requirements. It will be taken seriously and appreciated.

If you are considering video, download Audio/Video in Admissions: Get Ready for Prime Time, a free special report.

3. Additional Information (optional)

Please provide any additional information that you would like to bring to the attention of the Admissions Committee. This may include current or past gaps in employment, further explanation of your undergraduate record or self-reported academic transcript(s), plans to retake the GMAT, GRE and/or TOEFL or any other relevant information.

If you are unable to submit a recommendation from your current supervisor, you must explain your reason, even if you are a re-applicant.

If you are a re-applicant from last year, please explain how your candidacy has improved since your last application.

Obviously if you fit into one of the categories described in the three points above, you need to write this essay. If you don’t fit into the above categories and have something you want the admissions committee to know that isn’t part of the required essays, then you still should write this optional essay.

If you are an MBA reapplicant, please realize that the question posed here by NYU Stern is THE key question you need to answer as a reapplicant. What have you done to improve your candidacy that should change the outcome?

NYU Stern 2016 Application Deadlines:

Come read our other school-specific MBA Essay Tips

 

If you would like professional guidance with your NYU Stern MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the NYU Stern MBA application. 





Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One - Download your copy today!



 

Linda Abraham

By , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

Related Resources:

More School Specific Essay Tips
Tips For Video MBA Essay Questions
• Exploring the Part-Time MBA Options at NYU Stern

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Understanding Stanford GSB’s Core Value Of Intellectual Vitality http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/09/stanford-gsb-core-value-intellectual-vitality/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/09/stanford-gsb-core-value-intellectual-vitality/#respond Thu, 09 Jul 2015 16:44:52 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32259 What are the qualities that Stanford GSB is looking for as they build their class? How do successful applicants stand out from the crowd? At a school as competitive as Stanford, it’s a fact that many smart, accomplished applicants won’t get in—so how can you demonstrate that you have that “it” factor? Let us walk […]

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Get Accepted to Stanford GSB! [Register for the webinar]

Do you have the smarts SGSB is looking for?

What are the qualities that Stanford GSB is looking for as they build their class? How do successful applicants stand out from the crowd? At a school as competitive as Stanford, it’s a fact that many smart, accomplished applicants won’t get in—so how can you demonstrate that you have that “it” factor? Let us walk you through Stanford’s evaluation criteria and give you some advice.

Criteria #1: Intellectual Vitality

You’re smart. But this isn’t about smart. Most of the people Stanford GSB rejects are smart (often very smart). A person of average IQ may have enormous intellectual vitality, while a person with a stratospheric IQ may have scant intellectual vitality. Pretty much everyone uses their raw intellect, whatever its degree, in practical application – to get things done. People with intellectual vitality do that and more – they nurture and refine their raw intellect to make it a force in itself, one that draws them into new and challenging territory. No wonder Stanford wants it.

So what does intellectual vitality consist of? Here are 5 key components (separated for discussion purposes only, as they’re interconnected).

1. Zest for ideas. When you encounter a new or challenging idea, you’re tantalized. You have to find out more. What does it mean? Where did it come from? And how, and why? You relish ideas for their inherent meaning; they’re alive to you. You value them as a new lens to see through.

2. Dynamic, engaged mind. You’re always mentally comparing and contrasting, probing limits and boundaries, seeing overlaps between disparate points and differences between similar ones. To you, an event is not static, but rather part of a continuum, with a history to explore and future ramifications to consider. And you never take things at face value!

3. But why…? When you were a child, you probably were told you’re too curious. But curiosity underpins intellectual vitality. It drives you to learn more and more and more about something, to set off on thrilling learning journeys. (And you sometimes snag other people along for the ride!)

4. There’s a reason for what you believe and for what you do. Back to ideas – they animate you. Whether you’re politically conservative, moderate, or liberal, you’re not that way because your family or friends are, but because you’re interested in and think about the issues – from multiple angles. Your thought process informs your decisions, beliefs, actions.

5. Open, as in unafraid. So, you have your beliefs, your ideas. But you don’t hide behind them. You welcome them being challenged – it’s actually … fun. Intellectual fun. And you challenge back thoughtfully. You’re a skillful devil’s advocate, able to argue from multiple perspectives, even ones you personally disagree with. You relish learning what drives and underlies opposing ideas and beliefs (there’s that curiosity again…).

Hopefully the above points make clear that intellectual vitality is not something ponderous – it’s a thrill! Yes, it engages matters of seriousness and gravity. But it’s fundamentally invigorating. It fuels you. And it scintillates others.

Now, how do you let Stanford know you have it? The application essays are the perfect venue for showcasing this quality – integrate it into anecdotes, details, and reflections. If you are invited to interview, that’s an ideal place to demonstrate intellectual vitality.

Register for our free webinar: Get Accepted to Stanford GSB!

Cindy Tokumitsu By , author and co-author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports, including Why MBA and Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted.com.

Related Resources:

Stanford School of Business Zone Page
Stanford GSB 2016 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
• Valentine’s Day, Economics, and Stanford GSB

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