Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog http://blog.accepted.com Admissions consulting and application advice Thu, 20 Aug 2015 16:06:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.4 Why Applicants Should Consider A School’s Soft Skills Training http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/20/why-applicants-should-consider-a-schools-soft-skills-training/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/20/why-applicants-should-consider-a-schools-soft-skills-training/#respond Thu, 20 Aug 2015 16:06:12 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=33539 You need a lot more than an advanced degree to climb the old career ladder. Corporate recruiters are looking for newly minted MBAs to show leadership potential, ability to work in diverse teams, and communication skills. These tools in the MBA toolbox fall under the umbrella of soft skills and were not actively taught by […]

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Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One  - Download your copy today!

“Is success part of your DNA?”

You need a lot more than an advanced degree to climb the old career ladder. Corporate recruiters are looking for newly minted MBAs to show leadership potential, ability to work in diverse teams, and communication skills. These tools in the MBA toolbox fall under the umbrella of soft skills and were not actively taught by most business schools until relatively recently.

Why? To please employers, of course. Eighty-nine percent of recruiters in the just-released GMAC 2015 Corporate Recruiters Survey Report said that communications skills are a “critical factor” when selecting whom to interview, second only to “Proven ability to perform” and ahead of “Strong technical and/or quantitative skills.”  “Strong writing skills” are fifth with 56% of recruiters saying they are a critical factor.

That’s why applicants are also becoming more interested in what’s on the soft skills menu at their dream schools.

“As we recognize that content, such as marketing and strategy, has become increasingly accessible, applicants are discussing what kinds of skills they will pick up at school,” says Dan LeClair, executive vice president and chief operating officer of the accrediting organization, Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB).

Many applicants will tell you they are looking for a program in which they can “grow,” which is code for becoming a better leader. While they are not choosing schools based solely on their trust exercises, obstacle courses, or group therapy sessions, they are looking for something in addition to being able to read financial statements.  

For example, when applying to business schools, James Rapuzzi says he was less impressed with rankings and core curriculum than the leadership training schools provided.

“I was more focused on finding out, ‘What are you going to teach me that I don’t already know?” he says. “And who will I be surrounded by and what can I learn from my classmates?’”

In fact, Rapuzzi, who graduated from the Notre Dame University Mendoza College of Business’ full-time MBA program in May 2015, says his greatest lessons came from group projects and communication coursework that had him giving speeches and writing in a professional manner. He recently moved to New York City, where he’ll be working at an investment bank in its financial sponsors group, and he credits his communication and networking training for helping him get interviews and later a full-time job offer.

“Recruiters are vetting you throughout the job search,” adds Rapuzzi. “They are looking at you and asking, ‘Are you the type I can put in front of a client? Is success part of your DNA?’”

Octavia Costea, who graduated from Babson College’s F.W. Olin School of Business in May 2015, shares a similar story. She sought programs that would help her with strategy, analytics, and entrepreneurial endeavors, she writes in an e-mail. She too picked up soft skills nonetheless and adds she found herself taking advantage of resources that weren’t required but helped her develop as a manager.

When Costea was facing challenges with her cohort, she turned to the school’s sessions on improving communication. “I tend to be direct, lay the problem on the table, talk it out and move on,” adds Costea. “However, non-confrontational people don’t respond well to that approach. The speech center helped me understand that.”

For some schools, soft skills are old hat. Stanford Graduate School of Business has been offering its most popular elective, “Interpersonal Dynamics,” which was long ago nicknamed “Touchy Feely,” for more than 40 years. Columbia Business School has the Program on Social Intelligence, which includes a roster of courses designed to hone leadership skills. Other schools have begun offering retreats, lessons in meditation, and workshops with improvisational actors. The list goes on.

Swimming through the information available on all these programs can be overwhelming for applicants. LeClair suggests applicants search for transformative experiences by asking business schools about opportunities for hands-on learning, personal coaching, and examples of how they demonstrate to potential employers the so-called softer achievements of their graduates.

Today, soft skills are at the “heart of the value proposition of an MBA education,” says LeClair.

“The world is changing,” he adds. “Our success will depend less on what we know than our ability to frame and reframe problems, communicate, and think creatively.”

Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One - Download your copy today!

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Related Resources:

• MBA Project Search: Matchmaking for MBAs and Businesses
• The Hottest Skills that will Land You the Hottest Jobs
• Have an Open Mind, Learn Skills, Build Relationships: Darden MBA Interview

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Columbia MBA Class Of ’17: More Women, Internationals, U.S. Minorities http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/19/columbia-mba-2015-entering-class-profile/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/19/columbia-mba-2015-entering-class-profile/#respond Wed, 19 Aug 2015 22:31:49 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=33627 Columbia Business School posted its incoming MBA class profile. Here’s the scoop: What does the data show? Pretty much steady state with marked improvements in class diversity. And there’s both good news and bad from an applicant perspective. The most noteworthy change is a 12.5% increase in the female make-up of the class — no pun intended […]

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Columbia Business School posted its incoming MBA class profile. Here’s the scoop:

Check out our Columbia GSB zone page!

What does the data show? Pretty much steady state with marked improvements in class diversity. And there’s both good news and bad from an applicant perspective.

The most noteworthy change is a 12.5% increase in the female make-up of the class — no pun intended — and a 9% increase in minorities of U.S. origin. The percentage of internationals went down insignificantly, but I expect that small decline will reverse itself in this upcoming application cycle since Columbia now has a no-cosigner loan program fully operational for international MBA students.

The 1-point dip in CBS’ average GMAT score is also not significant, especially given the lower acceptance rate and higher yield that Columbia enjoyed last year. It is a little surprising because of the GMAT score arms race that seems to have gripped much of CBS’s competition. (Chicago, Kellogg, and Wharton have all reported increased average GMAT scores for their incoming classes.)

Apparently in this past year CBS chose to focus more on diversity and less on the GMAT. I expect that CBS will want to report an increase in its GMAT average in the upcoming class. And with it’s 715 score, it still remains one of a handful of schools with an average GMAT equal or greater than a lofty 715.

Linda AbrahamBy Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

 

Related Resources:

• Columbia Business School 2016 MBA Essay Tips
• Get Accepted to Columbia Business School
• The Admissions Team at the Very Center of Business

 

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Thomas Jefferson Medical College 2016 Secondary Application Tips http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/19/thomas-jefferson-medical-college-2016-secondary-application-tips/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/19/thomas-jefferson-medical-college-2016-secondary-application-tips/#respond Wed, 19 Aug 2015 17:26:30 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=33434 Thomas Jefferson Medical College is located in Philadelphia and prides itself on educating physicians who will provide integrated community healthcare. For example, one of their unique programs focuses on providing physicians for rural areas. The new curriculum integrates basic sciences with clinical experience and professional development and is uniquely suited to produce doctors who consider […]

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Check out more school specific Secondary essay tips!

Thomas Jefferson Medical College is located in Philadelphia and prides itself on educating physicians who will provide integrated community healthcare. For example, one of their unique programs focuses on providing physicians for rural areas. The new curriculum integrates basic sciences with clinical experience and professional development and is uniquely suited to produce doctors who consider the social and ethical implications of their work in addition to the medical and scientific side. The school also has a large focus on altruism and individual development.

Thomas Jefferson’s 2016 Secondary Application Essay Question:

•  Character limit is 4,000 characters.

Optional Secondary Application Essay: 

Thomas Jefferson does not have required questions, only a prompt asking if you have “any additional information that you would like to share.”

Because this is an optional essay, you should not repeat any information that is on your AMCAS. This section should be used either to a) highlight your unique connection to or interest in the school; b) explain something in your application that may be unclear; or c) add any information that was not included in the AMCAS.

To highlight your unique connection, you should write something that is very focused on details specific to why you would be a good fit for Thomas Jefferson. Do not write a general essay about yourself or the school, but do the research and investigate specific programs that would be a good fit for you. You should also mention if you have special ties to Jefferson or to the area. Do not use this essay to beg or make a plea; the essay should be direct and focused.

If you use the essay to clarify or add information, you should ensure the essay does not repeat the AMCAS or letters of recommendation, if you have access to them. This section can be used to provide updates on current employment or plans for the gap year, additional steps you’ve taken to improve your application, additional classes you have completed, new volunteer work you have undertaken or any other new information that was not previously discussed. Similarly, the essay should be specific, direct and focused.

Thomas Jefferson Timeline:

Click for other school specific secondary essay tips!

If you would like professional guidance with your Thomas Jefferson Medical School application materials, please consider using Accepted’s Medical School Admissions Consulting and Editing Services, which include advising, editing, and interview coaching for Thomas Jefferson application materials.

View our med school resource library for valuable tips on every stage of the application process!

JessicaPishkoJessica Pishko graduated with a J.D. from Harvard Law School and received an M.F.A. from Columbia University. She spent two years guiding students through the medical school application process at Columbia’s PostBacc Program and teaches writing at all levels. 

Related Resources:

• 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Med School Essays [Free Guide]
• Getting Into Medical School: Advice from a Pro [Podcast]
• Mindful Of Medicine: A Peek Into The Life Of An M3

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How To Upload Medical Terminology To Your Permanent Memory Bank http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/19/how-to-upload-medical-terminology-to-your-permanent-memory-bank/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/19/how-to-upload-medical-terminology-to-your-permanent-memory-bank/#respond Wed, 19 Aug 2015 16:23:58 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=33562 If you love studying and spending endless hours pouring over textbooks gives you a thrill, then this episode will be sure to disappoint. For the rest of you, though, this week’s guest Adeel Yang is about to rescue you from monotonous memorization and the tedious evil of exam prep. Listen to Linda’s conversation with the co-founder […]

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Listen to the show!If you love studying and spending endless hours pouring over textbooks gives you a thrill, then this episode will be sure to disappoint.

For the rest of you, though, this week’s guest Adeel Yang is about to rescue you from monotonous memorization and the tedious evil of exam prep.

Listen to Linda’s conversation with the co-founder and president of Picmonic, the visual learning community, and it won’t be long before you are asking yourself “How could I have studied any other way?”

1:52 – Introducing Picmonic and the story of how it came to be.

6:20 – How Picmonic can help Low Stat Pat (or you) increase scores.

8:12 – Who the program is for.  

8:55 – Overview of a Picmonic user experience.  

10:35 – Bonding over test prep: Picmonic’s social community.  

11:40 – Research shows that these techniques will improve your memory retention and test scores. Take it from nerdy med students.

14:13 – The students who make Adeel proud.

15:55 – How a guy with so many interests juggled it all in med school! (And what’s next on the agenda)

19:03 – Was med school worth it for this entrepreneur?

20:59 – What does the future hold for Picmonic?

Click here to listen to the show!*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com

Related Links:

• Picmonic
Picmonic YouTube Channel
Moonwalking with Einstein by Joshua Foer

Related Shows:

• The Doctor As Renaissance Man
• Medical School Admissions 2015-2016: A Dean’s Perspective
• Getting Into Medical School: Advice from a Pro
• Elliptical, Meet Med School: Interview with Andrea Tooley
• Jon Medved & OurCrowd: The Remarkable Story of an Entrepreneur
• A Wharton Grad Rids the World of Bank Fees

Navigate the Med Maze - Download your free guide today!

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Tips For Answering Columbia University Supplemental Essay Prompts http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/18/tips-for-answering-columbia-university-supplemental-essay-prompts-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/18/tips-for-answering-columbia-university-supplemental-essay-prompts-2/#respond Tue, 18 Aug 2015 17:44:12 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=33084 This post about the Columbia supplement to the Common Application is part of a series of posts written to help you complete the 2016 Common Application supplement for Ivy League and other top schools.   In addition to the basic Common Application essay, the Ivy League schools require supplemental essay responses. These extra essays help these […]

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New York CityThis post about the Columbia supplement to the Common Application is part of a series of posts written to help you complete the 2016 Common Application supplement for Ivy League and other top schools.  

In addition to the basic Common Application essay, the Ivy League schools require supplemental essay responses. These extra essays help these elite schools gain a deeper understanding of the applicant. They are your opportunity to explain how the school is a good match for you and vise versa. These schools want to know what is important to you and how they fit into your future goals!

Note that you can apply via the Common Application or the Columbia First-Year Application. The school has no preference; however, applicants can only submit ONE of the applications.

When addressing each prompt, consider the overall character and focus of the school in relationship to your personal objectives. Visit the school website, read about their educational mission, and think about how the school supports your interests. Columbia takes pride in the synergy created between its diverse residential student population and its location in the heart of bustling New York City. It also embraces a rich educational tradition in its interdepartmental Core Curriculum that encourages creative critical thinking by encompassing writing, science, philosophy, literature, art, music, and history.

What single activity listed in the activity section of your Common Application are you most proud of and why? (150 words or less)

This is an opportunity to highlight one of the activities you listed on your Common Application. Select an activity that reveals something important to you. This may be something you have been involved with for years or an experience that exposed you to something novel. Whichever activity you select, make sure to convey your enthusiasm and what it reflects about you. If appropriate, tie your interests to opportunities available at Columbia and in NYC.

Please tell us what you find most appealing about Columbia and why. (300 words or less)

This is a very important question. You need to convince the admissions committee that Columbia is the best school to help you meet your goals. You also have to show them how you can enrich the dynamic educational environment at Columbia. Discuss what excites you most about the Columbia experience. They want to know what kind of student you might be at Columbia.

Columbia University requires additional essay responses for students applying to Columbia College and The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science:

If you are applying to Columbia College, tell us what from your current and past experiences (either academic or personal) attracts you specifically to the field or fields of study that you noted in the Member Questions section. If you are currently undecided, please write about any field or fields in which you may have an interest at this time. (300 words or less)

If you are applying to The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science, please tell us what from your current and past experiences (either academic or personal) attracts you specifically to the field or fields of study that you noted in the Member Questions section. (300 words or less)

Both of these prompts ask you to consider your interests and experiences that helped you determine your specific career path. If you are truly undecided, in the Columbia College response, focus on the areas you are currently interested in, what excites you about those topics, and your hopes for the future. These prompts ask you to think broadly about your life experience as well as provide specific examples of how these experiences affected your interests and propelled you toward a particular area of study. Your discussion should reveal your passion for the subject. Remember to include why the program at Columbia is the best match to help you achieve your goals.

In addition to essay responses, Columbia requests the following lists. As you select required readings, books, and other forms of media, think about the breadth and depth of your interests. Consider how your selections represent your identity, reflect your intellect and curiosity, relate to Columbia’s Core Curriculum requirements, and make you a good match for the overall educational experience at Columbia.

List the titles of the required readings from courses during the school year or summer that you enjoyed most in the past year. (150-words or less)

This is an opportunity to showcase a particular area of interest to you. Consider classes, which you discovered something new and exciting, allowed you to explore a previous area of interest in more depth, or covered a topic that helped you see the world in a different way.

List the titles of the books you read for pleasure that you enjoyed most in the past year. (150-words or less)

The admissions committee wants to know the sorts of topics that you find interesting. What better way than to share your recent favorite books? They are trying to gain a deeper sense of who you are and how you might fit in at Columbia. This list sheds some light on how you spend your spare time.

List the titles of the print, electronic publications and websites you read regularly. (150-words or less)

The sources of information and media you engage with routinely provide insights into how you perceive the world. This list to some degree demonstrates what topics are important to you. It also indicates the modes of information exchange you find most comfortable.

List the titles of the films, concerts, shows, exhibits, lectures and other entertainments you enjoyed most in the past year. (150-words or less)

This list is allows you to tell the admissions committee the sorts of activities you do for fun! Your responses suggest the kinds of activities that may appeal to you at Columbia and provide insight about how you engage the world around you.

The admissions website clearly states Columbia’s commitment to a holistic approach to the admission process: “every single application is given a thorough review, and there is positively no minimum grade point average, class rank, or SAT/ACT score one must obtain in order to secure admission to Columbia.” That said Columbia has a highly competitive applicant pool. It received 36,250 undergraduate applications for the class of 2019. Only 2,222 or 6.1% were offered admission and over 90% of students admitted were in the top 10% of their high school class with average SAT scores of 2245 and an average ACT score of 33. Your essays make you more than a number.

In this environment it is essential to remain calm and focused. Keep in mind, while adhering to the designated word limits and deadlines, your goal is to distinguish yourself from your peers by sharing your personal examples, anecdotes, and perspectives. In short, by providing sincere insight into what makes you, you! And why you are a good match for Columbia! Be sure to allow yourself appropriate time to reflect on your educational goals and to convey your best self to the admissions committee through your essay responses.

The Guide to Preparing for College in High School - free guide

Marie Todd By , Accepted’s college admissions specialist. Marie has worked in college admissions for over twenty years. She has both counseled applicants and evaluated applications. Most recently she evaluated 5000+ applications for the University of Michigan’s College of Literature, Science and the Arts; College of Engineering; School of Kinesiology. She is available to assist you (or your child) with your applications.

Related Resources:

•  Tips for Answering Common Application Essay Prompts
•  Tips for Answering Brown University Supplemental Essay Prompts
•  7 Signs an Experience Belongs in Your Application Essay

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An Incoming MS1 Talks About Med School, Rejection, Blogging & Food http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/18/an-incoming-ms1talks-about-med-school-rejection-blogging/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/18/an-incoming-ms1talks-about-med-school-rejection-blogging/#respond Tue, 18 Aug 2015 17:02:17 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=33496 This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with medical school applicants and students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top medical schools and the med school application process. And now, introducing Jessica… Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an […]

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Read more med student blogger interviews here!This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with medical school applicants and students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top medical schools and the med school application process. And now, introducing Jessica…

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What is your favorite ice cream flavor?

Jessica: Great! I’d love for you to get to know me as well! I am from a small town in Southern California, and I studied Cell/Molecular Biology during undergrad.

My favorite ice cream? I LOVE mint chocolate chip – specifically, the kind from Thrifty’s.

Accepted: Where are you in med school? What year?

Jessica: I am an incoming MS1 at a wonderful school here on the West Coast. I love my school, because it focuses on raising physician leaders who will go on to serve in underserved communities.

Accepted: What’s your favorite class so far?

Jessica: As of now, I have not begun the official curriculum, but I am looking forward to topics that deal with Genetics and Molecular Biology.

Accepted: Did you go straight from college to med school? Or did you take time off? (If you took time off, how did you spend your time?)

Jessica: No, I did not go straight to medical school from college. I finished undergrad in December, and worked full-time until matriculation. In addition to working, I went on mini-adventures throughout California, and experienced this great state as a tourist would.

Accepted: Looking back, what was the most challenging aspect of the med school admissions process? How did you approach that challenge and overcome it?

Jessica: I think the most difficult part of the process was post-interview. There were times when I left an interview and felt as though I presented myself well, but then I would receive an admissions decision contrary to what I had believed. These adverse decisions were difficult for me to process, because I believed there was something wrong with me.

Those negative feelings were indeed real, but I decided to change my perspective on the application cycle. Instead of basking in those feelings, I chose to acknowledge them and change how I viewed an adverse decision. It was not because there was something wrong with me, rather I was not a good fit at a particular school. By changing how I viewed these decisions, I was able to process my feelings in a healthy manner, and not take things personally. In addition, I was able to encourage others who struggled with similar feelings.

Accepted: Can you tell us about your blog? When did you start blogging? What have you gained from the experience?

Jessica: Sure! I began Operation: Med Student because I felt I had a lot to say, but no place to say it. I wanted to find an avenue that: 1. allowed free self-expression 2. created a place where I could encourage future applicants and 3. allowed my family and friends to stay updated on my life as I transitioned into medical school. The latter was of most importance, because medical school will require most of my time and I did not want my relationships to suffer.

In March of 2015, I began to blog and I absolutely love the experience. I love connecting with current and future applicants, talking about musical interests and discovering new bloggers. From this experience, I learned that it is healthy, if not necessary, to find an avenue to release your feelings. It could be through journaling, singing, dancing…literally, anything! It is something that I highly recommend to those who struggle with expressing themselves.

Accepted: On your blog you talk a lot about your adventures. Can you share some highlights?

Jessica: As far as my adventures, I think one highlight was my recent trip to San Francisco. It was an absolutely amazing and freeing experience. There, I was able to attend a food festival called “Off The Grid,” and had a fusion chicken and waffle sandwich. I am an avid foodie and I must say it was delicious!

Accepted: And last but not least…your thoughts on boba and K-barb?

Jessica: What is boba and K-barb? Well, boba pearls are made of tapioca and can be put in hot or cold drinks such as teas or smoothies. You have to try it!

K-barb, short for Korean BBQ, is a unique experience that allows you to cook your meal yourself. You have a choice of several meats and sides (i.e. marinated chicken, brisket, kimchi) that can be used to create your own delectable meals!

You can follow Jessica’s med school adventure by checking out her blog, Operation: Med Student. Thank you Jessica for sharing your story with us!

For one-on-one guidance on your med school applications, please see our catalog of med school admissions services.

Do you want to be featured in Accepted.com’s blog, Accepted Admissions Blog? If you want to share your med school journey with the world (or at least with our readers), email us at bloggers@accepted.com.

Navigate the Med Maze - Download your free guide today!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Related Resources:

5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Med School Essays [Free Guide]
• Getting Into Medical School: Advice from a Pro [Podcast]
5 Mistakes to Avoid During M1

 

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Stanford Applicants: September 22 Will Be Here Before You Know It! http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/18/stanford-applicants-september-22-will-be-here-before-you-know-it/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/18/stanford-applicants-september-22-will-be-here-before-you-know-it/#respond Tue, 18 Aug 2015 16:34:45 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=33506 On your mark…get set…go! That Stanford GSB Round 1 finish line is in sight, and yours for the conquering…if you play your cards right! The following resources will sharpen your competitive edge, making you a prime candidate for Stanford’s class of 2018: 1.  Get Accepted to Stanford GSB – What are the Stanford GSB adcom […]

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Get Accepted to Stanford GSB! On your mark…get set…go! That Stanford GSB Round 1 finish line is in sight, and yours for the conquering…if you play your cards right!

The following resources will sharpen your competitive edge, making you a prime candidate for Stanford’s class of 2018:

1.  Get Accepted to Stanford GSB What are the Stanford GSB adcom readers looking for when reviewing applications? View this webinar to learn the four key principles that will boost your GSB candidacy and get you accepted. **Updated for 2015-2016 applicants!

2.  Stanford GSB 2016 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines Here you’ll find detailed advice on writing each of Stanford’s application essays.  

3.  Intellectual Vitality, Demonstrated Leadership Potential, and Personal Qualities And Contributions are the three qualifications Stanford seeks in its applicants. Read these articles for advice on how to make sure you demonstrate them all.

4.  Entrepreneurship at Stanford GSB: Carlypso Drives Down the Startup Street Enjoy this interview with Nick Hinrichsen and Chris Colemen, Stanford GSB alums and founders of the startup Carlypso, which Tech Crunch calls a “brilliant concept.”

5.  Do Stanford GSB Grads REALLY “Change Lives. Change Organizations. Change the World”? – Are YOU ready to change organizations and change the world? Do you have what it takes to live up to Stanford’s motto? Read this blog posts for details.

Want more? With one of our MBA Application Packages, you’ll work one-on-one with an experienced consultant who will guide you through each and every element of your Stanford application.

Register for our free webinar: Get Accepted to Stanford GSB!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

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Future Whartonites…Tune In On Wednesday! http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/17/future-whartonitestune-on-wednesday/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/17/future-whartonitestune-on-wednesday/#respond Mon, 17 Aug 2015 18:36:05 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32826 Attention Wharton Applicants: The webinar you’ve all been waiting for, Get Accepted to Wharton, will take place this Wednesday, August 19th! Reserve your spot now and tune in on Wednesday to hear important Wharton application tips that could transform your Wharton dream into reality! Tags: MBA Admissions

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Attention Wharton Applicants: The webinar you’ve all been waiting for, Get Accepted to Wharton, will take place this Wednesday, August 19th!

Get Accepted to Wharton! Register for the webinar today!

Reserve your spot now and tune in on Wednesday to hear important Wharton application tips that could transform your Wharton dream into reality!

Save your spot!

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Clichéd Writing: Med School Application Flaw #3 http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/17/cliched-writing-fatal-flaw-3/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/17/cliched-writing-fatal-flaw-3/#respond Mon, 17 Aug 2015 16:05:29 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=33459 “Clichéd Writing” is the next post in our series, 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Medical School Essays. Don’t hide your lucid answers to essay questions behind meaningless verbiage and abused clichés. I once read an interview with an MBA grad on BW (to protect the guilty, I won’t link.) “As a new company in […]

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Learn how to avoid the 5 Fatal Flaws in your Med School Applications!

Can the buzz!

“Clichéd Writing” is the next post in our series, 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Medical School Essays.

Don’t hide your lucid answers to essay questions behind meaningless verbiage and abused clichés. I once read an interview with an MBA grad on BW (to protect the guilty, I won’t link.)

“As a new company in a new space, we need to exceed client expectations, so first and foremost I drive client projects in the health-care and telecom verticals. But my job requires an internal focus as well, and I spend a ton of time both building and updating scalable systems, from knowledge management to invoicing and payroll.”

Ouch!!! I suppose this fellow is highly intelligent, and I hope he is good at what he does, but don’t write like he talks. Write directly and clearly so people can understand you. Can the buzz! Perhaps a translation would be:

“As a new company entering a new market, we need to impress our clients with outstanding performance.  I personally manage projects for clients in the health-care and telecom industries.  But in addition to serving our clients, I am striving to build our business by ensuring that all our systems from personnel to invoicing support our growth.”

Avoid Fatal Flaw #3: Write pointed and direct answers to the questions.

5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Med School Essays - Download your free guide!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Related Resources:

• Writing Secondary Essays That Get You Accepted [On-Demand Webinar]
Nine Ways To Get Rejected From Medical School
• So These Two Grad School Applicants Walk Into A Bar . . .

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4 Don’ts For Your Residency Personal Statements http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/16/4-donts-for-your-residency-personal-statements-3/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/16/4-donts-for-your-residency-personal-statements-3/#respond Sun, 16 Aug 2015 16:55:34 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=33409 The ERAS (Electronic Residency Application Service) is now open for the 2016 match, so it’s time to get cracking on those residency essays! Your personal statement is a vital part of your application: it is your chance to explain why you’ve chosen your target specialty and show the committee something of who you are. Unlike […]

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5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Residecy Personal Statements - Download a copy today!

Don’t just copy the same personal statement for each program!

The ERAS (Electronic Residency Application Service) is now open for the 2016 match, so it’s time to get cracking on those residency essays!

Your personal statement is a vital part of your application: it is your chance to explain why you’ve chosen your target specialty and show the committee something of who you are. Unlike other pieces of your app (such as letters of rec), it’s also something that you have complete control over. Make the most of it!

Here are 4 things you should AVOID when preparing your residency personal statement:

1.  DON’T explain why you went into medicine. This isn’t a med school application; you’ve already convinced your med school’s adcom why you want to be a doctor. Now that you are a doctor, that information is really beside the point.

2.  DON’T offer a superficial or generic explanation for choosing your specialty. Show that you are serious about your chosen field by giving a serious explanation. Saying that you have wanted to be a surgeon ever since playing Operation as a child doesn’t really shed the right level of knowledge or experience on your decision. Most likely, you’ve chosen your field based on something you learned or an experience you had during med school. Go with that instead.

3.  DON’T send the same personal statement to each of the programs you’re applying to. It should go without saying that since your reasons for applying to each of your given programs are different, then your essays should be different as well. After all, you’re supposed to write about why each program appeals to you – they can’t all have the same attractions.

4.  DON’T use all 28,000 characters for your personal statement. The 28,000 character limit – that’s approximately five pages – set by ERAS is the absolute maximum your essay is allowed to be. But that doesn’t mean that it should be that long. In fact, no residency director wants to read that much, or even close to that much. Try and stick to a one-page essay that addresses all of your key points. Your essay will be more effective if you’re more to the point and concise. You can offer longer answers during your interview.

If you would like professional guidance with your residency application materials, please consider using Accepted’s Residency Admissions Consulting and Editing Services, which include advising, editing, and interview coaching for application materials.

5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Residency Personal Statement - Download your copy today!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Related Resources:

• Residency Applications: How to Match [Free On-Demand Webinar]
• Record Year For Residency Match
• A Residency Admissions Tip for Third-Year Medical Students

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Wharton: “Putting Knowledge Into Action” http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/16/wharton-putting-knowledge-into-action-part-4-in-the-big-brand-theory-series/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/16/wharton-putting-knowledge-into-action-part-4-in-the-big-brand-theory-series/#respond Sun, 16 Aug 2015 16:18:43 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=33445 Episode 4 in our Big Brand Theory Series for MBA applicants: Wharton’s motto. Does the oldest business school actually have a brand?  Does the oldest business school actually need a brand? Ironically, Wharton is a more powerful global brand than the elite Ivy League university of which it resides.  In fact, many people don’t know that the […]

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Register for the webinar!Episode 4 in our Big Brand Theory Series for MBA applicants: Wharton’s motto.

Does the oldest business school actually have a brand?  Does the oldest business school actually need a brand? Ironically, Wharton is a more powerful global brand than the elite Ivy League university of which it resides.  In fact, many people don’t know that the University of Pennsylvania is a highly regarded Ivy League institution. Outside the United States the University of Pennsylvania, Wharton’s “parent” university is often confused with Penn State University, the “parent” university to the Smeal College of Business, to the humorous consternation of both schools.

As I searched through Wharton’s collateral, it was difficult to zero in on its point of view. However, its tagline, putting knowledge into action, was easy to find. But I ask, is Wharton’s tagline synonymous with its brand?  I will go out on a limb here and say, “no.” Wharton is its own brand.  Wharton is Wharton. But the admissions officers and their marketing colleagues are giving you a hint through this tag line that they are seeking students who can “put knowledge into action”.

How does one “put knowledge into action”?  Well, I would venture to say that you would put knowledge into action the same way Columbia students “bridge theory with practice” and how Michigan Ross students put “thought into action.”  These taglines sound extremely similar, but they do get to the crux of the type of student these schools seek.

Wharton seeks a student who can take the information that he or she gathers from school, the workplace, the community, and the world, process the information and then act on the ideas and concepts acquired.   As an applicant you need to demonstrate that you not only know the information, but that you have implemented the concepts that you’ve learned. For more information on how to do explain this process in an essay, read my blog post “Show me, Don’t Tell Me.”  While I wrote the blog for PhD students, the “theory” applies to MBA candidates as well.

In the application, the main essay looks toward the future, so you can’t demonstrate that you have the trait to turn your knowledge into action in the main essay. You can only explain that you can act on your knowledge in the work experience, extracurricular activities and community service section in the application.  You can also establish that you offer this trait on your resume and in optional essay 1.  

I’ll focus on optional essay 1 for the purpose of this blog. I suggest exhibit how and where you learned about something and then acted upon it in optional essay 1.  Did you read about a theory in a book and then test it out in the real world?  Did you hear a political pundit on the news describe something and gather your friends in a grass roots effort to implement or refute the pundit’s opinion?  A great example comes from a environmentally astute MBA.  He believed that if areas of the world that don’t have access to potable water were given access to potable water that it would lessen the political unrest in these countries where access to water is a big issue.  He researched his theory through expert white papers and journal articles. He tested his theory by creating a process to make polluted water potable and distributed his patented invention to several regions that suffered from political unrest.  He put his theory into action, and had results that proved his theory worked in over half of the regions where he distributed this process.  He is now working with a manufacturer and an NGO to gain more distribution throughout the world.  

While your example doesn’t need to have the kind of impact that changes the world, it does need to describe in detail, what you did to make a difference.  Did your Relay for Life impact the latest therapies for cancer?  Did your understanding of the book Trading Systems that Work lead you to pursue a finance degree?  Did your Improvisational class at school help you become a skilled public speaker?  Did you learn something from a colleague at work or at school that enabled you to arrive at a better answer.

Their tagline is put to the test during their Team Based Discussions.  If you are invited to participate, you are given a mini-case, asked to present a solution and then work for 35 minutes with a team of potential future classmates to come up with the best or optimal solution.  The evaluators will observe how you synthesize the information around the table and use it to come up with a viable action Wharton can use in the future.

So while Wharton’s brand stands alone, its tagline is instrumental to the success of your application.  For more information about successful strategies on your Wharton application, register for Accepted’s Get Accepted to Wharton Seminar and contact our consultants for assistance with your application.

Register to learn how to get accepted to Wharton!

Natalie Grinblatt Epstein By , an accomplished Accepted.com consultant/editor (since 2008) and entrepreneur. Natalie is a former MBA Admissions Dean and Director at Ross, Johnson, and Carey.

 

Related Resources:

• Wharton 2016 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
The Wharton Difference
• Wharton B-School Zone Page

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Key Findings From 2015 Compensation Report: Are Med Residents Happy? http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/14/key-findings-from-2015-compensation-report-are-med-residents-happy/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/14/key-findings-from-2015-compensation-report-are-med-residents-happy/#respond Fri, 14 Aug 2015 16:07:37 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=33254 The results of Medscape’s 2015 Residents Salary & Debt Report are in. Below you’ll find information about the salaries of residents and an answer to one of the most important questions in the report: Do med residents feel fairly compensated? • Average resident salary: $55,400 • Residents who specialized in Critical Care earned the most, […]

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This year, the male-female salary gap was just $1,000 per year

The results of Medscape’s 2015 Residents Salary & Debt Report are in. Below you’ll find information about the salaries of residents and an answer to one of the most important questions in the report: Do med residents feel fairly compensated?

• Average resident salary: $55,400

• Residents who specialized in Critical Care earned the most, at $62,000. This is followed by Oncology/Pulmonary Medicine ($61,000) and Cardiology ($60,000).

• Residents who specialized in Internal Medicine/Family Medicine/General Medicine earned the lowest salaries ($53,000).

• On average, first year residents earned the least on average at $52,000 per year. Each year following, residents earned more, with seventh year post-MD residents earning the most on average at $66,000 per year. Eighth year post-MD residents, however, took a salary dip, earning on average $63,000 per year.

• This year, the male-female salary gap was just $1,000 per year ($56,000 compared to $55,000, respectively). Last year, the gap was $2,000 – men took home on average $56,000, while women averaged $54,000.

• Residents in the Northeast earned $62,000 in 2015, up $1,000 since last year. Ranking second in this category are the residents in the Northwest who earned $57,000 this year. Last in line here are the Southeasterners (for the second year in a row) who earned $51,000 (compared to $50,000 last year).

• In general, 62% of residents said they felt fairly compensated. On the flip side, 38% do not.

• For the male-female breakdown, 60% of men feel fairly compensated, compared to 65% of females.

The Medscape survey covers loads more areas related to residents’ overall satisfaction and wellbeing, including student debt, the amount of scut work residents have, resident benefits, relationships with nurses, PAs, and attendings, amount of time spent at the hospital, number of hours on call, and much more. It’s definitely worth checking out. Here’s a link to the article, and here’s the slideshow.

5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Residency Personal Statement - Download your copy today!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Related Resources:

• Residency Applications: How to Match [Free On-Demand Webinar]
• Record Year For Residency Match
• The Mrs. The Mommy. The M.D. Shares Her Residency Application Experiences

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Tufts University 2016 Secondary Application Tips http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/14/tufts-university-2016-secondary-application-tips/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/14/tufts-university-2016-secondary-application-tips/#respond Fri, 14 Aug 2015 16:04:33 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=33370 Tufts describes their fundamental mission as promoting human health, with an emphasis on leadership and clinical care. They are looking for students with a strong background in the fundamentals of science who also want to apply that work in a clinical setting. The school’s curriculum emphasizes patient contact early on along with full integration of […]

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Click for other school specific secondary essay tips!Tufts describes their fundamental mission as promoting human health, with an emphasis on leadership and clinical care. They are looking for students with a strong background in the fundamentals of science who also want to apply that work in a clinical setting. The school’s curriculum emphasizes patient contact early on along with full integration of the sciences.

Because Tufts’ medical school is focused on classes where there is a dynamic environment with a great deal of peer-to-peer work, you should emphasize your ability to lead and contribute to a medical school class.

Tufts 2016 Secondary Application Essay Questions:

• Character count is 1000 characters, including spaces.

• The secondaries are optional, but we recommend that you answer them.

Secondary Application Essays:

1. Do you wish to include any comments (in addition to those already provided in your AMCAS application) to the Admissions Committee at Tufts University School of Medicine?

You can use this space to write about anything not in the AMCAS. Be sure you do not repeat your personal statement. This is a good place to indicate anything specific about Tufts or about your personal background.

2. Do you consider yourself a person who would contribute to the diversity of the student body of Tufts University School of Medicine?

For this question, you should consider diversity of race, ethnicity, language, family background, economic circumstances, and education or past experience. Consider how you might interact with a diverse group of medical students and contribute to your class.

3. Do you have any withdrawals or repeated coursework listed on your transcript(s)?

Explain anything in your academic history that fulfills this question. Be honest and do not make excuses.

4. Did you take any leaves of absence or significant breaks from your undergraduate education? (Do not include time off after graduation.)

Include information about what you did during your time off. Include volunteer work.

5. Is any member of your family a graduate of TUSM or a current member of our faculty?

Tufts Application Timeline:

Check out more school specific secondary essay tips!

If you would like professional guidance with your Tufts Medical School application materials, please consider using Accepted’s Medical School Admissions Consulting and Editing Services, which include advising, editing, and interview coaching for Tufts application materials.

5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Med School Essays - Download your free guide!

 

JessicaPishkoJessica Pishko graduated with a J.D. from Harvard Law School and received an M.F.A. from Columbia University. She spent two years guiding students through the medical school application process at Columbia’s PostBacc Program and teaches writing at all levels. 

Related Resources:

• Applying to Medical School with Low Stats: What You Need to Know [Free Guide]
• Getting Into Medical School: Advice from a Pro [Podcast]
• Boost Your GPA for Medical School Acceptance

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An Interview With Our Own: Michelle Stockman http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/13/an-interview-with-our-own-michelle-stockman/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/13/an-interview-with-our-own-michelle-stockman/#respond Thu, 13 Aug 2015 16:43:39 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=33297 Curious about the life and times of our spectacular admissions consultants? Please enjoy our newest blog series in which we interview the fabulous people who make up the Accepted.com staff. Next up is…Michelle Stockman. Accepted: Can you tell us a little about yourself? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? Do you hold […]

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Read more Accepted Admission Consultant Interviews!Curious about the life and times of our spectacular admissions consultants? Please enjoy our newest blog series in which we interview the fabulous people who make up the Accepted.com staff. Next up is…Michelle Stockman.

Accepted: Can you tell us a little about yourself? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? Do you hold any graduate degrees? What’s your favorite non-school/non-work book?

Michelle: I studied at Brigham Young University for my undergrad and majored in history. A few years later, I earned a Masters in Science in Journalism from the Columbia Journalism School in New York City.

As a history nut, I love reading non-fiction. My favorite recent read is Empire of the Summer Moon – a fascinating, poignant look at the rise and fall of the Comanches, the most powerful Native American tribe in the United States. It illuminates a violent chapter in American history that featured new military technology as the Comanche rose to prominence largely through their prowess as fierce warriors.

Accepted: What was your journey like – from NY, all the way out west, and then back to NY? Was NYC your final destination? Where do you currently reside?

Michelle: My connection to the American West dates back to my childhood. My father is from Salt Lake City, and we would drive cross-country from New York to Utah every other summer to visit my grandmother. Nestled amongst the Rocky Mountains during college, I had the opportunity to quench both my intellectual curiosity and thirst for outdoor adventure. Ultimately, my penchant for storytelling drew me back east, at first to New York City. Eight million people – so many stories to capture. As a video journalist, I covered everything from rooftop bee keepers to the attempted Times Square bombing. I went on to work for a French media company – Agence France Presse – where I covered events at the White House and met nearly all the candidates on the 2012 Presidential campaign trail. Next I moved to Islamabad, Pakistan where I linked up with CNN for occasional presenting work and also returned to admissions consulting. Just a month ago, I relocated to Berlin where I will be living for the foreseeable future.

Accepted: Can you map your path towards becoming an admissions consultant for Accepted?

Michelle: When I first moved to New York, I got a job coordinating interviews and reading applications at the Columbia Business School Admissions Office. I gained an insider view of the admissions process, and decided to combine my experience with the writing and editing skills I honed in journalism school by joining Accepted.com in 2007.

Accepted: What’s your favorite thing about consulting?

Michelle: Of course, I love the “I got in!” emails from my clients. But there’s so much ground work that we’ve laid together before that moment. I love when clients start to “get” the process. They realize that my coaching is improving their message. Then they catch on themselves, and surprise me, within a matter of weeks, how much more concise their writing and interviewing skills have become.

Accepted: How do you think your journalism skills contribute to your work as a consultant?

Michelle: Messenger + Target Audience + Content = Persuasion.

That’s the formula I learned as a journalist.

If my applicants tell the truth, then they are a trusted messenger. But will the admissions committee listen if that truth doesn’t resonate? If it’s just a bunch of boasts and industry jargon? I know how to choose and tell stories that signal leadership and transformation. I also have an inside understanding of my applicants’ target audience: the admissions committee.

Finally, journalists always have limited space to tell their stories – one of the toughest hurdles to overcome when putting together an MBA application. I can edit like a champ!

Accepted: What sorts of applicants do you mostly work with?

Michelle: I generally work with MBA and graduate school applicants.

Accepted: What are your top 3 admissions tips?

Michelle:

1. This process is as much relationship driven, as it is about having a cogent message. Dig into your network and try to create connections to your school of choice.

2. Make your essays about personal relationships that illustrate a theme.

3. Start early. The best applications are built on a strong foundation of deep thought.

Learn more about Michelle and how she can help you get accepted!

View our catalog of admission services!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Related Resources:

• Get Your Game On: Prepping for Your Grad School Application [Free Guide]
• MBA Admissions Consulting and Editing Services
• Graduate School Admissions Consulting and Editing Services

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Icahn School Of Medicine At Mount Sinai 2016 Secondary Application Essay Tips http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/13/icahn-school-of-medicine-at-mount-sinai-2016-secondary-application-essay-tips/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/13/icahn-school-of-medicine-at-mount-sinai-2016-secondary-application-essay-tips/#respond Thu, 13 Aug 2015 16:10:45 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=33146 According to U.S. News and World Report, Icahn SOM is ranked in the top 20 medical schools in the U.S. for research.  In 2009, the school received the Spencer Foreman Award for Outstanding Community Service because it places special emphasis on recruiting students from diverse backgrounds who demonstrate a strong dedication to community service through […]

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Check out other school specific secondary essay tips!

According to U.S. News and World Report, Icahn SOM is ranked in the top 20 medical schools in the U.S. for research.  In 2009, the school received the Spencer Foreman Award for Outstanding Community Service because it places special emphasis on recruiting students from diverse backgrounds who demonstrate a strong dedication to community service through long-term involvement and leadership roles. Implication for applicants: Highlight your unique characteristics, talents and experiences that will enhance the diversity on Icahn’s campus while demonstrating commitment and leadership.

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai 2016 Essay Questions:

• Two short essays, with a character limit of 250 and 200 words.

• Applicants should use single line spacing and 12 point size font.

• Responses should be constructed strategically to highlight an applicant’s strengths.

Secondary Application Essays:

1. Please tell us about a passion (professional or personal) you have had thus far in your life. (250 word limit)

Since this question is intentionally broad, you’ll want to be strategic in what topic you choose to cover here.  Start by making a list—be creative.  Rank your list of interests based on relevance to their school’s mission. Consider using only those interests that will be helpful to you, your classmates and patients in your medical education.  If you have always had a wonderful sense of humor and have performed at comedy clubs or at hospitals, mention this!  There are so many possibilities that could illustrate what you will bring to medicine that is unique to you.  If you are stuck on this question, you can ask friends and/or family to help you identify a talent, hobby or skill that you use professionally and/or personally.  It would be ideal to choose something that has taken you considerable time and effort to cultivate.

2. Please tell us about a situation in which working with others has been challenging. (200 word limit)

Basically, the adcom wants you to demonstrate the depth of your experience in working on a team.  To provide the best response, select a professional situation that will reveal how you were able to successfully create a positive outcome through your interpersonal communication skills and/or ability to problem solve. Create an outline.  Introduce what the situation was in the first few sentences.  Describe the issues and difficulties that arose.  Focus on what you did and how you changed the outcome for the group to successfully meet your collective goals.  Illustrate what role you play on a team and how you lead and/or support others.

Icahn School of Medicine Application Timeline:

Check out other school specific med secondary essay tips.

*Strong recommendation: Submit within two weeks after receipt.

If you would like professional guidance with your Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai application materials, please consider using Accepted’s Medical School Admissions Consulting and Editing Services, which include advising, editing, and interview coaching for Icahn SOM’s application materials.

View our med school resource library for valuable tips on every stage of the application process!

 

Alicia McNease Nimonkar is an Accepted.com advisor and editor specializing in healthcare admissions. Prior to joining Accepted, Alicia worked for five years as Student Advisor at UC Davis’ postbac program where she both evaluated applications and advised students applying successfully to med school and related programs.

Related Resources:

• 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid In Your Med School Essays [Free Guide]
• Medical School Admissions 2015-2016: A Dean’s Perspective [Podcast]
• Writer, Designer, And MS1 At The Icahn School Of Medicine

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Global Opportunities: The “Wharton Difference” And Fit With The Program http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/13/global-opportunities-the-wharton-difference-and-fit-with-the-program/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/13/global-opportunities-the-wharton-difference-and-fit-with-the-program/#respond Thu, 13 Aug 2015 16:05:14 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=33402 My previous posts on defining your fit with Wharton addressed three of the four components of “The Wharton Difference” (Largest Global Network, Culture of Engagement, and Innovative Leadership Learning).  Here I’ll look at the fourth, final component: Global Opportunities.   BUT… you might think, all top MBA programs have a global dimension; why is it […]

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Register for the "Get Accepted to Wharton" webinar, today!

Today, everyone working anywhere can directly or indirectly identify a global dimension to their work.

My previous posts on defining your fit with Wharton addressed three of the four components of “The Wharton Difference” (Largest Global Network, Culture of Engagement, and Innovative Leadership Learning).  Here I’ll look at the fourth, final component: Global Opportunities.  

BUT… you might think, all top MBA programs have a global dimension; why is it part of The Wharton Difference?  

The answer lies in how those specific opportunities align with the other three components by emphasizing connection, growth through experience, sharing/collaboration, and exploration.  This is evident in the following phrases:

• The Global Opportunities prepare you for “an interconnected world.”

• You will “immerse yourself” in local cultures and business approaches.

• You will “extend” your experience to your classmates as part of a “global community.”

The bolded words above reveal the adcom’s distinct lens on the global dimension:  its global resources start with you connecting with other people and groups to understand and eventually impact global business holistically.

BUT… What if your goals don’t include global enterprise?  Perhaps you plan to launch an IT initiative in a region of the U.S. where coal mining is dying.  Perhaps you plan to develop strategy for domestic healthcare provider chains.  In the first case, other countries, e.g. Poland, face the same challenge; perhaps there’s a prospective global collaboration on the horizon!  In the second case, perhaps learning from countries with different healthcare systems would give you fresh ideas to adapt.

Today, everyone working anywhere can directly or indirectly identify a global dimension to their work.  If it’s not immediately obvious, think further, and you will surely discern how it’s so in your own situation.

To demonstrate fit with Wharton, portray the “Global Opportunities” component in your application:

•  Familiarize yourself with both the academic opportunities (majors, Global Modular Courses, Global Immersion Program, and Global Consulting Practicum, and exchange programs) and the extracurricular opportunities (conferences, International Volunteer Program, and Global Career Treks), decide which ones best meet your needs, and discuss how and why in your essay and interview.

•  In your essay and interview, as appropriate, include anecdotes and examples about global experiences and the human, cultural, and values-oriented factors beyond the hard facts and numbers (you can include non-business experiences if relevant, even interactions with colleagues from other countries/cultures if you don’t have firsthand international experience).

•  In your resume and application form, mention activities with a global or international element.

Register to learn how to get accepted to Wharton!

 

Cindy Tokumitsu By , author and co-author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports, including Why MBA and Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted.com.

Related Resources:

• Understanding The Wharton Difference
• Wharton 2016 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
• Interested In Impact: A Talk With Wharton Student Jenna Gebel

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Seats Running Out For Our Wharton Webinar… http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/12/seats-running-out-for-our-wharton-webinar-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/12/seats-running-out-for-our-wharton-webinar-2/#respond Wed, 12 Aug 2015 18:37:42 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32821 If you are applying to Wharton – then you’ll want to tune in on Wednesday, August 19, 2015 for our Get Accepted To Wharton webinar. Access winning tips that put you ahead of your competition including the 4 key strategies you need to get accepted and advice for your team-based discussion! Don’t get left behind – reserve your spot for Get Accepted to Wharton […]

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If you are applying to Wharton – then you’ll want to tune in on Wednesday, August 19, 2015 for our Get Accepted To Wharton webinar.
Get Accepted to Wharton - Register for the webinar today!

Access winning tips that put you ahead of your competition including the 4 key strategies you need to get accepted and advice for your team-based discussion!

Save your spot!

Don’t get left behind – reserve your spot for Get Accepted to Wharton now!

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A Med School With A Mission: Sophie Davis School Of Biomedical Education http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/12/a-med-school-with-a-mission-sophie-davis-school-of-biomedical-education/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/12/a-med-school-with-a-mission-sophie-davis-school-of-biomedical-education/#respond Wed, 12 Aug 2015 16:39:07 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=33275 A physician shortage looms large. Enter Dr. Maurizio Trevisan and the Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education, the newest accredited medical school in the United States. Listen to the show to find out how the City College of New York medical school is simultaneously paving the path to primary care for “unevenly educated students” and changing […]

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Listen to the show!

City College of New York

A physician shortage looms large. Enter Dr. Maurizio Trevisan and the Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education, the newest accredited medical school in the United States.

Listen to the show to find out how the City College of New York medical school is simultaneously paving the path to primary care for “unevenly educated students” and changing the status quo for medically underserved communities.

00:01:47 – History of The Sophie Davis School and its evolution into a med school.

00:03:13 – About the BS/MD program.

00:05:58 – Why a 7-year curriculum is critical for Sophie Davis’s mission.

00:07:15 – Taking chances, supporting students and bringing diversity to the medical profession.

00:14:20 – What pushed the program to get accreditation and what the future holds.

00:17:25 – Alums making the school proud.

00:19:29 – Advice for financially or academically challenged med school hopefuls.

Click here to listen to the show!*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com

Related Links:

Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education
Are You Cut Out for a Combined BS/MD Program?
New CUNY School of Medicine accredited

Related Shows:

The Doctor As Renaissance Man 
Baylor College Of Medicine: A Holistic Approach To Admissions
Attn Med Applicants: A Class Is Matriculated Every Single Year
Medical School Admissions 2015-2016: A Dean’s Perspective

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Get Accepted to Med School with Low Stats!  Download your guide today!

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Mindful Of Medicine: A Peek Into The Life Of An M3 http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/11/interview-with-racquel-forever-mindful-of-medicine/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/11/interview-with-racquel-forever-mindful-of-medicine/#respond Tue, 11 Aug 2015 16:32:08 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=33308 This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with medical school applicants and students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top medical schools and the med school application process. And now, introducing Racquel… Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an […]

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Read more med school student interviews!This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with medical school applicants and students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top medical schools and the med school application process. And now, introducing Racquel…

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What is your favorite ice cream flavor?

Racquel: I was born and raised in sunny Tucson, AZ. Year round sun can be fun when you’re a kid and want to play outside all day, but as an adult I’m looking forward to moving somewhere a bit colder! Growing up in AZ as a minority was also a dynamic experience and it definitely contributed to my sense of social justice.

My decision to stay in Tucson for college and attend the University of Arizona was twofold. I wanted to stay close to my family but I was also fortunate enough to have scholarships. I was in the Honors College and majored in Physiology, Religious Studies, and Spanish & Portuguese. I also minored in Arabic and studied abroad in Lebanon. I think that being the first person in my family to go to college made undergrad both challenging and exciting. Within the first year of college I realized I had a lot of interests, hence all of the majors and the minor! I figured since I only got to go to college once I might as well get the most out of it by approaching learning with an open mind. If I had more hours in the day I definitely would have picked up an English major since I love literature, poetry and prose. The goal of my undergrad experience was to get me into medical school while learning as much as I could along the way. Looking back, I would do it all over again.

My favorite ice cream flavor would have to be French vanilla – Baskin Robbins used to have it when I was a kid but discontinued it. I’ve been searching for a replacement ever since!

Accepted: Where are you in med school? What year?

Racquel: I’m currently a third year medical student, and though I would like to keep the exact location of my med school a bit private, I will say it is in the Southwest.

Accepted: What is your favorite class so far? Favorite clerkship?

Racquel: During the first two years we had a wide variety of “blocks.” I definitely enjoyed our metabolism block the most though. Biochem has been my favorite subject since undergrad and I enjoyed learning pathways in terms of pathology and treatment.

I’m currently on the Internal Medicine clerkship, which is my first clerkship ever. So while I don’t know which has been my favorite clerkship just yet, I will say I’m very excited for pediatrics, OB/GYN and surgery. I have an idea of what my idea medical career would look like but I’m looking forward to finishing more clerkships in order to solidify my vision. Who knows, I might even surprise myself and decide to go into something totally unexpected!

Accepted: Did you go straight from college to med school? Or did you take time off? (If you took time off, how did you spend your time?)

Racquel: I went straight from college to med school. Though I have many interests, my ultimate goal has always been medicine. With that in mind, undergrad was my opportunity to explore those interests while strengthening my application for medical school. I’m a very goal-oriented person with high expectations of myself so I never planned to take time off between college and med school. It just wasn’t something I saw myself doing. Had I not gotten in the first time around I likely would have spent a year doing research and working.

Accepted: Looking back, what was the most challenging aspect of the med school admissions process? How did you approach that challenge and overcome it?

Racquel: The med school admissions process is a really difficult time, both logistically and emotionally. I think that the uncertainty that comes along with constantly waiting for an email that decides your fate can make you question your sanity. The whole process can wreak havoc on your inner peace, but it doesn’t have to. Keeping busy but also having a strong spiritual foundation helped me. At the time I was starting my senior year of college and had 24-unit semesters (thanks to all those majors) on top of working at a dermatology practice in the afternoons. I was busy, but I was still stressed. I turned to prayer and my husband to help keep myself centered. Another important thing to keep in mind during the admissions process is that you’re still a person who is worth more than an interview invite, rejection, etc. Let the process be a learning experience, but don’t let it break you.

Accepted: How did you choose which med school would be the best one for you?

Racquel: When choosing which med school was best for me I had to consider more than just academics. Things like finances, price of living, and what the potential city has to offer all come into play. My husband and I got married during my senior year of college so we chose a school based on the overall quality of life we wanted to have for four years. We chose to go somewhere that would allow us to live comfortably but also be close to family. That being said, had I gotten into my dream school I would have gone there in a heartbeat!

Accepted: Do you have any other advice for our med school applicant readers?

Racquel: Just remember that your hard work will pay off! One way or another you will find a way to get where you want to be, so make the most of the journey.

Accepted: Can you tell us about your blog? When did you start blogging? What have you gained from the experience?

Racquel: I’ve followed many blogs over the years and appreciate the open platform that a blog offers. One day I decided to try it for myself. I first posted in December 2014 as my first semester of MSII came to an end. I had no idea how to start a blog, but my HTML skills from middle school (I attended a science-focused charter school) were finally put to good use. My blog started as a space where I could share some of the challenges I’ve had in my life as well as what medical school is like. I like the idea that my blog will continue to evolve as I do. Writing a blog has allowed me to work through some of my experiences. I have also been able to offer advice to people who write to me, and that is very humbling. My blog has also allowed me to connect with other women in medicine, which is a huge source of motivation for me!

You can follow Racquel’s med school adventure by checking out her blog, Mindful of Medicine. Thank you Racquel for sharing your story with us!

For one-on-one guidance on your med school applications, please see our catalog of med school admissions services.

Do you want to be featured in Accepted.com’s blog, Accepted Admissions Blog? If you want to share your med school journey with the world (or at least with our readers), email us at bloggers@accepted.com.

Navigate the Med Maze - Download your free guide today!

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Related Resources:

• Attn Med Applicants: A Class Is Matriculated Every Single Year [Podcast]
• Nine Ways To Get Rejected From Medical School
• Dear Diary…: Advice for Third-Year Medical Students 

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How To Pay For Medical School http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/11/how-to-pay-for-medical-school/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/11/how-to-pay-for-medical-school/#respond Tue, 11 Aug 2015 16:09:58 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=33179 Paying for medical school is easy right? Wrong. Paying for medical school has become increasingly challenging for students and families. Higher education is expensive, and is getting more expensive each year. Keeping up with the rising cost of tuition, living expenses, books, and supplies is difficult for every student. If you are an incoming medical […]

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Trying to Get Accepted to Medical School? Learn how to navigate the Med school maze!

Paying for medical school isn’t impossible if you know where to look.

Paying for medical school is easy right? Wrong.

Paying for medical school has become increasingly challenging for students and families. Higher education is expensive, and is getting more expensive each year. Keeping up with the rising cost of tuition, living expenses, books, and supplies is difficult for every student. If you are an incoming medical student you know how expensive it is to become a doctor.

As reported by the Association of American Medical Colleges, the median four-year cost of medical school (including expenses and books) was $278,455 for private schools, and $207,866 for public schools in 2013. As tuition bills hit mailboxes nationwide, you may be wondering how you can possibly afford to go to medical school. In this article we like to highlight a few paths to consider if you are looking for ways to fund your education.

Federal Financial Aid

The Department of Education realizes that paying for an education is difficult. Luckily, there are a number of federal programs available to help you pay your bill. If you haven’t already submitted the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) get on it. You must submit the FAFSA if you would like to be considered for federal financial aid such as grants or loans. Filing the FAFSA is easy and can be done online in less than 30 minutes.

In short, the FAFSA will determine the amount of financial aid you are eligible to receive. The Department of Education offers both need-based and non-need-based aid. Even if you don’t think you qualify, take 30 minutes and file the FAFSA. Your medical school may even require it as part of the application process.

All incoming medical students will qualify for some form of financial aid. The Department of Education offers graduate and professional students up to $20,500 in Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loans. These loans have fixed interest rates set at 5.84% for the 2015-2016 period. You can use Federal Stafford Loans to pay for tuition, room and board, textbooks, and other costs related to your cost of attendance. Please note, if you’ve already used federal student loans for your undergraduate studies you can borrow no more than $138,500 in aggregate.

Lastly, you should know that Unsubsidized Federal Student Loans will accrue interest while you are in medical school. It is recommended that you payoff your accrued interest to protect against capitalization.

Private Student Loans

If you aren’t able to meet your cost of attendance even after federal financial aid, you may be considering using a private student loan. Private student loans get a bad rap at times. For most students, private student loans will have higher interest rates in comparison to federal student loans. Private student loan rates range from 2% to 13%. Unlike the Department of Education’s loans, private student loans are issued based off creditworthiness. The rate you are offered will be determined by your creditworthiness and the options selected.

About 9 out of 10 private student loan borrowers need the help of a cosigner to get approved for a private student loan. In general, you or your cosigner will need good credit (+700), a low debt-to-income ratio (below 40%), and gross income over $35,000. Private student loans come in many shapes and sizes. You can select from variable rates, fixed rates, and even choose the term length of your loan. There are plenty of private student loan lenders on the market. Each lender has different options, rates, and approval criteria. We recommend shopping around between lenders before signing that promissory note.

It is always recommended that you maximize your federal financial aid options before using private student loans. For more detailed information about private student loans, please check out this guide.

Scholarships

You’ve likely already started looking at scholarships. But I want to mention it just in case. Unlike student loans, scholarship awards do not need to be repaid. Scholarships are free money.

Scholarships come in many forms. Merit scholarships are the most popular form of scholarship aid. That being said, there are plenty of scholarships available for incoming and current medical students. I would suggest avoiding the first page of Google search results when looking for scholarships. Don’t waste your time applying for scholarship lotteries or “No application! Takes only 2 minutes!” scholarships. Get creative. Look for local scholarships and niche awards. Don’t be afraid to apply for smaller awards too. The smaller the award, the less competition.

Lastly, make sure you avoid scholarship scams. Don’t ever pay to apply for a scholarship. Don’t ever provide your social security number. And if it seems too good to be true, it probably is. Online scholarship marketing is a huge business. Be careful with your information.

Medical school is expensive. But paying for medical school isn’t impossible if you know where to look. Start with federal financial aid and scholarships. Then if need be, consider private student loans.

Navigate the Med Maze - Download your free guide today!

By Matt Lenhard, Co-Founder at LendEDU. LendEDU is a marketplace for student loans and student loan refinance. LendEDU works to create transparency in the student loan market. For more information about financial aid or student loans check out LendEDU’s website!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Related Resources:

• How Much Does Applying to Med School Cost?
• The AAMC Fee Assistance Program: How & Who Should Apply
• US News Most Affordable Med Schools

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Financing Your INSEAD MBA http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/11/financing-your-insead-mba/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/11/financing-your-insead-mba/#respond Tue, 11 Aug 2015 15:55:25 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=33359 I was lucky enough to get accepted to study at INSEAD 10 years ago. But before the great news I had spent at least 18 months preparing: from doing the GMAT, writing essays, deciding which school to go to, and determining how to finance this unique and life changing experience. I probably spent the least […]

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Get tips for writing successful INSEAD application essays!

I was lucky enough to get accepted to study at INSEAD 10 years ago. But before the great news I had spent at least 18 months preparing: from doing the GMAT, writing essays, deciding which school to go to, and determining how to finance this unique and life changing experience. I probably spent the least amount of time on the financing point, but in the end it was the most important.

Here are a few recommendations to keep in mind when financing your MBA:

The first recommendation is that whatever you expect to spend on your MBA, you are going to spend at least 30% more on your living expenses, and other expenses that come up. Of course, I wanted to make the most of the experience, and every MBA program, including INSEAD’s, has more activities than anyone can imagine going to. And it’s very tough to say “no” to them due to lack of savings. So tip 1: save at least an extra $5,000 for “travel expenses” per year.

The second recommendation is to evaluate the financial difference between a 1 year and 2 year MBA program. It is not only the opportunity cost of not working and making money, but the 2 year MBA is normally 50%-100% more expensive due to cost of living and 2 years of tuition. Choosing a 1 year MBA like INSEAD was not a conscious decision on my part but I’m glad I decided on it in the end. There is a trend around the world for more 1 year MBAs because of this reason.

The third and most important recommendation is to look for other sources of funding aside from a loan – a few options include:

1.  Scholarships (there are a lot more per country than you may think. In Spain, there are at least 8 organizations that give scholarships)

2.  Ask family and friends for donations or savings

3.  Crowdsource your MBA experience

4.  Get a side job for extra money

I started with the 4th option and managed to save a worthwhile extra amount for INSEAD. Three months before starting the program, I got lucky and got an amazing scholarship from Fundacion Rafael del Pino in Spain for my studies.

Finally, I encourage you to look at what others are doing around you, search on blogs and forums, be creative, and most importantly: if you are set on doing an MBA, with a little bit of discipline and structure, you can save for the future.

Prodigy Finance - RicardoRicardo is Prodigy Finance’s Head of Business Development. He got his MBA from INSEAD in 2006. After his MBA, he worked in management consulting for 8 years before shifting his focus to consult for startup companies in the Fintech space. He joined the Prodigy Finance team in 2014.

 

Related Resources:

• MBA Admissions A-Z: 26 Terrific Tips [Free Guide]
• INSEAD Essay 3: Writing About Cultural Diversity
• The Money will Sort Itself Out: IV with a Future INSEAD Student

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Failure To Answer The Question: Med School Application Flaw #2 http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/10/failure-to-answer-the-question-med-school-application-flaw-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/10/failure-to-answer-the-question-med-school-application-flaw-2/#respond Mon, 10 Aug 2015 16:02:26 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=33287 “Failure to Answer the Question” is the next post in our series, 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Medical School Essays. Failure to answer the question is such a common error! Applicants so many times ask, “What does the admissions reader want?” They want the answer to their question. And too frequently you don’t provide […]

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Download your copy of 5 Fatal flaws to avoid in your medical school application essays!

The starting point has to be an answer to the question posed.

“Failure to Answer the Question” is the next post in our series, 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Medical School Essays.

Failure to answer the question is such a common error! Applicants so many times ask, “What does the admissions reader want?” They want the answer to their question. And too frequently you don’t provide what they want. If the question asks you to discuss a failure, somewhere in that essay you must discuss a time when you really blew it. And then what you learned, and if appropriate, a nice dose of how you successfully handled a similar subsequent situation. But the starting point has to be an answer to the question posed. If the question asks why you want to attend a given program, you need to provide specifics about that program that relate to your interests and goals. Don’t respond with an answer that could apply to all programs in your field. That is a non-answer, non-starter, and probable ding. Don’t tell them why you are more qualified than anyone else to attend their program. Just answer the question. What if it’s an open-ended question with just general instructions? Then follow the general instructions and enjoy the luxury of writing about what interests you and best presents your qualifications.

Avoid Fatal Flaw #2: Keep the application alive. Answer the question.

5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Med School Essays - Download your free guide!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Related Resources:

• Writing Secondary Essays That Get You Accepted [Free On-Demand Webinar]
• Secondary Strategy: Why Do You Want To Go Here?
• How to Get the Most Out of Your Experience Working With A Medical School Consultant

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Harvard Medical School 2016 Secondary Application Essay Tips http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/09/harvard-medical-school-2016-secondary-application-essay-tips/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/09/harvard-medical-school-2016-secondary-application-essay-tips/#respond Sun, 09 Aug 2015 16:43:40 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=33194 HMS is looking for students who will help find new ways to approach patient care through diversity, research, and a dedication to service.  In this secondary application, it will be important to include relevant leadership roles that you have held in which you were able to improve methods or outcomes.  Highlight your experience working with […]

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Read more school specific secondary essay tipsHMS is looking for students who will help find new ways to approach patient care through diversity, research, and a dedication to service.  In this secondary application, it will be important to include relevant leadership roles that you have held in which you were able to improve methods or outcomes.  Highlight your experience working with diverse communities and your own cultural background.  If you have recent research experience, discuss your contributions to the team.  Most importantly, describe any community service or volunteer roles you participated in and explain how your work impacted the community you served.  HMS is looking for applicants who can set themselves apart through the quality of their leadership, research, and community service experiences.     

Harvard 2016 Secondary Application Essay Questions:

• Two 4000-character essays are requested, not required.

• One additional essay is required for applicants interested in applying to the HST MD Program with a limit of one page.

• Applicants should use single line spacing and 10 or 12 point size font.

• Responses should be constructed strategically to highlight all of an applicant’s strengths.

Secondary Application Essays:

1. If you have already graduated, briefly summarize your activities since graduation. (4000 characters maximum)

This essay applies only to students who have graduated Spring 2012 or earlier from an undergraduate institution.  Using an updated copy of your resume, create a list of the activities that you have participated in since graduating.  You can discuss the activities in chronological order, present to past or past to present.  Or you can organize the list based on type of activity.  Select a method of organization—write it out as a list or draw circles grouping similar activities together.  Once you have decided the method of your approach, you can focus paragraph by paragraph on each activity in the order that you chose—providing details about the level of your responsibilities, what you are learning, how you are impacting the community you are working with and/or how the experience is influencing your life goals.  Provide clear and succinct summaries that are focused on demonstrating HMS’ core commitments as described above or on their website. 

2. If there is an important aspect of your personal background or identity, not addressed elsewhere in the application, that you would like to share with the Committee, we invite you to do so here. Many applicants will not need to answer this question. Examples might include significant challenges in access to education, unusual socioeconomic factors, identification with a minority culture, religion, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation or gender identity. Briefly explain how such factors have influenced your motivation for a career in medicine. (4000 characters maximum)

For a question like this, it is better to demonstrate the strength of your connection rather than describing it.  If you have a personal connection to any of the communities described above, describe your involvement in the community and any relevant community service or work related positions you have held to support the community.  The more long term your commitments, the more compelling your connection and identification with the group will be.  Have you assisted other diverse or minority communities?  How have you been involved?  How long has your commitment been?  What impact did you have on the community?  Be sure to provide a strong conclusion for this essay—focusing on how your life has been enriched by the diverse communities you have served.    

HMS Application Timeline:

Read more school specific secondary essay tips!

If you would like professional guidance with your Harvard Medical School application materials, please consider using Accepted’s Medical School Admissions Consulting and Editing Services, which include advising, editing, and interview coaching for the HMS application materials.

Navigate the Med Maze - Download your free guide today!

Alicia Nimonkar is an Accepted.com advisor and editor specializing in healthcare admissions. Prior to joining Accepted, Alicia worked for five years as Student Advisor at UC Davis’ postbac program where she both evaluated applications and advised students applying successfully to med school and related programs. Explore Accepted.com’s services to see how Alicia can help you achieve your professional dreams in healthcare.

Related Resources:

• Applying to Medical School with Low Stats: What You Need to Know [Free Guide]
•  Getting Into Medical School: Advice from a Pro [Podcast]
• Shaping the Evolution of Humanity’s Health: Harvard Medical School Student IV

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6 Fatal Resume Flaws To Avoid http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/09/6-fatal-resume-flaws-to-avoid/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/09/6-fatal-resume-flaws-to-avoid/#respond Sun, 09 Aug 2015 16:07:05 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32926 The MBA Resume: Done right, this one-to-two-page list of accomplishments can woo the adcoms towards acceptance; done wrong, a resume could be your ticket to ding-hood. 1. Don’t view your resume as an afterthought; it should not be your last priority. Your resume provides an amazing opportunity to share a snapshot of your candidacy with the admissions […]

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Click here for more MBA Resume tips!

Don’t offer unnecessary information such as your weight or marital status

The MBA Resume: Done right, this one-to-two-page list of accomplishments can woo the adcoms towards acceptance; done wrong, a resume could be your ticket to ding-hood.

1. Don’t view your resume as an afterthought; it should not be your last priority.

Your resume provides an amazing opportunity to share a snapshot of your candidacy with the admissions committee. This is your chance to introduce yourself and leave a positive first impression.

2. Basic job descriptions just won’t cut it.

When top b-school adcoms quickly scan a resume (which is what they do at first), they’re looking for career progression. Even a list of the most impressive jobs won’t mean nearly as much to an adcom as a list of impressive jobs that show that a candidate has achieved goals, been promoted, and has generally made an impact on his or her surroundings.

3. Do not submit a job resume as part of your MBA application.

Your MBA resume should not include industry-specific or technical lingo that you might include on a resume for, say, an IT position. The details on your resume should be as accessible as possible to the widest circle of readers.

4. When formatting your resume, standards trump creativity.

Review the resume standards for your target school. Check out resources at the school’s career services department to find out how you should standardize your tenses, punctuation, and formatting. Don’t bold headings if your school-specific format doesn’t bold headings, for example.

5. Don’t offer information overload.

That means no SAT or GMAT scores, no high school education, and no references. The school will have all of that information from other parts of your application. Needless to say, date of birth, marital status, height, and weight should be excluded.

6. Don’t forget to edit.

A resume that hasn’t been spell-checked, grammar-checked, and reviewed by an extra set (or two) of eyes, will probably have errors, and therefore won’t make a very good first impression.

Need help perfecting your MBA admissions resume? Check out Accepted Resume Services and work one-on-one with an admissions expert to create a coherent, compelling admissions resume that will convince your target school’s adcom that they should keep reading.

The Quick Guide To Admissions Resumes - Download your free guide today!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Related Resources:

• Reminder for Your Resume [Short Video]
• Aligning Your Resume With Your Application Essays
• Write a Resume that is Readable, Impactful, and Unique

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5 Mistakes To Avoid During M1 http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/07/5-mistakes-to-avoid-during-m1/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/07/5-mistakes-to-avoid-during-m1/#respond Fri, 07 Aug 2015 16:48:39 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=33144 Medical school is tough. I don’t think there is anyone who would disagree with that statement— however, there are definitely ways to make it easier. The following are a few tips which will help you avoid the mistakes that so many new medical students make year after year. 1. Don’t show up to the anatomy […]

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Click here to check out our library of medical school admissions guides!

The act of note-taking can at times be superfluous.

Medical school is tough. I don’t think there is anyone who would disagree with that statement— however, there are definitely ways to make it easier. The following are a few tips which will help you avoid the mistakes that so many new medical students make year after year.

1. Don’t show up to the anatomy lab unprepared. You could easily spend countless hours mucking around the anatomy lab trying to learn detailed anatomy from an un-neatly dissected cadaver. This is especially true if you don’t really know what you’re looking for. Or, you could learn the details of human anatomy from a neatly displayed textbook, and THEN go to the lab. You will find it much easier to identify the sought-after structures, and will definitely spend less time in the lab.

2. Avoid taking excess notes. The physical act of note-taking can be a great way to help you remember a mentioned detail. But spending the entire lecture focusing on choosing the right highlighter, and creating a work of art in your notebook will only distract you from the material being presented. With most lectures now being recorded in their entirety, the act of note-taking can at times be superfluous.

3. Don’t show up to lecture unprepared. Medical students often get lost in lecture if they are not somewhat familiar with the subject material beforehand. The pace can be relentless. By studying the material at home before lecture, you will have created a good base for learning. This will allow you to keep up during lecture with less difficulty, and thereby get much more out of it.

4. Don’t rely on cramming—it’s the most inefficient way to study. While cramming may have worked for you in the past, it is the least efficient way to study. Giving yourself only a few days to study for an exam probably won’t provide the grounds for concepts to take hold. And with fewer learning repetitions (due to time constraints), you are likely to forget the details of what you have learned shortly after the exam. This will not only give you an inferior knowledge base, but it will make studying for the USMLE that much more difficult.

5. Don’t worry so much! Yes, the prospect of medical school is daunting. Many incoming students fear the onslaught of material that is coming their way and cringe at the prospect of having little free time. The truth is, you can succeed in medical school while still making time for other activities/relaxation and lead a happy and balanced life. But that will only be true if you work intelligently and efficiently. Have confidence in yourself and your study plan. Worrying excessively is neither efficient nor productive.

Navigate the Med Maze - Download your free guide today!

By Daniel R. Paull M.D. author of So You Got into Medical School…Now What? A Guide to Preparing for the Next Four Years. He received his medical degree from the University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, and is currently in his orthopedic surgery residency.  

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Related Resources:

• Elliptical, Meet Med School: Interview with Andrea Tooley
• Why I Chose B’s In Medical School
• Dear Diary…: Advice for Third-Year Medical Students 

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Interested In Impact: A Talk With Wharton Student Jenna Gebel http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/07/interested-in-impact-a-talk-with-wharton-student-jenna-gebel/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/07/interested-in-impact-a-talk-with-wharton-student-jenna-gebel/#respond Fri, 07 Aug 2015 16:08:44 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=33134 This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Jenna Gebel, a second-year MBA student at Wharton. Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study […]

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Read more MBA interviews!This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Jenna Gebel, a second-year MBA student at Wharton.

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? Where are you currently in school and what year?

Jenna: Originally from New Jersey, I’ve been an east coast girl all of my life. I went to undergrad at University of Maryland where I focused on marketing and international business. Currently I’m getting my MBA at Wharton and am set to graduate in 2016.

Accepted: Why did you choose Wharton? How is it the best fit program for you?

Jenna: When I decided that I wanted to go to business school, I would have never guessed that I would end up at Wharton. I’m very interested in social enterprise so I looked at schools with strong programs in that area like Harvard, Kellogg and Duke. I was really surprised that when I went to visit these schools, none of them felt like the right fit.

Wharton was the best fit for me because I loved the amount of effort they were putting into their social impact initiatives. This has given me the chance to lead and develop new projects rather than simply participate. For example, I helped launch the school’s Women & Girls Initiative to explore business solutions that support females at the bottom of the pyramid. Plus, I find Wharton’s data-driven approach is balancing out my skillset since I am definitely a writer at heart.

Accepted: What’s your favorite class so far?

Jenna: I loved negotiations! No matter what I do in life, I know the lessons I learned in that class will be applicable. From negotiating my rent to pitching a new idea, I learned how to position my argument, understand others’ motivations and approach relationships with a shared value perspective.

Accepted: Can you tell us about your summer internship? What are you doing? What role did Wharton play in helping you secure this position?

Jenna: Currently I’m interning at the Office of Sustainability at Coca-Cola. It has been an amazing experience! This summer I am working on the EKOCENTER project, a Coca-Cola initiative that is empowering communities through social enterprise. EKOCENTERs are modularly designed kiosks that provide access to basic goods and services such as safe drinking water, solar power, health supplies and wireless connectivity.

Here is more information on my internship experience.

Accepted: We hear you’re working on an interesting project with fellow Accepted interviewee Mary Patton Davis – we’d love some details! How can our blog readers help?

Jenna: Yes! Business school is a whirlwind of an experience. People often talk about all the amazing experiences that MBA students have, but the reality is that it’s altogether stressful, social, lonely, stimulating and exhausting! Mary Patton and I wanted to create space for our classmates to pause, reflect and gut check our goals and ambitions for our internships, final year of business school and beyond. And the Wharton Wrap Up was born!

The first retreat was such a success that we are expanding the experience to all Penn graduate students in the fall – but we have a much bigger vision. We want to help more students and young professionals take a break from their hectic lives to connect with likeminded people, learn mindfulness tactics and find time to align their passions with their actions.

Wharton Wrap-Up

Given that the readers of Accepted.com are our target audience, we would love to hear from you! Please fill out this quick survey and let us know your thoughts so we can create the most exciting and useful experience to fit your needs.

Accepted: Looking back at the MBA admissions process, what would you say was your greatest challenge? How would you advise others who may be facing a similar challenge?

Jenna: Throughout the MBA admissions process, you will get advice and perspective from countless people. Everyone will have an idea on the best place for you to be and why. At the end of the day, it’s your choice and you need to follow your gut.

Plus, I think it’s important to hit the road and visit all the schools you are considering. As soon as I got to Philadelphia, I got this overwhelming sense that it was the place where I belonged. Even though some of my family and friends thought it was a nontraditional choice for me, I had a strong feeling it was the best place for me – and looking back, I know I made the right choice since I really listened to my instincts.

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages.

Thank you Jenna for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck! (Jenna also maintains a blog with her mom on adult mother-daughter relationships called “My Mother, My Daughter, My Friend.” – check it out!)

Register to learn how to get accepted to Wharton!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Related Resources:

Wharton 2016 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
Understanding The Wharton Difference
• Global Business Leadership at Wharton’s Lauder Institute

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HURRY! 5 Weeks Until HBS’s R1 Deadline http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/06/hurry-5-weeks-until-hbss-r1-deadline/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/06/hurry-5-weeks-until-hbss-r1-deadline/#respond Thu, 06 Aug 2015 16:37:26 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=33171 Harvard Business School’s Round 1 deadline is on September 9th – are you ready to rock those applications? The following resources will help you navigate the windy road to an HBS admit: 1. Get Accepted to Harvard – View this webinar for a full hour’s worth of Harvard-specific application advice with a focus on four key principles […]

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Read more about Harvard Business SchoolHarvard Business School’s Round 1 deadline is on September 9th – are you ready to rock those applications?

The following resources will help you navigate the windy road to an HBS admit:

1. Get Accepted to Harvard – View this webinar for a full hour’s worth of Harvard-specific application advice with a focus on four key principles that will help you wow the HBS adcom. **Updated for 2015-2016 applicants!

2.  Harvard 2016 MBA Essay Tips – Read up on expert advice on how to approach the Harvard essay question, as well as pointers on putting together your post-interview reflections.

3.  Harvard looks for three qualities in its applicants: Habit of Leadership, Analytical Aptitude and Appetite, and Engaged Community Citizenship. Do you possess these traits? Explore these attributes here and learn how to demonstrate them in your application.

4.  A Window into Life at Harvard Business School – In this interview, Tim, a current HBS student, shares stories and thoughts on Harvard’s recruiting season, the FIELD program, and what surprised him most about HBS.

5.  Life as an HBS MBA Student – Listen to this podcast episode with guest Philip Blackett, a member of the Harvard MBA class of 2016, who tells of his successful reapplication journey, as well as details about the ins and outs of life at Harvard.

For one-on-one assistance on your HBS application, be sure to check out our MBA Application Packages – A-Z assistance on your entire HBS application, at a flat rate.

Wathc the webinar: Get Accepted to Harvard Business School!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Related Resources:

• Application Timing: When Should You Submit? [Podcast]
• MBA Maze: Application Timing
• MBA Round 1 Timeline

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Duke University Medical School 2016 Secondary Application Tips http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/06/duke-university-medical-school-2016-secondary-application-tips/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/06/duke-university-medical-school-2016-secondary-application-tips/#respond Thu, 06 Aug 2015 16:08:46 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=33063 Duke University’s Medical School is ranked 8th among its peers with a focus on interdisciplinary learning and inclusiveness among the student body. They aim to take medical research to solve global problems. Duke emphasizes diversity, inclusion, and attention to community health problems. The secondary application questions ask you to consider your role as a physician […]

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Check out the rest of our school specific secondary tips and deadlines​. Duke University’s Medical School is ranked 8th among its peers with a focus on interdisciplinary learning and inclusiveness among the student body. They aim to take medical research to solve global problems. Duke emphasizes diversity, inclusion, and attention to community health problems. The secondary application questions ask you to consider your role as a physician in global and local communities.

Duke University’s 2016 Secondary Application Essay Questions:

• No word count. We suggest aiming for about 500-1000 words.

• Applicants should use single-spacing and 12-point font.

Secondary Application Essays:

1. Describe the community in which you were nurtured or spent the majority of your early development with respect to its demographics.  What core values did you receive and how will these translate into the contributions that you hope to make to your community as a medical student and to your career in medicine?  What improvements do you think might make the described community better?

This question asks you to look at your own experience and examine your values. Make a list of the communities to which you belong and what you have learned from each one. Then, ask yourself how these lessons apply to your motivation to pursue medicine. Finally, step back and look at the big picture – how does you community fit into the larger scope of the world? What can you say about your own community with some objective perspective and informed outlook?

2. Describe a situation where you have chosen to advocate for someone who is different from yourself.  What does advocacy mean to you and how has your advocacy developed?  How do you see it linked to your role as a physician/leader? What risks, if any, might be associated with your choice to be an advocate?

For this prompt, make a list of times you have either helped someone express his or her needs or obtain a needed service or acknowledgement. The prompt asks for an individual example, but you can also think about an individual you have worked with who represents a broader group of people. This question is asking you to think about your role as a physician-advocate, someone who will represent her patient in the quest to obtain fair and adequate healthcare. The question also addresses Duke’s emphasis on the physician as a member of the community with a duty to improve care for all.

3. What has been your most humbling experience and how will that experience affect your interactions with your peers and patients?

This prompt requires that you address an experience where things did not go as planned. You should give an example honestly while avoiding any response that implies you did something illegal or immoral. Your answer should emphasize what you did after this experience – how did you recover? What lesson did you learn? What would you do differently next time?

Duke Application Timeline:

Check out the rest of our school specific secondary tips and deadlines​.

If you would like professional guidance with your Duke University application materials, please consider using Accepted’s Medical School Admissions Consulting and Editing Services, which include advising, editing, and interview coaching for the GWSMHS application materials.

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JessicaPishkoJessica Pishko graduated with a J.D. from Harvard Law School and received an M.F.A. from Columbia University. She spent two years guiding students through the medical school application process at Columbia’s PostBacc Program and teaches writing at all levels.

Related Resources:

Five Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Med School Essays [Free Guide]
The Doctor as Renaissance Man [Podcast]
• Boost Your GPA for Medical School Acceptance

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Sustainability, Ross MBA, And The Erb Institute: Business As A Force For Good http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/05/sustainability-ross-mba-and-the-erb-institute-business-as-a-force-for-good/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/05/sustainability-ross-mba-and-the-erb-institute-business-as-a-force-for-good/#respond Wed, 05 Aug 2015 17:05:21 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=33098 Sustainability is the wave of the future, and leading the way is Michigan Ross and specifically the Erb Institute. This week, we invited Diana Economy, Senior Associate Director of Admissions at University of Michigan Ross and Terry Nelidov, Managing Director of the Erb Institute for Global Sustainable Enterprise to tell us more about Michigan Ross, […]

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Listen to the show!Sustainability is the wave of the future, and leading the way is Michigan Ross and specifically the Erb Institute.

This week, we invited Diana Economy, Senior Associate Director of Admissions at University of Michigan Ross and Terry Nelidov, Managing Director of the Erb Institute for Global Sustainable Enterprise to tell us more about Michigan Ross, Erb, and how to get accepted to both.

Listen to the show!

00:02:31 – A quick glance at the Ross 2-year MBA program.

00:06:06 – About the Erb Institute and the dual-degree program.

00:10:59 – Where Erb Institute grads are making an impact.

00:12:20 – Rolling water in India: An exciting Erb alum project.

00:15:12 – What some cool Ross MBAs are up to.

00:17:30 – Analyzing the Ross admission requirements: What the program is looking for and what applicants do wrong.

00:20:46 – Calculus – still a must at Ross?

00:21:50 – GMAT vs. GRE rumors and facts.

00:24:04 – How to make your application come alive.

00:26:45 – What the Erb Institute is looking for in applicants.

00:28:57 – Does past experience matter for Erb applicants?

00:34:50 – The optional team exercise (and why its optional).

00:36:51 – Final words of advice for applicants.

Click here to listen to the show!

*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com

Related Links:

Michigan Ross 2016 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
Ross MBA Application Requirements and Deadlines
Admissions Director Blog
Erb Institute
Erb Strategic Plan 2015-20
Erb Videos & Podcasts
Erb Perspective Blog
Michigan Ross MAP
Michigan Ross Application Requirements
Michigan Ross Team Exercise

Related shows:

MBAs Across America: Entrepreneurs with a Heart
How To Earn A Spot On Team Fuqua
The Admissions Team at the Very Center of Business
It’s MBA Season: Do You Know Where Your Applications Are?

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Write Secondary Essays That Get You Accepted! http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/05/med-secondary-essay-advice-webinar/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/05/med-secondary-essay-advice-webinar/#respond Wed, 05 Aug 2015 16:44:20 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=31891 Our recent webinar on Writing Secondary Essays that Get You Accepted was a huge success! If you missed it (or want to see it again), it’s available for viewing and download here. If you have any questions about your secondary applications, browse the profiles our med school admissions experts and then drop us a note! Tags: […]

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Our recent webinar on Writing Secondary Essays that Get You Accepted was a huge success! If you missed it (or want to see it again), it’s available for viewing and download here.
Watch the webinar!

Watch the webinar!

If you have any questions about your secondary applications, browse the profiles our med school admissions experts and then drop us a note!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

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Get Accepted To Stanford GSB—Webinar On Demand! http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/05/get-accepted-to-stanford-gsb-webinar-on-demand/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/05/get-accepted-to-stanford-gsb-webinar-on-demand/#respond Wed, 05 Aug 2015 16:10:45 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32954 Our recent webinar, Get Accepted to Stanford GSB, was a huge success! Thanks to our wonderful audience for your great participation and questions. In case you missed it—or if you want to review— the webinar recording is now available on our website! Watch it today for critical advice on how to create a successful Stanford application. Best of luck! […]

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Our recent webinar, Get Accepted to Stanford GSB, was a huge success! Thanks to our wonderful audience for your great participation and questions.

Watch the webinar!In case you missed it—or if you want to review— the webinar recording is now available on our website!

Watch it today for critical advice on how to create a successful Stanford application.

Watch the webinar!

Best of luck!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

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What Does The AAMC Post-MCAT Questionnaire Tell Us About Premeds? http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/04/what-does-the-aamc-post-mcat-questionnaire-pmq-tell-us-about-premeds/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/04/what-does-the-aamc-post-mcat-questionnaire-pmq-tell-us-about-premeds/#respond Tue, 04 Aug 2015 18:02:56 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32995 AAMC has published its summary report of the Post-MCAT Questionnaire (PMQ), a survey that collects information from MCAT test-takers in order to help med schools and medical educators better understand their prospective students. Here are some highlights from the PMQ, from questionnaires filled out in 2013-2014. •  There were 40,820 PMQ respondents in 2013 and […]

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The New MCAT - What's Hype, What's Real and What You Can Do Today - watch the webinar

Over 70% of respondents said they had used an MCAT prep book.

AAMC has published its summary report of the Post-MCAT Questionnaire (PMQ), a survey that collects information from MCAT test-takers in order to help med schools and medical educators better understand their prospective students. Here are some highlights from the PMQ, from questionnaires filled out in 2013-2014.

•  There were 40,820 PMQ respondents in 2013 and 37,677 respondents in 2014.

•  In both years, the most commonly reported native/functionally native/advanced proficiency language other than English was Spanish (29.7% in 2013 and 30.3% in 2014). This is followed by Chinese (11.7% both years), French (10.9% in 2013 and 10.3% in 2014), Hindi (6.5% in 2013 and 7.1% in 2014), and then Arabic (5.7% in 2013 and 5.9% in 2014).

•  Just under one-third of respondents (30.2% in 2013 and 31.3% in 2014) reported that they had decided to study medicine during high school or before college.

•  More than one-half of respondents (54.7% in 2013 and 56.5% in 2014) were taking college courses at the time that they took the MCAT.

•  Most respondents (93.0% in 2013 and 93.3% in 2014) were full-time students while undergraduates.

•  More than two-thirds of respondents (71.5% in 2013 and 70.3% in 2014) said they had used an MCAT prep book (hard copy) to prep for the MCAT. In both years, 42.1% of respondents who had used an MCAT prep book said that it was “Very useful.”

•  Nearly half of respondents (46.3% in 2013 and 47.4% in 2014) indicated that no one helped them prepare for the MCAT.

•  85% of respondents in 2014 and 85.1% in 2013 reported that they were “Very likely” to apply to an MD-granting medical school.

•  In both years, “Finding a medical school where I will feel comfortable” was most often cited as the thing that would encourage applicants to apply to med school. “Grades, MCAT scores, and other academic qualifications” was the most commonly cited concern that would discourage respondents from applying to med school.

•  56.2% in 2013 and 56.4% in 2014 reported having no college/pre-med debt.

•  For those who reported undergraduate loan debt, $25,000 was the median education debt in 2013 and 2014.

See the full PMQ report for more details.

View our med school resource library for valuable tips on every stage of the application process!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy
Related Resources:

• The New MCAT: What’s Hype, What’s Real, and What You Can Do Today
• First Scores From The New MCAT
• What You Need To Know About The New MCAT

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Innovative Leadership Learning: The “Wharton Difference” And Fit With The Program http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/04/innovative-leadership-learning-the-wharton-difference-and-fit-with-the-program/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/04/innovative-leadership-learning-the-wharton-difference-and-fit-with-the-program/#respond Tue, 04 Aug 2015 16:22:38 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32991 My previous post on defining your fit with Wharton addressed two of the four components of “The Wharton Difference” (Largest Global Network and Culture of Engagement).  Here I’ll look at the third component: Innovative Leadership Learning. On the Wharton website, the short paragraph introducing this component contains the keys to unlocking its real meaning and […]

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Register for our webinar!My previous post on defining your fit with Wharton addressed two of the four components of “The Wharton Difference” (Largest Global Network and Culture of Engagement).  Here I’ll look at the third component: Innovative Leadership Learning.

On the Wharton website, the short paragraph introducing this component contains the keys to unlocking its real meaning and import.  Let’s look at those keys – literally, the key words and phrases.  They reveal the adcom’s core interests and values.

•  “You’ll find your leadership style…”  Leadership isn’t the pivotal word here, but rather find.  Of course MBAs are about leadership.  But “find” indicates that the adcom wants people who are “in process” – seeking, growing, and changing in response to what they learn.

•  “…by participating in unmatched entrepreneurship and leadership activities.”  What’s the pivotal word here?  Yeah, participating.  It means active involvement.  The little word by is important too, because it indicates that this participation is the way through which you grow, change (including finding your leadership style).

•  “You’ll take risks, try new roles…”  Wharton adcom equates risk-taking with action; putting yourself out there; opening up not just intellectually but personally.  Wharton’s leadership and entrepreneurship (and other) resources offer avenues for risk-takers to try new roles. And note the word try: you don’t have to follow a straight, smooth path to a goal; the adcom recognizes the growth value in varied experiences, which you internalize and synthesize along the way.

 “…inspire others, and work with peers to shape your experience.”  In a word, collaboration.  In Wharton’s culture, it’s the magic through which the alchemy of growth happens.  The verbs inspire and shape imply deep experience and profound, transforming outcomes.  Innovative Leadership Learning clearly is more than “gaining skills” and “building networks”…

Here’s how you can portray the “Innovative Leadership Learning” component to demonstrate fit with Wharton in your application:

•  Throughout your essay(s), weave in anecdotes and examples that show you participating, taking risks through collaboration, inspiring others in the process – and growing as a leader as a result.  Given the tight word counts, you can even do this within 1-2 sentences, e.g., “When I [did some activity/initiative], it challenged me to [think differently in some way; be specific], which proved valuable when I subsequently [led in a new capacity].

•  The Wharton interview process is a natural extension of this component – develop a strategy for portraying these qualities in a way that is natural to you.

•  In your resume and application form, mention activities where you took initiative and/or drew others in and/or “stretched” beyond your comfort zone.  These won’t be as in-depth as the essays, but they’ll enhance the related points elsewhere in the application.

Register to learn how to get accepted to Wharton!

Cindy Tokumitsu By , author and co-author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports, including Why MBA and Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted.com.

Related Resources:

• Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One [Free Guide]
• Wharton 2016 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
• The “Wharton Difference” And Fit With The Program

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Catching Up With Columbia P&S Med Student Ashley http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/04/catching-up-with-columbia-ps-med-student-ashley/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/04/catching-up-with-columbia-ps-med-student-ashley/#respond Tue, 04 Aug 2015 16:04:19 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32950 This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with med school applicants and students. And now for a follow up interview with Ashley Paige White-Stern, who just completed her first year of medical school at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. We first met Ashley two years ago – you can […]

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Ashley White - SternThis interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with med school applicants and students. And now for a follow up interview with Ashley Paige White-Stern, who just completed her first year of medical school at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. We first met Ashley two years ago – you can read our first interview with her here.

Accepted: Last time we spoke, you were in the middle of your postbac program. Can you bring us up to speed? Where did you end up applying to med school? Where do you currently attend med school and what year are you?

Ashley: Happy to! I ended up finishing my postbac program and applying to medical school through its linkage program. This effectively eliminated the “glide” or “gap” year – and the months-long application cycle that I would have otherwise had after finishing the program. In my second year of the postbac, I visited a number of medical schools and one really stood out to me: Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. I felt like I would be a great fit in the community there, and really fell in love with the student body. This is why I applied to Columbia through linkage. I was lucky that it ended up working out for me, and I’m now preparing to start my second year in medical school here! Time really flies.

Accepted: Do you think Columbia is the best med school for you? How do you think you’re a good fit for the program?

Ashley: So, I alluded to this question in the previous answer, but yes, I do. I remember coming up to the medical campus from the undergrad campus for a tour: I just instinctively felt like I “fit” here. There is a vibrancy to the student body.

In medical schools all over the U.S., students are incredibly smart and really motivated. What I loved about Columbia is that everyone is smart and motivated and also really involved in extracurricular activities. In my class, students are musicians, actors, athletes and teachers. One classmate of mine competes in heavy lifting outside of school. Other peers used to perform on Broadway or act on television. It’s really an incredibly diverse range of talent.

I have my own strengths that I can lend to the group – here at Columbia, for example, I have begun to find my voice in public health and in fighting structural racism through and in medicine. I’m also really passionate about medical education and interested in how we train medical educators.

The nice thing about Columbia is that as different as we all are, all of our passions and talents are welcome, and brought to bear on our training. It’s incredibly enriching.

Accepted: Now that you’ve completed your first year, you must have some good advice for our readers – is there anything you wish you would’ve known before starting med school? Were there any surprises during your first year?

Ashley: My biggest two pieces of advice may seem in tension with each other, but I think they’re both important.

First, I think it’s important for medical students to be brave. Not to be cocky or arrogant, but be brave and stretch yourself in medical school. Don’t be afraid to take a risk – sign up for a class that you wouldn’t otherwise take, volunteer in a clinic as a medical student. Remove the pressure of trying to be perfect (which can be hard to let go of after a competitive premed experience) and just try to learn.

The second piece of advice I have is to be kind to yourself – medicine is such a long road. As a premed it can be easy to believe that the finish line is entrance to medical school, when in fact nothing could be further from the truth. Starting medical school is the first step to residency, to fellowship, to a long and demanding career. Setting up good habits of self care – knowing when to take a break, when to give yourself a rest from studying, making time for friends and family, keeping up with interests outside of medicine, and getting enough sleep – is imperative to staying effective as a clinician and not burning out.

Accepted: What’s your favorite thing about med school? Least favorite thing? 

Ashley: I love all the challenges and the wide range of skills we start to acquire – interpersonal skills, skills in physical diagnosis, scientific inquiry, learning how to be part of a care team, recognizing patterns of disease and health, thinking about improving health care delivery.

I will say that even the parts of medical school that can be more mundane – like long lectures and PowerPoint slide decks – have redeeming qualities. For example, even though our lectures are recorded so that students can watch them at home rather than going to class, I actually prefer to go to class for many reasons: I get to see my friends and learn in a more socially engaged way; I get to meet truly brilliant clinicians and scientists; and I get a chance to engage with questions after the lecture. So there’s usually always a way to reframe the less amazing parts of med school!

Accepted: Are you involved in any clubs or associations on campus? How central to student life is club involvement? 

Ashley: Extracurricular life is HUGE here at P&S – I actually can’t think of anyone in my class who “just” goes to school. Even though the material is challenging, our exams are pass/fail, which really liberates us to pursue a range of activities outside of the library.

I am the President of the Black and Latino Student Organization (BALSO), a club that unites our Student National Medical Association (SNMA) chapter and our Latino Medical Student Association (LMSA), founded in the 1970s by former P&S student Dr. Mary Bassett, who is currently the Commissioner of the NYC Health Department. We’ve been very involved in the work of national group White Coats for Black Lives, one initiative that medicals students have undertaken to support Black Lives Matter.

I am a Curricular Representative for my class, working with two other medical students on increasing communication and transparency between faculty and students, and taking part in the ongoing conversations about curricular reform. I am also a co-leader of the Emergency Medicine Interest Group, which connects students with shadowing opportunities in the Emergency Department and also provides workshops on suturing, splinting, and venipuncture.

One highlight about P&S is that there is incredible student-to-student academic support, and second-year students lead review sessions and make study sheets for first-year students through a program called the Student Success Network (SSN). This fall, I will be working as an SSN teacher, helping give review lectures on first-year biochem classes – I’m really looking forward to that!

Accepted: Looking back at the medical schools admissions process, what would you say your greatest challenge was? What steps did you take to overcome that challenge?

Ashley: I think the biggest challenge for me was really forcing myself not to compare myself to others. I knew that I was smart – so are the other applicants. I knew that I wanted to go into medicine – so do the other applicants. I felt I would make a great doctor – so will the other applicants.

At a certain point, I really had to put others out of my mind and just focus on myself and what I could control. What I could control was my preparation, my studying, my attitude, and my outlook. It’s really human to want to size yourself up to others, but medicine is so full of brilliant, talented people that it can also be really depressing to do that. Once I decided to accept myself – to work on my flaws but not fear them – I felt a lot more comfortable in the application process. I think it helped me be more confident when interview day came, because I was genuinely excited to be in the interview suite and felt really curious to meet the other wonderful applicants in the room.

Accepted: Can you share your top 3 med school admissions tips with our readers?

Ashley:

1.  Habits are behaviors that are practiced over time. Don’t expect that new habits will spontaneously form in medical school or residency: lay the groundwork for your future success. Practice self care (whatever that means to you), eat well, stay involved in a passion of yours that is outside of medicine (playing an instrument, athletics, painting, tutoring others, volunteering in a park or soup kitchen, etc.). Yes, you can list it as an extracurricular on your application, but more importantly it will continue to shape your development as a person contribute to your ability to care for others.

2.  Don’t go it alone. No one becomes successful in medicine in a vacuum. Gather your support system early and check in with them often. Have a range of different supporters – you parents or caregivers or that one friend who you can tell everything to, a more objective person with a perspective like an academic adviser or premed counselor who can read your personal statement and give you editing tips, another premed friend who you can commiserate about studying for the MCAT with, and also try to keep some friends outside of the premed world – someone who wants to go into business, or who plans to get an MFA and teach art – these people can enrich your life by telling you their passions and will help you keep things in perspective.

3.  Be curious about medicine itself – it’s a profession that has complex roots and continues to evolve in complex ways. Ask questions and learn its history. Read up on the Flexner Report and how that shaped medical education. Find out how health care delivery has changed since health insurance. Be curious about health inequities and how they are shaped by other structural inequities in this country. Understand the gravity of medical research and experimentation, and be sensitive to the fact that the culture of medicine was not always as deferential to informed consent as it is today. There isn’t always time to learn the history of medicine in medical school, but if you can dig in before you get there, you will be a resource to your peers and you will be able to frame our contemporary dialogues about medical care in a much more sophisticated light.

To read more about Ashley’s journey, you can follow her on Twitter @A_P_W_S. Thank you Ashley for continuing to share your story with us and we wish you lots of luck!

For one-on-one guidance on your med school applications, please see our catalog of med school admissions services. Do you want to be featured in Accepted.com’s blog, Accepted Admissions Blog? If you want to share your med school journey with the world (or at least with our readers), email us at bloggers@accepted.com.

View the 9 Keys to Postbac Acceptance in 2015 webinar today!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Related Resources:

• Navigating the Med School Maze [Free Guide]
• Why I Chose B’s In Medical School
• Insights, Advice and Experiences of a Non-Traditional Med Student

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Cooper Medical School Receives $1.75 Million Grant http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/03/cooper-medical-school-receives-1-75-million-grant/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/03/cooper-medical-school-receives-1-75-million-grant/#respond Mon, 03 Aug 2015 17:10:24 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32973 The Cooper Medical School of Rowan University received a five-year $1.75 million federal grant to be used to address the primary care doctor shortage in the U.S. The school plans on putting the money towards its primary care training enhancement project, an initiative to transform primary care education for all medical professionals, including medical students, residents, nursing […]

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Cooper University Hospital

The Cooper Medical School of Rowan University received a five-year $1.75 million federal grant to be used to address the primary care doctor shortage in the U.S.

The school plans on putting the money towards its primary care training enhancement project, an initiative to transform primary care education for all medical professionals, including medical students, residents, nursing students, nurse practitioner students, and PA students.

According to Dr. Annette Reboli, vice dean at Cooper, the focus of the program is to help build a “larger and better equipped” primary care workforce with a goal of developing an accelerated primary care track for those students who wish to pursue careers in pediatrics or internal medicine. The program will also encourage greater diversity among primary care practitioners.

“We hope to build a prototype training environment that can serve as a model [for other medical schools],” says Reboli.

Source: “Medical school gets $1.75M grant to target primary-care doctor shortage

Navigate the Med Maze - Download your free guide today!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Related Resources:

• 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Med School Essay [Free Guide]
• City College In NYC To Open Med School
• Medical School Admissions 2015-2016: A Dean’s Perspective [Podcast]

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So These Two Grad School Applicants Walk Into A Bar . . . http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/03/so-these-two-grad-school-applicants-walk-into-a-bar-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/03/so-these-two-grad-school-applicants-walk-into-a-bar-2/#respond Mon, 03 Aug 2015 16:51:57 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32348 This might be a great opening line for a comedy night at a university student center, but can you use humor in a graduate school application essay? Should you even try? The answer is . . . maybe. If you can use humor effectively, it will help you stand out from your competitors in an […]

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Learn the 5 fatal flaws to avoid in your grad school application

If used right, humor can help you stand out from your competitors in an unexpected way.

This might be a great opening line for a comedy night at a university student center, but can you use humor in a graduate school application essay? Should you even try?

The answer is . . . maybe. If you can use humor effectively, it will help you stand out from your competitors in an unexpected way.  (“Oh, is she the one who joked about her first time playing jazz in a live audience?”, an adcom member might ask while reviewing the season’s applicants.)  Humor can make us appear more human and relatable, especially with the most popular form of humor: the gently self-deprecating remark. For example, “My single New Year’s resolution this year is to buy a new bathroom scale, and, perhaps, one day, use it.” Or, “I discovered that I had a textbook case of ‘Congenital Fraidy Cat Syndrome.’  I knew it: my expanding medical knowledge was slowly killing me.”

This kind of humor reveals a writer’s vulnerabilities, making her sympathetic. However, as a grad school applicant, your goal is to show yourself as a focused, qualified, intelligent, and capable individual. If you lack the confidence to show that vulnerability, or the confidence to try to get a laugh, do not try. It is far more important to speak with your authentic voice. But if you have a track record of getting laughs among friends, don’t be afraid to use humor — judiciously — in a personal essay.

Here are a few examples of how – and how not – to use humor:

Good: “In all my travels, I had never before sipped anything called Toadstool Brew. After I was finished, I hoped never to have to sip it again.” This works because it is gently self-deprecating; you are poking fun at your own lack of appreciation for an exotic tea.

Not good: “In all my travels, I had never seen a more bizarre-looking individual. My first thought was, ‘This guy could get a gig on a reality TV show in the States.’” This doesn’t work because poking fun at someone else looks petty.

Never force humor into your writing. Use it when it feels natural, and perhaps try it out on another reader first. Adcom members will surely appreciate a laughter break while reading through all those serious essays!

From Example to Exemplary - Download your guide today!

Judy Gruen By , MBA admissions consultant since 1996 and author (with Linda Abraham) of MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

 
Related Resources:

• From Example to Exemplary [Free Guide]
Can I Use Humor In My Application Essays?
• How To Think Like A Dean Of Admissions

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George Washington School Of Medicine And Health Sciences 2016 Secondary Application Essay Tips http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/03/george-washington-school-of-medicine-and-health-sciences-2016-secondary-application-essay-tips-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/03/george-washington-school-of-medicine-and-health-sciences-2016-secondary-application-essay-tips-2/#respond Mon, 03 Aug 2015 16:15:07 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32789 The curriculum and goals of George Washington SMHS center on its ability to graduate “Physician Citizens.” Since the school is located in the most powerful city in the U.S., Washington D.C., GW emphasizes the opportunities to treat the area’s diverse communities. It is essential to have years of service, either clinical or nonclinical, with diverse […]

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The curriculum and goals of George Washington SMHS center on its ability to Check out the rest of our school specific secondary tips and deadlinesgraduate “Physician Citizens.” Since the school is located in the most powerful city in the U.S., Washington D.C., GW emphasizes the opportunities to treat the area’s diverse communities. It is essential to have years of service, either clinical or nonclinical, with diverse populations and to have a demonstrated record of long-term leadership experience.

In addition you need to know about GW’s educational approach. It initiated a brand new curriculum in Fall 2014 that incorporates more technology, independent study time, active learning models and clinical exposure. It also offers a Track System that allows students to gain special training in the following areas: Community/Urban Health, Emergency Management, Global Health, Health Policy, Integrative Medicine, Medical Education Leadership, Medical Humanities and Research. The Track System will influence the direction of a students’ education throughout their four years at George Washington SMHS.   

George Washington 2016 School of Medicine and Health Sciences Essay Questions:

• Four essays total requested: two essays with 750-character limits, one essay with a 1,000-character limit and one essay with a 2,000-character limit.

• Applicants should use single line spacing and 12 point size font.

• Responses should be constructed strategically to highlight an applicant’s strengths.

Secondary Application Essays:

1. Please provide the Admissions Committee with a brief summary of your activities, academics, employment or other occupations to account for full-time activity (approx. 30-40 hours/week) for the 2015-2016 application cycle, or from the point of application through matriculation in 2016. (750 characters)

The best way to approach this type of question is to create a list of the commitments you have made for the next year. Only include those activities that you have already started or plan to definitely complete. It will not be helpful to list things that you end up not participating in because you could be asked about them in an interview, and it will not help your application if you have to explain why you are not completing the activities you listed on the secondary. Ideally, you will be able to bring an updated CV or resume to the interview with the new experiences you have completed.

2. What is your most meaningful community service experience to date? (350 characters)

Based on the fact that they emphasize leadership, community service and a commitment to life-long learning, you can select an achievement that 1) was truly meaningful for you and that 2) allows you to share your dedication to helping others through leadership and/or education. It’s essential to be authentic so do select something that is important to you. Situations that reveal creative leadership will be most effective.

3. What is your most meaningful clinical experience to date, involving direct patient contact? (350 characters)

For this question, consider the range of your experience and the level of responsibility that you’ve taken on in a clinical setting.  Choose the one that required you to provide the most support or hands-on assistance.  Effective examples would be if you’ve traveled to another country for a medical mission or translated at a free clinic.  Educating patients on any aspect of preventative health or taking a patient’s medical history would also work.  The most important part of this essay will be providing successful outcomes for your work.  What was the end result or patient reaction?  Did you receive an award for your service or recognition for excellence in patient care?  Highlight any outcomes from your clinical experience.

4. What makes you a unique individual? What challenges have you faced? How will these factors help you contribute to the diversity of the student body at GW? (1000 characters)

In responding to this essay prompt, it will be important for you to select a challenge that you have overcome that will allow you to demonstrate by showing, rather than telling, how you are a “unique individual.” For example, if you came up with a unique way to approach an issue that provided a successful resolution for everyone involved, this would be an effective choice.

Creating an outline will help you ensure that you respond to all three questions in the prompt. In identifying what was unique about your approach to the challenge, you will be answering the third question listed. Many different challenges would work well for this essay, just be sure to select one that highlights your approach to problem solving.

5. What is your specific interest in the MD Program at GW? What opportunities would you take advantage of as a student here? Why? (2000 characters)

Do your research for this question. There are lots of wonderful special programs at GW. Create a list as you read through their website. After you’ve read through all of their webpages, rank your list in the order of importance to you. Create an outline based on these rankings. Again, it’s essential to be authentic in your response and to demonstrate how you have used similar opportunities in the past. It’s even more helpful if you have visited the school or spoken with representatives or students.

George Washington SMHS Application Timeline:

Check out the rest of our school specific secondary tips and deadlines

*Strong recommendation: Submit within two weeks after receipt.

If you would like professional guidance with your George Washington School of Medicine and Health Sciences application materials, please consider using Accepted’s Medical School Admissions Consulting and Editing Services, which include advising, editing, and interview coaching for the GWSMHS application materials.

Register for our upcoming webinar: Writing Secondary Essays That Get You Accepted!

Alicia McNease Nimonkar is an Accepted.com advisor and editor specializing in healthcare admissions. Prior to joining Accepted, Alicia worked for five years as Student Advisor at UC Davis’ postbac program where she both evaluated applications and advised students applying successfully to med school and related programs.

Related Resources:

• Med School Rankings & Numbers: What You Must Know [Free Guide]
• EMBA Blogger Interview: Vit’s Journey
The 6 Commandments For A Successful CV

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5 Tips For Spectacular Secondaries http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/02/5-tips-for-spectacular-secondaries/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/08/02/5-tips-for-spectacular-secondaries/#respond Sun, 02 Aug 2015 17:53:52 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32915 At this point, most schools have already sent out secondary applications – so let’s jump right into the important advice you need to tackle them! The following 5 tips will help you write spectacular secondary essays: 1. Create complementary content. The stories that you choose to tell in your secondary essays should complement the material you […]

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5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid on Your Med School Application Essays - download today!

 Read the questions very carefully to make sure your answers are on target.

At this point, most schools have already sent out secondary applications – so let’s jump right into the important advice you need to tackle them!

The following 5 tips will help you write spectacular secondary essays:

1. Create complementary content. The stories that you choose to tell in your secondary essays should complement the material you already provided in the AMCAS essay, not repeat it. You are a unique individual with loads to say; don’t waste space by saying the same thing twice.

2. Say something school-specific. Research the school’s strengths, values, mission, method, and philosophy, and then slant your secondaries towards the program by using your life experiences to show that you are a perfect fit for the school based on those things.

3. Tackle that timing. You should begin work on your secondary essays as soon as they are available. Not only will this give you a more leisurely writing experience (which will likely improve your quality of writing), but it will give you the opportunity to submit early, which med schools like.

4. Answer accurately. Seems obvious, I know, but many applicants need the reminder: Answer the questions as they are written and not as you wish they were written. You may write a lovely essay about your shadowing stint at your local ER during high school, but if the question was about extracurricular activities in college, then you still haven’t gotten the job done right. This also means that if you’re trying to reuse stories in multiple applications, you need to read the questions very carefully and make sure you’re on target.

5. Edit effectively. You don’t just want to tell your story; you want to tell your story well – this includes choosing the right topic, writing about your experiences with interesting and relevant details, and – last but not least – editing the essay so that it gleams. A successful secondary essay isn’t messy with typos and poor grammar; it’s neat, organized, and error-free. If English is not your first language – and even if it is – you will most definitely benefit from having another set of eyes (or more) look over your essay to ensure that it’s top-notch and ready for send-off.

5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Med School Essays - Download your free guide!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy
Related Resources:

Writing Secondary Essays That Get You Accepted [On-Demand Webinar]
• School-Specific Secondary Essay Tips
• Attn Med Applicants: A Class Is Matriculated Every Single Year  [Podcast]

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University Of Chicago Pritzker School Of Medicine 2016 Secondary Application Essay Tips http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/31/university-of-chicago-pritzker-school-of-medicine-2016-secondary-application-essay-tips/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/31/university-of-chicago-pritzker-school-of-medicine-2016-secondary-application-essay-tips/#respond Fri, 31 Jul 2015 16:45:46 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32576 This medical school is looking for student leaders from diverse backgrounds who demonstrate a strong scientific foundation, thrive in team settings, and find solutions to complex issues. In this secondary application, I recommend focusing on what makes you a unique applicant – your love of science or learning and how you’ve pursued that interest, your […]

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Read more med school specific secondary tips!This medical school is looking for student leaders from diverse backgrounds who demonstrate a strong scientific foundation, thrive in team settings, and find solutions to complex issues. In this secondary application, I recommend focusing on what makes you a unique applicant – your love of science or learning and how you’ve pursued that interest, your connection to medically underserved communities and your commitment to providing assistance to those in need, and the qualities and talents that you will share with your classmates and that will enhance your approach to patient care.

University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine 2016 Medical School Essay Questions:

•  Two essays are required; the first essay has a 550-word limit and the second essay has a 400-word limit.

•  An additional optional essay is requested, with no word limit.

•  Applicants should use single line spacing and 12 point size font.

•  Responses should be constructed strategically to highlight an applicant’s strengths.

The following are required in the Secondary Application:

“At the University of Chicago in an atmosphere of interdisciplinary scholarship and discovery, the Pritzker School of Medicine is dedicated to inspiring diverse students of exceptional promise to become leaders and innovators in science and medicine for the betterment of humanity.”

Essay Question 1. Our Mission Statement above is an expression of our core purpose and educational philosophy. In particular, it highlights the value we place on diversity since we regard the diversity of the entering class as essential for educational excellence. Please write an essay on how you would enhance diversity at Pritzker and advance the Pritzker mission. We suggest that you limit your essay to about 550 words.

Create a list of what you would contribute in terms of diversity. Approach this list creatively. You can include anything from your ethnicity, language and cultural background to work experience and hobbies or talents. For example, if you are a talented artist or teacher, how would you share these skills with your classmates? Selecting only the most relevant and important items from your list, use this as your outline.  Explain clearly how each characteristic you cover will benefit your classmates and community.

Essay Question 2. Tell us about a difficult or challenging situation you have encountered and how you dealt with it. In your response, identify both the coping skills you called upon to resolve the dilemma, and the support person(s) from whom you sought advice. We suggest that you limit your essay to about 400 words.

For this response, it would be appropriate to discuss a death in the family or serious illness of a family member or friend. This essay would demonstrate your level of maturity and highlight healthy coping mechanisms you have developed. Or you could use a professional example. In the latter case, be sure to select an example that has a clearly positive outcome as a direct result of your efforts. Once you have selected the situation, explain how you were able to identify a successful approach and create a positive outcome, even if only to gain closure.

Optional Essay: Additional Information. Please feel free to use this space to convey any additional information that you might wish the Committee to know. We suggest that you limit your text to about 200 words.

Use this essay to update the adcom on your recent activities and publications. If you have already covered all significant experiences in your primary application and in the essays above, discuss how you have spent your time since submitting the primary application.

Pritzker SOM Application Timeline:

University of Chicago 2016 Secondary Essay Timeline

*At 11:59 PM CST (Strong recommendation: Submit within two weeks after receipt.)

If you would like professional guidance with your Pritzker School of Medicine application materials, please consider using Accepted’s Medical School Admissions Consulting and Editing Services, which include advising, editing, and interview coaching for the Pritzker SOM application materials.

View our med school resource library for valuable tips on every stage of the application process!

 

Alicia Nimonkar is an Accepted.com advisor and editor specializing in healthcare admissions. Prior to joining Accepted, Alicia worked for five years as Student Advisor at UC Davis’ postbac program where she both evaluated applications and advised students applying successfully to med school and related programs.

Related Resources:

• The Ultimate Guide to Medical School Interview Success [Free guide]
Medical School Admissions 2015-2016: A Dean’s Perspective [Podcast]
Boost Your GPA for Medical School Acceptance

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Should You Retake The GMAT? [Short Video] http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/31/should-you-retake-the-gmat-short-video/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/31/should-you-retake-the-gmat-short-video/#respond Fri, 31 Jul 2015 15:52:09 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32836 Not sure if you should retake the GMAT? Check out this video for the three key factors to examine when evaluating your GMAT score: Related Resources: • That GMAT Score: Implications for Your MBA Application [webinar] • Low GMAT Score? Don’t Panic…Yet. • GMAT, GRE, SAT, and All Things Test Prep  Tags: GMAT, MBA Admissions, MBA Video Tips

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Not sure if you should retake the GMAT? Check out this video for the three key factors to examine when evaluating your GMAT score:
Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Related Resources:

• That GMAT Score: Implications for Your MBA Application [webinar]
• Low GMAT Score? Don’t Panic…Yet.
• GMAT, GRE, SAT, and All Things Test Prep 

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What You Need To Know To Get Accepted To Wharton http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/30/what-you-need-to-know-to-get-accepted-to-wharton-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/30/what-you-need-to-know-to-get-accepted-to-wharton-2/#respond Thu, 30 Jul 2015 18:35:53 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32811 Applying to Wharton? You are invited to attend our upcoming webinar! On Aug 19th, Accepted CEO and b-school admissions expert, Linda Abraham, will share the secret to creating a standout application including: • The 4 ingredients of a successful Wharton application. • Insights into what the adcom is looking for. • How to ace Wharton’s […]

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Applying to Wharton? You are invited to attend our upcoming webinar!

Get Accepted to Wharton! Register for the webinar today!

On Aug 19th, Accepted CEO and b-school admissions expert, Linda Abraham, will share the secret to creating a standout application including:

• The 4 ingredients of a successful Wharton application.

• Insights into what the adcom is looking for.

• How to ace Wharton’s TBD/interview.

Save your spot!

Spaces are limited! Reserve your spot for Get Accepted to Wharton today!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

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Duke Fuqua 2016 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/30/duke-fuqua-2016-mba-essay-tips-and-deadlines/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/30/duke-fuqua-2016-mba-essay-tips-and-deadlines/#comments Thu, 30 Jul 2015 16:38:54 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32724 Leadership, teamwork, ethics, and a global approach to business are essential elements of the Duke Fuqua MBA, which is why you’ll need to make sure you express your passion for these ideals in your application essays. Impress the Fuqua adcom by positioning yourself as an innovative leader and team player, as someone who can see the big picture, work […]

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Check out more school specific MBA Essay TipsLeadership, teamwork, ethics, and a global approach to business are essential elements of the Duke Fuqua MBA, which is why you’ll need to make sure you express your passion for these ideals in your application essays. Impress the Fuqua adcom by positioning yourself as an innovative leader and team player, as someone who can see the big picture, work collaboratively, and shape global business.

My tips are in blue below. 

Three short answer questions and 2 essays are required from all applicants.

• Responses should use 1.5 line spacing and a font size no smaller than 10-point.
• Respond fully and concisely.
• Responses must be completed before submitting your application.
• Prepare your responses carefully. The Admissions Committee considers your answers important in the selection process.
• All essays are scanned using plagiarism detection software. Plagiarism is considered a cheating violation within the Honor Code and will not be tolerated in the admissions process.

Application Tip: Check out Fuqua’s section criteria.

Required Short Answers Questions

Instructions: Answer all 3 of the following questions. For each short answer question, respond in 500 characters only (the equivalent of about 100 words).

1. What are your short term goals, post-MBA?

State what you see yourself doing immediately after you earn your MBA in terms of function and industry. If location or geography are important to your goal, include them.  If you know the type of companies you would like to work for, you can include that information too, but don’t say you want to work for Company X, unless Company X is sponsoring you. Without sponsorship, a “Company X” answer is probably too narrow, but saying you would like to work for a firm like Company X would work.

2. What are your long term goals?

Your long term goals should flow logically from your short-term goals. They can be fuzzier and both in terms of direction and timing. But you should have them. They can, but don’t have to, include larger aspirations and present a broader perspective on where you are headed. But please don’t go so general and say something like “I aspire to be a good person” or “I strive to leave a lasting impact on my community.” Nice sentiments, but way too vague.

3. Life is full of uncertainties, and plans and circumstances can change. As a result, navigating a career requires you to be adaptable. Should the short-term goals that you provided above not materialize what alternative directions have you considered?

What’s your Plan B? If you can’t get a job at a leading strategy consulting firm — your first choice — what do you want to do? If Plan A is investment banking, what’s Plan B?

First Required Essay: 25 Random Things About Yourself

Instructions: Answer the following question — present your response in list form, numbered 1 to 25. Some points may be only a few words, while others may be longer. Your complete list should not exceed 2 pages.

1. The “Team Fuqua” spirit and community is one of the things that sets The Duke MBA experience apart, and it is a concept that extends beyond the student body to include faculty, staff, and administration. When a new person joins the Admissions team, we ask that person to share with everyone in the office a list of “25 Random Things About Yourself.” As an Admissions team, we already know the new hire’s professional and academic background, so learning these “25 Random Things” helps us get to know someone’s personality, background, special talents, and more.

In this spirit, the Admissions Committee also wants to get to know you–beyond the professional and academic achievements listed in your resume and transcript. You can share with us important life experiences, your likes/dislikes, hobbies, achievements, fun facts, or anything that helps us understand what makes you who you are. Share with us your list of “25 Random Things” about YOU.

Have some fun with this list. It certainly allows a more creative approach than permitted by most essay prompts. Note that the questions asks you to go “beyond the professional and academic achievements listed in your resume and transcript.”  So you can list your Pez collection or perhaps your brief membership in a rock band or the fact that you took violin from age 6-18 or your membership in a gospel choir or your volunteer work in a hospital, your needlepoint, your favorite recipe or photo. Gosh the list is endless. Just let it reflect you. Think of this list as an introduction to potential friends.   For more insight into this question and the  motivation behind, please read Megan Overbay’s, the former Director of Admissions’, advice. I believe you will find it helpful. And very friendly.

Second Required Essay (choose 1 of 2)

Instructions: Choose only 1 of the following 2 essay questions to answer. Your response should be no more than 2 pages in length, and should reflect your knowledge of the Fuqua program and experience, and the types of activities and leadership you would engage in as a Fuqua student.

Choose to the prompt that will let you reveal something important to you and impressive about you. Write the essay that you will be able to draft most enthusiastically and easily.

1. Why Duke: When asked by your family, friends, and colleagues why you want to go to Duke, what do you tell them? Share the reasons that are most meaningful to you.

Why Duke? But you’re not talking to the admissions committee, whom you just may be a tad less than candid with. You are talking to your family, friends, and colleagues, people you know and like (at least the friends).  The Fuqua admissions staff really wants to get to know you. Authenticity is the goal. The admissions readers want to be able to imagine you as a part of Team Fuqua — their family — as a friend or colleague. Will you be real stiff and formal? Of course not. You will be friendly in a professional way. Don’t take this as an invitation to be inappropriate, coarse, or rude. Just friendly.

What appeals to you at Duke? What about its program, culture, and professional opportunities attracts you and would compel you to accept an offer of admission? Maybe address a letter to a close friend and tell her why you want to go to Duke.  That letter may morph into this essay.

2. The Team Fuqua community is as unique as the individuals who comprise it. Underlying our individuality are a number of shared ideas and principles that we live out in our own ways. Our students have identified and defined 6 “Team Fuqua Principles” that we feel are the guiding philosophies that make our community special. At the end of your 2 years at Fuqua, if you were to receive an award for exemplifying one of the 6 Principles listed below, which one would it be and why? Your response should reflect the research you have done, your knowledge of Fuqua and the Daytime MBA program and experience, and the types of activities and leadership you would engage in as a Fuqua student.

1. Authentic Engagement: We care and we take action. We each make a difference to Team Fuqua by being ourselves and engaging in and supporting activities about which we are passionate.
2. Supportive Ambition: We support each other to achieve great things, because your success is my success. The success of each individual member of Team Fuqua makes the whole of Team Fuqua better.
3. Collective Diversity:  We embrace all of our classmates because our individuality is better and stronger together.
4. Impactful Stewardship: We are leaders who focus on solutions to improve our communities both now and in the future. We aren’t satisfied with just maintaining the status quo.
5. Loyal Community: We are a family who looks out for each other. Team Fuqua supports you when you need it the most.
6. Uncompromising Integrity: We internalize and live the honor code in the classroom and beyond. We conduct ourselves with integrity within Fuqua, within Duke, and within all communities of which we are a part.

Do your homework about Fuqua (and yourself) before responding to this question. What activities and groups appeal to you? How do you see yourself participating? Making a difference? Then look at the list of six principles above. Which do you most identify with? Imagine how you would exemplify that principle in your activities. The story of that role and how would see yourself earning an award is your essay.  While you can reference similar activities in the past, keep the focus of this essay on what you would do at Fuqua and why you would earn recognition for exemplifying one of these six principles.

Optional Essay Question:

If you feel there are extenuating circumstances of which the Admissions Committee should be aware, please explain them in an optional essay (e.g. unexplained gaps in work, choice of recommenders, inconsistent or questionable academic performance, or any significant weakness in your application).

• Do NOT upload additional essays nor additional recommendations in this area of the application.
• The Optional Essay is intended to provide the Admissions Committee with insight into your extenuating circumstances only.
• Limit your response to two pages.

Why isn’t your current supervisor writing your rec? Why is there a six-month gap on your resume? Why did your grades dip during the first semester of your senior year? What are your responsibilities while working for a family business after having left a prestigious investment bank, and why did you make the change? Answering any of those questions (but not all) could be the topic of your optional essay.

Duke Fuqua 2016 MBA Application Deadlines:

Check out our other school-specific MBA Essay Tips

If you would like professional guidance with your Duke Fuqua MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our  MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Duke application. 

12 Terrific Tips for MBA Applicants - Download your free copy today!

Linda AbrahamBy Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

Related Resources:

How To Earn A Spot On Team Fuqua [Podcast]
• Culture, Location, and Support: A Duke MBA Speaks
• 2016 MBA Application Essay Tips

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University of Pittsburgh Medical School 2016 Secondary Application Essay Tips http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/29/university-of-pittsburgh-medical-school-2016-secondary-application-essay-tips/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/29/university-of-pittsburgh-medical-school-2016-secondary-application-essay-tips/#comments Wed, 29 Jul 2015 16:53:07 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32586 UPSOM places special emphasis on their collaborative problem-based curriculum and the fact that their medical students begin interacting with patients in their first year of medical school.  Providing the best care to patients through research, education, leadership and diversity is central to their mission.  In your own background, how can you demonstrate your commitment to […]

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Secondary Essay tips - download a copy today!UPSOM places special emphasis on their collaborative problem-based curriculum and the fact that their medical students begin interacting with patients in their first year of medical school.  Providing the best care to patients through research, education, leadership and diversity is central to their mission.  In your own background, how can you demonstrate your commitment to service?  Have you experienced the patient side of medicine yourself or through family members?  How have these unique life experiences and the communities you have served contributed to your unique development and identity?

University of Pittsburgh 2016 Secondary Application Essay Questions:

•  Two short essays with 250 word limits are required.

•  Applicants should use single line spacing and 12 point size font.

•  Responses should be constructed strategically to highlight all of an applicant’s strengths and how they relate to the mission and values of UPSOM.

Application Tip: Check out the UPSOM admissions committee procedures and criteria:

Secondary Application Essays:

1. Tell us about a challenging problem you faced and how you resolved it. (Limit your response to 250 words or less.)

Given UPSOM’s focus on one-on-one patient interactions, use an experience in which you were able to resolve a professional conflict.  Emphasize the role that you played in finding a solution and the skills you employed to identify and implement a positive outcome that was mutually beneficial for all parties involved.  I recommend using an issue that has a clear positive resolution and one that is not personal in nature. 

2. UPSOM is a culturally diverse and talented community. How would you enrich/enliven the UPSOM community? The essay should discuss material that is not included in the rest of your application. (Limit your response to 250 words or less.)

To best address this essay, take your time to make a long list of your unique qualities, talents and experiences—the longer the better.  Cross out those items that you have already included in your personal statement.  Identify your top three on the list—as they relate to UPSOM’s mission and goals.  Explain how those three identifiers will allow you to connect with the community and how they represent you an individual.   

UPSOM Application Timeline:

Check out other school specific secondary essay tips

*Strong recommendation: Submit within two weeks after receipt.

If you would like professional guidance with your University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine application materials, please consider using Accepted’s Medical School Admissions Consulting and Editing Services, which include advising, editing, and interview coaching for the UPSOM application materials.

View our med school resource library for valuable tips on every stage of the application process!

 

Alicia McNease Nimonkar is an Accepted.com advisor and editor specializing in healthcare admissions. Prior to joining Accepted, Alicia worked for five years as Student Advisor at UC Davis’ postbac program where she both evaluated applications and advised students applying successfully to med school and related programs.

Related Resources:

Med School Rankings and Numbers: What You MUST Know! [Free Report]
• Attn Med Applicants: A Class Is Matriculated Every Single Year  [Podcast]
• Boost Your GPA For Medical School Acceptance

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The 4 Must-Haves Of A Grad School Application http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/29/the-4-must-haves-of-a-grad-school-application/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/29/the-4-must-haves-of-a-grad-school-application/#respond Wed, 29 Jul 2015 16:12:44 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32831 Linda Abraham has been living and breathing admissions for over 20 years. Does she know the secret to getting accepted to graduate school? Well, since you asked – yes she does. Listen to the show (and takes notes!) for the four things you need to know and do to get admitted to your top choice […]

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Listen to the show!Linda Abraham has been living and breathing admissions for over 20 years. Does she know the secret to getting accepted to graduate school? Well, since you asked – yes she does.

Listen to the show (and takes notes!) for the four things you need to know and do to get admitted to your top choice grad school.

00:00:36 – Obsessed with stats? You may be barking up the wrong tree.

00:03:16 – Linda’s holistic framework for grad school admissions success.

00:04:39 – #1: Show you can excel: the role of grades and test scores.

00:05:30 – #2: Don’t apply to med school to become a financial analyst (but do apply if you want to be a doctor) AKA the importance of goals.

00:06:44 – #3: Can you show fit?

00:08:19 – #4: Climb Mt. Kilimanjaro. Just kidding.

Applying the framework to:

00:12:26 – MBA Admissions.

00:18:47 – Grad School Admissions.

00:21:44 – Med School Admissions.

00:24:29 – Law School Admissions.

Click here to listen to the show!*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com

Related links:

Get Accepted to HBS / Wharton / Stanford CBS
Get Accepted to Medical School in 2016
Writing Secondary Essays that Get You Accepted

Related shows:

How To Think Like A Dean Of Admissions
How to Earn a Spot on Team Fuqua
The Admissions Team at the Very Center of Business
Attn Med Applicants: A Class Is Matriculated Every Single Year
• Baylor College Of Medicine: A Holistic Approach To Admissions

Leave a Review for Admissions Straight Talk:

Check Out Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes! Check Out Admissions Straight Talk in Stitcher!

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Lack Of Substance: Med School Application Flaw #1 http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/28/lack-of-substance-med-school-application-flaw-1/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/28/lack-of-substance-med-school-application-flaw-1/#respond Tue, 28 Jul 2015 16:34:14 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32791 “Lack of Substance” is the first post in our series, 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Med School Essays. Writing about nothing tends to bore, like a trite sitcom or movie with no plot. They lack substance and so will your essay if it isn’t based on: • Substantive self-reflection. • Use of specifics, […]

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Download a copy of Navigate a Med School Maze.

Use good examples to bring your essays to life and engage the reader.

“Lack of Substance” is the first post in our series, 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Med School Essays.

Writing about nothing tends to bore, like a trite sitcom or movie with no plot. They lack substance and so will your essay if it isn’t based on:

• Substantive self-reflection.

• Use of specifics, examples, and anecdotes.

• Willingness to reveal your thought processes and feelings.

So start your writing process with self-knowledge. You don’t have to search the internet or a large library. Start with your experiences and your dreams. Search your head and your heart. That is where the substance of a good personal statement is stored.

Then use anecdotes, specifics, and examples to reveal what’s in your heart and show that your dreams are grounded in experience. Good examples can bring your essays to life and engage the reader.

At the same time, recognize that essays with only examples and anecdotes don’t reveal your thought processes and consequently are also superficial. Make sure you balance your stories with insight and analysis.

Avoid Fatal Flaw #1: Bring your personal statements to life with self-reflection and astute use of examples balanced by analysis.

Navigate the Med Maze - Download your free guide today!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Related Resources:

• Navigating the Med School Maze
• Successful Medical School Secondary Application Strategies
• Nine Ways To Get Rejected From Medical School

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The “Wharton Difference” And Fit With The Program http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/28/the-wharton-difference-and-fit-with-the-program/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/28/the-wharton-difference-and-fit-with-the-program/#respond Tue, 28 Jul 2015 16:04:46 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32801 The Wharton MBA adcom offers you some help in shaping your Wharton application – by clearly and succinctly defining the four core components of “the Wharton difference.”  Understanding these components is a key to conveying your fit with the program. These four components are encompassed in Wharton’s emphasis on “putting knowledge into action.”  This value […]

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Register for our live webinar on How To Get Accepted to Wharton!

The Wharton MBA adcom offers you some help in shaping your Wharton application – by clearly and succinctly defining the four core components of “the Wharton difference.”  Understanding these components is a key to conveying your fit with the program.

These four components are encompassed in Wharton’s emphasis on “putting knowledge into action.”  This value should guide your application approach: action is always specific, anecdotal.  Therefore, keep your resume, essays, and application answers specific, anecdotal, and action focused.

In this post I’ll discuss two of the four components that are tightly correlated, then I’ll do one post each for the remaining two.  In all, I’ll keep on the radar screen the overarching “putting knowledge into action.”

Largest Global Network and Culture of Engagement are the two interconnected components.  They go hand-in-hand:

•  The vast global alumni network is an immense resource, and culture involves a cyclical process of using, synthesizing and creating new resources.

•  A network and a culture are both built on and serve people.

•  The network component uses the phrases “call on” and “tap into” while the culture of engagement component uses the words “join” and “collaborative” – reflecting dynamism, connection, proactivity.

There is another fascinating but perhaps less intuitive point of alignment between these two components: impact.

•  “Increase your impact through the resources of this diverse, connected community” (from Global Network).

•  “…Turning knowledge into impact” (from Culture of Engagement).

What does all this add up to?  PEOPLE TAKING ACTION CREATE IMPACT.  That’s basic.  What you want to demonstrate, and what Wharton seeks, is you being part of PEOPLE TAKING ACTION TOGETHER TO CREATE CONSTRUCTIVE, DESIRED IMPACTS.

Here’s how you can demonstrate fit with Wharton by incorporating these values into your application:

•  Refer specifically in your application and interview to how you will use the global alumni network to advance your goals and/or how you will engage with it (specific actions as opposed to the ubiquitous but bland “contribute to”).

•  Give examples and anecdotes in essays that illustrate your resourcefulness and collaboration leading to concrete outcomes.

•  In discussing how you will achieve your goals, include these elements, which also align with the action orientation.

• Ensure that your resume reflects these values, and start bullet points with verbs to underscore action.

•  If your recommenders are open to your input, ask them to use examples and present strengths that reflect these attributes (and not just “ability to” but also achieving impacts).

•  In your interview frame your answers and points to reflect these elements and even refer specifically to them, if you can do so naturally.

Register to learn how to get accepted to Wharton!

Cindy Tokumitsu By , author and co-author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports, including Why MBA and Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted.com.

Related Resources:

• Global Business Leadership at Wharton’s Lauder Institute
• Wharton 2016 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
• The Wharton Executive MBA Program: An Insider’s View [Podcast]

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Why I Chose B’s In Medical School http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/27/why-i-chose-bs-in-medical-school/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/27/why-i-chose-bs-in-medical-school/#respond Mon, 27 Jul 2015 16:39:04 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32752 Journeys with Joshua: Joshua Wienczkowski walks us through med school at East Tennessee’s College of Medicine with his monthly blog updates. Get an inside look into med school down South and life as a student adcom member through the eyes of a former professional songwriter with a whole lot of clinical experience — thanks Joshua for […]

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Read more of Joshua's journey through med school!Journeys with Joshua: Joshua Wienczkowski walks us through med school at East Tennessee’s College of Medicine with his monthly blog updates. Get an inside look into med school down South and life as a student adcom member through the eyes of a former professional songwriter with a whole lot of clinical experience — thanks Joshua for sharing this journey with us! 

I’m over 50% finished with my MD program in the Appalachian Mountains, done with (and passed!) the first part of my licensing boards, and am finally onto the greener grass of clinical medicine. So, what have I learned, and how have I changed in this process? Through my first year, my clinical research in sepsis taught me so much about the bigger picture of medicine; I began to fine-tune my bedside manner; I was finally able to see and understand the undeniable impact of socioeconomic status on health. The second year of medical school is notoriously the hardest, because while balancing an even more challenging course load, preparation for licensing boards begins simultaneously. Yes, I learned about disease processes, drugs, interventions, and all that, but I learned about my priorities in the process. I was even crazy enough to get married – to another 2nd year medical student! I’m going to share something incredibly personal that I’m hoping you can grow from – my grades, how I got them, and why I chose (and continue to choose) life over numbers.

During my first year, I began to study how I study, the outcomes, and the most effective ways for me, personally. After dozens of exams, countless hours banging my head against my whiteboard, and proverbially throwing mud at the wall for months on end, I made some pretty interesting discoveries about how I learn. Turns out, it takes me personally about an extra 15-20 hours per exam of additional, dedicated study time on top of my normal study habits to achieve a strong A. What did getting that A do for me? Were those hours worth it? Well, also turns out it just means I pounded into my head the additional minutiae to get the detailed questions, but those details didn’t impact my overall understanding of the material or the concepts. Hmm… I found myself at a fork in the road – I could achieve a higher GPA, class rank, and increase my chances of matching somewhere fancy, OR I could invest those hours into something else.

I made the conscious choice and effort to achieve B’s in the first 2 years of medical school, and I don’t have a single regret about it. Here’s why:

With those extra 15-20 hours per exam (there are a lot of exams), I invested in my relationship with my girlfriend, who became my fiancé, and is now my dear wife. Clearing up some hours meant I always had an extra hour per day to take our Great Dane, Wrigley, on a walk or to the dog park with my wife. Those walks meant we had more quality time together every single day. We started taking longer lunches and dinners together. We talked more. We grew more. We went on more dates! We even built strong friendships at the dog park because we made the conscious effort to put ourselves before the books. I actually watched tv shows and kept up with them with my wife, and we had something to look forward to on Monday nights and could laugh about what farmer Chris was going to do next week on The Bachelor.

With more time, I began songwriting again, and recording things for pleasure, which I haven’t done in years. I even performed one for our school where I wrote about the life of my anatomy group’s donor, Winston. I even started brewing more beer while crafting new recipes, and I invested some time to learn about the craft brewing business to see if opening a brewery one day is a feasible option. With more time, my best friend taught me how to paint, and I was able to give my wife a meaningful piece on our wedding day.

Making the conscious effort to focus on myself, the people around me, and investing in the things I care about instead of numbers is one of the greatest decisions I’ve ever made. I noticed that when I did achieve an A, it came at the expense of my relationships with those I love as well my own ability to be introspective. Being introspective and decompressing with hobbies  and life outside of medicine is one of the most important pieces to handling and managing the immense pressure of medical education. Of course I’ve never been perfect in the process, and when I noticed myself turning sour to those around me, like a corked bottle of wine left too long without being enjoyed, it was because I had lost focus on my priorities. It’s a balancing act, and I’m thankful I have those who love me enough to help in this imperfect science.

With two years of medical education and a few weeks of clinical medicine under my belt, I’ve learned that medicine can be a selfish and consuming mistress, if you let her. I’ve learned it is incredibly easy to achieve at the expense of personal growth. However, if you choose day in and day out to love and invest in those around you instead of her, the payback is invaluable. I have also learned that your value can never be measured in numbers or letters, but instead in the depth of relationships you have with loved ones and the impact you make in your community. As a medical student, time is our most valuable asset – be wise with it. Invest it as you would your hard-earned money; buy things with it that will last the longest, and stretch your time-dollar as far as it will go with the things that matter most to you in life. I’m not top of my class. Not even close. But my relationship with my wife has never been better, and because I bought time to work on some humanities, I haven’t noticed any soured wine in quite some time.

Best,

Joshua A. Wienczkowski

MD Candidate, Quillen College of Medicine 2017

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Related Resources:

• Dear Diary…: Advice for Third-Year Medical Students 
• Reflections on Being 25% an MD
• Insights, Advice and Experiences of a Non-Traditional Med Student

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Choosing From Multiple Business School Acceptances http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/27/choosing-from-multiple-business-school-acceptances/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/27/choosing-from-multiple-business-school-acceptances/#respond Mon, 27 Jul 2015 16:11:20 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32702 “Choosing From Multiple Business School Acceptances” is the final post in our series Navigate the MBA Maze. You’ve been accepted at two solid schools. Great! Or, you’ve been offered admission to an OK school with a significant scholarship and your #1 choice with no financial aid. Or, you’ve been admitted to a top-tier program, but you […]

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Multiple acceptances: Congrats! But what now?

Choosing From Multiple Business School Acceptances” is the final post in our series Navigate the MBA Maze.

You’ve been accepted at two solid schools. Great! Or, you’ve been offered admission to an OK school with a significant scholarship and your #1 choice with no financial aid. Or, you’ve been admitted to a top-tier program, but you really wanted to go to Harvard. You should be celebrating, but instead you’re worrying.

What do you do now? What criteria do you use in making your decision? Here are the factors that should guide you:

1. Which institution best supports your future goals and most likely career path? This criterion is paramount when you have clear, well-defined goals, for instance, “I want to run an IT consultancy serving financial services firms.” If financial aid is an issue, calculate whether the full tuition program will increase your earning power by more than the amount of the scholarship, or whether your preference for the more expensive school is worth the difference in cost.

2. Which educational approach do you prefer?  Do you prefer to learn through case study or analysis, or a combination of the two?

3. Where would you rather live for X years? Do you want to live in a big city or small college town? What region do you want to live in? Do you prefer a big university or a small college? Religious or secular? Liberal or conservative?

Enjoy your great options and use these criteria to guide you as you make your decision.

Navigating the MBA Maze - Download your free guide today!

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Related Resources:

• How To Pay For Your MBA [webinar]
Show Me The Money
• MBA Choices: Dream School vs. Scholarship School?

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UCSF Medical School 2016 Secondary Application Essay Tips http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/26/ucsf-2016-medical-school-secondary-application-essay-tips/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/26/ucsf-2016-medical-school-secondary-application-essay-tips/#respond Sun, 26 Jul 2015 20:21:22 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32571 It is important to focus on your leadership roles and the diversity of your experiences and activities in this secondary application.  UCSF accepts students with highly competitive GPA’s and MCAT scores so it would be to your advantage to explain any decreases or irregularities in your academic records or test scores, if you have not […]

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Click here for more school specific secondary essay tips!It is important to focus on your leadership roles and the diversity of your experiences and activities in this secondary application.  UCSF accepts students with highly competitive GPA’s and MCAT scores so it would be to your advantage to explain any decreases or irregularities in your academic records or test scores, if you have not already done so in your primary application.  Be sure to highlight the qualities, experiences, awards and scholarships that set you apart from other applicants.   

UCSF 2016 Secondary Application Essay Questions:

•  One 500-word essay with additional information

•  Two additional 500-word essays for students interested in applying to the Joint Medical Program, described below.

•  Applicants should use single line spacing and 12 point size font.

•  Responses should be constructed strategically to highlight all of an applicant’s strengths and research interests.

Secondary Application Essay:

If you wish to update or expand upon your activities, you may provide additional information below. (500 word limit)

Use this essay as an opportunity to update the adcom on your current activities.  Focus on the diversity of your commitments—in leadership, volunteering, tutoring, mentoring, as well as your academic, cultural, musical, athletic and professional interests.  If you have long-term commitments to organizations, discuss your years of service and continued commitment.  What sets you apart as an applicant?  Strategically bring their attention on the strengths that you have not covered in the primary application.        

JMP Program Only:

1. Please describe the basis for your interest in and your preparations for the MS with research thesis. Given the opportunity to pursue such a degree, what topics, questions or areas of research might you be interested in addressing? (500 word limit)

The Joint Medical Program is hosted by UC Berkeley School of Public Health and UCSF.  It is a five-year program that allows participants to earn a Master’s Degree in health and medical sciences (HMS) as well as a medical degree.  Students are expected to complete at least 20 units of coursework and to write a thesis in addition to their medical education requirements.  To see a list of recent research topics, please see the invitation to the sixth annual UC Berkeley—UCSF Joint Medical Program Research Symposium.

Be sure to discuss in detail any research experience that you have.  Explain the projects that you participated in and the outcomes of your contributions—publications, poster discussions, panels, or workshops.  What was the level of your responsibility in the lab?  How long did you work on each project?  What issues did you encounter in your research and how did you find solutions these problems either individually and/or collaboratively?  If any of the topics that you covered are health-related, how could you further develop your ideas into a research project?   

2. Please describe the basis for your interest and experience with small group, case-based problem oriented learning. (500 word limit)

You should focus on any experiences that you have working successfully in small groups in this essay response.  This could range from athletics to clinical experiences.  Describe the roles that you played within the teams you have participated on.  What were you able to accomplish as a team?  What did you as an individual contribute?  How would you benefit from a program that uses a case-based learning model? 

UCSF Application Timeline:

Check out the rest of our school specific secondary tips and deadlines

If you would like professional guidance with your UCSF application materials, please consider using Accepted’s Medical School Admissions Consulting and Editing Services, which include advising, editing, and interview coaching for the UCSF application materials.

Navigate the Med Maze - Download your free guide today!

Alicia Nimonkar is an Accepted.com advisor and editor specializing in healthcare admissions. Prior to joining Accepted, Alicia worked for five years as Student Advisor at UC Davis’ postbac program where she both evaluated applications and advised students applying successfully to med school and related programs. Explore Accepted.com’s services to see how Alicia can help you achieve your professional dreams in healthcare.

Related Resources:

• Applying to Medical School with Low Stats [Free Report]
• Getting Into Medical School: Advice from a Pro [Podcast]
Successful Medical School Secondary Application Strategies

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MBA Admissions Decisions: Should You Go Full-Time Or Part-Time? http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/24/mba-admissions-decisions-should-you-go-full-time-or-part-time-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/07/24/mba-admissions-decisions-should-you-go-full-time-or-part-time-2/#respond Fri, 24 Jul 2015 16:40:38 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=32704 When I was applying to b-school, I contemplated part-time vs. full-time, and one of my best friends, Colleen, had to make the same decision at the same time. Ultimately, I decided to attend the full-time program at the University of Michigan. Colleen decided to attend a part-time program at the University of Michigan. We shared […]

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Full-time or Part-time?

When I was applying to b-school, I contemplated part-time vs. full-time, and one of my best friends, Colleen, had to make the same decision at the same time.

Ultimately, I decided to attend the full-time program at the University of Michigan. Colleen decided to attend a part-time program at the University of Michigan. We shared 60% of the same classes, 40% of the same professors and even had a class together (Michigan offered, at the time, courses where they reserved half the registrations for full-time students and half the registrations for part-time students). Since that time, they dramatically changed the full-time curriculum and it is unlikely that we would overlap now like we did then. However, I graduated two years before Colleen with a unique internship, an opportunity to begin a new career and a lot of debt. Colleen advanced quickly with the company that hired her upon our graduation from college and graduated without debt because her company sponsored her education. We both have the same degree.

Now as an Accepted.com consultant and as a former Admissions Director and Dean of full-time, part-time and EMBA programs, I lend you my insight and guidance from the other side of the table in this brief analysis of programs.

Full-time programs: Traditional full-time programs are the media darlings of MBA programs. A school’s reputation relies mostly on its full-time program rankings. They consume the largest portion of the school’s budget, and they rarely make revenue for a school. More than 90% of all scholarships and fellowships are dedicated to full-time students. Full-time programs are perfect for career-changers in the 23-30 year old age range that can afford the opportunity cost of leaving work to immerse themselves in education and experience. If you choose this experience, you will feel like you are an undergraduate again with clubs and activities, but the workload will be greater. You will have access to on-campus recruiting (I always recommend you conduct your own off-campus job search in parallel with on-campus recruiting), company presentations, fellowships and scholarships and a lot of fun. Full-time students prioritize the job search and school. Family often gets the short stick, but there are typically resources to support a spouse. If you are single, it’s a great opportunity to form a romantic relationship. My grad school roommate found the love of her life in our core operations course.

Part-time programs: Part-time programs are the cash cow of MBA programs and have to live in the shadow of their smaller full-time counterpart. They take very few resources, but they often share the same faculty as the full-time program. Many professors would rather teach at night or on the weekend to lighten their teaching load and dedicate their days to research. Schools will also complement the faculty with adjuncts in part-time programs. Aggregated, the part-time applicant pool is not as competitive or as diverse in terms of admissions as schools typically receive fewer applications, and they are limited to their immediate region and the industries that dominate that industry. Furthermore, schools have the capacity to serve at least as many and often more students than their full-time counterpart.

As much as schools say the quality of the full-time students and the part-time students are the same, the quality is dependent on location and how that location generates applications. Bigger cities have an easier time of attracting great applicants to their part-time program and can maintain higher quality standards, but full-time programs generate applications from around the globe and it’s much easier to pick and choose candidates for admission.

Part-time programs are perfect for the 24-35 year old career enhancer, but rarely serve the career changer. Part-timers typically do not have the same access to comprehensive career services as full-time programs because company presentations and interviews are typically held during the day. At one school for whom I worked, we dedicated one career services staff member to all of our professional programs (part-time, EMBA, on-line) serving over 1000 students and 5 career services staff to the small 200-student full-time program.

Part-time students can often get full or partial sponsorship from their company lessening the financial burden, but do not typically have access to fellowships or scholarships from the school. It typically takes students longer than 2 years to complete a part-time program and part-time students prioritize work first, school second and again, family gets the short end stick. Part-time students often feel like the stepchild of the full-time counterparts.

EMBA programs: EMBA programs are also lucrative for schools, but they typically are not as large as full-time programs, and schools charge a premium to attend an EMBA program. They are perfect for students in the 30-year-old to 42-year-old age range that have been supervising employees and that have the support of their executive management to attend a program because executives view these students as fast-trackers in their company. These programs are typically held every other weekend and offer no fellowships or scholarships because schools expect the student’s company to sponsor the student partially or completely. EMBA students typically prioritize work first, family second and school last. While EMBA students may cross from technical supervisory roles to business supervisory roles in their companies, EMBA programs do not cater to the career changer only the career enhancer. Schools take care of their EMBA students for their tuition premium. However, these students rarely interact with either the part-time or full-time students, but bond well with their cohort and the faculty.

Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One - Download your copy today!

 

Natalie Grinblatt Epstein By , an accomplished Accepted.com consultant/editor (since 2008) and entrepreneur. Natalie is a former MBA Admissions Dean and Director at Ross, Johnson, and Carey.

Related Resources:

• Ace the EMBA
Tips for Applying to Part Time MBA Programs
• The MBA Family: A Roundup and Overview

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