Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog » MBA Admissions http://blog.accepted.com Admissions consulting and application advice Wed, 25 Mar 2015 11:28:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1.1 INSEAD Essay 3: Writing About Cultural Diversity http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/23/insead-essay-3-writing-about-cultural-diversity/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/23/insead-essay-3-writing-about-cultural-diversity/#respond Mon, 23 Mar 2015 16:04:25 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=29707 For those of you struggling with INSEAD’s cultural diversity question [Essay 3. Tell us about an experience where you were significantly impacted by cultural diversity, in a positive or negative way. (300 words max.) and the INSEAD EMBA choice of questions for Essay 5. Have you ever experienced culture shock? What insights did you gain? […]

The post INSEAD Essay 3: Writing About Cultural Diversity appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Click here for INSEAD Essay Questions and Tips

Ready to answer the diversity essay question?

For those of you struggling with INSEAD’s cultural diversity question [Essay 3. Tell us about an experience where you were significantly impacted by cultural diversity, in a positive or negative way. (300 words max.) and the INSEAD EMBA choice of questions for Essay 5. Have you ever experienced culture shock? What insights did you gain? OR Describe the ways in which a foreigner in your country might experience culture shock. (500 words max.)], Pamela Druckerman has provided an interesting starting point in her New York Times Op Ed piece “Decoding the Rules of Conversation”.

Druckerman is an American expatriate in France and typically writes about the cultural differences she notices in French child rearing. On the other hand, “Decoding” explores not only how her de facto French children speak and interact, but also how French adults do, with added insight into UK culture thanks to her husband’s British background.

While Druckerman’s mention of British self-deprecation is well known, her description of the French emphasis on one-upping and even humiliating others will certainly come as a culture shock to many. Non-French INSEAD applicants exposed to these behaviors could discuss their own experiences navigating the team environment in France where, according to Druckerman, it is de rigueur to emphasize one’s intelligence at the expense of his or her peers’. Conversely, a French professional working in a global environment could share his experience adapting to a culture that places more emphasis on teamwork and gaining support from others – where he could no longer employ the French strategy of putting everyone else down.

Druckerman demonstrates the cultural astuteness that INSEAD is seeking in its students. Sharing an example of your own cultural insight and response to cultural challenges is essential to any applicant to this renowned international business school.

Applying to INSEAD? Check out our application essay tips!

Jennifer Bloom By Jennifer Bloom who has been helping applicants to the top MBA programs draft their resumes, application forms, letters of recommendation, and essays for 15 years. She is happy to serve as your personal coach and hand-holder throughout the entire process. There’s no time like the present to begin!

Related Resources:

Best MBA Program: A Guide to Selecting the Right One
• An Inside Look at INSEAD
• Tips for Applying to European B-Schools

Tags: ,

The post INSEAD Essay 3: Writing About Cultural Diversity appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/23/insead-essay-3-writing-about-cultural-diversity/feed/ 0
Interview with a Techie at Chicago Booth http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/20/interview-with-a-techie-at-chicago-booth/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/20/interview-with-a-techie-at-chicago-booth/#respond Fri, 20 Mar 2015 15:55:29 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=29643 This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Andrew Edelman, a student at Chicago Booth. Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as […]

The post Interview with a Techie at Chicago Booth appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Click here for more b-school student interviews!This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Andrew Edelman, a student at Chicago Booth.

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What was your most recent pre-MBA job?

Andrew: Thanks for featuring me on Accepted.com! I was born in Paris, France, but grew up here in the U.S. where I spent most of my youth in the Boston area. Needless to say, I really enjoyed the outcome of this year’s Super Bowl!

I attended Davidson College in North Carolina where I received a B.A. in Economics with a Concentration in Applied Mathematics. At Davidson, I was captain of the Men’s Division I Swimming team and met my future wife who was captain of the volleyball team. We now have two amazing sons, the second of whom was born during my first week at Chicago Booth. I always say my wife is my secret weapon during this business school journey.

Immediately before attending business school, I was a Vice President at Corrum Capital Management, a boutique alternative investment management firm headquartered in Charlotte, NC. Upon moving to Chicago and before starting classes, I did a two-month internship with a classmate’s startup that was participating in Chicago Booth’s Polsky Center Accelerator Program. My experience was actually featured in a recent WSJ article about pre-MBA internships and was an exciting opportunity to diversify my skill set before starting summer internship recruiting.

Accepted: Where are you currently in b-school? What year?

Andrew: I’m a second year at The University of Chicago Booth School of Business. It’s hard to believe I’m already entering my final quarter; graduation is less than 100 days away!

Accepted: Why did you choose Booth? How would you say you’re a good fit for the program? Which other programs had you considered?

Andrew: I choose Booth because I wanted to surround myself with extremely intelligent, high quality people. From the incredible faculty to my impressive classmates to the accessible alumni, I’ve been fortunate to learn from such a diverse and humble group.

I’ve personally benefitted most from Booth’s pay it forward mentality that permeates career preparation and recruiting. I’ve really enjoyed the opportunity to give back as a member of the Graduate Business Council and co-chair of the Booth Technology Group.

My business school decision came down to Booth and UC Berkeley (Haas), both great programs. It was a difficult decision, but after visiting Booth during the admitted students weekend, now called First Day, I knew it was the right fit for me.

Accepted: And if you could change one thing about the program, what would it be?

Andrew: With evening, weekend, and PhD programs, Booth is unique in the sheer number of working professionals concurrently pursuing their MBAs. Although I’ve taken a couple evening classes at our downtown Gleacher Center, I feel that most of my academic experience has been centered down at the Harper Center in Hyde Park and kept separate from evening/weekend students. With more work experience on average and equally diverse backgrounds, I wish I had more organized opportunities to interact with these students to expand my network and learn from their experiences.

Accepted: Where did you intern last summer? Can you tell us about the role Booth played in helping you secure that position?

Andrew: I did my summer internship at Google in Mountain View. I was an MBA intern with the Global SMB Solutions team, which is responsible for increasing product adoption and driving revenue growth with small and medium businesses. It was an amazing experience!

As a career switcher, from financial services to tech, the preparation and mentorship offered through Career Services and the members of the Booth Technology Group were invaluable to my success securing a coveted spot at Google. I also benefited from the advantages of Booth’s flexible curriculum that permitted me to take courses early in my first year to prepare for the internship, including the experiential Developing New Products & Services course that paired my group with a leading digital media company for a consulting project.

Many people assume that because Booth is in the Midwest there are fewer opportunities in the technology industry, but that’s a common misconception. I had internship interviews with five of the largest technology companies in the world and was one of a dozen Boothies at Google this summer. In fact, Booth placed more students from my class in tech internships than investment banking, second only to consulting. It’s a trend that is developing at business schools across the country and it’s exciting to see Booth leading the way!

Chicago also has a very underrated tech scene that is booming. Booth has been a large contributor with successful startups growing out of our New Venture Challenge like GrubHub, BrainTree, and MuSigma.

Accepted: Likewise, if you have a job lined up for next year, can you talk about how Booth was involved in that process? What’s recruiting like on campus? How early does it start?

Andrew: I’m excited to be returning to Silicon Valley as a Management Associate with Box in their Rotational Leadership Program. I was looking to join a smaller tech firm full-time, so the majority of my recruiting this year was done off-campus. I was able to leverage the Booth network and my experience at Google to gain access to several high-growth tech companies.

Although I didn’t participate in on-campus recruiting for my full-time search, I can tell you that it does begin very quickly, pretty much right when we all return from our summer internships in late August. There tends to be a flurry of on-campus activity the first two weeks back, which this year included tech firms like Amazon, Apple, Microsoft, and Samsung.

Accepted: Looking back at the MBA application process, what would you say was your biggest challenge? How would you advise others who are facing a similar challenge?

Andrew: The biggest challenge for me was managing the surprisingly demanding application process while balancing my career and family responsibilities. Looking back, I wish I had started the process earlier to meet the Round 1 deadlines and not felt obligated to push my applications back to Round 2. In addition, it’s become increasingly difficult to fully showcase your whole self in such a short amount of space and limited word count. Getting to an interview was my biggest objective because I knew I could better convey a sense of self than I could in an essay.

Accepted: How are you enjoying your time in Chicago? How does student life differ there than in North Carolina?

Andrew: My wife and I always joke that if you could remove the harsh winters from Chicago it would easily be the best city in the U.S., if it’s not already. We’ve honestly loved our time here in Chicago. We live downtown where we have several world-class museums, an abundance of amazing restaurants, and even the sandy beaches of Lake Michigan right at our doorstep. Having grown up in the Northeast, the winters have not been too bad for me, but I definitely feel for my classmates from South America who are experiencing true winter for the first time.

It’s hard to compare my undergrad experience in Davidson, NC to my graduate student experience here in Chicago. Overall, studying business at Booth in a big city like Chicago has been a great complement to my liberal arts education at a small school in rural North Carolina. I’ve thoroughly enjoyed both experiences!

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school applications, please see our MBA Application Packages. 

You can read more about Andrew’s journey by checking out his Twitter and LinkedIn pages. Thank you Andrew for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

Learn how to get accepted to Chicago Booth!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Related Resources:

• Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One
Chicago Booth 2015 MBA Questions, Deadlines, Tips
• Chicago Booth: A Social Experience Outside of My Comfort Zone

Tags: , ,

The post Interview with a Techie at Chicago Booth appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/20/interview-with-a-techie-at-chicago-booth/feed/ 0
The MBA Family: A Roundup and Overview http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/18/the-mba-family-a-roundup-and-overview-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/18/the-mba-family-a-roundup-and-overview-2/#respond Wed, 18 Mar 2015 15:57:36 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=29441 At its core, the MBA is a graduate program in business administration for professionals who seek knowledge, skills, a credential, and/or a network to advance in business and to maximize their business performance.  While “MBA” makes many people automatically think of a two-year, full-time program, in recent years the variations on the MBA theme have […]

The post The MBA Family: A Roundup and Overview appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Not Sure which MBA program is right for you?  Download a free guide!At its core, the MBA is a graduate program in business administration for professionals who seek knowledge, skills, a credential, and/or a network to advance in business and to maximize their business performance.  While “MBA” makes many people automatically think of a two-year, full-time program, in recent years the variations on the MBA theme have multiplied, in order to meet changing and diversifying needs and interests of students and organizations.  Here’s a roundup of the main MBA options that are currently available, and their benefits and drawbacks.

Full-Time MBA Programs: This is a two-year, full-time program with an internship in the summer.  It targets business (and sometimes other) professionals with roughly 3-8 years of experience.  Obtaining a new position post-MBA is often a major focus of students, and recruiting by potential employers is a significant benefit of attending a full-time MBA.

Pros: close and sustained interaction with other full-time students, ideal for career changers, internship opportunity, strong recruiting.

Cons: significant opportunity cost, time away from industries that are undergoing rapid change.

Part-Time MBA Programs: Ideal for people who don’t want to leave their company or industry for any significant period or who can’t afford to stop working. Such programs target people who are employed full time, under the premise that students’ ongoing work will inform classroom discussion and projects. Part-time MBA students trend a little older than full-time MBA students.  While these programs have traditionally served local students, increasingly they are offering varied structures and online components to attract distance students.  They do not generally offer access to recruiters.  Often admission is less competitive than for the same school’s full-time program, enabling part-time students to obtain a “brand” they may not qualify for otherwise.

Pros: can continue to work/earn, apply learning in real time, access to top-tier programs.

Cons: take longer, no internship, usually no recruiting, it can be grueling to work and study simultaneously.

One-Year MBA Programs:  Of course, most European full-time MBA programs are one-year.  Some top US MBA programs, e.g., Cornell’s Johnson and Northwestern’s Kellogg, have offered one-year options for a while, and others are joining the fray as demand for such programs grows.  Often these one-year programs have special requirements, such as some prior business education or an advanced degree.  They are ideal for people who don’t need an internship and who have a strong base of experience; not usually the best path for career changers.

Pros: the intensity of a full-time program with less opportunity cost, usually regular recruiting, ability to quickly rejoin a fast-moving industry.

Cons: no conventional internship, less time to network with students and faculty.

Executive MBA Programs:  EMBAs are part-time programs targeting seasoned managers and entrepreneurs, typically people from mid-thirties to late forties (depending on the program) whose rise to senior manager level is imminent or who are already in senior management.  There is range within this category in terms of desired/required length of experience.  While coursework covers the same topics as regular MBA programs, it’s developed and presented with the higher level perspective.  A great benefit of EMBAs is the chance to network and form relationships with peers from a variety of industries and functions at a career phase when a fresh perspective is quite valuable but sometimes hard to obtain.  These programs don’t target career changers, but are increasingly used by and open to them, even though most EMBA programs don’t offer formal recruiting.

Pros: can apply learning immediately at work, breadth of exposure at a pivotal professional moment, valuable credential.

Cons: challenge of school plus demanding career and personal/family responsibilities, usually no formal recruiting for career changers.

Specialized MBA Programs: These programs offer the MBA course with focus on a specific industry or function; there are such options among both regular and executive MBA programs.  They vary in their formats and approaches.  Boston University’s Public & Nonprofit MBA is an example of a two-year specialized MBA; UC Irvine’s Health Care Executive MBA (HCEMBA) is an example of a specialized EMBA.  A relatively new one-year specialized MBA is Cornell Johnson’s Tech MBA.

Pros: intensive focus on area of interest with coursework adapted accordingly, network of colleagues with related experience and goals.

Cons: missing out on the diverse perspectives from other industries/sectors that can refresh and invigorate your thinking.

While you can’t apply to two different types of MBA programs at the same school in the same admissions cycle, you can do so in different cycles.  And you can apply to different types of programs at different schools at the same time.  For example, if someone is between regular and executive MBA in terms of age or length of experience, he could apply to some regular MBAs that trend older and some exec MBAs that trend younger.  Or someone may apply to full-time MBA programs but also apply to a part-time program nearby as an acceptable back-up.

Please do keep in mind, and address in your application, the nuances of the type of MBA as well as the particular program!

Download our free special report: Best MBA Programs
Cindy Tokumitsu By , author and co-author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports, including Why MBA and Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted.com.

Related Resources:

MBA Action Plan: 6 Steps for the 6 Months Before You Apply
Tips for Applying to Part-time MBA Programs
• Ace the EMBA

Tags: , ,

The post The MBA Family: A Roundup and Overview appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/18/the-mba-family-a-roundup-and-overview-2/feed/ 0
3 Ways to Make Your Own Student Loan Luck http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/17/3-ways-to-make-your-own-student-loan-luck/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/17/3-ways-to-make-your-own-student-loan-luck/#respond Tue, 17 Mar 2015 15:47:38 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25942 “Diligence is the mother of good luck.”  – Benjamin Franklin If you’re one of the 37 million Americans with student loans, you know it’s going to take a lot more than a few four-leaf clovers to make your debt disappear. You wouldn’t rely on winning the lottery in order to pay your loans, would you?  […]

The post 3 Ways to Make Your Own Student Loan Luck appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Not sure how to fund your MBA? Listen to this podcast for pointers.

Luck can’t pay off student loans, but YOU can!

“Diligence is the mother of good luck.”  – Benjamin Franklin

If you’re one of the 37 million Americans with student loans, you know it’s going to take a lot more than a few four-leaf clovers to make your debt disappear. You wouldn’t rely on winning the lottery in order to pay your loans, would you?  Unfortunately, neglecting to understand the various loan repayment options can be just as foolish, because you may be missing out on opportunities to reduce or even eliminate your debt burden. Essentially, leaving your loans to chance could mean leaving money on the table.

Rather than wait around for good fortune to find you, take a proactive approach by seeing if one of these three options apply to you:

1.  Spend money to save money
. All education loans, whether federal or private, allow for penalty-free prepayment, which means that you can pay more than the monthly minimum or make extra payments without incurring a fee. Prepaying may sound painful, but the benefits can be huge. The more you do it, the sooner you’re done with your loans – and the less interest you spend over the life of the loan.

Let’s say you have a $100,000 student loan balance at a 6.8% interest rate and 10-year term. If you increased your monthly payment by just $100, you’d save about $5,600 in total interest and pay off your loans about a year early. Or perhaps you pay down an extra $2,000 per year using your annual bonus, saving yourself about $7,400 in interest and paying off your loans about 1.5 years early. Every borrower’s situation is different, but you can do the math on your own loans with a calculator like this.

One thing to note – prepaying is most effective when the extra cash is applied directly to your principal, rather than being earmarked for future payments.  It’s best to check with your loan servicer to see what their policy is before increasing or adding extra payments.

How to get lucky: Commit to increasing your monthly student loan payment each time you get a raise and/or putting a percentage of every bonus toward your loan balance.

2.  Recalibrate your rate
. One of the fastest ways to slash your student loan burden is to lower the interest rate on your loans, which can only be accomplished through the act of refinancing. In addition to reducing the amount of interest you pay on your loan over time, refinancing can allow you to make lower monthly payments or shorten your payment term (so that you can be done with your loans sooner).

Student loan refinancing is still a relatively new option, so many borrowers who could be eligible to refinance aren’t even aware the opportunity exists. Which is unfortunate, because the savings can be significant.  For example, the average SoFi borrower saves $9,400 when they refinance with us.*  In addition, some private lenders offer additional benefits to borrowers when they refinance, such as complimentary career coaching and entrepreneurial support.

How to get lucky: When shopping around for a refinance lender, be sure to compare interest rates as well as other potential benefits.

3.  Ask for forgiveness. What borrower hasn’t fantasized about winning the lottery and paying off their loans in one fell swoop?  Unfortunately, you’re more likely to get hit by an asteroid than win a seven figure jackpot. So what’s the next best thing? How about making your student loan balance magically disappear.

It sounds too good to be true, but this is the basic idea behind student loan forgiveness. Surprisingly, there are quite a few ways to get your loan slate wiped clean, but the most well-known one (and the one that applies to the most people) is the government’s Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) Program. Under the program, borrowers who work full-time for a qualifying public service organization may be eligible to have federal loans forgiven after 10 years of on-time monthly payments.

Before you skim over this section and assume that PSLF won’t apply to you, consider this: The CFPB estimates that about one in four working Americans has a job that meets the definition of “public service”, and yet they believe a “substantial sum” is left on the table by borrowers who don’t take advantage. This may be because the definition is broader than what most people would expect – for example, soldiers, doctors at non-profit hospitals and public defenders are all examples of professions that may qualify a borrower for PSLF.

How to get lucky: Find out if you qualify for PSLF or other forgiveness programs by contacting your student loan servicer.  

*SoFi average borrower savings assumes 10-year student loan refinancing with a weighted average rate of 7.67% and a loan balance of $86,000, compared to SoFi’s median 10-year rates of 5.875% (with AutoPay).

This post is by Anna Wolf and originally appeared on the SoFi Blog. SoFi connects alumni borrowers and investors to refinance private and federal student loans.

Learn how to use sample essays to create an exemplary essay of your own!

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

• SoFi: Alumni Funded Student Loans
Tips for Financing Your MBA
• PayScale: How Much You Can Earn, and How to Earn It

Tags: , , , , , ,

The post 3 Ways to Make Your Own Student Loan Luck appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/17/3-ways-to-make-your-own-student-loan-luck/feed/ 0
Tips for Applying to European B-Schools http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/15/tips-applying-european-b-schools/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/15/tips-applying-european-b-schools/#respond Sun, 15 Mar 2015 14:35:05 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=29499 Applying to a European MBA program isn’t quite the same as applying to an American program. The programs themselves often have a different focus than U.S. schools, and adcoms therefore look out for different skills and qualifications. I’d like to direct you to the following resources on our website – blog posts that focus specifically […]

The post Tips for Applying to European B-Schools appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Click here for more European school essays and tips

Do you know what you need to do to get admitted to a European MBA program?

Applying to a European MBA program isn’t quite the same as applying to an American program. The programs themselves often have a different focus than U.S. schools, and adcoms therefore look out for different skills and qualifications. I’d like to direct you to the following resources on our website – blog posts that focus specifically on how to answer specific questions on specific European b-school applications. Please check them out and be in touch if you have any questions!

Tip Posts for European B-Schools:

• ESADE 2015 MBA Essay Tips

HEC Paris 2015 MBA Essay Tips

HKUST 2015 MBA Essay Tips

IMD 2016 Essay Tips

INSEAD 2015 MBA Essay Tips

London Business School 2015 MBA Essay Tips

London Business School 2015 MiM Essay Questions and Tips

NUS MBA 2015 Essay Tips

Oxford Said 2015 MBA Essay Tips

For more advice, I recommend you check out these podcasts that feature interviews with adcom members from top European b-schools – it’s always good to get advice from the source itself!

• The Scoop on the London Business School Masters in Management Program

• Interview with Philippe Oster of HEC Paris

• An Inside Look at INSEAD

International_Students_Tips
Linda AbrahamBy Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

The post Tips for Applying to European B-Schools appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/15/tips-applying-european-b-schools/feed/ 0
A Window into Life at Harvard Business School http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/13/window-life-harvard-business-school/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/13/window-life-harvard-business-school/#respond Fri, 13 Mar 2015 16:35:08 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=29496 This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a follow up interview with Tim Massey, who is about to complete his first year at Harvard Business School. (We first met Tim last year – you can read […]

The post A Window into Life at Harvard Business School appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Click here for more mba student interviewsThis interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a follow up interview with Tim Massey, who is about to complete his first year at Harvard Business School. (We first met Tim last year – you can read our first interview with him here.)

Accepted: Since we last spoke you applied to and got accepted to HBS. Congrats! How has your first year been so far? It b-school as you expected it to be? Any surprises? 

Tim: The first year has been an incredible ride. I’ve really enjoyed pretty much every aspect of it so far and I haven’t regretted my decision to study in the US for a second. The students here are an incredible bunch of people, and it’s really evident that the professors love teaching here. We’re fortunate enough to meet many of the protagonists of our cases or leading business leaders who come to visit our campus. The worldwide draw of HBS really enhances the experience. Without particularly seeking these opportunities out I’ve been able to listen to Peter Thiel (founder of Paypal and hugely successful investor), and Alan Mullaly (former CEO of Ford and Boeing).

HBS also is far more friendly and collaborative than I expected. It has a reputation for being a tough dog-eat-dog place, and that’s not really been my experience at all. Yes, it’s competitive but certainly not at any cost.

My biggest surprise is quite how busy I’ve been (despite HBS’ reputation) – it’s very different from my undergraduate studies and I’ve barely had a minute to myself from when I started right up until the Christmas break at the end of the first semester.

Accepted: Which MBA programs did you end up applying to? Was HBS your first choice? 

Tim: I described HBS originally as my joint first choice. As an engineer, I was also keen on MIT, but MIT made it an easy decision for me! I had a few other applications that I withdrew from early as I knew where I was going to be, and HBS is pretty much one of the first decisions you get in Round 1.

Accepted: If you could change anything about the program, what would it be?

Tim: My least favorite aspect of the whole MBA experience has undoubtedly been recruiting season. In contrast to many other parts of the experience, which tend to focus on self-growth and really achieving something meaningful, this seems very much stuck in the past.

I am sure this is borne out of necessity to compete with other schools and maintain league placing high up the recruitment league tables that applicants look at. But depth of support is really variable between traditional MBA industries (finance/consulting) and other more creative directions. It is very much at odds with the rest of the course and HBS’s mission to ‘educate leaders who make a difference in the world.’

I have a strong suspicion this is not unique to HBS and I think the competitive stats-based ranking system for admissions to the top business school really influences behavior here. Any school that deviates from promoting the top highly paid starting salaries and internships will suffer from a disadvantage in these metrics, and this promotes a ‘groupthink’ approach.

Accepted: Are you involved in any clubs on campus? How central to student life is club involvement?

Tim: There is a pretty huge array of clubs on campus to join, HBS definitely benefits from its size in this respect with members forming based on range of different interests. The majority are based around either professional/career interests (e.g. VCPE club (venture capital/private equity), Tech club), geographical locations (e.g. Euro club/LatAm club) or sports, with some special interests thrown in.

I’m been involved in helping to organize several of these, which is a bit of a throwback to my undergrad days when I was also heavily involved in the student body.

The main difference is a slightly more ‘professional’ edge than undergraduate clubs, with most designed to help navigate and network amongst the diverse student body, and attract specific career opportunities to campus.

Accepted: Can you tell us about  your experience with HBS’ FIELD program?

Tim: So far, I’ve travelled to Chengdu in China on FIELD 2, working with a social enterprise focused on promoting recycling electronics (I wrote about this in a little more detail on my blog here). It was a great project and really allowed me to get a unique perspective on awareness of environmental issues in China. As a whole experience, it really challenged some perspectives I had before I went.

At the moment I’m in the thick of FIELD 3, in the early stages of starting my own business with a group of other students. I’ll be sure to write more about it as we make progress!

Accepted: Have you been keeping up your blogging? Can you direct us to one or two posts that will further help us get up to date with your b-school adventure?

Tim: In addition to my post about FIELD above, I wrote down some of my perspectives on the first semester here.

I’m trying to keep up the blogging, but the strain on my time commitments makes it a bit more difficult to find time than it used to be! I try to write once a month or so – I’m in an incredibly fortunate position to write about what’s it like on the inside – I try to answer the questions I had as an applicant, and if anyone has any suggestions of things they’d like to know more detail about, I’m happy to take requests!

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school applications, please see our MBA Application Packages.  To read more about Tim’s b-school journey, please check out his blog, The Adventures of a MBA Student. Thank you Tim for sharing your story with us! 

Check out our free webinar: Get Accepted to Harvard Business School!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy
Related Resources:

• Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One
• What Does Harvard Business School Want?, a video
• Life as an HBS MBA Student

Tags: , ,

The post A Window into Life at Harvard Business School appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/13/window-life-harvard-business-school/feed/ 0
The GMAC, the GMAT, and the MBA Degree http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/12/the-gmac-the-gmat-and-the-mba-degree/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/12/the-gmac-the-gmat-and-the-mba-degree/#respond Thu, 12 Mar 2015 22:30:37 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=29590 Admit it. You just can’t stop thinking about the GMAT. If you are a b-school student (present or future), then Rich D’Amato, Vice President of Global Communications at GMAC, has some important info to share with you. Listen to the full recording of our conversation with Rich for the scoop on new GMAT features, the […]

The post The GMAC, the GMAT, and the MBA Degree appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
IV with Rich D'AmatoAdmit it. You just can’t stop thinking about the GMAT.

If you are a b-school student (present or future), then Rich D’Amato, Vice President of Global Communications at GMAC, has some important info to share with you.

Listen to the full recording of our conversation with Rich for the scoop on new GMAT features, the MBA Alumni survey, the relevance of the MBA degree, and more.

00:02:44 – The low-down on GMAC’s Enhanced Score Reports and how they can help you prepare effectively and score higher on the GMAT.

00:08:17 – The new Score Preview feature: how it works and how it can help you.

00:11:22 – Featured Applicant Question: Can I retake the GMAT, and then cancel the score and reinstate the original score?

00:12:08 – The case for the GMAT in the GMAT vs GRE battle.

00:15:24 – The role of “entrepreneurial traits” (and an MBA education) in career success.

00:19:16 – Is the end of the MBA degree in sight?

00:21:54 – The growth of specialized business degrees.

00:26:36 – Rich’s awesome advice for future test-takers.

Click here to listen to the show!*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Related Links:

• The Official GMAT Website 
GMAT NEWSFLASH: GMAT to Feature Score Preview
• GMAT’s New Enhanced Score Report
GMAT Unofficial Enhanced Score Report FAQs
Control Your GMAT Experience with These Three Features

Related Shows:

• The GMAT, the GRE, and the Guy Who Knows them Well
• The GMAT Score Preview and Application Boxes
• GMAT, GRE, SAT, and All Things Test Prep
• Chris Ryan of Manhattan GMAT on What MBA Applicants Need to Know

Leave a Review for Admissions Straight Talk:

Check Out Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes! Check Out Admissions Straight Talk in Stitcher!

Tags: , , , ,

The post The GMAC, the GMAT, and the MBA Degree appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/12/the-gmac-the-gmat-and-the-mba-degree/feed/ 0
Three Topics to Discuss in Waitlist Letters http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/12/three-topics-discuss-waitlist-letters/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/12/three-topics-discuss-waitlist-letters/#respond Thu, 12 Mar 2015 15:44:35 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=29324 If you are on a waitlist, Linda Abraham has something to tell you: Related Resources: • College Applicants: Waitlisted or Rejected? • Help! I’ve Been Waitlisted! • How to Write Waitlist Update Letters Tags: College Admissions, College Video Tips, Grad School Admissions, Grad Video Tips, Law School Admissions, Law Video Tips, MBA Admissions, MBA Video Tips, […]

The post Three Topics to Discuss in Waitlist Letters appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
If you are on a waitlist, Linda Abraham has something to tell you:

Get off that waitlist! Listen how Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy
Related Resources:

• College Applicants: Waitlisted or Rejected?
Help! I’ve Been Waitlisted!
How to Write Waitlist Update Letters

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

The post Three Topics to Discuss in Waitlist Letters appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/12/three-topics-discuss-waitlist-letters/feed/ 0
AIGAC’s 2015 MBA Applicant Survey [You Can Win $500!] http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/11/aigacs-2015-mba-applicant-survey-can-win-500-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/11/aigacs-2015-mba-applicant-survey-can-win-500-2/#respond Wed, 11 Mar 2015 19:51:13 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=29532 As Association of International Graduate Admissions Consultants (AIGAC) members, we are conducting a survey to help us better understand our readers’ goals and needs. We’d like to invite all of our MBA readers to share their school selection priorities and views on the MBA application process. Take the MBA Search Survey, and win $500 and […]

The post AIGAC’s 2015 MBA Applicant Survey [You Can Win $500!] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Click here to take the survey!As Association of International Graduate Admissions Consultants (AIGAC) members, we are conducting a survey to help us better understand our readers’ goals and needs.

We’d like to invite all of our MBA readers to share their school selection priorities and views on the MBA application process.

Take the MBA Search Survey, and win $500 and our sincere gratitude! The anonymous data will be shared with admissions officers from top programs. Make your voice heard!

The survey should take no more than 10 minutes to complete. Everyone completing the survey will be entered to win $500 cash (contact email will be used for prize purposes only). We’ll also be sharing the results of the survey this spring to help candidates better understand the nature of today’s applicant pool.

Click here to take our MBA prospect survey.

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Tags: ,

The post AIGAC’s 2015 MBA Applicant Survey [You Can Win $500!] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/11/aigacs-2015-mba-applicant-survey-can-win-500-2/feed/ 0
U.S. News 2016 Best Graduate Business Schools http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/11/u-s-news-2016-best-graduate-business-schools/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/11/u-s-news-2016-best-graduate-business-schools/#respond Wed, 11 Mar 2015 15:35:57 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=29502 U.S. News released its graduate school rankings today. Let’s see how our top b-schools fared… Top 20 U.S. B-Schools – 2016 1. Stanford GSB (1) 2. Harvard Business School (1) 3. UPenn Wharton (1) 4. Chicago Booth (4) 5. MIT Sloan (5) 6. Northwestern Kellogg (6) 7. UC Berkeley Haas (7) 8. Columbia Business School […]

The post U.S. News 2016 Best Graduate Business Schools appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
U.S. News released its graduate school rankings today. Let’s see how our top b-schools fared…

Top 20 U.S. B-Schools – 2016

Visit our b-school zone page for info on the top business schools.1. Stanford GSB (1)
2. Harvard Business School (1)
3. UPenn Wharton (1)
4. Chicago Booth (4)
5. MIT Sloan (5)
6. Northwestern Kellogg (6)
7. UC Berkeley Haas (7)
8. Columbia Business School (8)
9. Dartmouth Tuck (9)
10. UVA Darden (11)
11. NYU Stern (10)
11. Michigan Ross (11)
13. Duke Fuqua (14)
13. Yale SOM (13)
15. UCLA Anderson (16)
16. Cornell Johnson (17)
17. Texas McCombs (15)
18. UNC Kenan-Flagler (19)
19. Washington Olin (22)
20. CMU Tepper (18)

25% of US News rankings is made up of survey responses from business school deans and directors; 15% is based on recruiters’ survey responses. The remaining 60% is based on statistical data reflecting program selectivity and placement success. (For details, read up on U.S. News methodology.)

Here are some highlights from the Poets & Quants article on the rankings:

• Last year’s three-way Stanford/Harvard/Wharton tie was broken this year with each school taking one of the first three spots (Stanford in first, HBS in second, and Wharton in third).

• The P&Q article states that Wharton’s slip to third is due to lower peer assessment and corporate recruiter survey scores.

• Wharton also reported an acceptance rate of 20.7%, up from last year’s 18.7% — this is another metric used by U.S. News in their methodology.

• Another factor contributing to Wharton’s position this year is its position regarding salary and bonus. Last year it took top slot at $141,243, while this year it slipped to fourth place at $142,574 – yes, higher than last year, but this year, Harvard, MIT, and Stanford reported even higher salaries/bonuses (HBS took the cake at $144,936 this year).

• Stanford’s top stats this year: average GMAT – 732; average GPA – 3.74; acceptance rate – 7.1%.

• In the top 20, there weren’t significant changes beyond a given school moving up or down a couple places. But further down in the rankings there were some big shifts. Texas A&M jumped 10 places to 27th place (tied with Carlson); Wake Forest jumped 13 places to 45th place; and Louisville moved up at least 31 places to 71st place – it was previously unranked.

• Big drops include Missouri Trulsake which fell 21 places from 58th to 79th place; Pepperdine Graziadio which fell at least 25 places, from last year’s 76th place to its unranked position this year.

Wondering how much rankings should play a roll in determining where you apply? Watch the video below for Linda Abraham’s answer:

Are You Misusing the B-School Rankings?

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Related Resources:

• Financial Times Global MBA Rankings 2015
• What’s an MBA Really Worth?
• PayScale: How Much Can You Earn, and How to Earn It?

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The post U.S. News 2016 Best Graduate Business Schools appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/11/u-s-news-2016-best-graduate-business-schools/feed/ 0
What Are My Chances? Young Veteran Looking for Investment Banking “In” http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/10/chances-vet-u-s-college-grad-looking-investment-banking/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/10/chances-vet-u-s-college-grad-looking-investment-banking/#comments Tue, 10 Mar 2015 16:02:14 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=29428 This blog post is part of a series of MBA profile evaluations called “What are My Chances?”  by Michelle Stockman. Michelle, who started consulting for Accepted in 2007 and worked previously in the Columbia Business School admissions office, will provide selected applicants with school recommendation as well as an assessment of their strengths and weaknesses. If […]

The post What Are My Chances? Young Veteran Looking for Investment Banking “In” appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
This blog post is part of a series of MBA profile evaluations called “What are My Chances?”  by Michelle Stockman. Michelle, who started consulting for Accepted in 2007 and worked previously in the Columbia Business School admissions office, will provide selected applicants with school recommendation as well as an assessment of their strengths and weaknesses.

If you would like Michelle to evaluate your profile at no charge and as part of this series, please provide the information requested at http://reports.accepted.com/what_are_my_chances.

PROFILE #9: Eli, Army veteran and U.S. college student looking for investment banking “in”

Watch this video on how to show leadership in your application

Where is the evidence that you take charge?

-BACKGROUND: American male who will graduate in 2016 from Baruch College. Completed eight month finance internship at VR, Inc. “a corporation engaged in the innovation, development and monetization of intellectual property.” Served two years in the Israeli Defence Force. Worked for a summer at a home for developmentally disabled adults.

Going through your profile, I feel like I’m looking at a tidy construction site with a newly laid foundation. The structure looks like it will be solid. But gaping holes have yet to be filled, raw materials yet to arrive.

So let’s talk about that foundation. It looks good. You’ve accrued a strong mix of technical and business skills at university. An internship at VR shows off your IT skills. The philosophy minor and military experience sets you up, potentially, as an insightful leader.

But where is the evidence that shows you taking charge, making an idea into a reality, or convincing a reluctant group to take on a challenge? As you have relatively little work experience, I’d have to base that judgment off your military service. By what you’ve provided on your resume, I have little to go on.

-GOALS: Sales & Trading at a bulge bracket or high end boutique firm.

This goal makes sense with your past, although an internship at a bank would be stronger than at the intellectual property firm. That’s likely why you want an MBA–to get that “in” at an investment bank.

So what do investment banks want in their new recruits?  In his how-to-book, Andrew Gutman says IB recruiters ask themselves two questions. First, would I want this person working for me? She’ll want someone who has the intellectual capacity to handle complex, fast-moving transactions, plus the physical stamina and good attitude required to put in long hours. Your grades and internship demonstrate a keen intellect. To show you’ve got the guts, bring out stories from your military experience about making tough decisions under pressure, and keeping up morale during long stretches on duty.  

The second question is: would I mind being stuck at the airport with this guy? Can you handle hours of chatting about interesting subjects, or are you a bore? Your extracurriculars on campus show that you’re social. You put down snowboarding, classical music, fitness, and paintball as interests on your resume. Make these activities come to life in your essays. Show how you’re a leader, how you challenge yourself in perfecting your skills, and how you’ve developed your interior life.

-GMAT: ??

A unique choice. You’ve decided to take the GRE, but you have yet to take the test. That’s the big gaping hole.

Ad comms decided to accept the GRE to attract non-traditional candidates from liberal arts or hard science backgrounds. You, sir, fall into the traditional pool. It’s not against the rules for you to take the GRE, but you would raise fewer eyebrows if you took the GMAT.

Seek to score 720 or above.

-GPA: 3.8 with a major in finance and two minors, CIS and Philosophy.

This is a great GPA. It puts you right near the top of the competition at elite business schools. No worries here.

-EXTRACURRICULAR: Served on the executive board of the Phi Eta Sigma Honors Society. Active Member at Baruch Hillel.

It’s difficult to decipher, from your brief descriptions, how you impacted these organizations.

Will you go down in history for the epic activities you organized, the vast network you created for yourself, or the new avenues you forged to have a real social impact on the surrounding community? In your resume you need to be much more descriptive of what you actually did. Titles are not enough.

-SCHOOLS:

I really can’t recommend any schools for you without your GMAT score. All the programs on your target list are reach choices with your profile, even if you score a 720 or above on the GMAT.

My question for you is: what will you do if you don’t get into business school right away? You’re a unique case because you’ve had military experience and you’re a fresh grad. But you’ve done little actual work in finance. You could apply right now, but you’ve got to convince me of why now is the time for you to get an MBA, instead of a couple more years out on the job.

In conclusion, the big missing piece for me is: your military experience. From my understanding, the Israeli military is much less hierarchical than the U.S. military. So you have a chance to show not only leadership, but also how you asserted your ideas, perhaps when you weren’t in the top spot and had an impact.

The pieces of your profile make sense with your ultimate goal, but start filling in those gaps.

Download our free special report: Best MBA Programs

Michelle Stockman Michelle Stockman is a professional journalist, former Columbia Business School admissions insider, and experienced MBA admissions consultant.

 

Related Resources:

Your 3-Part Plan to Dominate the GMAT, a free webinar
• An NYU Stern Grad and Strat Consultant Helping Vets Get Into School
Two Ways to Reveal Leadership in Your Applications

Tags: ,

The post What Are My Chances? Young Veteran Looking for Investment Banking “In” appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/10/chances-vet-u-s-college-grad-looking-investment-banking/feed/ 2
Complimentary MBA 2016 Webinar on Wednesday! http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/09/complimentary-mba-2016-webinar-wednesday/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/09/complimentary-mba-2016-webinar-wednesday/#respond Mon, 09 Mar 2015 16:08:03 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=29046 We’d like to remind you about Wednesday’s webinar, Get Accepted in 2016: 7 Steps to a Strong MBA Application, which will take place at 10:00 AM PT / 1:00 PM ET (that’s on March 11th). It is essential that you attend if you are planning on applying to b-school next year. Applicants who get an early start […]

The post Complimentary MBA 2016 Webinar on Wednesday! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
We’d like to remind you about Wednesday’s webinar, Get Accepted in 2016: 7 Steps to a Strong MBA Application, which will take place at 10:00 AM PT / 1:00 PM ET (that’s on March 11th). It is essential that you attend if you are planning on applying to b-school next year.

Register for the webinar!

Applicants who get an early start can move through the application process more quickly, more efficiently, and with better results than their peers who leave their MBA applications to the last minute.

Get Accepted in 2016_Register

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Tags:

The post Complimentary MBA 2016 Webinar on Wednesday! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/09/complimentary-mba-2016-webinar-wednesday/feed/ 0
What is a Goal? (And What is Not) http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/08/goal-not/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/08/goal-not/#respond Sun, 08 Mar 2015 15:50:47 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=29339 Let’s start by talking about what ISN’T a goal. When an applicant says something along the lines of: “I’m interested in investment banking or consulting or marketing,” then I know there’s significant work to be done, because THIS is NOT a goal. A strong, clear MBA goal should guide your admissions research and your choice […]

The post What is a Goal? (And What is Not) appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Learn more tips on how to clarify your goals.

Let’s start by talking about what ISN’T a goal. When an applicant says something along the lines of: “I’m interested in investment banking or consulting or marketing,” then I know there’s significant work to be done, because THIS is NOT a goal.

A strong, clear MBA goal should guide your admissions research and your choice of target schools. A goal is something you want to do (not just study), and for MBA admissions purposes it should relate to a specific function and ideally to an industry. For some applicants, geography is also an important element in their goal. Your goal should be based on your experience, not on television, not on what your parents/significant other or friends think you should do, and not simply on what will make you a lot of money.

I am not saying that you can’t change careers. After all, roughly 50% of MBA students are career changers. But you need to have a realistic vision of your future based on skills and character traits you have developed and based on experiences that you have had.

Let’s return to our initial point of what ISN’T an MBA goal. What’s the problem with stating that you want to go into marketing, for example? There are numerous dimensions and opportunities subsumed under the heading of “marketing,” including business development, market research, brand management, and channel management.

Do you see how general and unfocused you seem if you say your post-MBA goal is “marketing,” not to mention a goal of “marketing, investment banking, or consulting”?

On the other hand if you are a software consultant who has worked on software marketing projects or a software designer who has worked in product development and you now want to go into brand management in the software industry, your goal makes sense. It is focused. It is clear. It is an asset to you in the application process.

There is a Proverb that goes, “Without a vision, the people will perish.” The adcom readers will note the red flags when they see your lack of vision. Know where you’re going before you start packing your bags. And certainly before you start applying.

Get clear, practical guidelines for answering the MBA goals essay question. Click here to download our free report.
Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy
Related Resources:

Why MBA?
MBA 2016 – Ready, Set, Go!
MBA Goals 101

Tags: ,

The post What is a Goal? (And What is Not) appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/08/goal-not/feed/ 0
4 Ways to Show How You’ll Contribute in the Future http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/06/4-ways-show-youll-contribute-future/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/06/4-ways-show-youll-contribute-future/#respond Fri, 06 Mar 2015 17:33:41 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=29350 Schools want to see that the applicants will actively participate in and contribute to their student bodies and alumni communities, not to mention the greater community and society. Yet grandiose, declarative statements and promises to be a superlative do-gooder are unpersuasive. So how is an applicant to show what he or she will do in […]

The post 4 Ways to Show How You’ll Contribute in the Future appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Click here to learn how to demonstrate leadership in your application

Will your past allow the adcom a peak into your future?

Schools want to see that the applicants will actively participate in and contribute to their student bodies and alumni communities, not to mention the greater community and society. Yet grandiose, declarative statements and promises to be a superlative do-gooder are unpersuasive.

So how is an applicant to show what he or she will do in the future? Point to the past. Most admission committees are firm believers that past behavior reveals abilities and interests and is a good predictor of the future.

Here are four tips to help you relay the message that you plan on achieving greatness by contributing to your school/community/world-at-large, by highlighting your impressive past.

1. Share the story of past achievements and quantify if possible the impact you had. – By showing how you’ve already contributed, you demonstrate that you have the initiative, people skills, and organizational talent to make an impact in the future.

2. Discuss skills you’ve developed that will aid to future contributions. – You can show the adcoms that you’re prepared to give back by proving that you’ve got the skills and the tools needed. Use evidence to support your skill development by talking about how you’ve worked to build your skill set, i.e. by taking a course or through work experience, etc. Analyze your success and failures (when asked for the latter) to reveal that you are a thinking, growing, dynamic individual. And when asked about failures or setbacks, discuss what you learned from the tough times. Demonstrate a growth mindset.

3. Show how your skills are transferable. – To contribute to your classmates or school, you’ll need to show how your unique talents or experiences can be shared with your classmates, professors, or work colleagues. Talk about how your skills, understanding, and ethics can impact those around you.

4. Mention how your target school will help. – Now the adcom readers know that you’ve got skills and that you’re ready to share them. Next, you need to reinforce the idea that their school is THE PLACE to accelerate your upward trajectory.

A good essay on your contributions will cover each of the above topics – what you’ve done in the past, how you’ve developed your skills, how you plan on sharing that knowledge, and how your target school will help you effect change. Remember, the past reveals much about the future, so share the story of what you’ve done and how you’ve reached this point and you’ll be well on your way to proving that you’ve got what it takes to contribute in the future.

The Quick Guide to Admissions Resumes: Get your free copy!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy
Related Resources:

Leadership in Admissions
How to Prove Character Traits in Essays
Does Extracurricular Equal Extra Credit?

Tags: , , , ,

The post 4 Ways to Show How You’ll Contribute in the Future appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/06/4-ways-show-youll-contribute-future/feed/ 0
Hone Your MBA Goals [Video] http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/04/hone-mba-goals-video/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/04/hone-mba-goals-video/#respond Wed, 04 Mar 2015 16:27:42 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=29157 A solid MBA goal should drive many of the decisions surrounding your business school application and education. In this video, Linda Abraham explores the essential components of a compelling MBA goal and shares a few tips on how to develop it. By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for […]

The post Hone Your MBA Goals [Video] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
solid MBA goal should drive many of the decisions surrounding your business school application and education.

In this video, Linda Abraham explores the essential components of a compelling MBA goal and shares a few tips on how to develop it.

Get clear, practical guidelines for answering the MBA goals essay question. Click here to download our free report.

Linda AbrahamBy Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

Related Resources:

Why MBA? 
• Your MBA Goals Essay: Get Ready, Get Set, THINK!
Getting Your MBA Goals in Shape

Tags: , ,

The post Hone Your MBA Goals [Video] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/04/hone-mba-goals-video/feed/ 0
Why Extracurriculars Activities Make a Difference http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/03/extracurriculars-activities-make-difference/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/03/extracurriculars-activities-make-difference/#respond Tue, 03 Mar 2015 17:02:09 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28957 Don’t underestimate the value of extracurricular activities in your b-school application! Use the following Q&A to help you prioritize and then write about your extracurricular activities. What are extracurricular activities? An extracurricular activity is a non-academic, non-professional activity that you participate in. These activities include hobbies, sports, the arts, and volunteering or community service. Why […]

The post Why Extracurriculars Activities Make a Difference appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Click here for MBA Admissions 101

Your hobby may be your ticket to acceptance

Don’t underestimate the value of extracurricular activities in your b-school application! Use the following Q&A to help you prioritize and then write about your extracurricular activities.

What are extracurricular activities?

An extracurricular activity is a non-academic, non-professional activity that you participate in. These activities include hobbies, sports, the arts, and volunteering or community service.

Why are extracurriculars important?

Extracurricular activities play a critical role in your MBA application. Here are five reasons why:

1. Extracurricular activities add color and texture to an otherwise one-dimensional application. They help the adcom get to know YOU – not just the you that works nine to five (or six to ten) crunching numbers at the desk, but the YOU that also has ten state-wide blue ribbons in figure skating or that has quilted the largest quilt east of the Mississippi with the help of your town’s local special ed school.

2. Extracurricular activities prove your commitment. You’ve taught piano (pro bono) to the same kid for eight years straight? You must be a committed, reliable, and dependable person. Admissions committees like that.

3. Extracurriculars demonstrate creativity and passion. Extracurricular or volunteer commitments don’t need to be typical soup kitchen or Big Brother/Big Sister experiences, although those are valuable too. Think beyond run-of-the-mill examples to other things you’ve done – like all those winter breaks you spent running a camp for your autistic baby brother and two other kids from the neighborhood, or that summer you traveled to India to help run a vaccination clinic. These examples don’t specifically relate to business, but creativity and passion can easily be seen in each experience. If you share your passions, you’ll inspire your readers!

4. Extracurricular activities allow you to demonstrate initiative, as well as leadership and organizational skills. Let’s look back at our examples from above and ask a few questions: What steps did you take to set up your backyard camp? Whose idea was it? What sorts of activities did you plan and execute with the kids? And about the clinic in India: What role did you play in running the vaccination clinic? Did you just sit around and do what you were told to do? Or did you take initiative to present your own organizational ideas? Did you fund raise? Get others to commit too? In both of these cases, it shouldn’t be hard to demonstrate that you are the type of thoughtful, inspirational leader who transforms an idea into reality.

5. Extracurricular activities can tip the scale in your favor when you’re up against an otherwise equally competitive candidate. Extracurricular activities and community service can make the difference between acceptance and rejection when adcoms are sizing up two applicants with similar competitiveness. A fundamental assumption of admission is that past behavior predicts future behavior. Admissions committees are proud of their schools and know that to thrive, these communities constantly need new, active, involved members. Furthermore, they want people who will also be involved as alumni and community leaders after business school. If two applicants have the same scores, equally persuasive essays, impressive letters of rec, and similar professional experience, AND if there’s only one more seat to be filled, then the adcom members will choose the applicant who has served her community or shown commitment, leadership, and all those other good things we’ve discussed above, through an extracurricular activity, over the guy who’s focused only on furthering his career.

What should you do if you don’t have long-term extracurricular or volunteer commitments?

This is a common question I’m asked, and a good one. If you don’t have much (or any) extracurriculars to write about, then it is better to start an activity, pick up a new hobby, or resume participation in a past activity or hobby just before applying to b-school so that you have something to write? Will the adcom view this as a shallow or phony move? Is it better to not mention any extracurriculars and hope that the adcoms just don’t notice, rather than highlight the fact that you just a few, or none at all, worth mentioning?

My Answer: You should start now! Here are four reasons why:

1. A little volunteering or a new extracurricular activity is better than no volunteering/extracurriculars at all. The impact you can make in even a short period of time can be great. Involvement in an extracurricular activity or in community service can dramatically affect you as a person, and therefore can significantly affect your MBA candidacy as well.

2. A little commitment is better than no commitment at all. Obviously a commitment that’s lasted only a couple of months will not be as effective as one that’s lasted years, but it’s still better than no commitment at all. Think of it this way: If you don’t show that you’ve been committed to a non-academic, non-professional activity, then the adcom may think that you’re incapable of doing so.

3. Even a little extracurricular activity will liven up a flat application. See #1 in the first list. You don’t want to come off as a workaholic who has no time or interest in anything non-work related. Demonstrate your humanity and liven up your application – a little could go a long way.

4. What if you’re waitlisted or you need to reapply? Obviously we hope for the best, but it doesn’t hurt to think ahead and make room for Plan B, which is: You may be waitlisted. You may need to reapply. If yes, then won’t you be glad that you started your extracurricular/volunteer experience as early as you did? What looked like a brief volunteer encounter during your first application effort now looks like an impressive long-term experience. By now your endeavor is more impressive and has had a greater impact – on you and on others. The same goes for people who plan on applying this year, start volunteering, and then change their minds to apply next year.

So, to sum up: If you’re not already involved in an extracurricular activity, take the time NOW to find an activity that you feel passionate about. Then, follow your passions and DO something.

MBA Admissions A-Z: 26 Great Tips - Download your free copy!
Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy
Related Resources:

Leadership in Admissions
How to Prove Character Traits in Your Application Essays
4 Ways to Show How You’ll Contribute in the Future

Tags:

The post Why Extracurriculars Activities Make a Difference appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/03/extracurriculars-activities-make-difference/feed/ 0
MBA 2016 – READY, SET, GO! http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/02/mba-2016-ready-set-go/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/02/mba-2016-ready-set-go/#respond Mon, 02 Mar 2015 16:48:14 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=29173 It’s not even spring yet. So why am I nagging you to get moving on your MBA application prep? Not just because those Round 1 deadlines creep up with wicked stealth and speed. But also because there is so much you can still do between now and then to improve your candidacy (sometimes a lot, […]

The post MBA 2016 – READY, SET, GO! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Download: 6 Steps for the 6 Months Before You Apply

Deadlines are sooner than you think. Are you prepared?

It’s not even spring yet. So why am I nagging you to get moving on your MBA application prep?

Not just because those Round 1 deadlines creep up with wicked stealth and speed. But also because there is so much you can still do between now and then to improve your candidacy (sometimes a lot, sometimes on the margins, but margins matter). Also, preparing now will enable you to apply to more programs earlier, and therefore to adjust strategy in Round 2 if necessary.

So, what should you be doing NOW?

First, two obvious things.

GMAT: I’ve seen too many people leave the GMAT till late summer or early fall, get a lower score than they expect, and have to recalculate their plans. If you don’t have a GMAT score yet, NOW is the time to prepare and take the GMAT, ideally by end of spring. Then, if your score isn’t realistic for your schools of choice, you have time to retake the test, reconsider your target schools, or both. And you will have it behind you when you focus on the applications.

SCHOOL RESEARCH: It’s best to visit schools when classes are in session. So NOW is the ideal time to research schools for a preliminary list. I developed an easy-to-use resource, Best MBA Programs, A Guide to Selecting the Right One, to walk you through this process. This effort will also get you thinking about your profile strategically.

Then there are the less obvious things.

ACADEMIC RECORD: Is your academic record a potential weakness? There is time (not much), NOW, to take a relevant course or two, complete it, and have an A or two to report to the adcom as evidence of your ability to excel academically.

RECOMMENDATIONS: Not sure whom to ask for recommendations? Sort it out NOW, while there’s time to weigh the pros and cons of various options, to possibly broach the issue (directly or indirectly) with people, and adapt as needed. You do know whom you’ll ask? NOW is time to enhance your positive visibility to them, so they can’t help but write a scintillating letter.

LEADERSHIP: You can improve – deepen, broaden, refine – your leadership NOW and every day before your application. Whether or not you have a formal leadership role, you can always find ways to exercise informal leadership. And you can’t have too much leadership in an MBA application. If there isn’t space to write about it in essays, portray it in your resume.

GOALS: Naturally, since you’re planning to apply for an MBA, you know what your goals are. But what are you going to say about them of interest? About your planned industry, company, function? Read. Books, journals, company reports, not just the WSJ. And do informational interviews (use your undergrad alumni network). An interview needn’t be longer than 10 minutes with two good questions to be illuminating! Interesting, informed perspective on your goals will make your essay jump out from the sea of merely competent essays. But do this research NOW, to digest and integrate it well.

RESUME: NOW is also the perfect time to prepare or adapt your resume for business school. You can get it at least 95% done, and adjust as needed for any new developments later. This way, if you have a chance to visit or school or meet with an adcom member earlier than you planned, you’re ready.

Six months and counting to round 1 deadlines…

Download your free copy of Navigating the MBA Maze!

Cindy Tokumitsu By , author and co-author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports, including Why MBA and Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted.com.

Related Resources:

MBA Action Plan: 6 Steps for the 6 Months Before You Apply
Best MBA Programs, A Guide to Selecting the Right One
5 Tips to Assess Your MBA Profile

Tags: ,

The post MBA 2016 – READY, SET, GO! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/02/mba-2016-ready-set-go/feed/ 0
3 Tips for Parents of Grad School Applicants http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/01/3-tips-parents-grad-school-applicants/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/01/3-tips-parents-grad-school-applicants/#respond Sun, 01 Mar 2015 17:22:41 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28344 I’ve been working in graduate admissions for almost 20 years so I have witnessed this trend firsthand: Parents are playing a much larger role in the application process these days than they used to. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing – parents can provide a lot of much-needed support (financial, practical, emotional) for their kids […]

The post 3 Tips for Parents of Grad School Applicants appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Download Get Your Game on Special Report

Make sure your child’s in the driver’s seat

I’ve been working in graduate admissions for almost 20 years so I have witnessed this trend firsthand: Parents are playing a much larger role in the application process these days than they used to.

This isn’t necessarily a bad thing – parents can provide a lot of much-needed support (financial, practical, emotional) for their kids during the admissions process; but I cringe when I see parents overstepping their bounds, attempting to control their children’s actions and outcomes.

How much involvement is TOO MUCH involvement for parents of applicants? Check out these 3 tips:

• Make Sure Your Child’s in the Driver’s Seat. – When you take the lead in the admissions process, you’re essentially telling your child: “I don’t think you have what it takes to manage this process yourself.” And what you’re telling the school is: “My kid isn’t competent or ambitious enough to apply to school himself.” You can help your child apply, surely, but make sure that’s what you’re doing – helping them, and not the other way around.

• Your Child’s Voice Should be the Sole Voice of this Operation. – All communication with the school should be between your child – not you, the parent – and the school. Likewise, the voice your child uses to write her application essays should be her voice – and not yours. And it should go without saying that this advice relates to interviews as well. Help, guide, coach, and edit, but please never speak for your child.

• Help Your Child Deal with Disappointment. – Be it a rejection or a poor score, a parent needs to understand the role they play here. First, your child is the one experiencing this distress, not you. By showing your disappointment, you will only make your child feel worse, not to mention potentially preventing your child from continuing to move forward. Instead, allow your child time to express disappointment, provide the appropriate amount of comfort (you know your child best), and then encourage your child to persevere.  Suggest that your applicant explore alternatives and examine the factors he or she can change to improve the outcome in the future. Play the role of the motivational coach; don’t play the blame game.

Not sure you can effectively guide your child through the grad school admissions process (in a balanced, non-pushy way of course)? Browse our catalog of services to access professional guidance today!

Get Your Game On: Free Special Report

Linda AbrahamBy Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

Related Resources:

5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid on Your Grad School Statement of Purpose
• The Biggest Application Essay Mistake
•  Admissions Tip: BE YOURSELF!

Tags: , , , , ,

The post 3 Tips for Parents of Grad School Applicants appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/01/3-tips-parents-grad-school-applicants/feed/ 0
IV With an Overrepresented Minority MIT Sloan Admit! http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/01/iv-overrepresented-minority-mit-sloan-admit/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/01/iv-overrepresented-minority-mit-sloan-admit/#respond Sun, 01 Mar 2015 17:02:31 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=29082 This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with MBA applicant bloggers, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at the MBA application process. And now…introducing our anonymous blogger, “John Thunder”… Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What is your […]

The post IV With an Overrepresented Minority MIT Sloan Admit! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Click here to download "MBA Admissions: A-Z"

This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with MBA applicant bloggers, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at the MBA application process. And now…introducing our anonymous blogger, “John Thunder”…

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What is your current job?

John: I’m from the midwest and went to an Ivy League to study economics and mathematics. I was a former investment banker and currently work in investment management.

Accepted: Congrats on your recent acceptance! Can you tell us where you applied and where you got accepted/rejected/waitlisted?

John: I got accepted at Sloan. Waitlisted at Wharton and Booth. Rejected at Kellogg/HBS/Stanford GSB.

Accepted: And if you get more acceptances from the waitlists, how will you decide where to go?

John: I’m fortunate to receive an acceptance to one of my preferred schools. If I get off the waitlist at other schools, maybe I will reconsider.

Accepted: Can you share some admissions tips as an “overrepresented minority”? How would you advise others who are trying to stand out from the crowd?

John: This is the tough question. If I had to re-do my 2-3 year plan for MBA, I would do 1 year of international development in the “motherland” and/or get involved with organizations in those countries. I did not do anything different to standout, except I demonstrated that sure I have similar stats and background to others but coworkers ranked me as the top analyst each year out of the whole class. Instead of thinking about other “Asians,” I saw my application holistically with the applicant group.

Accepted: Do you have any other admissions advice for our applicant readers? 

John: This is a stressful process. I took my GMAT in Fall 2013 to apply for Class of 2017. Get started early and have set goals. If you are targeting HBS/Stanford only, I recommend applying to only one of those round 1 and the other round 2 and go all-out to visit and hustle. I’ve seen success from those who did that.

Accepted: What is your post-MBA plan? 

John: Finance has lost its luster. Please hire me Google.

Accepted: Can you tell us about your blog? When and why did you start blogging? What have you gained from the experience? 

John: Kudos to the community created at GMATClub. I used it religiously to study for my GMATs. I just wanted to give back to that community. I was stressed out throughout the whole application process and it was helpful to see other applicants’ experiences. It’s important to pay-it-forward, and that’s what it’s about in business school.

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages.

You can read more about John Thunder’s b-school journey by checking out his blog, John Thunder MBA. Thank you for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

Download our free special report: Best MBA Programs
Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy
Related Resources:

Navigate the MBA Maze
GMAT 101
Waitlisted! What Now

Tags: , ,

The post IV With an Overrepresented Minority MIT Sloan Admit! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/03/01/iv-overrepresented-minority-mit-sloan-admit/feed/ 0
How to Get Accepted in 2016: FREE WEBINAR! http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/27/get-accepted-2016-free-webinar/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/27/get-accepted-2016-free-webinar/#respond Fri, 27 Feb 2015 17:25:10 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=29044 That’s right – we’re already talking about 2016 MBA applications! You may feel like you’ve got loads of time, but believe me…you’ve got loads to do!  We’d like to help you start out on the right foot by inviting you to our upcoming live webinar, Get Accepted in 2016: 7 Steps to a Strong MBA […]

The post How to Get Accepted in 2016: FREE WEBINAR! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
That’s right – we’re already talking about 2016 MBA applications! You may feel like you’ve got loads of time, but believe me…you’ve got loads to do! 

Get_Accepted_FEB2015

We’d like to help you start out on the right foot by inviting you to our upcoming live webinar, Get Accepted in 2016: 7 Steps to a Strong MBA Application, in which Linda Abraham, Accepetd.com CEO & Founder, will outline the steps you can take NOW to increase your chances of a successful application next year.

Let me repeat this point: It’s NOT TOO EARLY to get started!

Remember, the early bird gets the worm – those who are prepared to hit the ground running once those apps are released are the ones who will stand a better shot at getting accepted.

Get Accepted in 2016_Register

WEBINAR DETAILS:

Date: Wednesday, March 11, 2015

Time: 10:00 AM PT / 1:00 PM ET

(Spaces tend to fill up quickly, so grab your spot now!)

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Tags:

The post How to Get Accepted in 2016: FREE WEBINAR! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/27/get-accepted-2016-free-webinar/feed/ 0
4 Qualities Top MBA Programs Seek http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/26/4-qualities-top-mba-programs-seek/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/26/4-qualities-top-mba-programs-seek/#respond Thu, 26 Feb 2015 17:08:59 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28050 There are four main qualities that top b-schools look for when reviewing MBA applications. If you’re aiming for the top 10, then you’ll want to make sure not only that you possess these qualities, but that you’ve highlighted them in your application. • Problem Solving Skills – This is probably the most important quality, at least initially. Schools […]

The post 4 Qualities Top MBA Programs Seek appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Don't think your application is good enough?  We can help!

Does your application highlight the qualities that top b-schools are looking for?

There are four main qualities that top b-schools look for when reviewing MBA applications. If you’re aiming for the top 10, then you’ll want to make sure not only that you possess these qualities, but that you’ve highlighted them in your application.

 Problem Solving Skills – This is probably the most important quality, at least initially. Schools want the types of students that exclusive consulting firms like McKinsey would take interest in, and that type of student is an expert problem solver. Everyone working in firms like McKinsey needs to be adept at solving a range of “problems” – top schools recognize this and seek out students who would eventually be an excellent fit at these top firms.

• Drive/Ambition – Applicants must show evidence of longstanding drive for success in their applications, resumes, and interviews. Did you push yourself to succeed inside and outside the classroom in college? Do you have an ambitious vision for your career path? B-schools want students who will succeed in the business world once they graduate – if you prove that you have drive/ambition, then you’ll stand out as someone who they want in their classrooms, and beyond.

• Interpersonal Impact – “Brains on a stick” just won’t cut it at business school and then later on in the business world. You also need to be dynamic and likable. You need to be able to work well on a team and gain the respect of your teammates, not to mention later on, your employers and employees. You can show the adcoms your interpersonal impact by highlighting your involvement in teams at work as well as in clubs, sports, or other socially driven activities. Additionally, choose recommenders who know you well and who will attest to this attribute. 

• Leadership/Management Capabilities – Demonstrating general interpersonal impact isn’t enough: top candidates need to show strong evidence of leadership experience and potential. Did you take on leadership positions in clubs, sports teams, and service organizations? You need to express that you are the type of person who will earn the respect of those around you so that they’ll be eager to follow your lead. In your application, resume, and interview, come up with concrete examples that show how you wielded authority with skill and integrity.

Do you need help highlighting these essential qualities in your MBA application? We’re here to help! Contact us so we can provide the one-on-one counseling you need to put together the highest-impact b-school application.
The Quick Guide to Admissions Resumes: Get your free copy!Accepted.com: The Premier Admissions Consultancy

Related Resources:

5 Ways to Make B-Schools love you – free webinar
• Leadership in Admissions
How to Prove Character Traits in Essays

Tags:

The post 4 Qualities Top MBA Programs Seek appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/26/4-qualities-top-mba-programs-seek/feed/ 0
An HBS Entrepreneur Promoting Career Flexibility http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/25/hbs-entrepreneur-promoting-career-flexibility/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/25/hbs-entrepreneur-promoting-career-flexibility/#respond Wed, 25 Feb 2015 17:31:10 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=29115 Check out our interview with HBS alum and entrepreneur Allison O'Kelly exploring the Flex Movement, the value of b-school for entrepreneurs, HBS, and more.

The post An HBS Entrepreneur Promoting Career Flexibility appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Click here to listen to our conversation with Allison O'KellyPeople looking for traditional 9 to 5 desk jobs almost seem to be the exception in 2015. HBS grad and entrepreneur Allison O’Kelly is all for the change.

Want to know more? Listen to the full recording of our talk with Allison, Founder/CEO of Mom Corps and champion of the Flexibility Movement.

00:01:31 – Introducing Allison O’Kelly and Mom Corps.

00:04:13 – The value of the “traditional route” of spending a few years in the workforce before launching a startup.

00:05:41 – How an I-don’t-know-what-I-want-to-do-with-my-life moment shaped Allison’s future.

00:07:27 – Pros and cons of “staffing up” your small business.

00:10:37 – How helpful is b-school for an entrepreneur?

00:16:10 – What people simply get wrong about Harvard Business School.

00:17:46 –The “flexibility movement” – beneficial for employers and employees.

00:20:52 – Want to join the flex movement? Here’s what you need to do.

00:24:23 – Thoughts on enhancing your profile for HBS admissions.

00:26:56 – Advice for future entrepreneurs. (And a word to those who “don’t have it in their blood.”)

00:29:14 – What the future holds for Mom Corps.

Listen to the full conversation to learn more!*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Related Links:

Mom Corps

Related Shows:

• Entrepreneurship at Stanford GSB: Carlypso Drives Down the Startup Street
• Making International Student Loans a Prime Investment
• Entrepreneurship at UCLA Anderson
Valentine’s Day, Economics, and Stanford GSB
• MBAs Across America: Entrepreneurs with a Heart
• Life as an HBS MBA Student
MBA Search: Matchmaking for MBAs and Businesses

Leave a Review for Admissions Straight Talk:

Check Out Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes! Check Out Admissions Straight Talk in Stitcher!

Check out our free webinar: Get Accepted to Harvard Business School!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Tags: , , , , , , ,

The post An HBS Entrepreneur Promoting Career Flexibility appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/25/hbs-entrepreneur-promoting-career-flexibility/feed/ 0
Putting Your GMAT Game Plan in Action http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/24/putting-gmat-game-plan-action/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/24/putting-gmat-game-plan-action/#respond Tue, 24 Feb 2015 16:50:24 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28718 Are you ready to nail the GMAT? You will be once you finish watching the recording of last week’s webinar, Your 3-Part Game Plan to Dominate the GMAT. Then you can put your prep plan into action. View Your 3-Part Game Plan to Dominate the GMAT for actionable, confidence-boosting GMAT strategies that will provide you […]

The post Putting Your GMAT Game Plan in Action appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Are you ready to nail the GMAT?

You will be once you finish watching the recording of last week’s webinar, Your 3-Part Game Plan to Dominate the GMAT. Then you can put your prep plan into action.

Click here to view the webinar!

View Your 3-Part Game Plan to Dominate the GMAT for actionable, confidence-boosting GMAT strategies that will provide you with an outstanding GMAT game plan!

Click here to watch the recording!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Tags: , ,

The post Putting Your GMAT Game Plan in Action appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/24/putting-gmat-game-plan-action/feed/ 0
How to Ace Your Team Based Interview [4 Tips for the Big Day] http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/22/tbd-interview-day-tips/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/22/tbd-interview-day-tips/#respond Sun, 22 Feb 2015 17:09:40 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28974 Last week we shared our tips for preparing for Team Based Interviews. Today we’re going to move forward and offer 4 tips for acing the interview itself: 1. Don’t be confrontational. This is not a debate in which you’re trying to score points. It’s not Crossfire. It’s not a verbal battle. It’s a simulation of what […]

The post How to Ace Your Team Based Interview [4 Tips for the Big Day] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Learn more about Team Based Interviews!

The key to a good TBD is balancing what to say, how much to say and when to say it.

Last week we shared our tips for preparing for Team Based Interviews. Today we’re going to move forward and offer 4 tips for acing the interview itself:

1. Don’t be confrontational. This is not a debate in which you’re trying to score points. It’s not Crossfire. It’s not a verbal battle. It’s a simulation of what you may encounter in a b-school classroom or group project, and so it’s that vibe and model that you’ll want to emulate. Interviewees should build on one another’s points, contributing to the conversation; they shouldn’t cut each other down with rude or judgmental remarks. Of course you’re allowed to disagree, and you should be persuasive and enthusiastic about your positions, but do so with respect and grace.

2. Think quality, not quantity. Participants are judged on the quality – and not the quantity – of their comments. You should add to the conversation, but certainly not dominate it. Refrain from speaking for the sake of being heard. Thoughtful and succinct comments are appreciated; chatter is not.

Don’t let this tip backfire on you! Qualitative comments are a must, so don’t hold back from speaking because you’re worried that your contributions won’t hit the mark. You need to find a balance – don’t blab on incessantly, but don’t be too shy to open your mouth either. You’re there to contribute; make sure you do!

3. Keep it real. While many of the topics or prompts given may lead you to a world of theoretical thought, you need to work to push through the theory to arrive at concrete points that are supported with evidence from your own firsthand experiences. Business schools are interested in students who have paid attention to their life stories and who are able to draw deep understanding and practical results from them.

4. Keep notes to a minimum. Just as a treatise of pre-interview notes will distract you from the interview action (as we mentioned in last week’s article), so will scribbling notes furiously during the interview. You definitely want to have a pen and clipboard or a tablet available if you need to quickly jot something down, but remember – this is a group discussion and you want to keep the flow of the conversation natural. Taking notes and then reading your monologue will certainly disrupt that flow.

Good luck!

Have a TBD Coming Up? Practice with the pros before your big day! CLICK HERE TO REGISTER FOR A MOCK WHARTON TBD!
Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy
Related Resources:

• Get Ready, Get Set, and ACE that Team Interview Challenge!
• Four Tips for the Wharton Interview
Wharton B-Scool Zone

Tags: , , , ,

The post How to Ace Your Team Based Interview [4 Tips for the Big Day] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/22/tbd-interview-day-tips/feed/ 0
4 Tips for Team Interviews http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/20/4-tips-team-interviews/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/20/4-tips-team-interviews/#respond Fri, 20 Feb 2015 15:19:00 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28887 Since so much of b-school life and learning includes team discussions, the adcom needed a tool for assessing how applicants will fit in the team-based discussion culture of their programs. Thus, the Team-Based Discussion (TBD) was born. In team-based interviews, applicants need to use a different set of skills than they use during traditional, individual interviews. […]

The post 4 Tips for Team Interviews appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Click here for more TBD tips

Win an Academy Award for your interview performance

Since so much of b-school life and learning includes team discussions, the adcom needed a tool for assessing how applicants will fit in the team-based discussion culture of their programs. Thus, the Team-Based Discussion (TBD) was born.

In team-based interviews, applicants need to use a different set of skills than they use during traditional, individual interviews. Personal interviews require one-on-one presentation, interpersonal skills, and self-awareness, while team interviews require critical thinking, listening, persuasion, and leadership.

Here are four to-do’s to help you win an Academy Award for your performance in an interview:

1. Review school material. This includes the specific materials that the school provides prior to the interview, as well as all other material about the program. As with an individual interview, you need to know the school well – its mission, curriculum, teaching style, etc. Review the school’s website and speak with current students and recent grads so you get a clear picture of what it’s like to be a student at B-School X.

2. Read Case in Point. This is an excellent book by Marc Consentino that will teach you how to state your position during team-based interviews, and then clearly and succinctly support your position.

3. Role-play. Use family, friends, colleagues, and consultants at Accepted.com to role-play with you. The more in-the-know your mock interviewer and peers are, the better idea you’ll get of how the interview will run on the big day.

4. Take notes. You are allowed to bring notes to the interview, and while you don’t want to read off a piece of paper or even refer to it frequently, it may help you feel more confident knowing that some of your key points are written down in case you need them. You never know how performance anxiety may set in, and if your brain freezes and you completely forget your plan, you’ll be glad you jotted some ideas down beforehand.

TIP: Don’t bring a 400-page stack of papers! You don’t want to spend the whole time shuffling through your notes, making noise and ignoring your co-interviewees while they speak. Paperless notes on a tablet may reduce the shuffle, but they won’t reduce the distraction – keep paperless notes to a minimum as well.

Coming up next: 4 Tips for the Interview Itself  

Have a TBD Coming Up? Practice with the pros before your big day! CLICK HERE TO REGISTER FOR A MOCK WHARTON TBD!
Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy
Related Resources:

How to Ace Your MBA Interviews
7 Tips for MBA Interview Prep
The 10 Commandments of MBA Interviews

Tags: , , , ,

The post 4 Tips for Team Interviews appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/20/4-tips-team-interviews/feed/ 0
London Business School Master In Finance 2015 Essay Tips http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/20/london-business-school-master-finance-2015-essay-tips/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/20/london-business-school-master-finance-2015-essay-tips/#respond Fri, 20 Feb 2015 15:14:44 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=29001 The relatively short LBS MFin essay questions, together, convey the adcom’s interest in both who you are and how you envision and plan your career.  Given that your classmates will be experienced finance professionals (the average work experience is six years), it’s important to deliver throughout and “across” the essays mature, informed insights and perspectives […]

The post London Business School Master In Finance 2015 Essay Tips appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Click here for more information on LBSThe relatively short LBS MFin essay questions, together, convey the adcom’s interest in both who you are and how you envision and plan your career.  Given that your classmates will be experienced finance professionals (the average work experience is six years), it’s important to deliver throughout and “across” the essays mature, informed insights and perspectives derived from your experience in your particular area of finance.

The essay questions are: 

1. What is it about Finance that interests and inspires you? (300 word limit) 

Be yourself.  No need to wear a halo; while some people are inspired by the belief that finance can change the world for the better, others feel equally inspired by the high stakes and fast pace, or a technical or intellectual dimension.  

This essay work best as a story – simply tell the story of how you “fell in love” with finance (whether industry or function or both—what finance means and looks like to you).  This approach will allow the reader to see through your eyes what interests and inspires you about the field.  And it will inherently lead you to provide the detail and anecdote to make the essay memorable and vivid.

2. What role do you see yourself in immediately after the programme? How will the MiF build on your current skills and experience to help you achieve this? In what geographical region do you see yourself working in immediately after the programme? If you are not successful in your first choice of role, is there another role you would consider? (500 word limit) 

This is really four questions. You needn’t answer them in order, and I suggest combining the “geographical region” answer with the answer to the first question about where you see yourself immediately post-program.  That discussion should include details such as company or type of company, specific positions and titles, and what you want to achieve in that role and why – your “vision” for this step in your career. Should you mention long-term goals?  Sure, if you wish, but briefly.  Sometimes they are important for understanding your short-term goals.  The immediate goal should be consistent with the message in the first essay, and should be a realistic target that’s also appropriately ambitious.

The final question asks for your “Plan B.” In describing it, give a brief rationale as well for why it’s a suitable and appealing path.

3. What value will you add to London Business School? (200 word limit)

Feel free to discuss relevant factors beyond finance here (note the question asks not what you’ll bring to the MFin program, but to London Business School).  Some possible topic areas include unusual work experience or industry/functional exposure, personal interests (though please don’t say traveling), formative academic or social experiences, distinctive or unusual aspects of your background, etc. Think about what will round out your profile in an appealing and relevant way to prospective classmates.  With only 200 words, don’t discuss more than 3 things; you’ll still need example and detail to make the topics credible and interesting.   

Deadlines:
Want more info on LBS? Click here

If you would like professional guidance with your LBS MFin application, please consider Accepted’s essay editing and admissions consulting or our Masters in Finance Application Package.

Click here for Must-Know info & Advice for Students Abroad

Cindy Tokumitsu By , author and co-author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports, including Why MBA and Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted.com.

Related Resources:

MBA in Sight: Focus on Finance
Master in Finance: What You Need to Know
• Princeton University Master in Finance: Is It Right for You, and Are You Right for Princeton?

Tags: , ,

The post London Business School Master In Finance 2015 Essay Tips appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/20/london-business-school-master-finance-2015-essay-tips/feed/ 0
Entrepreneurship at UCLA Anderson http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/18/entrepreneurship-ucla-anderson/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/18/entrepreneurship-ucla-anderson/#respond Wed, 18 Feb 2015 17:12:30 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28995 Well before “entrepreneurship” was a household word, UCLA Anderson was one of the first b-schools to teach it. Decades later, they are still going strong. Listen to the full recording of our podcast interview with Elaine Hagan, Executive Director of the Price Center at UCLA Anderson, and Angela Klein, ‎Program Manager at Anderson, for the […]

The post Entrepreneurship at UCLA Anderson appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Listen to our complete interview with Elaine Hagan and Angela Klein!Well before “entrepreneurship” was a household word, UCLA Anderson was one of the first b-schools to teach it. Decades later, they are still going strong.

Listen to the full recording of our podcast interview with Elaine Hagan, Executive Director of the Price Center at UCLA Anderson, and Angela Klein, ‎Program Manager at Anderson, for the scoop on entrepreneurship at UCLA.

00:01:41 – Featured Applicant Question: Should I take seriously an email from an admissions committee encouraging me to apply and even offering help?

00:05:48 – Introducing Elaine Hagan and Angela Klein.

00:07:04 – What the Price Center does for ULCA Anderson students.

00:10:10 – Changes to teaching entrepreneurship over the past 10 years.

00:11:46 – Can the “the mindset of an entrepreneur” be taught?

00:15:30 – Anderson’s approach to teaching entrepreneurship.

00:20:35 – The Knapp Venture Competition.

00:25:40 – Benefits of working for an established company first

00:28:35 – Ingredients of a successful entrepreneur.

00:30:38 – The difference between guy and gal entrepreneurs (and a word about international differences, too).

00:33:58 – What future entrepreneurs should do before arriving on campus.

00:36:46 – Will writing, “I want to study entrepreneurship” on your application convince the adcom? (And what Anderson hates more than anything else.)

Listen to the full conversation to learn more!*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Related Links:

UCLA Anderson Price Center 
UCLA Anderson 2015 MBA Essay Tips
• “Start-up Costs for MBA Graduates Pay Off” from the Financial Times

Related Shows:

• MBAs Across America: The Coolest HBS Internship
• Life as an HBS MBA
• SoFi: Alumni Funded Student Loans
• CommonBond’s Story: A Revolution in Student Loans
• Entrepreneurship at Stanford GSB: Carlypso Drives Down the Startup St.
• Making International Student Loans a Prime Investment

Leave a Review for Admissions Straight Talk:

Check Out Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes! Check Out Admissions Straight Talk in Stitcher!

Best MBA program CTA

Tags: , , , ,

The post Entrepreneurship at UCLA Anderson appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/18/entrepreneurship-ucla-anderson/feed/ 0
IE MBA 2015 Essay Tips and Deadlines http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/18/ie-essay-tips-deadlines/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/18/ie-essay-tips-deadlines/#respond Wed, 18 Feb 2015 14:45:56 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28981 IE is a top-ranked international MBA program in Madrid, Spain. The Financial Times ranks the program 12th in the world and Bloomberg Business Week ranks it 2nd among non-US programs. Graduates enjoy job placement around the world – with the help of IE’s 50,000 global alumni and 27 representative offices building relationships with companies on […]

The post IE MBA 2015 Essay Tips and Deadlines appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Learn more about IE Business School here!IE is a top-ranked international MBA program in Madrid, Spain. The Financial Times ranks the program 12th in the world and Bloomberg Business Week ranks it 2nd among non-US programs. Graduates enjoy job placement around the world – with the help of IE’s 50,000 global alumni and 27 representative offices building relationships with companies on every continent: 35% of the class accepted positions in Europe, 28% in Latin America, 12% in Asia, 12% in North America, and 8% in the Middle East and North Africa after graduation. Graduates enter diverse industries as well: the four largest fields are consulting (19% of graduates), financial services (19% of graduates), consumer products (14% of graduates), and technology (13% of graduates).

IE has three intakes (start dates) each year, so it truly has a rolling application review calendar. At any time of year, you can apply to IE! When applying, applicants must choose which session they are applying to (April, September, or January) and are accepted for the program date they chose AND the one thereafter, a big advantage in case of an unexpected hurdle in the way of attendance. (I’ve had many clients who have had to reapply after receiving acceptances to other programs when unexpected professional or personal changes have occurred because in most cases, top MBA programs will not offer deferred admissions.)

IE’s application offers a lot of choice, allowing applicants to shine the spotlight on what makes them special in truly unique ways. For example, there are 12 prompts, and applicants must respond to any three of them; however, only one of the applicant’s three responses must be answered with an essay of 400-600 words. The other two responses may be either essays OR photographs, drawings, videos, animations, or presentations a la Prezi or Slideshare hosted online.

Here are the 12 prompts to choose from, with my guidance in blue beneath each:

1. If you had the opportunity, what actions would you demand of the United Nations Secretary General and why?

IE’s International MBA program aims to develop leaders who understand other perspectives and challenge the status quo. This is a great question to answer if you have been politically active or involved in a global issue that is important to you since it will provide you a platform to discuss the issue, the efforts that you have made to shape it, and how the UN could play a role in addressing it further.

2. Describe the situation with the greatest ethical complexity that you have faced in your professional or academic life, and how your input helped resolve it.

I like the phrasing of this question because it is clear where other programs sometimes obfuscate: ethical complexity means that it was not simple to determine the right thing to do; there was no one ideal path to follow. This is your chance to demonstrate the level of decision-making you have enjoyed in your career and how you have creatively navigated complicated ethical waters.

3. Describe a time when you took a great risk. What was the outcome?

IE places a great emphasis on entrepreneurship and is seeking risk takers who think unconventionally: people who are willing to leave a steady, low return behind to instead pursue an uncertain but potentially high reward. A good essay or presentation here will show the admissions office your analysis of the potential gain and what actions you took to improve your chances of success.

4. Cite at least one example of when your leadership had an impact on or changed a certain situation, and justify how an IE Master’s Degree program would help you to strengthen or improve this competence.

Leadership can turn situations around. A good answer to this question will explain or show what the situation was and why you felt it needed to be changed. Then, it will demonstrate your leadership – how you wooed, cajoled, and earned the support of others above, parallel, and below you in the organization to accept your ideas and how those ideas improved the situation. Strong essays will end with insight into IE’s Behavioral Fitness leadership training program and the areas in which IE will help you further improve your leadership skills.

5. Describe the most outstanding leader you have worked with. Indicate some aspects of the way you work that are similar to the way this leader works and others that are different.

A description of a role model’s leadership requires some insight into how he or she leads, makes use of his/her talents to gather internal and external support to make an impact. If you have enjoyed a front row seat to excellent management, then this essay will allow you to highlight what you’ve learned and how you’ve borrowed from that example in your own leadership experiences.

6. You have just participated in an important meeting with your superior. How will you ensure that every part of the instructions you received will properly reach all subordinates, suppliers and clients, located in different parts of the world?

IE’s International MBA program is comprised of students from 70 countries and myriad industries. The answer to this question is not just about an email that you cc to everyone , but rather must demonstrate that you understand the challenge and opportunity of connecting with global teams. Good answers to this prompt will not remain in the theoretical but will instead draw upon similar global experiences from the applicant’s past to prove their international leadership ability and cultural understanding.  

7. Do you think that the lifestyle of the inhabitants of your town or city reflects behavior that is in line with the concept of sustainable development? In your opinion, what should be improved?

If you have been involved in municipal or local community service, this is the ideal essay to shine the spotlight on the issues in its sustainable development that matter to you most. IE seeks strong critical thinking skills in its students: the ability to assess strengths and weaknesses in the status quo, so good responses to this prompt will make use of that ability to discuss the ways in which denizens are living sustainably (ethically, responsibly, amid diversity, and with consideration to the environment) and could improve in doing so.  

8. What do you believe are the greatest challenges facing the sector or industry you would like to specialize in at IE? What role do you hope to be able to play in this sector or industry in the medium term?

This essay or presentation offers you the opportunity to discuss the exciting advancements and challenging obstacles that lie on the horizon for your target industry. Good answers to this question will show your excitement for your chosen industry and your readiness for it.

9. Show us an activity you enjoy doing. Tell us how you think it contributes to your personal and professional development.

Oh well, they couldn’t all be phrased in interesting ways to make the applicant think, could they? This is an opportunity to share some of your experiences from outside of work and how they have helped you grow in the qualities and skills that IE is seeking: risk taking, innovation, cultural awareness, and leadership are among the most important.  

10. How do you imagine social interaction within 10 years, taking into consideration the impact of technology on human relations?

Here’s an opportunity to think creatively and use a bit of a crystal ball to predict how communication and interaction will change by the year 2025. If you consider yourself particularly creative or prescient, this essay will offer you a perfect canvas to paint your prediction for the not-so-distant future.

11. If all of the world’s cultural heritage (sports, music, fashion, architecture, literature, painting, etc..) was contained in a time capsule, what would you include to demonstrate the legacy of your country?

IE’s student body is diverse for a reason: IE aims to expose its students to the sundry cultural mindsets around the world. This prompt offers you the opportunity to demonstrate how you will contribute to that discussion. What unique elements of your country’s culture do you feel embody its nature and uniqueness? Personal essays that inspire an emotional or visceral connection to that culture in the reader will be the most memorable.

12. How do you envision the city of the future?

Like option 10 above, this question allows you to share your vision of the future, albeit not limited to just a small 10-year jump through time. What changes do you anticipate in transportation, energy, industry, safety needs, education, population and/or family structure and how will they affect the structure and motion of future cities?

If you would like professional guidance with your IE IMBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and consulting or our application package which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the IE IMBA application.

Jennifer Bloom By Jennifer Bloom who has been helping applicants to the top MBA programs draft their resumes, application forms, letters of recommendation, and essays for 15 years. She is happy to serve as your personal coach and hand-holder throughout the entire process. There’s no time like the present to begin!

Related Resources:

Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One
• An IE Grad Reflects on Spain, School, and Career Searching
School-Specific MBA Application Essay Tips

Tags: , , ,

The post IE MBA 2015 Essay Tips and Deadlines appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/18/ie-essay-tips-deadlines/feed/ 0
AIGAC’s 2015 MBA Applicant Survey [You Can Win $500!] http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/17/aigacs-2015-mba-applicant-survey-can-win-500/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/17/aigacs-2015-mba-applicant-survey-can-win-500/#respond Tue, 17 Feb 2015 21:04:22 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28777 As Association of International Graduate Admissions Consultants (AIGAC) members, we are conducting a survey to help us better understand our readers’ goals and needs. We’d like to invite all of our MBA readers to share their school selection priorities and views on the MBA application process. Take the MBA Search Survey, and win $500 and […]

The post AIGAC’s 2015 MBA Applicant Survey [You Can Win $500!] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Click here to take the survey!As Association of International Graduate Admissions Consultants (AIGAC) members, we are conducting a survey to help us better understand our readers’ goals and needs.

We’d like to invite all of our MBA readers to share their school selection priorities and views on the MBA application process.

Take the MBA Search Survey, and win $500 and our sincere gratitude! The anonymous data will be shared with admissions officers from top programs. Make your voice heard!

The survey should take no more than 10 minutes to complete. Everyone completing the survey will be entered to win $500 cash (contact email will be used for prize purposes only). We’ll also be sharing the results of the survey this spring to help candidates better understand the nature of today’s applicant pool.

Click here to take our MBA prospect survey.

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Tags: ,

The post AIGAC’s 2015 MBA Applicant Survey [You Can Win $500!] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/17/aigacs-2015-mba-applicant-survey-can-win-500/feed/ 0
LBS Executive MBA 2015 Essay Tips http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/16/lbs-executive-mba-2015-essay-tips/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/16/lbs-executive-mba-2015-essay-tips/#respond Mon, 16 Feb 2015 14:55:46 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28904 In the LBS EMBA website landing page, a short introduction to the program includes the words “transform,” “transition,” and “catalyst.”  Also, “accelerate” and “propel.”  This is a clear message from the adcom: the program goes beyond conveying necessary skills for senior managers; it is for people who have a dynamic sense of their future and […]

The post LBS Executive MBA 2015 Essay Tips appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Click here to learn more about LBSIn the LBS EMBA website landing page, a short introduction to the program includes the words “transform,” “transition,” and “catalyst.”  Also, “accelerate” and “propel.”  This is a clear message from the adcom: the program goes beyond conveying necessary skills for senior managers; it is for people who have a dynamic sense of their future and a willingness to change and grow, as well as to study and learn.  Your essays should mirror and convey this dynamic sense, this energy, this vigor.

Question 1: How has the scope of your management experience affected your career objectives? (500 word max)

This is a goals question, albeit rather indirect.  And the question itself reflects the dynamic perspective: rather than “what” your career goals are, it asks you to present them as a part of an ongoing process.  

It’s an essay for which the most work might come before you write it – in the preliminary thinking process.  Make it an exercise: FIRST, define your career objectives (short and longer term).  SECOND, identify what factors influenced the development of those objectives.  THIRD, of those factors, single out those related (directly and/or indirectly) to your management experience.  Now, you’ve got the raw material for your essay.

In the actual essay, you could start with career objectives and work back to portray the related management experience – or vice versa.  Either way, be specific in all aspects – make your goals concrete, and use anecdote and detail in describing the influential management experience.

Question 2: What was your response to a piece of feedback that you have received regarding an area of weakness?  (500 words max)

The adcom wants to see how frankly you portray the feedback and your own shortcoming, and how insightfully you contextualize your experience.  Secondarily, it’s about change –did you grow and change as a result of the feedback?

This essay will be most compelling and engaging if written as a story.  Start right in with the story’s setting – where, who, when (ideally make it a fairly recent experience, and one that holds some meaningful stakes).  Then progress through the story, highlighting not just what you and the other party said and did, but also your thinking as the story progresses.  Finally, give a short example of how you have applied this feedback (or your learning from this feedback experience) subsequently – in other words, how you grew.

Question 3 (500 words max):  Please choose ONE essay from the following two options:

If you could choose any three people who have ever lived to join you for dinner, who would you invite and why?

OR

If you were on the cover of any publication in 10 years, what would the headline and the content of the article be?

If the first two questions are rooted in real-world, concrete experience, this question urges you to “play” a little and use your imagination, wit, creativity, and possibly broader passions in answering.

Which should you answer?  Both are equally good; it depends on which serves your needs and interest best.

There are various viable and effective approaches to this essay. One is “gut instinct” and personal appeal.  I.e., if one of these questions strikes a chord with you, engages you, and you have an idea that you like, probably it will be an effective essay.   Go with it!  BUT, do apply some objective, focused analysis as well.  Ensure that your content truly illuminates you in some new and fresh way relevant to the application, and do use detail and example to make your essay credible and vivid.  

Another approach is strategic.  If your imagination isn’t tickled by these questions, instead analyze and plan.  What relevant and interesting aspects of your profile aren’t yet portrayed (or portrayed adequately) in the application?  Identify one or two such points, and work back from that to find suitable topics for one of the two questions.  BUT: don’t be too heavy handed with the essay, which wouldn’t align with the question’s tone.

Random pitfalls:

• If you choose the first question, please don’t use very obvious or overly angelic people (I’ve seen this essay answered with Gandhi and Mother Teresa more often than I can believe over 15 years.)  Rather, discuss people who show your creative thinking and/or are personally meaning to you.

• If you choose the second question, don’t turn the essay into a second goals essay.  Ensure that it extends the portrayal of you in some way.

 Deadlines:

For September 2015 and January 2016 start:  Applications are reviewed on a rolling basis within 2 weeks of receipt.  A final decision will come 6 to 8 weeks after submission.

Get clear, practical guidelines for answering the MBA goals essay question. Click here to download our free report.

Cindy Tokumitsu By , co-author of The EMBA Edge, and author of the free special report, Ace the EMBA. Cindy has helped MBA applicants get accepted to top EMBA programs around the world. She is delighted to help you too!

Related Resources:

Ace the EMBA
• School-Specific EMBA Application Essay Tips
• The GMAT and EMBA Programs

Tags: , , , ,

The post LBS Executive MBA 2015 Essay Tips appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/16/lbs-executive-mba-2015-essay-tips/feed/ 0
An HBS Reapplicant’s Success Story http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/15/hbs-reapplicants-success-story/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/15/hbs-reapplicants-success-story/#comments Sun, 15 Feb 2015 17:09:18 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28862 This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Prerit Jain, a future MBA student at Harvard Business School. Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study […]

The post An HBS Reapplicant’s Success Story appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Read more MBA student interviews here!This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Prerit Jain, a future MBA student at Harvard Business School.

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What is your current job?

Prerit: My parents moved to New Delhi when I was less than a year old. This is where I grew up, went to school, college and have worked. In fact, it’s the only city I have ever lived in. (Well, you have to discount living out of a suitcase as a management consultant; more on that later.)

I went to the Indian Institute of Technology Delhi to study mechanical engineering, and did quite well academically, graduating at the top of my class.

Hoping to get diverse experiences, early in my career, I chose to start my career in consulting. Booz & Company had just opened its office in India, and seemed like an exciting opportunity. I worked there for more than three and a half years, before moving to my current role in early-stage venture capital with the First Light Accelerator Fund. I have been in my new role for only about a year now.

Accepted: Can you tell us about your application/reapplication experience? Where did you apply the first time around? What was the outcome? Where did you apply the second time?

Prerit: I submitted my first set of applications in Sept.-Oct. ’13 (R1 for the class matriculating in fall ‘14). I had worked at Booz for about three years, had been promoted twice, had a clear idea about my long-term goals and how an MBA would help. I was sure that I needed the MBA and the time was right. I applied to four schools: HBS, Wharton, Booth and Kellogg. I was interviewed by all four schools and in my view they all went well. I felt confident of getting admitted to more than one school. However, when the decisions came out, HBS put me on a waitlist and the other three said “thanks but no thanks.” I thought the world had come to an end and spent the next 2 weeks sulking!

Thankfully, I came out of that feeling in a couple of weeks, and began looking ahead. I decided to reapply. However, I realized that my learning curve at Booz had plateaued, and I needed to pursue something else. I was lucky to quickly find an exciting new opportunity (in venture capital), and by February, I had kick-started my new role.

Six months later, I reapplied in Sep ‘14 (R1 for the class matriculating in fall ‘15) to three schools: HBS, Booth, and Columbia. I was interviewed at all three schools, and finally received admits from HBS and Booth. I will be heading to Boston in the fall!

Accepted: What do you think went wrong the first time and what did you do when you reapplied to improve your candidacy?

Prerit: We can only speculate here! When I applied for the first time, I had only worked in one over-represented industry – consulting. Moreover, in hindsight, I perhaps did not practice my interviewing as much.

When I reapplied, I had gained some diverse work experience, and had some more interesting stories to tell. Also, I put in hours of practice before the interviews. I got several of my friends to interview me and I video recorded myself to observe softer elements such as body language and posture.

Accepted: Can you share some tips about applying to b-school as an over-represented minority? 

Prerit: Being an Indian-male-engineer-consultant, I knew I was indeed in a fiercely competitive pool. I knew I needed to show that I am both competent and interesting. I looked through the different parts of the application – the resume, application, essays etc. – and made choices about how I would use each of them.

Hard facts and stats went into the CV and the application form. The more differentiated and interesting personal qualities and experiences went into the essays.

Accepted: I see you got a 760 on your GMAT – amazing! What are your top 3 GMAT tips?

Prerit:

• A few weeks of dedicated preparation go farther than months of insincere efforts

• Practice those 4-hour full-tests. The GMAT is also a test of stamina.

• Right from day 1 of your preparation, get used to working under time constraint. Never attempt a GMAT question without having a timer in front of you.

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages. For specific advice on how to create the best application for Harvard see:

You can read more about Prerit’s journey by following him on Twitter at @preritjain1988. Thank you Prerit for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

MBA admissions tips for Indian applicants! Download Free.
Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy
Related Resources:

• Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One
• Get Accepted to Harvard Business School, a free webinar
• Harvard Business School 2015 MBA Questions, Deadlines, Tips

Tags: , ,

The post An HBS Reapplicant’s Success Story appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/15/hbs-reapplicants-success-story/feed/ 2
Introducing Accepted! http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/13/introducing-accepted/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/13/introducing-accepted/#respond Fri, 13 Feb 2015 17:40:06 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28867 The Accepted team is super excited to welcome all of our new blog readers! For those of you who don’t know much about Accepted, here is a little bit about who we are and what we do best: We look forward to getting to know you better too – so keep up the great conversations in […]

The post Introducing Accepted! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
The Accepted team is super excited to welcome all of our new blog readers!

For those of you who don’t know much about Accepted, here is a little bit about who we are and what we do best:

We look forward to getting to know you better too – so keep up the great conversations in the comments section.

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Tags: , , , , ,

The post Introducing Accepted! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/13/introducing-accepted/feed/ 0
Cornell Tech Receives $50 Million Gift from Verizon http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/13/cornell-tech-receives-50-million-gift-verizon/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/13/cornell-tech-receives-50-million-gift-verizon/#respond Fri, 13 Feb 2015 16:32:35 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28857 Cornell Tech will open its new 12-acre Roosevelt Island campus in summer 2017, in part due to a recent $50 million gift from Verizon which will go towards developing the innovative Verizon Executive Education Center. According to the Cornell Tech press release, “The center will be a place for the entire tech community to gather, […]

The post Cornell Tech Receives $50 Million Gift from Verizon appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Listen to our podcast interview for the scoop on Cornell Tech.

Cornell Tech’s new campus design

Cornell Tech will open its new 12-acre Roosevelt Island campus in summer 2017, in part due to a recent $50 million gift from Verizon which will go towards developing the innovative Verizon Executive Education Center.

According to the Cornell Tech press release, “The center will be a place for the entire tech community to gather, a convening place to leverage the impact the campus has on technology beyond its degree programs. The center will be part of the first phase of the campus, which began construction last month and is due to open in the summer of 2017.”

The center in particular and Verizon’s involvement in general will not just contribute to active technological innovation, but will “facilitate direct collaboration with other companies and Cornell Tech students to bring cutting-edge ideas to market.” It will facilitate cross-sector learning – for students, corporations, and customers, and will increase the number of internships, full-time positions, and scholarships for Cornell Tech students.

Lowell McAdam, Verizon Chairman and CEO, says: “Our donation to Cornell Tech is an investment in the future and fits perfectly with our mission to use communications technologies to solve big challenges and make people’s lives better. The Verizon Executive Education Center will be a magnet for developers, entrepreneurs, educators and innovators across all industries, building on the great talent and creativity we already have in the tech sector here in New York City.”

Download our free report on choosing the best MBA program!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy
Related Resources:

• 2014 B-School Grads Flock to Jobs in Tech, Healthcare, and Manufacturing
• Dr. Douglas Stayman Shares the Scoop on Cornell Tech NYC
• Cornell Tech Student Interview: Where CS Meets the MBA

Tags: , , , ,

The post Cornell Tech Receives $50 Million Gift from Verizon appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/13/cornell-tech-receives-50-million-gift-verizon/feed/ 0
Free Webinar Recording: Round 3 vs. Next Year http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/12/free-webinar-recording-round-3-vs-next-year-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/12/free-webinar-recording-round-3-vs-next-year-2/#respond Thu, 12 Feb 2015 16:24:59 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28601 Now’s your chance to catch up on valuable information you may have missed during our webinar, Round 3 vs. Next Year: The MBA Admissions Debate. MBA applicants torn with the big R3 or next year dilemma – you won’t want to miss this! View Round 3 vs. Next Year: The MBA Admissions Debate for free now! Tags: MBA Admissions, […]

The post Free Webinar Recording: Round 3 vs. Next Year appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Should you apply Round 3 or wait till next year? Watch the webinar and find out!Now’s your chance to catch up on valuable information you may have missed during our webinar, Round 3 vs. Next Year: The MBA Admissions Debate.

MBA applicants torn with the big R3 or next year dilemma – you won’t want to miss this!

View Round 3 vs. Next Year: The MBA Admissions Debate for free now!

Click here to watch the webinar!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Tags: ,

The post Free Webinar Recording: Round 3 vs. Next Year appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/12/free-webinar-recording-round-3-vs-next-year-2/feed/ 0
Valentine’s Day, Economics, and Stanford GSB http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/11/valentines-day-economics-stanford-gsb/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/11/valentines-day-economics-stanford-gsb/#respond Wed, 11 Feb 2015 18:22:33 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28838 The Valentine’s Day episode of Admissions Straight Talk — the perfect opportunity to invite… an economist to be our guest on the show. Listen to the full recording of our enlightening conversation with Dr. Paul Oyer, Professor of Economics, at Stanford’s Graduate School of Business. Dr. Oyer and Linda discuss the common thread between dating, […]

The post Valentine’s Day, Economics, and Stanford GSB appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Listen to our interview with Dr. Paul Oyer!The Valentine’s Day episode of Admissions Straight Talk — the perfect opportunity to invite… an economist to be our guest on the show.

Listen to the full recording of our enlightening conversation with Dr. Paul Oyer, Professor of Economics, at Stanford’s Graduate School of Business. Dr. Oyer and Linda discuss the common thread between dating, economics, and admissions. Spot-on, right?

00:02:12 – Featured Applicant Question: Do I need to explain my low GPA to the adcom?

00:06:18 – Why Dr. Oyer wrote Everything I Ever Needed to Know about Economics I Learned from Online Dating.

00:11:04 – The limits of economics in explaining online dating.

00:15:49 – How offline dating is like an economic market too. (Yup, economists take the fun out of everything.)

00:17:42 – Signaling: Why education is a waste, but still serves a purpose. How virtual roses signify credibility. And what the college/grad school admissions process has to do with signaling.

00:32:06 – The parallels between economics and dating – Wonderful, but not surprising.

00:33:47 – An interesting aspect of the law and MBA student internship-to-job-offer ratios.

00:38:20 – A Stanford GSB professor’s reflection on the defining characteristic of students at that b-school.

00:40:51 – How Dr. Oyer’s books have changed his teaching.

00:43:36 – What MBA students need to know before they start school.

Listen to the full conversation to learn more!*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Related Links:

• Everything I Ever Needed to Know about Economics I Learned from Online Dating
Roadside MBA: Back Road Lessons for Entrepreneurs, Executives and Small Business Owners 
• How to Be a Better Valentine, Through Economics
• Stanford GSB Zone
• Stanford GSB 2015 MBA Questions, Deadlines, Tips
• Get Accepted to Stanford GSB, a free webinar

Related Shows:

• A B-School Professor on Main Street, USA
• The Stanford MSx Program for Experienced Leaders
• MBA Project Search: Matchmaking for MBAs and Businesses
• Entrepreneurship at Stanford GSB: Carlypso Drives Down the Startup St.

Leave a Review for Admissions Straight Talk:

Check Out Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes! Check Out Admissions Straight Talk in Stitcher!

Tags: , , , , , , ,

The post Valentine’s Day, Economics, and Stanford GSB appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/11/valentines-day-economics-stanford-gsb/feed/ 0
Are Schools Reducing Their Number of Admissions Essays? http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/10/schools-reducing-number-admissions-essays/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/10/schools-reducing-number-admissions-essays/#respond Tue, 10 Feb 2015 21:57:51 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28377 Elite schools like Yale, Wharton, and Stanford looked like they were starting a trend in cutting the number of required admissions essays for applicants, but according to Kaplan Test Prep’s 2014 business school admissions officers survey, most U.S. MBA programs haven’t followed their lead. The survey indicates that just 13% of the participating 204 business […]

The post Are Schools Reducing Their Number of Admissions Essays? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Applying to Stanford GSB? Check out our Stanford application essay tips!

Is Stanford a trendsetter?

Elite schools like Yale, Wharton, and Stanford looked like they were starting a trend in cutting the number of required admissions essays for applicants, but according to Kaplan Test Prep’s 2014 business school admissions officers survey, most U.S. MBA programs haven’t followed their lead. The survey indicates that just 13% of the participating 204 business schools say they reduced the number of essays for this admissions cycle, compared to last year. Only 3% of schools plan on further reducing the number of required essays for the next application cycle.

According to Kaplan Test Prep’s executive director of pre-business and pre-graduate programs, Brian Carlidge, “Our survey finds that the overwhelming number of MBA programs continue to see value in applicants submitting more information about themselves. From what we’ve seen, the business schools that have cut their number of admissions essays are doing so to streamline the process, believing they can get what they need from applicants through fewer, more focused essays. While it may sound counter-intuitive, some applicants may find fewer essays and lower word counts difficult as it forces them to be more succinct. We encourage all aspiring MBAs to put effort into their essays, no matter the number or word count, as this piece of the application gives them the opportunity to show admissions officers why they’d be a good fit for the school in a way that their GMAT score, undergraduate GPA and work experience cannot.”

Analysis.

I certainly agree with Kaplan that MBA applicants need to put serious effort into their essays regardless of how many there are, but I found the disconnect between the highly publicized drop in essays for top-ranked programs vs. the relatively constant number of essays for lower ranked programs curious.

I’m going to indulge in speculating about the causes of this discrepancy:

The competition among the elite programs is intense. Application volume is a factor in rankings and also in perception of a school’s panache. Since more application work essentially raises the cost of applying, more essays could mean fewer applicants for these highly competitive programs. And they don’t want the hit to their application volume.

Perhaps lower ranked programs are more concerned about yield than about application volume. They want to accept people who put a little more effort into their applications. That effort implies the applicants are more invested in the application and are signaling more strongly that they really are interested in attending the programs they are applying to.

Finally another thought that really calls into question the validity of the Kaplan conclusions: While the Kaplan survey asks specifically about essays, it doesn’t discuss information being collected in short-answer responses and in boxes in the application. Many schools, notably HBS, have moved much of the information gathering to these boxes and short-form answers as opposed to the essays of a few years ago.

It’s a mistake to assume that those short-form answers are any less important than the essays.
MBA 5 Fatal Flaws
Linda AbrahamBy Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

Related Resources:

School-Specific MBA Application Essay Tips
MBA Rankings: What You Need to Know
How to Answer “Mini” MBA Essay Questions

Tags: , , ,

The post Are Schools Reducing Their Number of Admissions Essays? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/10/schools-reducing-number-admissions-essays/feed/ 0
Pop Quiz: How Should You Prepare for the GMAT? http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/09/pop-quiz-prepare-gmat/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/09/pop-quiz-prepare-gmat/#respond Mon, 09 Feb 2015 19:22:35 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28715 True or False? Some people are natural test-takers who won’t need to study at all and who will still ace the GMAT. FALSE! Even the smartest among us still needs to prepare for something as difficult and weighty as the GMAT. The more focused prep you do using reliable sources, the greater your chances are […]

The post Pop Quiz: How Should You Prepare for the GMAT? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Register for our Dominate the GMAT Webinar!True or False? Some people are natural test-takers who won’t need to study at all and who will still ace the GMAT.

FALSE! Even the smartest among us still needs to prepare for something as difficult and weighty as the GMAT.

The more focused prep you do using reliable sources, the greater your chances are of walking in on test day and taking the GMAT by storm.

I am truly excited to introduce you to Brett Ethridge, Founder of Dominate the GMAT, at our upcoming live webinar, Your 3-Part Game Plan to Dominate the GMAT. During the webinar, Brett will help you create an actionable plan for prepping for and taking the GMAT confidently and successfully.

The webinar will start this Wednesday (Wednesday, Feb. 11th) promptly at 10:00 AM PST/1:00 PM EST. Reserve your spot for Your 3-Part Game Plan to Dominate the GMAT now!

Register for the webinar!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Tags:

The post Pop Quiz: How Should You Prepare for the GMAT? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/09/pop-quiz-prepare-gmat/feed/ 0
Global EMBA 2015 Essay Tips http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/09/global-emba-2015-essay-tips/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/09/global-emba-2015-essay-tips/#respond Mon, 09 Feb 2015 18:34:26 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28707 The Global EMBA has 2 program options: EMBA-Global Americas & Europe which combines the strengths of Columbia University and London Business School; and EMBA-Global Asia, with Columbia University, London Business School, and Hong Kong University Business School.   Of course all MBA and EMBA applications are about “fit.”  The Global EMBA is too – just […]

The post Global EMBA 2015 Essay Tips appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Click here to learn more EMBA essay tips

You need to know what “global leader” means to you.

The Global EMBA has 2 program options: EMBA-Global Americas & Europe which combines the strengths of Columbia University and London Business School; and EMBA-Global Asia, with Columbia University, London Business School, and Hong Kong University Business School.  

Of course all MBA and EMBA applications are about “fit.”  The Global EMBA is too – just more so.  This adcom really focuses on fit, because the program is so unique and intense.  And the concept of “global leader” is a critical part of that fit.  How it’s embodied will be unique to each applicant; ensure that your essays reflect your own mindset and vision of global leadership.  

The adcom also looks for applicants who truly understand and will make productive use of this distinctive educational opportunity, which comprises multiple campuses and schools each with its own particular focus, opportunities, and areas of excellence.  

The three essay questions vary in approach, thus requiring you to present yourself effectively from different angles.  There’s a fairly classic goals essay, a “story” (behavioral) essay, and an open “statement.”  The challenge is to employ a consistent individual voice while also adapting it to the various essay types.

EMBA GLOBAL ESSAY QUESTIONS

Essay 1 (maximum 500 words)

Why do you wish to participate in the EMBA-Global programme? What do you hope to experience and how will participation in this programme help you to achieve your objectives?

Here’s that goals question.  First a note about the nuance of the question: notice the words wish, hope, experience, and participate/participation.  These words imply an immersive, personal, community, collaborative orientation.  In the essay (and indeed throughout the application) show how you fit with this holistic approach.

Structure: I’ve found that it’s intuitive and logical to start the essay by discussing your goals – the objectives at the very end of the question.  (And add a word about what motivates them.)  You will then naturally move into what you hope to experience from the program, because your professional goals create your learning needs.  This part can (indeed should) include a personal component as well.  To address participation, discuss elements beyond the classroom where you will learn and contribute, such as clubs, social interactions, etc.

Essay 2 (maximum 500 words)

Please describe a situation either work or personal where you faced a particular challenge. What was the outcome and what did you learn from the experience about your own strengths and personal development needs?

This is the story.  I suggest selecting a topic that’s relatively recent.  Make it a situation with some significant stakes, and one that yielded meaningful insight, growth, and change.  

Structure: Jump right into the story.  Avoid preambles that give away the ending!  This straightforward approach grips the reader and frees up space for detail and narrative, which is the way to grip the reader.  As you walk through what happened, highlight your actions and add in snippets of what you were thinking (and even feeling).  Conclude with a paragraph reflecting on what you learned about your strengths and development needs.

Personal statement (maximum 500 words)

Please tell us about yourself and your background. How do you embody the characteristics of a future global leader? The objective of this statement is to get a sense of who you are, rather than what you have achieved professionally.

First, think.  Selecting content is not so easy when faced with an open question such as this.  There is no one formula that will work for everyone.  Some people might best focus on aspects of their cultural milieu and its formative influence on their values and perspective.  Others might focus on pivotal experiences during university, others yet on influential role model(s) or relationships.  Many people will appropriately discuss more than one of these things.

The adcom knows that the term “global leader” is abstract and that it will be manifested uniquely in each “real” global leader.  So rather than trying to fit your experiences to the concept of global leader, work from the other direction: start with your experiences and background and elucidate how they will help make you a unique, individual global leader.  

Last but not least, you need to know what “global leader” means to you and what kind of global leader you aspire to be.  You can’t just use the phrase without defining it for the adcom.   You have to create the picture.

Remaining deadlines:

EMBA Global Americas & Europe:  02 March 2015

EMBA-Global Asia:  20 March 2015
Download your free copy of Ace the EMBA!
Cindy Tokumitsu

By , co-author of The EMBA Edge, and author of the free special report, Ace the EMBA. Cindy has helped MBA applicants get accepted to top EMBA programs around the world. She is delighted to help you too!

Related Resources:

• School-Specific Executive MBA Essay Tips
• The GMAT and EMBA Programs
• Tips for Executive MBA Reapplicants

Tags: , , , , ,

The post Global EMBA 2015 Essay Tips appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/09/global-emba-2015-essay-tips/feed/ 0
The Hottest Skills that will Land You the Hottest Jobs http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/08/hottest-skills-will-land-hottest-jobs/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/08/hottest-skills-will-land-hottest-jobs/#respond Sun, 08 Feb 2015 17:40:19 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28414 A recent Businessweek article highlights the top skills job-seekers need to make the greatest impression on headhunters and future employers. What’s not high up on the list? Involvement in startups. According to the recruiters surveyed in BW’s 2014 b-school rankings, employees who are entrepreneurial thinkers and “cosmopolitan self-starters” aren’t as important as employees who can “write […]

The post The Hottest Skills that will Land You the Hottest Jobs appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Watch the Career Strategy for MBA Applicants Webinar

What are recruiters really looking for?

recent Businessweek article highlights the top skills job-seekers need to make the greatest impression on headhunters and future employers. What’s not high up on the list? Involvement in startups. According to the recruiters surveyed in BW’s 2014 b-school rankings, employees who are entrepreneurial thinkers and “cosmopolitan self-starters” aren’t as important as employees who can “write clean e-mails, work in a team, and think analytically.”

Businessweek’s polled 1320 MBA recruiters from various industries, asking them to choose up to five skills or assets from a list of 14. Here’s what they found were most important (the top three) and least important (the bottom three):

 68% — Good communication

• 60% — Analytical thinking

• 55% — Ability to work collaboratively

• 15.2% — Industry-related work experience

• 12.3% — Global mindset

• 8.9% — Entrepreneurship

See BW’s chart for more details:

Click here for more blog posts about hiring news and trends.

Recruiters said that the following skills/assets were the most difficult to find among job applicants:

• 47.3% — Strategic thinking

• 44.4% — Creative problem-solving

• 42.2% — Leadership skills

Here’s the BW chart on that:

Click here for more blog posts about hiring news and trends.

Watch the Career Strategy for MBA Applicants Webinar

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy
Related Resources:

• MBA Hiring Expected to Increase in 2015
• MBA Project Search: Matchmaking for MBAs and Businesses
• 5 Tips to Find a Satisfying Career

Tags: , ,

The post The Hottest Skills that will Land You the Hottest Jobs appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/08/hottest-skills-will-land-hottest-jobs/feed/ 0
GMAT’s New Enhanced Score Report http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/06/gmats-new-enhanced-score-report/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/06/gmats-new-enhanced-score-report/#respond Fri, 06 Feb 2015 16:44:55 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28627 Starting in February 2015, GMAC will be launching its new Enhanced Score Report as a way of helping test takers better understand their GMAT performance and potentially strategize and plan for a retest.  With this new tool, test takers will be able to see how much time they spent on each question, identify their skill […]

The post GMAT’s New Enhanced Score Report appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Check out our GMAT 101 page for great tips and info!

New tool to help GMAT-takers plan for a retest.

Starting in February 2015, GMAC will be launching its new Enhanced Score Report as a way of helping test takers better understand their GMAT performance and potentially strategize and plan for a retest.  With this new tool, test takers will be able to see how much time they spent on each question, identify their skill strengths and weaknesses, and benchmark their performance against test takers from the last three years. The customized summary report will help test takers prepare for future study and test taking.

The AWA score is not included in the ESR since the report only uses data generated from unofficial scores (and this does not include the AWA). There is also no sub-section feedback given on the IR section since that section is too small to provide an adequate sample.

Test takers may purchase their GMAT Enhanced Score Report here for $24.95 and then have access to their report for five years. You can purchase your ESR for GMAT exams taken as far back as October 2013. ESRs become available up to 48 hours after you’ve completed your GMAT exam. Applicants who purchase the ESR also receive two additional practice exams and nearly 100 additional practice questions.

Starting last year in June 2014, GMAC gave test takers the option of cancelling their scores within a few minutes of completing the exam. The ESR authentication code can be applied to those cancelled exams, but not towards a GMAT exam for which a score was revoked due to a policy violation.

My thoughts:

This information should be valuable to those who aren’t satisfied with their GMAT score and want to know where to focus their studies. For those people the data is worth the fee. And in the context of the cost of the MBA, it is pocket change.

At the same time, this new revenue source for GMAC represents another competitive advantage for the GRE, which is less expensive than the GMAT to begin with.

Furthermore ETS, the entity behind the GRE, already provides the GRE Diagnostic Service at no additional cost to its test takers, and that service is similar to GMAT’s Enhanced Score Report. According to the ETS website:

“The GRE® Diagnostic Service provides insight into your performance on the test questions in the Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning sections of the GRE® revised General Test. This FREE service includes a description of the types of questions you answered right and wrong as well as the difficulty level and time spent on each question.”

Unlike the GMAC’s ESR, the Diagnostic Service does not provide practice exams or questions.

My sense is that the $25 fee will be resented by affluent test takers, but if they need the information they will (and should) pay for it. It will be yet one more hurdle for applicants from disadvantaged backgrounds. And for those unsure of which of the two tests to take, the price of the ESR just adds a little weight to the side of the scale that says “GRE.”

Watch the webinar!

Linda AbrahamBy Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

Related Resources:

• That GMAT Score: Implications for Your MBA Application
• Should You Retake the GMAT Exam?
• GRE vs. GMAT: Trends

Tags: , ,

The post GMAT’s New Enhanced Score Report appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/06/gmats-new-enhanced-score-report/feed/ 0
When is the Best Time to Take the GMAT? http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/05/best-time-take-gmat/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/05/best-time-take-gmat/#respond Thu, 05 Feb 2015 18:47:22 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28585 I remember when I was young and would ask my dad a question, more often than not he would respond, “Would you like the short answer or the long answer?” It didn’t matter which option I chose, because at some point he would inevitably launch into the long answer. And while I hated it at […]

The post When is the Best Time to Take the GMAT? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Click here to download your free guide: MBA Action Plan: 6 Steps for the 6 moths Before You Apply

I remember when I was young and would ask my dad a question, more often than not he would respond, “Would you like the short answer or the long answer?” It didn’t matter which option I chose, because at some point he would inevitably launch into the long answer. And while I hated it at the time, looking back, there were always some great nuggets of wisdom in the nuances of his long answer.

So in the spirit of my dad’s sage example, I present to you the short answer — and the long answer! — to the question, “When should I take the GMAT?”

The Short Answer

You should take the GMAT any time that you have 2-3 months, or approximately 80-100 hours, to adequately prepare for it.

Remember that your GMAT score is good for five (5) years, so you can take the GMAT whenever you’re ready — even if you don’t plan on applying to business school for another year or two. Why not get it out of the way early?

Now, why do I say that you’ll want to devote 80-100 hours studying for the GMAT? Because statistically, that’s how many hours students study to score above average on the GMAT. You can read my full article about how long you should expect to study for the GMAT by clicking here.

The Long Answer

Telling you to take the GMAT whenever you want, which is essentially what I’ve done in my short answer, may seem like a bit of a cop-out to you. At the very least, it’s still pretty vague. So let me dive deeper and give you three additional guiding principles for when you should consider taking the GMAT.

• In what application round are you applying?

 It’s a good idea to have a sense of when you’ll be applying to business school. Pretty basic, right? Once you know when the application deadline is for the round you’ll be applying in, you can work backwards from there.

For example, Round 1 deadlines for many MBA programs are at the end of September for matriculation the following Fall. If you’ll be applying Round 1, then, you should start studying for the GMAT in May or June and plan to take it toward the end of August. For Round 2 deadlines, you’ll usually want to take the GMAT in late November or early December, and for Round 3 deadlines, mid- to late- February is a good time to take the GMAT for most schools.

Note: If you’re currently studying for the GMAT with an eye toward Round 3 applications (or even if you’re not planning on applying until next year and haven’t started studying for the GMAT yet), join us on Wednesday, February 11th for a free webinar providing a 3-part game plan for dominating the GMAT. Click here to learn more and register.

• Leave time to retake the GMAT if necessary

 As confident as I am that you’ll get the GMAT score you’re looking for on the very first try (especially if you’ve taken one of our GMAT prep courses!), the reality is that many students end up needing to take the GMAT a second (ore even third) time. The GMAC makes you wait a minimum of 31 days before retaking the GMAT, so take that into consideration and plan accordingly. For example, if the Round 3 application deadline for your target school is April 1st, then plan to take the GMAT before March 1st to give yourself that 31-day buffer.

While technically a school will need your official GMAT results before granting you admission (official scores can take up to 20 days to arrive), often admissions offices will work with you and grant you provisional acceptance based on the unofficial score you receive immediately after finishing the GMAT, pending that final score report. When in doubt, call the admissions offices of your target schools and ask them what the absolute latest is that they’ll accept a GMAT score from you. They want to work with you, so don’t be afraid to ask.

• Don’t drag it out

 One of my favorite teaching points when I’m training my team on the importance of taking action goes as follows: Five birds are sitting on a wire. Three decide to fly off. How many are left?”

Answer: All five.

Why? Because deciding to do something isn’t the same as actually doing it! The same goes for the GMAT.

I can’t tell you how many times I have students sign up for one of my courses and despite having completed all of the course material and taken all of the practice tests, they drag out the process of actually signing up for the real thing. The truth is, you’ll probably never feel 100% ready for the GMAT. You’ll always feel like there’s one more thing to learn or one more practice problem to solve. But really, it’s fear that’s holding you back. And the best antidote to fear is action. So my advice is to pick a date based on the guidelines I described above and lock it in stone by actually submitting your registration. That way you’ll have a fixed target on your calendar that you can start working toward!

Watch the webinar: 3 Part plan to dominate the GMAT

Brett Ethridge is the founder of Dominate the GMAT, a leading provider of GMAT courses online and topic-specific GMAT video lessons. He has taught the GMAT for 10 years and loves working with students to help them achieve their highest potential. Brett is an entrepreneur, a triathlete, and an avid Duke basketball fan.

Related Resources:

GMAT Admissions 101
Should You Take the GMAT or the GRE?
• GMAT Facts: True or False

Tags: , ,

The post When is the Best Time to Take the GMAT? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/05/best-time-take-gmat/feed/ 0
Making International Student Loans a Prime Investment http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/04/making-international-student-debt-prime-investment/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/04/making-international-student-debt-prime-investment/#respond Wed, 04 Feb 2015 20:41:45 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28638 B-school students need funding, MBA alumni are looking to invest. Prodigy Finance brings the two together. Listen to the full recording of our conversation with Cameron Stevens, founder and CEO of the company that provides loans to international students and a secure and meaningful investment opportunity for business school graduates. 00:01:30 – Cameron Stevens and […]

The post Making International Student Loans a Prime Investment appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Listen to the full recording of our conversation with Cameron Stevens.B-school students need funding, MBA alumni are looking to invest. Prodigy Finance brings the two together.

Listen to the full recording of our conversation with Cameron Stevens, founder and CEO of the company that provides loans to international students and a secure and meaningful investment opportunity for business school graduates.

00:01:30 – Cameron Stevens and the wonderful story of Prodigy Finance.

00:06:05 – An overview of how Prodigy Finance works for investors and student borrowers.

00:11:02 – The difference between Prodigy Finance and the bank.

00:17:52 – Who is eligible for these student loans?

00:21:03 – How the loan application process works. (And the story of Linda’s embarrassing first version of Accepted.com.)

00:26:46 – Where the funding comes from.

00:30:26 – Cameron’s INSEAD experience and the value of an MBA in launching and running a business.

00:42:34 – On the roadmap: job search help.

00:44:16 – Fit and goals: two tips for b-school applicants.

Listen to the full conversation to learn more!*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Related Links:

Prodigy Finance
INSEAD 2014-2015 MBA Essay Tips
• INSEAD B-School Zone

Related Shows:

• An Inside Look at INSEAD
• SoFi: Alumni Funded Student Loans
• CommonBond’s Story: A Revolution in Student Loans
• Financial Aid & Health Insurance for International Students

Leave a Review for Admissions Straight Talk:

Check Out Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes! Check Out Admissions Straight Talk in Stitcher!

Learn How to Choose the Best MBA Program for You!

Tags: , , , , , ,

The post Making International Student Loans a Prime Investment appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/04/making-international-student-debt-prime-investment/feed/ 0
Preparing for the GMAT: Video Tips to Live By http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/04/preparing-gmat-video-tips-live/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/04/preparing-gmat-video-tips-live/#respond Wed, 04 Feb 2015 15:47:40 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28411 Expert tip: Practice for the GMAT in as close to real testing conditions as possible. This will help you quickly adapt to the testing environment on the actual test day, and will help you develop the mental stamina you need to ace the exam. If you practice for 20 minutes at a time, then when […]

The post Preparing for the GMAT: Video Tips to Live By appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Expert tip: Practice for the GMAT in as close to real testing conditions as possible. This will help you quickly adapt to the testing environment on the actual test day, and will help you develop the mental stamina you need to ace the exam. If you practice for 20 minutes at a time, then when it comes to actually taking the test, there’s no way you’ll be able to sit through the entire exam.

See the following video for the full tip:

For more in-depth GMAT prep strategies and advice, attend our upcoming webinar, Your 3-Part Game Plan to Dominate the GMAT. Brett Ethridge, founder of Dominate the GMAT (and the guy from the video above) will be presenting the webinar, offering actionable tips on how to best prep for the GMAT. The webinar will take place on Wednesday, February 11, 2015 at 10:00 AM PT/1:00 PM ET. Reserve your spot by registering for Your 3-Part Game Plan to Dominate the GMAT now!

Join our upcoming webinar: How to Get Accepted to Top B-Schools with Low Stats!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Tags: , ,

The post Preparing for the GMAT: Video Tips to Live By appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/04/preparing-gmat-video-tips-live/feed/ 0
Open Letter to 2016 MBA Applicants http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/03/open-letter-2016-mba-applicants/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/03/open-letter-2016-mba-applicants/#comments Tue, 03 Feb 2015 21:10:23 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28538 Dear 2016 MBA Applicant, I would like to have heart-to-heart with you. Yes. That means YOU. If you are hoping to have an application ready for round 1 of the next application cycle, but have not yet thought about why you want an MBA, taken the GMAT/GRE, researched schools, or evaluated your qualifications, have a […]

The post Open Letter to 2016 MBA Applicants appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Dear 2016 MBA Applicant,

I would like to have heart-to-heart with you. Yes. That means YOU. If you are hoping to have an application ready for round 1 of the next application cycle, but have not yet thought about why you want an MBA, taken the GMAT/GRE, researched schools, or evaluated your qualifications, have a seat. Let’s talk. (You can respond via the comments below. That way we can have a real conversation. Just you and me.)

I’ve been thinking about sending you this letter since the last two weeks of December. That’s when our phones started ringing off the hook with calls from frantic MBA applicants trying to prepare their applications for this year’s round 2 deadlines. They had holiday parties, family gatherings, gifts to buy or return, and sales to take advantage of. Some even had to work; some were off.

Deadlines loomed.

In any case, I’m writing this letter now, because I would like to help you avoid the harried hassle and diminished quality that those who start their applications in the weeks leading up to the deadlines experience. Instead follow the example of those many applicants who started their applications months before the deadline and worked steadily to complete them by those deadline dates circled in red on the calendar.

I don’t have stats for you, and know you love numbers, but my twenty years in this business tell me that those who start the application process 9-12 months before they actually apply:

• Get into more and “better” schools;

• Are more likely to get scholarships; and

• Are more prepared for b-school when they arrive on campus.

They simply fare better in the MBA application process than those who wait until the eleventh hour to get themselves in gear.

Those better prepared applicants – they are your real competition.

“How can I compete with them in the admissions marathon?” you ask.

Good question. Begin now. Not tomorrow. Not next week or next month or next quarter. Now.

Start Your GMAT or GRE Prep

Once you determine that you have a goal that requires an MBA, start preparing for the GMAT or GRE. Don’t wait for the summer or for “later.” Your test score is a critical element in your application. Choosing schools without knowing what that number is leads to all kinds of heartache and unpleasant surprises.

For example in mid-December “Stormers” wrote on this blog that he was anticipating a GRE of 325 (Q162, V163). On January 4th he wrote that he “belly flopped on [the] GRE and scored a 315.” He then asked if he should retake the exam or wait for Round 3.

Lower than expected test scores can throw a major monkey wrench in your plans when you take the test within two months of your target deadlines. However if you “belly flop” in the spring, you still have months to prepare again and retake the exam before the deadlines.

Where to Apply: Dartboard vs. Intent

And then there are the applicants who don’t understand the importance of fit in the application process. They just know they want an MBA from a “top N-ranked school.” They may or may not have a purpose, and for all the shallowness of their thinking, they could just as easily be throwing darts at a list of schools to determine where to invest their time and money.

Or maybe they just started too late to do the research and reflection that they could’ve and should’ve done had they started earlier. Like now.

In any case, this superficial approach in and of itself could lead to rejection, a very expensive mistake, or to a less than optimal MBA experience.

Apply purposefully to specific programs that support your goals and where you are competitive. Don’t apply to rankings. You won’t attend them.

Writing is Rewriting and Requires Time

Some of you know why you want an MBA, have good reasons for selecting the school you will apply to, and will get the GMAT or GRE that you want the first time you take the exam so you won’t be in Stormer’s shoes. Great. However, if you are too close to deadlines, you will end up rushing the writing process for your essays, short answers, and resume.

Not a good idea.

Writing – whether long essays, short essays, or resumes and activity descriptions — benefits from time. Temporal distance between revisions improves critical analysis and editing. In contrast, scrambling to slap something together leads to sloppy thinking and writing.

Taking these three key steps early will improve your chances of acceptance, but they still aren’t what I would truly like to see from you. I want to propose something more comprehensive and effective than just getting the GMAT or GRE out of the way, thinking profoundly about fit, and starting your essays early.

A Holistic, Purposeful MBA Application Timeline

Proceed purposefully, methodically, and thoughtfully so that you submit a superior MBA application to the most appropriate schools at the most desirable deadline for you.

Make that highlighted line above the 2015 resolution that you stick to. And really do stick to it.

I’m going to help you fulfill this resolution by laying out the process holistically from January through September so that you can present a superior application. It’s not just the test score or the GPA or the years of work experience or solid extracurriculars. It’s all of the above. And we mapped out the process for you here.

Check out the Smart Timeline for 2016 MBA Applicants!

If you are aiming for the Round 1 deadlines, you can download and print out the above PDF and post it on your mirror, wall, fridge, or anywhere else where you’ll see it, be inspired, and allow it to guide you. Alternatively we have created a public Google doc that you can copy and paste to your own Google account and modify to suit your needs. Then using the timeline as a guide, add these tasks to your calendar. And do them.

If you follow this MBA timeline, your MBA dreams will not be a mad, breathless sprint to the finish line, but a long, steady jog that allows you to successfully complete the MBA application marathon. You will be able to give appropriate attention to academic, professional, and extracurricular factors while allowing time for the self-reflection, research, writing, and editing that will produce an application that presents you at your best.

What do you think? Are you starting now? Please let me know below.

Best,

Linda

Linda AbrahamBy Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

Get clear, practical guidelines for answering the MBA goals essay question. Click here to download our free report.

Tags: ,

The post Open Letter to 2016 MBA Applicants appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/03/open-letter-2016-mba-applicants/feed/ 9
NYU Stern Launches 2-Year PTMBA Accelerated Program http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/03/nyu-stern-launches-2-year-ptmba-accelerated-program/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/03/nyu-stern-launches-2-year-ptmba-accelerated-program/#respond Tue, 03 Feb 2015 19:07:06 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28583 Applicants may now apply for NYU Stern’s new Langone part-time two-year accelerated option. According to a recent survey among NYU part-time prospective students, nearly a quarter of respondents said that they preferred an accelerated part-time MBA program over the previous self-pacing or weekend-only options (which took between two and six years). The course requirements for […]

The post NYU Stern Launches 2-Year PTMBA Accelerated Program appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Click here for our NYU Stern Langone application essay tips!Applicants may now apply for NYU Stern’s new Langone part-time two-year accelerated option.

According to a recent survey among NYU part-time prospective students, nearly a quarter of respondents said that they preferred an accelerated part-time MBA program over the previous self-pacing or weekend-only options (which took between two and six years).

The course requirements for the 60-credit part-time MBA will remain unchanged.

Also new this year: Part-time MBA applicants will have an earlier application deadline so that they may receive their admissions answers earlier (another request made by prospective students). This new deadline will be March 1st for R1, with subsequent deadlines on May 15th and July 15th.

You can read more about the new accelerated option here, and check out our NYU B-School Zone for tips on applying to NYU’s MBA programs.

Download Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One.

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Related Resources:

• NYU Stern Langone 2015 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
• Tips for Applying to Part-time MBA Programs
• MBA Admissions Decisions: Should You Go Full-Time or Part-Time?

Tags: , ,

The post NYU Stern Launches 2-Year PTMBA Accelerated Program appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/03/nyu-stern-launches-2-year-ptmba-accelerated-program/feed/ 0
Smart GMAT Test Prep – Are You Doing it Right? http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/02/smart-gmat-test-prep-right/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/02/smart-gmat-test-prep-right/#respond Mon, 02 Feb 2015 16:09:25 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28542 A smart GMAT test-taker will: (a) Start prepping for the GMAT months in advance. (b) Take time to understand the psychology, content, and scoring metrics of the GMAT. (c) Register for Accepted’s upcoming webinar, Your 3-Part Game Plan to Dominate the GMAT. (d) All of the above. Be smart about the GMAT. Answer (d) above […]

The post Smart GMAT Test Prep – Are You Doing it Right? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Register for our Dominate the GMAT Webinar!

A smart GMAT test-taker will:

(a) Start prepping for the GMAT months in advance.

(b) Take time to understand the psychology, content, and scoring metrics of the GMAT.

(c) Register for Accepted’s upcoming webinar, Your 3-Part Game Plan to Dominate the GMAT.

(d) All of the above.

Be smart about the GMAT. Answer (d) above for maximum GMAT confidence and readiness.

Mark your calendar: Wednesday, February 11, 2015 at 10:00 AM PST/1:00 PM EST.

Register now!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Tags:

The post Smart GMAT Test Prep – Are You Doing it Right? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/02/smart-gmat-test-prep-right/feed/ 0
UCLA Anderson Student Interview: Enjoying the MBA Whirlwind http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/01/ucla-anderson-mba-student-interview-tom/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/01/ucla-anderson-mba-student-interview-tom/#respond Sun, 01 Feb 2015 16:48:50 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28506 This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Tom Winterton, a first year student at UCLA Anderson. Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you […]

The post UCLA Anderson Student Interview: Enjoying the MBA Whirlwind appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Want to read  more MBA student interviews?  Click here!This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Tom Winterton, a first year student at UCLA Anderson.

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What was your most recent pre-MBA job?

Tom: I grew up in Nantwich, a small market town in north of England and completed my undergraduate degree in Physics with Finance at the University of Surrey. A slightly unusual combination but it stood me well in getting a job in financial services in London where I worked for a number of banks.

My last role was as a Strategy Development Analyst at Brewin Dolphin, one of the UK’s largest investment management and financial planning firms.

Accepted: Where are you currently in business school? What year?

I’m a 1st year full time MBA at the UCLA Anderson School of Management in Los Angeles.

Accepted: What’s your favorite thing about Anderson? And if you could change one thing about the program, what would it be?

Tom: My favorite thing about Anderson would have to be the school’s culture of shared success. Be it 2nd year students paying it forward through the career sessions they run, to the fact that MBAs competing for intern and full time positions regularly prep together ahead of interviewing for the same role. This supporting environment couldn’t be more different from uber competitive experience often associated with business school. While everyone is certainly pushing to land top positions at some of the most sought after companies, its important our class mates get there too and everyone’s committed to this principal of shared success.

They try to pack a lot into the MBA course and that’s especially true in your first few quarters. On top of that, UCLA operates on a quarter systems which seems to only compound this busy schedule.

If I could change one thing about the program it would be to start a bit earlier in the year and give 1st year students a little more time in the first quarter. I found this a big crunch time with recruiting and finals all in full swing. You find yourself living inside the business school bubble, neglecting friends from home as you become obsessed by informationals, GPAs, interview prep and all things MBA.

Accepted: Now that you’ve well into your first year of b-school, can you talk about your transition back to school? Is b-school what you thought it would be like? Any surprises? Any advice for next year’s incoming class?

Tom: It fair to say I’ve found the transition back to school at bit of a shock to the system. If it were only about being back in the class room that would be one thing, but the truth is you end up having to perform a juggling act skipping between company presentation, case competitions, sorting out the administrative nightmare that comes with moving countries, informational interviews, group assignments and much more in between. Plus of course socializing with everyone in your new MBA class. Fear of Missing Out (FOMO) means for the first few months at least you’re compelled to sign up to as many things as possible. Often the academic work ends up being just one point on a long list of priorities.

My advice to incoming MBA students would be to clear the decks before your MBA. If you’ve got the time to get ahead with career research do so. Start doing informational interviews and building connections with companies you’re interested in as early as possible; it will pay dividends when it comes to recruiting.

While the MBA experience is great, be prepared, it’s a whirlwind. Don’t expect to have many evening or weekends to yourself, and let friends and family know they’re about to see a lot less of you.

Accepted: Do you plan on heading back to the UK after you receive your MBA? What are your post-MBA plans

Tom: I haven’t decided where I want to be after my MBA. Much of it will depend on how the recruiting process goes, my summer internship and the connections I’m able to make over the two years. That said studying at a US school, MBA recruiting is obviously skewed toward American companies, with a large proportion of students getting full time jobs through on campus recruiting.

California is home to so many of the world’s most innovative businesses and I’ll certainly be exploring all the opportunities it has to offer.

Accepted: What’s your favorite class so far?

Tom: I would have to say Marketing has been my favorite class so far. For the first few quarters your timetable at Anderson (like most MBA programs) is dominated by a core class – Accounting, Finance, Statistics, etc. While these were great, well taught with lively debate and new interesting content, I had some experience of them from my undergraduate degree and professional career.

While Marketing is still a core class, I came into it with almost no background whatsoever and I’m enjoying being exposed to a whole new strand of business.

I also enjoyed that fact that as opposed to my other core class there isn’t necessarily one right answer when it comes to Marketing. Different approaches, targeting different segments of the market can both be effective. There’s really room to be creative as you look for the best way to market a product. While I wouldn’t say I had a favorite assignment, it was interesting writing a “Positioning Statement” for yourself, in the context of a job market, dating market or otherwise.

Accepted: Can you share your top 3 MBA admissions tips with our applicant readers?

Tom:

• Really think about why you want an MBA and how it will help reach your future goals. Every school will ask this as one of their essay questions and you need to have a good answer that makes sense. This story becomes even more important as an MBA, when you start talking to companies and applying for internships. Recruiters need to see how your skill and experience fit together and relate to the role your applying for.

Don’t just look at the rankings when applying to programs; sure they matter but only up to until a point. Instead I’d recommend looking on where a school’s MBAs interned and accepted full time positions. Do the companies you’re interested in recruit on campus? Does the school have strong alumni connections in the industries and with the firms you wanting to work for?

A big part of the recruiting process is getting to know companies, networking and for companies to get to know you. You’re at a big advantage if your school already has those connections.

• If you’re able to, visit the school and sit in on a class or two. At a very minimum make sure you speak to alumni and current students; they’re the best source of advice when it comes to applying to a school. While I wasn’t able to visit Los Angeles before applying to Anderson, I was able to speak to a number of current alumni. I also had good friends who’d attended UCLA as undergraduates. This was invaluable when making my decision. Remember where you’re living will be a big factor in your MBA experience.

Accepted: Can you tell us about your blog? When and why did you start blogging? What have you gained from the experience?

Tom: I had to check the dates, I started my current blog some 2.5 years back now, with my first post in May 2012. I’d also experimented with a couple of other blogs and websites prior to this.

I think the initial interest came about went I was working on a project to develop online services for a bank. Working with developers I decided should really know a bit more about how to build a website, having learned little to nothing in school. The blog developed out of this curiosity, I liked the thought of creating content and sharing it online, as well as experimenting learning bits of CSS and HTML to customize the site along the way.

What have I gained from my experience blogging? Well it’s really been an ongoing learning experience for me. From picking the basics of markup languages and web styling, to finding out more about different web services by experimenting with things like Google Analytics and Adwords. I’ve used it as a public record of what I’ve been up to, from hiking in Switzerland to my sharing my MBA orientation week experience; it’s a great way to add context and tell a story with the photos you’ve taken.

If nothing else it’s fed my curiosity and added a few lines to the interests section of my resume.

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages

You can read more about Tom’s journey by checking out his blog, Tom’s Blog. Thank you Tom for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

Download our free report on choosing the best MBA program!

Accepted: The Premier Admissions Cosultancy

Related Resources:

• MBA Rankings: What You Need to Know
• UCLA Anderson 2015 MBA Questions, Deadlines, Tips

Tags: , ,

The post UCLA Anderson Student Interview: Enjoying the MBA Whirlwind appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/02/01/ucla-anderson-mba-student-interview-tom/feed/ 0
MBA Admissions: Is Community Service Important? http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/29/mba-admissions-community-service-important/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/29/mba-admissions-community-service-important/#respond Thu, 29 Jan 2015 22:43:48 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28421 It’s winter, and many of you probably haven’t started thinking about next year’s MBA applications yet. But now is actually an excellent time to get started – not just on test prep and boosting GPAs, but on taking time to examine your community service. At most top b-schools, community service is virtually a requirement, and […]

The post MBA Admissions: Is Community Service Important? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
MBA admissions: Does extracurricular equal extra credit?It’s winter, and many of you probably haven’t started thinking about next year’s MBA applications yet. But now is actually an excellent time to get started – not just on test prep and boosting GPAs, but on taking time to examine your community service. At most top b-schools, community service is virtually a requirement, and if yours is on the weak side, then you have just enough time to start bulking up your experience…if you start NOW.

First let’s discuss what “community service” is and isn’t. I define it as:

“Active participation in and assumption of responsibility for your community.”

That is an intentionally broad definition that includes taking an active role in sports teams, professional organizations, alumni groups, churches, literacy programs, political campaigns, environmental causes, fund raising for immigrant assistance groups…whatever you define as your community. Community service almost always does – and should – reflect your values and priorities.

The operative phrases in the definition are “active” and “responsibility.” Writing checks is not enough. And helping your elderly neighbor occasionally makes you a nice person, but doesn’t mean you are taking responsibility for your community. Community service requires commitment.

So why is community service important?

1. It provides an opportunity for you to demonstrate attributes that young applicants frequently can’t reveal in the classroom or in their jobs: leadership, initiative, interpersonal skills, and the ability to handle responsibility. It expresses your willingness to contribute.

2. A foundational principle of admissions is “Past behavior predicts future behavior.” To adcoms a history of activism and participation evidences that you will be an active participant in their student and alumni communities. That’s exactly the impression you want your application to make.

3. It indicates breadth and well-roundedness. Surprise. Surprise. Top MBA programs don’t want workaholic nerds.

At the most competitive schools, community service and extracurricular activities frequently make the difference between who is accepted and rejected among otherwise competitive applicants. If you have been involved in community service, great. Keep up the good work and strive for a leadership role. If you haven’t been an active participant or leader, become one. Choose an activity, cause, or organization that you would like to contribute to. And then be consistently and actively involved so that you will have a commitment to write about other than school and work. You may even find that you enjoy it.

Learn How to Choose the Best MBA Program for You!

Accepted.com: The Premier Admissions Consultancy

Related Resources:

Leadership in Admissions
MBA Admissions: Does Extracurricular Equal Extra Credit?
Harvard Business School: Engaged Community Citizenship

Tags:

The post MBA Admissions: Is Community Service Important? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/29/mba-admissions-community-service-important/feed/ 0
Entrepreneurship at Stanford GSB: Carlypso Drives Down the Startup Street http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/28/entrepreneurship-stanford-gsb-carlypso-drives-startup-street/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/28/entrepreneurship-stanford-gsb-carlypso-drives-startup-street/#respond Wed, 28 Jan 2015 21:32:50 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28464 Thinking of launching a disruptive start-up? Dying to attend a leading entrepreneurial MBA program? Well meet Nick Hinrichsen and Chris Colemen, founders of the start-up Carlypso, which Tech Crunch calls a “brilliant concept.” Oh, and they earned their MBAs in 2013 from Stanford GSB. Listen to the recording of this intriguing interview as we discuss […]

The post Entrepreneurship at Stanford GSB: Carlypso Drives Down the Startup Street appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
Click here to listen to the podcast!Thinking of launching a disruptive start-up? Dying to attend a leading entrepreneurial MBA program? Well meet Nick Hinrichsen and Chris Colemen, founders of the start-up Carlypso, which Tech Crunch calls a “brilliant concept.” Oh, and they earned their MBAs in 2013 from Stanford GSB.

Listen to the recording of this intriguing interview as we discuss the founding of Carlypso, life as a Stanford GSB MBA student and the impact of the Stanford experience on the Carlypso launch.

00:01:37 – You asked, Linda answers! Linda explains why you should only give ONE example or story when application questions ask for one example.  Adding more than one can do more harm than good.

00:05:08 – What is Carlypso?

00:07:30 – Where did the idea for Carlypso come from.

00:10:39 – Who benefits from using Carlypso?

00:12:40 – Did their Stanford MBA degree really help them?

00:19:10 – Are people overestimating entrepreneurship at Stanford?

00:21:42 –  The Stanford MBA’s impact on Nick’s and Chris’s work.

00:23:10 – The $50,000 coffee that helped start Carlypso.

00:26:14 – Interested in attending Stanford? Nick and Chris give tips on how to get accepted (and rejected).

00:27:45 – Fail, and fail gracefully, but don’t do it again.

Listen to the full conversation to learn more!*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Relevant Links:

• Carlypso
• Tushar’s comment and my response
• Carlypso Could Change Everything About How We Buy And Sell Used Cars
• Stanford GSB Essay Tips 

Relevant shows:

• Life as an HBS MBA
• Dr. Douglas Stayman Shares the Scoop on Cornell Tech NYC
• Business, Law and Beyond: An Interview with John Engelman
• The Stanford MSx Program for Experienced Leaders
• Which Schools are Good for PE/VC and VC-Backed Entrepreneurship
• Jeff Reid on Entrepreneurship

Leave a Review for Admissions Straight Talk:

Check Out Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes! Check Out Admissions Straight Talk in Stitcher!

Get Accepted to Stanford Graduate School of Business! Click here to learn more!

Accepted.com: The Premier Admissions Consultancy

 

Tags: , , ,

The post Entrepreneurship at Stanford GSB: Carlypso Drives Down the Startup Street appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/28/entrepreneurship-stanford-gsb-carlypso-drives-startup-street/feed/ 0
MBA Hiring Expected to Increase in 2015 http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/27/mba-hiring-expected-increase-2015/ http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/27/mba-hiring-expected-increase-2015/#respond Tue, 27 Jan 2015 19:34:03 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=28372 GMAC’s 2014 Year-End Employer Poll Here are some highlights from GMAC’s 2014 Year-End Employer Poll. Spoiler: It’s good news! • 169 employers from 33 countries were interviewed. This is a relatively small sample. • Overall, the job market remains strong for 2015 b-school grads. • 90% of employers that expect to hire b-school graduates in […]

The post MBA Hiring Expected to Increase in 2015 appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
MBA hiring expected to increase in 2015

72% of employers plan on hiring MBA graduates in 2015

GMAC’s 2014 Year-End Employer Poll

Here are some highlights from GMAC’s 2014 Year-End Employer Poll. Spoiler: It’s good news!

• 169 employers from 33 countries were interviewed. This is a relatively small sample.

• Overall, the job market remains strong for 2015 b-school grads.

• 90% of employers that expect to hire b-school graduates in 2015 expect to maintain or increase the number of job openings compared with hiring in 2014.

• 72% of employers plan on hiring MBA graduates in 2015, compared to 69% in 2014.

• The majority of employers (54%-74%) plan on increasing starting salaries at or above the rate of inflation in 2015.

• 64% of employers say that their companies are expanding and that they plan on hiring more business school graduates.

• 87% of employers expect to offer internships to students. Usually these internships will go towards bachelor’s graduates (73% of employers). This is followed by MBA grads (55% of employers).

• 96% of employers agree that business school graduates create value for their companies.

As usual, the greatest hiring demand is for MBA graduates; though Master in Management grads are projected to experience the largest increase in hiring.

GMAC Hiring report 2015 projections

According to GMAC’s Survey Research Manager, Rebecca Estrada Worthingon, “The solid job prospects for b-school talent seen over the past several years and again reflected in this poll, give prospective students good reason to consider pursuing these degrees as part of a strategy to drive their career goals….Our data show that even in the depths of the recession, business and management degrees can provide a measure of job protection and opportunity. Today, in a recovering global economy, management degrees can be a powerful driver of confidence and provide fuel for an individual’s career growth.”

See the 2014 Year-End Poll of Employers Report and the GMAC press release for more details.

Click here to download your free copy of Focus on Management Consulting
Accepted.com: The Premier Admissions Consultancy
Related Resources:

MBA Admissions A-Z: 26 Terrific Tips
Payscale: How Much Can You Earn, and How To Earn It
25 Top MBA Employers According to MBA Students

Tags: ,

The post MBA Hiring Expected to Increase in 2015 appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.

]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2015/01/27/mba-hiring-expected-increase-2015/feed/ 0