Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog » MBA Admissions http://blog.accepted.com Admissions consulting and application advice Fri, 19 Sep 2014 19:22:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0 Admissions consulting and application advice Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no Admissions consulting and application advice Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog » MBA Admissions http://blog.accepted.com/wp-content/plugins/powerpress/rss_default.jpg http://blog.accepted.com/category/mba-admissions/ An Indian B-School Hopeful Racking Up the Work Experience http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/19/iv-with-an-indian-b-school-hopeful-racking-up-the-work-experience/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/19/iv-with-an-indian-b-school-hopeful-racking-up-the-work-experience/#respond Fri, 19 Sep 2014 15:32:21 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25635 ]]> MBA Applicant Bloggers

Balaji

This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with MBA applicant bloggers, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at the MBA application process. And now…introducing Balaji.

Accepted: First, can you tell us a little about yourself? Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What is your favorite non-school book? 

Balaji: I’m based on out Bangalore, India. I currently work as a Program Management Analyst in a Fortune 100 company. I did my undergrad in Bachelor of Engineering (Electronics & Instrumentation Engineering) from Anna University, Chennai.

I love reading fictional and history books. My favorite ones have been Dan Brown’s series and my most favorite book related to history is Glimpses of World History by Nehru.

Accepted: What stage of the admissions process are you up to? 

Balaji: I did not start my application process yet. As I currently only have 3 and a half years of experience. And after thorough study, I thought I would require 5 years of experience to have a good chance of getting into top b-schools as the average WE is 5 years.

Last year, I tried applying to one b-school to get some experience in the application process. But I was dinged without interview, and I think it was due to my WE, as I had only 2 years of experience while applying.

Accepted: Do you plan on staying in your current industry post-MBA, or changing to a new field/career?

Balaji: I haven’t decided on that yet. I wanted to stay in my field for sometime post-MBA, as I love Project/Program Management – rather to generalize I love management/operational stuffs.

Also I have a plan to start my own business at some point in future.

Accepted: As an Indian male in the software industry (a highly represented applicant group), you’re going to need to work hard to distinguish yourself from the crowd. What are some things that set you apart from your competition? 

Balaji: Yes, I belong to Indian-Male category but not in software industry any more. My previous employer was a top 15 IT service provider in the world. But as soon I was done with my undergrad, I wanted to pursue an MBA. So I avoided any software related jobs in my previous employer, so I worked as Enterprise Project Management Analyst. After 3 years working with CGI. I moved to Honeywell (here I work for Aero Division). I thought working in Fortune 100 Company will make my profile/application more visible and strong.

Now moving onto distinguishing myself from the highly represented group, below are my extra-curricular activities I presently do/did during my work, undergrad and high school.

A.    Student Coordinator in National Entrepreneurship Network during my last 2 years of my undergrad.

B.    Core Cultural Committee member during my last 2 years of my undergrad – in charge/single point of contact for all technical related activities.

C.    Was a Sergeant of National cadet corps in my high school.

D.    Was a vice-captain of my high school football (soccer) team.

E.    Was core member in corporate social responsibility team at my previous employer. We conducted many charity and fundraiser events for orphanages, etc.

F.    Certified Competent Communicator and Competent leader from Toastmasters International. And also served as Vice President Education for 2 terms.

G.    Finally was a core member in Employee Welfare Association club at my previous employer.

On Entrepreneurship: My in-law runs an event management company. I take care of the business when he is held up with other important works or on travel.

Accepted: Why did you decide to blog about your experience? What have you gained from the experience? What do you hope others will learn?

Balaji: There isn’t a better way than forums and blogs to tell everyone around the world who is currently preparing for the GMAT/MBA application that it is easy to get into top b-school with your efforts and perseverance. I thought, if I start blogging about my experience I can learn my mistakes. (In PM terminology: We always to tend to document our project plan and risks etc., so that it will be helpful for the lessons learnt at the end of the project.)

And for others, there will always be room to improve from one’s own mistakes from others’ mistakes/experiences.

You can read more about Balaji’sb-school journey by checking out his blog, GNPTH: My GMAT/MBA Journey. Thank you Balaji for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages.

MBA admissions tips for Indian applicants! Download Free.

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

GMAT 101 Page
Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One
Entrepreneurship & the MBA

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Is Your MBA Application Ready to Go Live? http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/18/is-your-mba-application-ready-to-go-live/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/18/is-your-mba-application-ready-to-go-live/#respond Thu, 18 Sep 2014 19:58:29 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25741 ]]> FinalCheck1Wait! Are you sure you’re ready to hit submit? Are you certain that your MBA application is in tip-top condition and ready to go live? Don’t you want a definitive stamp of approval? An A+ grade that will enable you to send off your application with confidence?

With Accepted’s new Final Check service, you’ll receive a final review and critique of your essays, resume, and short answer/optional question responses. Our expert consultants will let you know what you can do to further optimize your application to get it ready for submission.

Now’s the time to get your Final Check…especially with the following deadlines right around the corner:

• Sept. 23 – MIT Sloan
• Sept. 24 – INSEAD and Kellogg
• Sept. 26 – Booth
• Oct. 1 – Stanford, Haas, Johnson, and Wharton

Give Your MBA Application that Final Check!

Submit with confidence! Get your Final Check today!

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

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Honing in On the Cornell Johnson MBA http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/18/honing-in-on-the-johnson-at-cornell-university-mba/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/18/honing-in-on-the-johnson-at-cornell-university-mba/#respond Thu, 18 Sep 2014 16:41:31 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25730 ]]> Click here for the full recording of our conversation with Ann Richards. There is no place like Ithaca. And if you don’t know why, you are about to find out.

Listen to the recording of our conversation with Ann Richards, Interim Director of Admissions and Director of Financial Aid at Johnson at Cornell University to learn more.

00:02:06 – A run-down of the Johnson MBA programs.

00:06:34 – Overview of the 2-year MBA program.

00:12:25 – Performance Learning (Is it different from “experiential learning”?) and Immersions.

00:18:17 – The student-run funds at Johnson: not monopoly money.

00:21:41 – The Family Business Initiatives.

00:25:27 – The Johnson application! (What you really wanted to hear about)

00:28:54 – Admissions events for subgroups.

00:33:06 – What applicants should think about/do before starting the admissions process.

00:41:48 – What Ann LOVES to see in an MBA application.

00:42:46 – Take note: Advice for all MBA applicants.

Listen to the full conversation to learn more!*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Related Links:

Johnson at Cornell University  
• 
Johnson at Cornell University 2015 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
• 7 Tips for MBA Applicants from Family Businesses
• Smith Family Business Initiative 
• 
The Cayuga Fund 
• Where Does Wall St. Hire: U.S. B-Schools Sending Grads into Financial Services 

Related Shows:

Dr. Douglas Stayman Shares the Scoop on Cornell Tech NYC
• 5 Million to Share: The 43North Competition
• The Tuck School of Business and the Global Insight Requirement

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http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/18/honing-in-on-the-johnson-at-cornell-university-mba/feed/ 0 Cornell Johnson,podcast There is no place like Ithaca. And if you don’t know why, you are about to find out. - Listen to the recording of our conversation with Ann Richards, Interim Director of Admissions and Director of Financial Aid at Johnson at Cornell University to le... There is no place like Ithaca. And if you don’t know why, you are about to find out. Listen to the recording of our conversation with Ann Richards, Interim Director of Admissions and Director of Financial Aid at Johnson at Cornell University to learn more. 00:02:06 – A run-down of the Johnson MBA programs. 00:06:34 – Overview of the 2-year MBA program. 00:12:25 – Performance Learning (Is it different from “experiential learning”?) and Immersions. 00:18:17 – The student-run funds at Johnson: not monopoly money. 00:21:41 – The Family Business Initiatives. 00:25:27 – The Johnson application! (What you really wanted to hear about) 00:28:54 – Admissions events for subgroups. 00:33:06 – What applicants should think about/do before starting the admissions process. 00:41:48 – What Ann LOVES to see in an MBA application. 00:42:46 – Take note: Advice for all MBA applicants. *Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com. Related Links: • Johnson at Cornell University   • Johnson at Cornell University 2015 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines • 7 Tips for MBA Applicants from Family Businesses • Smith Family Business Initiative  • The Cayuga Fund  • Where Does Wall St. Hire: U.S. B-Schools Sending Grads into Financial Services  Related Shows: • Dr. Douglas Stayman Shares the Scoop on Cornell Tech NYC • 5 Million to Share: The 43North Competition • The Tuck School of Business and the Global Insight Requirement Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk: Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no 47:17
Exclusive Low Stats MBA Webinar Airing Live on Wed! http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/16/exclusive-low-stats-mba-webinar-airing-live-on-wed/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/16/exclusive-low-stats-mba-webinar-airing-live-on-wed/#respond Tue, 16 Sep 2014 17:44:39 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25700 ]]> You have ONE MORE DAY to clear your schedule and make room for what we promise will be an enlightening, practical, and helpful webinar on how to get into top business schools despite low GMAT/GPA scores.

Got low stats? This webinar is for you!

How to Get Accepted to Top B-Schools with Low Stats

Register ASAP for How to Get Accepted to B-School with Low Stats to reserve your spot. We’ll see you on Wed at 10:00 AM PST/1:00 PM EST!

Save my spot!

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

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Stranger Things Have Happened! http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/15/stranger-things-have-happened/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/15/stranger-things-have-happened/#respond Mon, 15 Sep 2014 17:10:53 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25683 ]]> How to Get Accepted to Top B-Schools with Low StatsHBS published their class of 2016 profile and if you look closely, you’ll find something very strange…

Someone was admitted with a 510 GMAT score!

While this probably WON’T happen to you (we need to be realistic!), it sure is nice to know that anything is possible in the world of MBA admissions. You just gotta give it your all!

Learn how to present yourself spectacularly, despite your low scores, when you attend our upcoming webinar, How to Get Accepted to Top B-Schools with Low Stats!

Date: Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Time: 10:00 AM PST/1:00 PM EST

Space is running out! Reserve your spot for How to Get Accepted to B-School with Low Stats now!

Save my spot! Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

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How to Deal with Deadlines http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/14/how-to-deal-with-deadlines/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/14/how-to-deal-with-deadlines/#respond Sun, 14 Sep 2014 17:07:10 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25510 ]]> Dealing with Deadlines

You don’t want to feel rushed and you don’t want to miss your deadline.

You don’t want to feel rushed (stress can lead to mistakes) and you don’t want to miss your deadline. So what can you do to stay on top of your game and submit your applications before the buzzer?

1. Set yourself a schedule and work backwards from your deadlines. Allow time for holidays, sleep, exercise, and of course work.

2. Focus first on the applications with the earliest deadlines. It wouldn’t make sense to work on the application with the further deadline first when you have a looming deadline for another application right around the corner!

3. Work on applications one at a time. Adapt essays from your first application, when possible, to later applications. However never merely paste in an essay because the question is similar. Customize it for this application and this program. Trying to write more than one application at once will only lead to confusion, not to mention unintentional overlapping of material – forgetting to change just one Harvard to Stanford shows a level of sloppiness that Stanford just won’t stand for!

4. If you fall behind, consider dropping/postponing an application to maintain quality overall. Pushing off an application to a subsequent round or the following year is better than submitting a subpar application.

Good luck!

Learn how to use sample essays to create an exemplary essay of your own! Click here to download our free report!

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

• 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Application Essay & Personal Statements
Resourceful Essay Recycling
• The Biggest Application Essay Mistake [Video]

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Defining Her Strengths, Researching Schools and Choosing NYU Stern http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/12/mba-applicant-interview-with-nyu-stern-student-lenore/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/12/mba-applicant-interview-with-nyu-stern-student-lenore/#respond Fri, 12 Sep 2014 17:05:14 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24882 ]]> Click here to read more interviews with current MBA Students!

Be reflective. Make friends. Take full advantage of the opportunity.

This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Lenore, a student at NYU Stern.

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What is your favorite ice cream flavor?

Lenore: I was born in Philadelphia and raised there and in the suburbs of the city. DC was one of my favorite places to visit growing up. Since it was just a short trip from home and my younger siblings, I was really excited to enroll at American University for my undergrad. I went in thinking I’d study international service, but switched to finance and marketing specializations after my first class in the business school.

Ice cream? Probably Ben & Jerry’s Half Baked or S’mores. But sometimes Turkey Hill Chocolate Peanut Butter. I guess it depends on the day. :)

Accepted: What did you do after finishing college?

Lenore: By the time I finished college I had worked in business communications, marketing for a start-up, and nonprofit business development. I didn’t yet understand how I could bring together what I thought were disparate interests in leadership, social impact, and business, so I would take a job and then keep freelancing or consulting or volunteering on the side, always trying to weave together those passions. I would throw myself into projects or jobs, but had a hard time feeling totally satisfied by any one of them. For example: a friend and I were hired to overhaul a local restaurant’s operations; then I was assistant director of an education nonprofit during a strategic redirection. In 2010 I moved to Haiti and worked as a project manager on a program for small businesses and social enterprises. Each of those experiences was enriching and educational for me, and helped me define my strengths and interests.

Accepted: What made you decide to pursue an MBA?

Lenore: Even though I went back and forth on how I would use it, I was always sure I would pursue an MBA. I love solving business problems, and believe that business plays an integral role, potentially a hugely positive one, in our communities and society.

My MBA application journey was an opportunity to identify patterns and common successes in the pieces of my professional background. Specifically, I started to recognize that the moments I was most proud of were those when I partnered with leaders to help shape their work and achieve success in their organizations. Through the admissions process and my own self-discovery, I recognized that working as a business and executive coach would allow me to combine each of the things I was passionate about.

Accepted: How will your MBA help you pursue your entrepreneur goals?

Lenore: An MBA deepens my business acumen, allowing me to support leaders more effectively. It also allows me the time to focus solely on my own professional development, which will make me a much better coach.

Accepted: How did you go about researching schools? Did you participate in any MBA fairs or events?

Lenore: I was first drawn to Stern when, during undergrad, I was looking for MBA programs with real-world opportunities to work in social enterprise. But I kept an open mind, and went to Forte Forums in Washington DC, listened to Forte webinars featuring admissions professionals from several schools, and visited as many of my target programs as I could. I also made a complicated spreadsheet and rating system to track the merits of each school! It was a long process, but I had a great roadmap as a member of the Forte Foundation and the Consortium for Graduate Study in Management.

Accepted: I’m sure MBA applicants reading your interview would be interested in seeing your spreadsheet. Could you share it with us?

Lenore: Unfortunately I no longer have the computer on which I created the spreadsheets, but here’s my suggestion if someone were to want to create one:

Create a spreadsheet to keep track of important details on each program. My rows were school names, and columns were titled with the features I valued most. I was looking for a program with robust social enterprise and entrepreneurship programs, an urban location, opportunities to travel, and flexibility in the curriculum (but of course these will be different for each applicant). I also took business school rankings into account, and I made a column for notes as well. In as many cases as possible, I went to the school and visited the campus. In some cases, I resorted to reading everything I could find online, and then supplemented that with conversations with current students and alum. Each time I learned more about a program, I tracked the information in my spreadsheet–I probably added to it over the course of two years and looked at 12 schools in total. The final addition to my spreadsheet was a column for my own personal rating of each school based all that I had learned. My personal ratings were also reflective of the intangibles, such as how well I connected with students during campus visits, as I think those are just as important.

All things considered, NYU Stern came out on top, validating the assumption I had made even before doing any research. Despite that I came up with the same result, the spreadsheet process was helpful in that I kept an open mind and it supported me in making an informed decision.

Accepted: Can you talk about your experience with the Forte Foundation? How have they helped you in your MBA admissions journey?

Lenore: I visited the Forte Foundation website quite regularly throughout my admissions process. The practical resources and webinars were especially helpful. I also valued the offline community that Forte creates; I met a GMAT study buddy and many friends at Forte events. Maybe most importantly, I draw inspiration from the Forte community, which is comprised of so many women living such full lives, pursuing and accomplishing their dreams.

Accepted: Which other schools did you apply to? Why did you choose NYU Stern?

Lenore: I ultimately applied to only two schools: NYU Stern and Georgetown, and was accepted to both. As I mentioned, I was interested in NYU even during undergrad, as the program offered an ideal match for my values and goals. NYU Stern provides an “education in possible,” and encourages broad and disruptive thinking. That is just the type of approach I planned to take with my degree and in my work.

Accepted: What are your 3 top tips for MBA applicants?

Lenore:

1. Be reflective. Your essays and interviews will be stronger if you know yourself and your goals. This process will give you the opportunity to tell your story often, so take the time reflect on what you would like to say.

2. Make friends. There are SO many resources out there for aspiring MBAs that you won’t be able to keep up with all of them yourself. Find buddies (through Forte and other networks) who are going through the process as well and can encourage and support you.

3. Take full advantage of the opportunity. You are making a significant investment, so get all that you can out of the process and the experience. Ask questions, make connections, visit schools, attend webinars: whatever you need to do to be informed and excited about pursuing your degree.

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages

Thank you Lenore for sharing your story with us!

Attend the Forte Forum 

Accepted.com

 

Related Resources:

• NYU Stern 2015 MBA Questions, Tips, and Deadlines
Forte Helps Women in Business Thrive: Interview with Elissa Sangster
• Interviews with current MBA students

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MBA Admissions Tip: Dealing with a Low GPA http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/12/mba-admissions-tip-dealing-with-a-low-gpa-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/12/mba-admissions-tip-dealing-with-a-low-gpa-2/#respond Fri, 12 Sep 2014 16:11:27 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25583 ]]> How to Get Accepted to Top B-Schools with Low Stats: Free Webinar

Prove that today you have the ability to excel.

Explaining a low GPA can be difficult and it requires you to examine your GPA’s trend. Consider the following scenarios:

• Scenario A – 3.0 GPA, upward trend – You goofed off for your first few semesters and didn’t weigh the consequences. You failed some classes and started out with an embarrassingly low GPA not because of lack of ability, but because of immaturity. Mid-sophomore year you wised up and continuously hit above the 3.8 mark for the rest of your undergraduate career.

• Scenario B – 3.0 GPA, downward trend – Your college experience started out with a motivated streak of genius—three solid 4.0 semesters in a row. But then…things took a turn towards apathy and laziness and your grades began to suffer significantly.

• Scenario C – 3.0 GPA, static – You work hard, but not too hard. You take some classes seriously, and some not so much. You never really cared about school or grades to really put the effort in. A few years out of school and a life-changing career move have motivated you to new heights and you want to apply to b-school. But now you need to deal with a less-than-impressive record.

Let’s interpret each of these scenarios:

• The student in Scenario A doesn’t really have too much to worry about (unless he’s applying to a top MBA program for which a 3.0 GPA is a significant hurdle). Many students early in their college careers have a couple of bad semesters because of immaturity. Your grades went up, proving your capabilities and your increased maturity.

• Scenario B’s student is in a bit more of a bind. She’s proved her abilities by acing those first few semesters, but why the dramatic downturn? Did things get too difficult for her? Does she have trouble performing under pressure? Or does she just not care about improving and perfecting her academic capabilities?

• The problem of mediocrity looms over Scenario C’s student. This student will need to prove his skill level if he wants to be considered for a spot in the next MBA class.

Let’s analyze a recovery plan for each of our students:

• Student A doesn’t need to prove ability as much as motivation and seriousness, which he may have already proven with his last few years of work. He may want to ask one of his recommenders to vouch for his maturity and steadfastness. A high GMAT/GRE score will help.

• Student B will need to enroll in some college courses to prove her verbal and/or quantitative abilities (especially if her test scores weren’t so great). She’ll want to make sure her essays express her newfound motivation as well as her keen writing abilities. Her essays should include clear anecdotes that illustrate how she’s matured since her last few semesters and how her skills should be judged based on recent work experience, rather than past college experience.

• Student C is in a similar boat as Student B. He’ll want to retake some of his math and English courses and he’ll want to get solid A’s this time. B’s and C’s just won’t cut it if he wants to prove he’s b-school material. Strong essays and letters of recommendation will also boost Student C’s chances of acceptance.

Of course many of you will not be like Students A, B, or C. Your grade dive may have resulted from illness or family crisis or circumstances beyond your control. Or perhaps steady, mediocre grades resulted from your working 20-30 hours per week to support yourself through school. There are many other scenarios too. The key is to prove that today you have the ability to excel in your target MBA programs and that the circumstances that contributed to the poor marks in college no longer affect you.

Moral of the story: A single low number can be explained or put in a less damaging context with hard work and a solid application strategy.

Join our upcoming webinar: How to Get Accepted to Top B-Schools with Low Stats!

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

• Low GMAT Score Advice
• How to Handle a Low GMAT Quant Score
• How to Handle a Low GMAT Verbal Score

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Princeton University Master in Finance: Is It Right for You, and Are You Right for Princeton? http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/11/princeton-university-master-in-finance-is-it-right-for-you-and-are-you-right-for-princeton/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/11/princeton-university-master-in-finance-is-it-right-for-you-and-are-you-right-for-princeton/#respond Thu, 11 Sep 2014 17:36:33 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25572 ]]> Click here to listen to our recent podcast episode, Masters in Finance: What You Need to Know!

So what’s the ticket to heaven?

Being amazing is just a qualification for the Princeton University Master in Finance program. But if you qualify, get admitted (about 30 out of 600 applicants do), and choose to attend (about 25 out of that 30), I believe you enter heaven.

 • All your classmates are not just extremely bright and passionate about finance; they also represent experience from across the industry – and they are chosen in part because they can communicate their insights from that experience.

• There is 100% recruitment for summer internships at the most desirable institutions, and almost 100% post-graduation employment (2014). These internships/jobs span the globe—Mexico City, Singapore, Hong Kong, London, and various cities in the US as well as NYC.

• A curriculum that is intensive and deep; following the core you can either develop your own study program or pursue 1of 3 course tracks: Financial Engineering and Risk Management, Quantitative Asset Management and Macroeconomic Forecasting, and Financial Technologies.

• Career “boot camps” where alumni, industry experts, and academics help you formulate a career path that is meaningful to you and productively employs your skills, talents, interests.

• World-renowned faculty (think Alan Blinder, Paul Krugman) from multiple disciplines who don’t just teach sophisticated skills but who engage passionately in ideas, thereby helping you become a thought leader in the field.

So what’s the ticket to heaven?

Academics – A high GPA and a transcript that reflects a strong quantitative component – many applicants have degrees in subjects such as mathematics, economics, and engineering, but it is not required and they have admitted people from a range of disciplines (though there are certain math requirements). A grad degree is “a plus but not required.”

Standardized tests – Both GMAT and GRE are accepted; the median quant GRE score is 167 and the average quant GMAT score is 49.5. That said, a high quant score doesn’t make up for weak quant coursework. If your undergrad school was not taught in English (or if it was taught in English in a non-English speaking country), either the TOEFL or IELTS is also required.

Interviews are by invitation only, and selected applicants will be notified. Others are discouraged from seeking interviews.

Experience – Professional experience is not required; however the adcom wants to see some practical industry exposure via internships at least – they note that potential employers look for this experience. So the program is open to new graduates who have had an internship or two – but make sure you have something substantive to say based on your experience; your competition will.

Qualitative factors – You may be surprised that in the adcom’s eyes it is the qualitative factors that “set applicants apart”! The adcom specifically looks for strong communication ability, expecting its students to contribute within a highly intelligent cohort and to become leaders in the industry. More than anything, it seeks passion for finance. Even if you’re a quant geek, don’t think there’s a formula for this passion – it must be expressed through application contents holistically. The adcom members will know it when they see it.

Finally, be sure this is the right degree for you. As the website states, it’s not the right program for people pursuing corporate finance or investment bank M&A; but the MiF “is becoming the preferred degree in the trading and asset management areas of the I-bank.”

 Click here for the lowdown on one of the most up and coming specialized masters programs in the business world.

Cindy Tokumitsu By , author and co-author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports, including Why MBA and Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted.com.

Related Resources:

• The Facts About Financial Services
• Where Does Wall St. Hire: U.S. B-Schools Sending Grads into Financial Services
What is Passion in Admissions?

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The Tuck School of Business and the Global Insight Requirement http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/11/tuck-school-of-business-the-global-insight-requirement/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/11/tuck-school-of-business-the-global-insight-requirement/#respond Thu, 11 Sep 2014 16:14:54 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25651 ]]> Click here to listen to the full conversation with Dr. Phillip Stocken!

On September 3, 2014, the Tuck School of Business introduced the new and exciting Global Insight Requirement.

Listen to the recording of our conversation with Dr. Phillip Stocken, the Associate Dean for the MBA Program at Tuck, for the scoop on the new requirement and more info about the b-school.

00:02:33 – The structure of the Tuck MBA Program.

00:05:15 – What is the Tuck Global Insight Requirement?

00:13:32 – About the first year project and where it meets the new program.

00:17:26 – What will define the Global Insight requirement as a success.

00:19:38 – Tuck alum are by far the most loyal MBA grads: What is the secret?

00:24:14 – The faculty cooperation that makes Tuck unique.

00:28:06 – What do Tuck students have in common?

00:30:10 – What Dr. Stocken wishes MBA students would know before starting b-school.

00:34:07 – Important advice for MBA applicants.

Listen to the full conversation to learn more!*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Related Links:

Tuck Announces New Global Insight Requirement 
• 
Tuck School of Business 
How to Get Accepted to Top B-Schools with Low Stats

Related Shows:

A B-School Professor on Main Street, USA 
• A Transformational Year: The MIT Sloan Fellows Program
Global Business Leadership at Wharton’s Lauder Institute

Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk:

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MBA Admissions A-Z: 26 Great Tips - Download your free copy!

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http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/11/tuck-school-of-business-the-global-insight-requirement/feed/ 0 Dartmouth Tuck,podcast On September 3, 2014, the Tuck School of Business introduced the new and exciting Global Insight Requirement. - Listen to the recording of our conversation with Dr. Phillip Stocken, the Associate Dean for the MBA Program at Tuck, On September 3, 2014, the Tuck School of Business introduced the new and exciting Global Insight Requirement. Listen to the recording of our conversation with Dr. Phillip Stocken, the Associate Dean for the MBA Program at Tuck, for the scoop on the new requirement and more info about the b-school. 00:02:33 – The structure of the Tuck MBA Program. 00:05:15 – What is the Tuck Global Insight Requirement? 00:13:32 – About the first year project and where it meets the new program. 00:17:26 – What will define the Global Insight requirement as a success. 00:19:38 – Tuck alum are by far the most loyal MBA grads: What is the secret? 00:24:14 – The faculty cooperation that makes Tuck unique. 00:28:06 – What do Tuck students have in common? 00:30:10 – What Dr. Stocken wishes MBA students would know before starting b-school. 00:34:07 – Important advice for MBA applicants. *Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com. Related Links: • Tuck Announces New Global Insight Requirement  • Tuck School of Business  • How to Get Accepted to Top B-Schools with Low Stats Related Shows: • A B-School Professor on Main Street, USA  • A Transformational Year: The MIT Sloan Fellows Program • Global Business Leadership at Wharton’s Lauder Institute Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk: Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no 37:49
MBA Essays That Earn an Automatic Rejection http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/10/mba-essays-that-earn-an-automatic-rejection/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/10/mba-essays-that-earn-an-automatic-rejection/#respond Wed, 10 Sep 2014 18:56:05 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25393 ]]> Download your free copy of 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your MBA Application Essays!

Don’t make these 3 mistakes!

You could have a perfect GMAT score, a 4.0 from Yale, and a list of extracurriculars as long as your leg, and still end up in the reject pile for transgressing any one of the following three MBA application sins:

1. Lying or lacking credibility

Lying on your application is literally one of the dumbest things you can do – it’s up there with shooting yourself in the foot. And when I say lying, I mean large scale hoaxes all the way down to the smallest, whitest lie, or even an exaggeration. Stick to the facts. Play it safe. If you worked at a job for six months, don’t say you were there for nine. If your job was assistant manager, don’t say you were manager. If you raised $5000 for a fundraiser, don’t make it $10K. If you have a criminal record – no matter how big or small – own up to it; not mentioning it, won’t make it disappear from your record. I’m not sure why people think they can get away with lying – it frequently comes back to haunt them.

2. Revealing arrogance

Nobody likes a showoff, so when you’re applying to b-school, I suggest you ditch your know-it-all, arrogant attitude at the door. Saying things like “I’m the only one who…” when you couldn’t possibly know if you are the only one, or “Thanks to my efforts, my team succeeded…” when more likely your team succeeded due to team collaboration, show that you think you deserve all the credit. That’s not a very nice attitude, and while schools do want high achievers, movers and shakers, they also want nice, and modest, people. If your essays reflect an attitude of “You’ll be lucky to have me because I’m just so great” or “I deserve to be accepted,” you’re dinged.

3. Sloppiness

A single typo won’t look good, but it won’t give you the automatic axe. When I say sloppiness, I’m talking about serious, messy writing, like writing Harvard when you mean Booth, or just littering your essay with grammatical errors, extra words that don’t belong, and misspellings. Forgetting to submit a section of the application is an obvious no-no, as is just writing very generically or superficially – clearly without much thought or attention. This latter type of carelessness reveals sloppy thinking more than sloppy writing; it is equally damaging.

Rule of thumb: Be honest, be modest, be neat! And of course, a perfect GMAT score won’t hurt.

For more sure-fire ways to get rejected, please see “The MBA Admissions Directors’ Recipe for Rejection.”

MBA 5 Fatal Flaws

Accepted.com

 

Related Resources:

Can You Get Accepted After Doing Something Stupid?
Important Admissions Tip: Be Yourself!
How to Edit Your MBA Application Essays

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Vault’s 2015 Banking Rankings http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/09/vaults-2015-banking-rankings/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/09/vaults-2015-banking-rankings/#respond Tue, 09 Sep 2014 17:07:53 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25575 ]]> The following banks were rated based on the issues that matter to bankers: prestige, hours, compensation, work-life balance, firm culture, overall satisfaction, business outlook, and other “quality of life” categories. For each of these parameters, other than prestige, the banking professionals rated their own place of work. They rated other intuitions and not their own for prestige.

And here are the rankings!

Where Does Wall St. Hire: U.S. B-Schools Sending Grads into Financial Services

Vault Bank Rankings 2015

(See the full rankings here.)

Here are some highlights from the rankings:

• Goldman Sachs ranks in 1st place for prestige, but for quality of life issues, specifically hours and work-life balance, it ranks in 15th place. Blackstone, on the other hand, ranked in the top 5 for each of the quality of life categories.

• Overall, work-life balance ratings are on the rise within these top companies, as are diversity ratings.

• Two years ago, J.P. Morgan ranked in 1st place; this year they’ve dropped to 4th place.

• Big jumpers include Moelis & Company (23rd last year to 12th this year) and UBS AG (26th last year to 19th this year), as well as Canaccord Genuity and Guggenheim Securities, LLC which both made it to top 25 (17th and 24th place respectively) this year and were not ranked at all last year.

• For more analysis, please see “Vault’s 2015 Banking Rankings are Live.”

Source: Vault Banking Rankings

MBA in Sight: Focus on Finance

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

• Which Business School Will Get Me to Wall Street?
• The Facts About Financial Services
• Where Does Wall St. Hire: U.S. B-Schools Sending Grads into Financial Services

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Hey You – Yeah, You With the Not Quite 780 GMAT Score… http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/08/hey-you-yeah-you-with-the-not-quite-780-gmat-score/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/08/hey-you-yeah-you-with-the-not-quite-780-gmat-score/#respond Mon, 08 Sep 2014 16:40:13 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25550 ]]> How to Get Accepted to Top B-Schools with Low Stats: Click here to register!What?! You have a low GMAT/GPA score and still haven’t signed up for our upcoming webinar, How to Get Accepted to B-School with Low Stats?

Well consider this post your personal reminder to reserve an hour of your time and attend THE webinar that will help you overcome your less-than-desirable GPA or GMAT score and apply successfully to your top choice MBA programs!

The details:

Date: September 17, 2014

Time: 10:00 AM PT/1:00 PM ET

Registration link: How to Get Accepted to B-School with Low Stats (Registration is free, but required.)

Save my spot!

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

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Get Accepted to the Wharton School Webinar Recording Available! http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/07/get-accepted-to-the-wharton-school-webinar-recording-available/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/07/get-accepted-to-the-wharton-school-webinar-recording-available/#respond Sun, 07 Sep 2014 16:35:30 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25536 ]]> Wharton hopefuls – this one’s for you! Our recent webinar, Get Accepted to the Wharton School, is now available on our website for instant downloading or on-demand viewing.

GetAcceptedToWharton

Who is the webinar for?

Get Accepted to the Wharton School is geared towards all Wharton applicants – U.S. applicants, international applicants, reapplicants, young applicants, older applicants…anyone with their eye on the Wharton prize.

The webinar is loaded with specific, concrete tips that will guide applicants through the Wharton admissions process, from creating a stand-out application to acing the Wharton group interview…and everything in between!

Watch the webinar

View Get Accepted to the Wharton School now!

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

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TexasWannaBeCali: 24 Year Old MBA Applicant Dreaming of the Beach http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/05/texaswannabecali-24-year-old-mba-applicant-dreaming-of-the-beach/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/05/texaswannabecali-24-year-old-mba-applicant-dreaming-of-the-beach/#respond Fri, 05 Sep 2014 16:22:51 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24572 ]]> Click here for more MBA applicant interviews. This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with MBA applicant bloggers, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at the MBA application process. And now…introducing our anonymous blogger, TexasWannaBeCali.

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What is your current job?

TexasWannaBeCali: I am from the great state of Texas. Dallas to be exact (Go Cowboys!). I went to college out of state to a nearby SEC school and graduated with a BS in Finance in 2012. After graduation, I joined a corporate tax advisory firm that was headquartered back in Dallas, and have been there ever since, working as a tax consultant on a team that specializes in the healthcare industry with a client base that includes most Fortune 500 healthcare services companies/hospitals and medical device vendors.

Accepted: Do you plan on staying in your current industry post-MBA, or changing to a new field/career?

TexasWannaBeCali: Post MBA, I would like to move into a corporate finance role at a big pharma/biotech company. I want to use my knowledge of the healthcare industry that I have gained from tax consulting on the provider side to be a valuable asset on the industry side of things.

Accepted: What stage of the application process are you up to so far? What has been the most challenging step and how did you work to overcome it?

TexasWannaBeCali: Right now, I am entering my last month of GMAT studying as well as drafting outlines to start essay writing. I would honestly say the most challenging part of the application process is not necessarily completing a certain requirement, they all take a little blood, sweat and tears, but more so being able to balance everything while still working 45+ hours a week.

I’ve found that determination, organization, and not being afraid to ask questions can alleviate a lot of the struggles.

Accepted: Where do you plan on applying to b-school? Will you be applying to any safety schools? Why or why not?

TexasWannaBeCali: I am applying to Anderson, Haas, Fuqua and McCombs. After a lot of thought, I decided not to apply to any safety schools this time around. I am only 24 years old, if I don’t get into one of my top schools, I’d rather take time to reflect on what I could’ve done better and try ten times harder the next time around than go somewhere just to go.

Accepted: So…why California? What’s the draw to California in general and to UCLA and Haas in particular?

TexasWannaBeCali: Yes I have been kind of obsessed with idea of living in California lately. I’ve lived in the South my whole life, and would love the opportunity to explore a new place…and be close to the beach. I love the culture, weather, lifestyle, and just the abundance of things to do there.

The fact that California is home to some of the top companies in the rapidly growing biotech and life sciences industry has made UCLA and Haas front runners in my school wish list. Both programs offer substantial post-MBA opportunities in healthcare because of brand name, proximity and an outstanding curriculum targeted at excelling in the industry and I would love to be a part of either one.

Accepted: As someone on the younger side of the applicant age spectrum, how do you plan on making up for what you lack in years of work experience?

TexasWannaBeCali: The age aspect has been one of my biggest internal struggles. I know adcoms will want to know more than usual why an MBA is necessary for me right now, and not 1 or 2 years down the road and then if I am admitted, what knowledge I can bring. I think that emphasizing that not only is the quality of my work experience high despite the quantity, but also the fact that at matriculation I will have 3+ years of consistent on the job learning from the same firm. My job has enabled me to take on a lot of responsibility and leadership roles at such a young stage of my career and I have learned so much from being able to build upon my knowledge with every new project and/or client I take on.

Accepted: Why did you decide to blog about your experience? What have you gained from the experience? What do you hope others will learn?

TexasWannaBeCali: I initially started blogging to organize my thoughts and ideas as I made my way through the b-school application process. I can get overwhelmed rather easily so being able to track my progress in one place would keep me somewhat sane.

Blogging has been a great outlet for giving and receiving feedback whether it’s from other first time applicants, re-applicants, or students that have successfully been accepted into their dream schools. At first I was honestly shocked people even took the time to read what I had to say, but I’m glad they did because I love reading their stories too. It’s like a little network of people wholeheartedly supporting each other and I am so happy I made the decision to start blogging. I would recommend it to anyone making the lofty decision to go back to school, you won’t regret it.

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages.

You can read more about TexasWannaBeCali’s b-school journey by checking out her blog, TexasWannaBeCali. Thank you TexasWannaBeCali for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

How to Choose the Best MBA Program for You

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

School Specific 2015 MBA Application Essay Tips
• IV with a Duke MBA Pursuing a Career in Healthcare
MBA Applicant Interviews

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See Jane Get into B-School with Low Stats http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/04/see-jane-get-into-b-school-with-low-stats/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/04/see-jane-get-into-b-school-with-low-stats/#respond Thu, 04 Sep 2014 20:56:42 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25463 ]]> See Jane.
See Jane Study.
See Jane sit for GMAT.
See Jane sad with low score.
See Jane attend Accepted.com webinar.

See Jane jump.
See Jane go to dream b-school!

We want to see you go to your dream school too.

Low stats cover SEPT2014 PROOF2

Join us live on Wednesday, September 17, 2014 at 10:00 AM PST/1:00 PM EST for How to Get Accepted to B-School with Low Stats – a webinar that will help you, like Jane, learn how to overcome a low GMAT/GPA and apply successfully to b-school.

Registration is required (and free). Reserve your spot for How to Get Accepted to B-School with Low Stats now!

Save my spot!

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Johnson at Cornell University 2015 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/04/johnson-at-cornell-university-2015-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/04/johnson-at-cornell-university-2015-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/#respond Thu, 04 Sep 2014 16:48:43 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24602 ]]> Check out the rest of our school-specific MBA essay tips!Are you looking for a close-knit, collaborative MBA program focused on experiential learning, committed to innovation, and further differentiated by an immersion learning component? Plus, it’s located on an Ivy League campus with all the resources and networking opportunities the larger community provides. Still interested? You’ve found it at Cornell Johnson.

I attended a class there last March and was really impressed by the dynamic professor and lively classroom interaction. I am also pleased to note that Cornell Johnson is letting you link to your LinkedIn profile as part of your MBA application. In addition to saving you time, this optional step allows Cornell Johnson to see you as a potential employer would.

This innovation highlights two realities in MBA admissions:

1. Social media count. For LinkedIn in particular, keep your profile up-to-date and professional. Make sure it’s something you’re proud of and happy to have others view.  

2. Much of MBA admissions is driven by prospective employment at graduation. Schools want to know that you have the experience to attract recruiter attention and to land a great post-MBA job. Many, many schools will at some point in the application evaluation process seek input from career services if they have any doubt about the attainability of your post-MBA goals. Let your profile and any information about your professional experience speak to that point.

Finally since your LinkedIn profile doesn’t have the tight limits you have in your MBA application, you may be able to provide more context and information there than here. However, no one wants to read a detailed autobiography on LinkedIn. Keep your job descriptions within reason if you do give Cornell access to your profile.   

Essays:

1. You are the author for the book of Your Life Story. In 2000 characters (including formatting characters) or less, please write the table of contents for the book in the space provided or upload it as an attachment. Note: approach this essay with your unique style. We value creativity and authenticity.

Have a little fun with the question. You certainly have a lot of options and flexibility here. You can reveal something about your youth, influential experiences or people, challenges, hobbies, interests, passions… Perhaps where you intend to be in 30 years. It’s Your Life Story. 

2. Targeted Job Type: What is the job that you would like to have immediately upon graduating with your MBA? (2000 character limit, including formatting characters)

Be concrete in describing what you would like to do. “Pursue a position that I find personally satisfying” or “Have a positive impact on society” are non-starters.  What task do you want to perform and in what industry do you want to perform it? The answer to that question is the foundation of your response to Cornell’s question.

2000 characters is a little less than 400 words so you may give a little background as to how this goal developed or why your previous experience when combined with a Johnson MBA, will help you achieve it.

3. Post-Collegiate Activities: List community activities (clubs, church, civic, etc.) and professional associations you contributed to since graduation from college. Please include the organization name, your role, hours dedicated, elected offices held, and dates of participation. (2000 character limit, including formatting characters)

Depending on how many activities you have, you may be able to go into a little detail or you may need to just stick to the facts. As much as possible, highlight evidence of impact, leadership, and collaborative teamwork. Quantify if you can.

4. Collegiate Activities and Employment: List your extracurricular activities while in college in order of importance to you. You may include details about your positions and the time commitment, honors or awards received, and dates of participation. The list may also include part-time and summer employment held while in college. Please list your employer, job title, responsibilities, hours per week, and the dates for each position. (2000 character limit, including formatting characters)

Very similar to #3, highlight impact, leadership and teamwork. Quantify when possible.  The one twist with this question: list the extracurricular activities in order of importance to you.  

5. Hobbies and Activities: Please describe any hobbies or activities that hold special significance for you. (2000 character limit, including formatting characters)

What do you do regularly when you aren’t working? Which of these activities would you like Johnson to know about? If you have too many to fit in the 2000 character limit, then choose those that show you contributing innovatively to your community and taking initiative. 

Optional Essay: Complete this essay if you would like to add additional details regarding your candidacy. For instance, if you believe one or more aspects of your application (e.g., undergraduate record or test scores) do not accurately reflect your potential for success at the Johnson School. (2000 character limit, including formatting characters)

Clearly you can use this optional to add context for a weakness in your record. Either a low stat or a period of unemployment or some dip in an otherwise strong record of achievement.However the wording is pretty open. If there is something positive or if you want to provide context for an achievement — challenges you overcome or circumstances that made your accomplishment even more noteworthy — you can also do so here. 

If you would like professional guidance with your Cornell Johnson MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our  MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Cornell Johnson application. 

Cornell Johnson 2015 MBA Application Deadlines:

Application Deadline Decisions Released
Round 1 October 1, 2014 December 17, 2014
Round 2 January 7, 2015 March 25, 2015
Round 3 March 11, 2015 May 13, 2015
Rolling June 3, 2015 – Final day to submit Rolling admissions

Click here for more school-specific MBA application essay tips!

Apply with an admissions pro at your side! Click here to learn more.

Linda Abraham By , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

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The GMAT Score Preview and Application Boxes http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/04/the-gmat-score-preview-and-application-boxes/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/04/the-gmat-score-preview-and-application-boxes/#respond Thu, 04 Sep 2014 14:49:25 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25482 ]]> Linda Abraham on the GMAT Score PreviewMBA applicants, pay heed: two major b-school admissions topics have been on Linda’s mind and in this week’s episode of Admissions Straight Talk, she shares the word.

Listen to the full recording of the show for some very important advice about the GMAT score preview and the growing significance of short application questions.

00:01:30 – The new GMAT score preview feature.

00:02:48 – Ravi’s mistake and 4 decisions to make before test day.

00:09:37 – The shrinking MBA application and the increasing importance of  short answers and boxes.

Listen to the full conversation to learn more!

*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Related Links:

•  Preview Your GMAT Score (from the official website of the GMAT)
•  The GMAT in MBA Admissions: Fact and Fiction
•  Get Accepted to Harvard Business School
•  Get Accepted to Stanford Graduate School of Business

Related Shows:

• GMAT, GRE, SAT, and All Things Test Prep
• How to Edit Your Application Essays
• Linda Abraham on Overcoming Weaknesses

Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk:

Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes!     Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in Stitcher!

Got GMAT Questions? Visit GMAT 101 for advice.

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http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/04/the-gmat-score-preview-and-application-boxes/feed/ 0 GMAT,podcast MBA applicants, pay heed: two major b-school admissions topics have been on Linda’s mind and in this week’s episode of Admissions Straight Talk, she shares the word. - Listen to the full recording of the show for some very important advice about t... MBA applicants, pay heed: two major b-school admissions topics have been on Linda’s mind and in this week’s episode of Admissions Straight Talk, she shares the word. Listen to the full recording of the show for some very important advice about the GMAT score preview and the growing significance of short application questions. 00:01:30 – The new GMAT score preview feature. 00:02:48 – Ravi’s mistake and 4 decisions to make before test day. 00:09:37 – The shrinking MBA application and the increasing importance of  short answers and boxes. *Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com. Related Links: •  Preview Your GMAT Score (from the official website of the GMAT) •  The GMAT in MBA Admissions: Fact and Fiction •  Get Accepted to Harvard Business School •  Get Accepted to Stanford Graduate School of Business Related Shows: • GMAT, GRE, SAT, and All Things Test Prep • How to Edit Your Application Essays • Linda Abraham on Overcoming Weaknesses Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk:       Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no 17:22
GMAT vs. GRE: Harvard Business School Weighs In http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/03/gmat-vs-gre-harvard-business-school-weighs-in/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/03/gmat-vs-gre-harvard-business-school-weighs-in/#respond Wed, 03 Sep 2014 17:47:51 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25455 ]]> HBS’s admissions director, Dee Leopold shares a helpful post on how HBS approaches the GMAT versus GRE issue. I’ll preface this with her preface: Please don’t over-crunch!

In short, the HBS view is agnostic. It’s not about which exam or even the overall score, but about the component scores and how they play into the individual applicant’s profile. For example (and this is her example), an engineer with highly quantitative work won’t need to prove her quant score as much as she’ll need to show off her verbal abilities with a high verbal score (either GMAT or GRE). An English major, on the other hand, will need to step up the quant component of his exam (again, either one) to show that he’ll be able to handle the quantitative work he’ll encounter at HBS.

Here’s a little chart from the original post:

Check out our GMAT 101 Page for great advice and info!

While this data may cause some of you quant jocks to jump to the conclusion that HBS really prefers the GMAT, remember the preface: “Don’t over-crunch.” If you only look at the stats in the table, you may conclude that GMAT takers have a slightly higher acceptance rate and that the GMAT is “preferred.” However that increased rate is probably more reflective of the make-up of GMAT-takers versus GRE-takers. People in the business world who are only pursuing an MBA (and not other degrees) are more likely to take the GMAT. It’s possible that applicants with weaker scores may lean toward the GRE or applicants with liberal arts backgrounds (and weaker quant skills) may have already taken the GRE. Hence the lower acceptance rate may not reflect any preference on Harvard’s part, but more a preference in the applicant pool.

Last point: HBS applicants need to choose to submit either the GRE or GMAT – and not both.

For more info, see the original post.

Applying to Harvard Business School? Check out our HBS 2015 application tips!

Accepted.com

 

 

Related Resources:

• GMAT, GRE, SAT, and All Things Test Prep
• That GMAT Score: Implications for Your MBA Application, a free webinar.
• Harvard Business School Zone

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Top 10 Most Expensive Private Business Schools in the U.S. http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/02/top-10-most-expensive-private-business-schools-in-the-u-s/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/02/top-10-most-expensive-private-business-schools-in-the-u-s/#respond Tue, 02 Sep 2014 17:16:52 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25325 ]]> In 2013-2014, b-school prices at private, elite business schools in the U.S. increased about $3,000 since the previous academic year. The average tuition for these 10 costly programs is almost $13,000 more than the average tuition of all ranked programs.

By contrast, one of the least expensive schools (not listed below) is Brigham Young’s Marriott School of Management with tuition and fees at $22,560 (and only $11,280 for students of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints faith).

Check out our B-School Zones to learn more about the top MBA programs!

Source: U.S. News “The Short List”

Check out our free webinar: How to Pay for Your MBA

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Related Resources:

• Which B-Schools Offer the Most Scholarships?
• CommonBond’s Story: A Revolution in Student Loans
• MBA Scholarships: How Do I Apply and What Should I Emphasize?

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Admissions Offers to International Grad Students Increase 9% Since 2013 http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/02/admissions-offers-to-international-grad-students-increase-9-since-2013/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/09/02/admissions-offers-to-international-grad-students-increase-9-since-2013/#respond Tue, 02 Sep 2014 17:10:32 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25428 ]]> Will you be studying abroad? Click here for some important information!

9% increase in grad school offers to international students

For the fourth year in a row, the Council of Graduate Schools (CGS) reported a 9% increase in graduate school offers to international students. Here are some highlights from the recent report (Findings from the 2014 CGS International Graduate Admissions Survey, Phase II: Final Applications and Initial Offers of Admission):

• There were fewer applications submitted by Chinese applicants in 2014 than in 2013, and no increase in acceptances, ending an eight-year streak of growth. Even with this decrease, Chinese students still make up the largest group of international representatives at U.S. graduate schools, at 37%.

• In India, there was an increase in the number of applications sent to U.S. graduate schools, and a 25% increase in initial admission offers. This follows a 27% increase the year before (2013).

• There was also an increase in offers to prospective students in Brazil (a 98% increase this year, after a 46% increase in 2013). Brazilian students still only make up 1% of the total number of offers to international students, even with this huge increase.

• Other regions with growth in offers of graduate school admission over the last year include Europe (2%), Africa (3%), Canada (4%), and the Middle East (9).

• Regions that experienced declines in offers include Mexico (-1%), Taiwan (-6%), and South Korea (-9%).

• The fields of study that saw the largest increase in initial offers of admission in 2014 were physical/earth sciences (13%), engineering (11%), “other” (7%), business (6%), social sciences/psychology (6%), life sciences (6%), arts/humanities (5%), and education (1%).

• Prospective international students received an increase in offers of admission in the following regions of the U.S. (from 2013-2014): the Midwest (12%), the West (9%), the South (9%), and the Northeast (8%).

According to Suzanne Ortega, CGS President, “American graduate schools continue to attract students from around the world. We should be excited about the fact that new growth is emerging from a host of different regions and nations. International students are important to the U.S. economy because our workforce will continue to face shortages of graduate-level talent over the next decade. To support our economic competitiveness, we should make it easier – for international graduates who wish to do so – to remain and work in the U.S. after completing their degrees.”

Click here for must-know info & advice for international students!

Accepted.com

 

Related Resources:

• Delivering STAR in an American Context
Get Your Game On, Prepping for Your Grad School Application 
Grad School Admissions 101

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Duke Fuqua 2015 MBA Essay Tips and Deadlines http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/31/duke-fuqua-2015-mba-essay-tips-and-deadlines/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/31/duke-fuqua-2015-mba-essay-tips-and-deadlines/#comments Sun, 31 Aug 2014 17:43:34 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24604 ]]> Want to learn more about Duke Fuqua? Click here!Leadership, teamwork, ethics, and a global approach to business are essential elements of the Duke Fuqua MBA, which is why you’ll need to make sure you express your passion for these ideals in your application essays. Impress the Fuqua adcom by positioning yourself as an innovative leader and team player, as someone who can see the big picture, work collaboratively, and shape global business.

My tips are in blue below. 

Three short answer questions and 2 essays are required from all applicants.

• Responses should use 1.5 line spacing and a font size no smaller than 10-point.
• Respond fully and concisely.
• Responses must be completed before submitting your application.
• Prepare your responses carefully. The Admissions Committee considers your answers important in the selection process.
• All essays are scanned using plagiarism detection software. Plagiarism is considered a cheating violation within the Honor Code and will not be tolerated in the admissions process.

Application Tip: Check out Fuqua’s section criteria.

Short Answers

Answer all 3 of the following questions. For each short answer question, respond in 250 characters only (the equivalent of about 50 words).

1. What are your short term goals, post-MBA?

State what you see yourself doing in terms of function and industry. If location or geography are important to your goal, include them.  If you know the type of companies you would like to work for, you can include that information too, but don’t say you want to work for Company X, unless Company X is sponsoring you. That’s probably too narrow.

2. What are your long term goals?

Your long term goals should flow logically from your short-term goals. They can be fuzzier and both in terms of direction and timing. But you should have them. They can, but don’t have to, include larger aspirations and present a broader perspective on where you are headed. But please don’t go so general and say something like “I aspire to be a good person” or “I strive to leave a lasting impact on my community.” Nice sentiments, but way to general.

3. Life is full of uncertainties, and plans and circumstances can change. As a result, navigating a career requires you to be adaptable. Should the short term goals that you provided above not materialize, what alternative directions have you considered?

What’s your Plan B? If you can’t get a job at a leading strategy consulting firm, what do you want to do? If Plan A is investment banking, what’s Plan B?

Essays:

1. Answer the following question — present your response in list form, numbered 1 to 25. Some points may be only a few words, while others may be longer. Your complete list should not exceed 2 pages.

The “Team Fuqua” spirit and community is one of the things that sets The Duke MBA experience apart, and it is a concept that extends beyond the student body to include faculty, staff, and administration. When a new person joins the Admissions team, we ask that person to share with everyone in the office a list of “25 Random Things About Yourself.” As an Admissions team, we already know the new hire’s professional and academic background, so learning these “25 Random Things” helps us get to know someone’s personality, background, special talents, and more.

In this spirit, the Admissions Committee also wants to get to know you–beyond the professional and academic achievements listed in your resume and transcript. You can share with us important life experiences, your likes/dislikes, hobbies, achievements, fun facts, or anything that helps us understand what makes you who you are. Share with us your list of “25 Random Things” about YOU. 

Have some fun with this list. It certainly allows a more creative approach than permitted by most essay prompts. Note that the questions asks you to go “beyond the professional and academic achievements listed in your resume and transcript.”  So you can list your Pez collection or perhaps your brief membership in a rock band or the fact that you took violin from age 6-18 or your membership in a gospel choir or your volunteer work in a hospital, your needlepoint, your favorite recipe or photo. Gosh the list is endless. Just let it reflect you. Think of this list as an introduction to potential friends.   For more insight into this question and the  motivation behind, please read Megan Overbay’s, the former Director of Admissions’, advice. I believe you will find it helpful. And very friendly.

2. Choose only 1 of the following 2 essay questions to answer. Your response should be no more than 2 pages in length.

Choose to the prompt that will let you reveal something important to you and impressive about you. Write the essay that you will be able to draft most enthusiastically and easily.

1. When asked by your family, friends, and colleagues why you want to go to Duke, what do you tell them? Share the reasons that are most meaningful to you

Why Duke? But you’re not talking to the admissions committee, whom you just may be a tad less than candid with. You are talking to your family, friends, and colleagues, people you know and like (at least the friends).  The Fuqua admissions staff really wants to get to know you. Authenticity is the goal. The admissions readers want to be able to imagine you as a part of Team Fuqua — their family — as a friend or colleague. Will you be real stiff and formal? Of course not. You will be friendly in a professional way. Don’t take this as an invitation to be inappropriate, coarse, or rude. Just friendly.

What appeals to you at Duke? What about its program, culture, and professional opportunities propels you to apply and would compel you to accept an offer of admission? Maybe address a letter to a close friend and tell her why you want to go to Duke.  That letter may morph into this essay.

2. The Team Fuqua community is as unique as the individuals who comprise it. Underlying our individuality are a number of shared ideas and principles that we live out in our own ways. Our students have identified and defined 6 “Team Fuqua Principles” that we feel are the guiding philosophies that make our community special. At the end of your 2 years at Fuqua, if you were to receive an award for exemplifying one of the 6 Principles listed below, which one would it be and why? Your response should reflect the research you have done, your knowledge of Fuqua and the Daytime MBA program and experience, and the types of activities and leadership you would engage in as a Fuqua student.

1. Authentic Engagement: We care and we take action. We each make a difference to Team Fuqua by being ourselves and engaging in and supporting activities about which we are passionate.
2. Supportive Ambition: We support each other to achieve great things, because your success is my success. The success of each individual member of Team Fuqua makes the whole of Team Fuqua better.
3. Collective Diversity:  We embrace all of our classmates because our individuality is better and stronger together.
4. Impactful Stewardship: We are leaders who focus on solutions to improve our communities both now and in the future. We aren’t satisfied with just maintaining the status quo.
5. Loyal Community: We are a family who looks out for each other. Team Fuqua supports you when you need it the most.
6. Uncompromising Integrity: We internalize and live the honor code in the classroom and beyond. We conduct ourselves with integrity within Fuqua, within Duke, and within all communities of which we are a part.

Do your homework about Fuqua (and yourself) before responding to this question. What activities and groups appeal to you? How do you see yourself participating? Making a difference? Then look at the list of six principles above. Which do you most identify with? Imagine how you would exemplify that principle in your activities. The story of that role and how would see yourself earning an award is your essay.  While you can reference similar activities in the past, keep the focus of this essay on what you would do at Fuqua and why you would earn recognition for exemplifying one of these six principles.

Optional Essay Question:

If you feel there are extenuating circumstances of which the Admissions Committee should be aware, please explain them in an optional essay (e.g. unexplained gaps in work, choice of recommenders, inconsistent or questionable academic performance, or any significant weakness in your application).

• Do NOT upload additional essays nor additional recommendations in this area of the application.
• The Optional Essay is intended to provide the Admissions Committee with insight into your extenuating circumstances only.
• Limit your response to two pages.

Why isn’t your current supervisor writing your rec? Why is there a six-month gap on your resume? Why did your grades dip during the first semester of your senior year? What are your responsibilities while working for a family business after having left a prestigious investment bank, and why did you make the change? Answering any of those questions (but not all) could be the topic of your optional essay.

If you would like professional guidance with your Duke Fuqua MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our  MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Duke application. 

Duke Fuqua 2015 MBA Application Deadlines:

Application Deadline Decision Notification
Early Action Sept. 17, 2014 Oct. 29, 2014
Round 1 Oct. 20, 2014 Dec. 19, 2014
Round 2 Jan. 5, 2015 Mar. 13, 2015
Round 3 Mar. 19, 2015 May 6, 2015

Click here for more school-specific MBA application essay tips!

Apply with an admissions pro at your side! Click here to learn more.

Linda Abraham By , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

 

Related Resources:

• What I Wish I Knew Before Entering the Duke MBA
• Culture, Location, and Support: A Duke MBA Speaks
• 2015 MBA Application Essay Tips

 

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Interview with MBA Reapplicant, “Top Dog” http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/29/interview-with-mba-reapplicant-top-dog/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/29/interview-with-mba-reapplicant-top-dog/#respond Fri, 29 Aug 2014 16:53:31 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24679 ]]> Click Here for More MBA Applicant Interviews

This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with MBA applicant bloggers, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at the MBA application process. And now…introducing our anonymous blogger, Top Dog.

Accepted: First, can you tell us a little about yourself? Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What is your current job?  

Top Dog: Hello, and thanks for the opportunity to talk about myself! I was born and went to school in the UK, studying for my Bachelor of Science at the University of London. I’m currently working in southern Europe as a global relationship manager for the largest corporate and investment bank in the energy and commodities sector.

Accepted: When did you first apply to b-school?  

Top Dog: I applied to five top 10 U.S. business schools in 2013/14 (Rounds 1 and 2). I got two interviews (at MIT Sloan and Wharton) but unfortunately failed to get an offer.

Accepted: What do you think went wrong and what are you doing this time to improve your candidacy?

Top Dog: I don’t think there were any obvious issues – aside from my 12 years WE and relatively low GPA – but my applications were maybe a bit bland and failed to fully explain what I have actually achieved so far and my detailed reasons for wanting an MBA. This year I got the chance to lead an international team after my boss resigned – that’s definitely an experience I’ll be writing about in my applications that I didn’t have last time.

Accepted: Where do you plan on applying this time?

Top Dog: I’m going to be focused and reapply to MIT Sloan and Wharton, plus INSEAD for the first time. I’ve done a lot of research and love the location, culture, collaborative spirit and emphasis on entrepreneurship and social enterprise at these b-schools. I’m toying with reapplying to Stanford too – the lure of the West Coast is difficult to resist!

Accepted: Can you talk about your decision to apply to/attend a European program versus a U.S. program? What are the pros and cons on either side?

Top Dog: I have tried to balance my target b-schools this time and, while most top b-schools will give you a great education, there are differences. In Europe, I really like the international classes (INSEAD’s incoming class has 90 nationalities with c. 60% from outside Europe), but 10 months is short to fully experience the teaching, culture and career prospects on offer. In the U.S., b-schools simply rock the MBA – this is where the MBA was born and it’s still the best place to study it – plus it broadens my otherwise European profile, while the con would definitely be the cost – ouch!

Accepted: What stage of the application process are you up to so far? What has been the most challenging step and how did you work to overcome it? 

Top Dog: I’m in a good position as I have my experience from last season so I’m all done with research, profile building and I’m about to start my essays. I’ve blogged about my mistakes from last time and I’m already falling into the first trap – leaving it too late to start writing my essays (where did July go!?). Another challenge was not keeping on top of my recommenders, and I’m definitely going to be focused on this this time around.

Accepted: Do you plan on staying in your current industry post-MBA, or changing to a new field/career?

Top Dog: A big motivation for the full time (rather than exec) MBA is the ability to transition into a new field. Post-MBA I’ll go back into banking with a focus on business development and corporate social responsibility – ideally in the emerging markets – where innovation and entrepreneurship are rewarded skills. Longer term I want to combine my finance experience in a start-up, potentially a social entrepreneur focused micro-finance venture in an emerging economy.

Accepted: Why did you decide to blog about your experience? What have you gained from the experience? What do you hope others will learn?

Top Dog: I got a lot of knowledge and comfort from other bloggers last season and I’d like to give something back to the MBA applicant community. My blog encourages me to keep on top of my applications while testing ideas with others in the same position (and some helpful consultants too!). In exchange, I hope I’m giving some useful insight, sparking a bit of debate and creating a sense of companionship among fellow and future applicants.

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages.

You can read more about Top Dog’sb-school journey by checking out his blog, TopDogMBA, and Twitter, @topdogmba. Thank you Top Dog for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

Get clear, practical guidelines for answering the MBA goals essay question. Click here to download our free report.

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Related Resources:

MBA Applicant Interviews
Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One
2015 MBA Application Essay Tips

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Financial Aid and Health Insurance for International Students http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/28/financial-aid-and-health-insurance-for-international-students/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/28/financial-aid-and-health-insurance-for-international-students/#comments Thu, 28 Aug 2014 16:17:16 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25295 ]]> Listen to the interview!If you are one of the adventurous souls planning on leaving your comfort zone to study abroad, we’d like to introduce you to a treasure trove of invaluable resources.

Listen to the recording of our conversation with Ross Mason, VP of Envisage International for important tips and information about international student loans, health insurance, and other topics that matter to you.

00:03:31 – Envisage: Helping international students.

00:06:02 – How Ross got involved and what’s changed in past decade plus.

00:10:08 – Advice for a US resident applying to school abroad.

00:14:00 – Advice for a non-US resident applying to school in the United States.

00:19:42 – Health insurance for a US student accepted to an international school.

00:22:48 – What a non-US resident accepted to an US school needs to know about health insurance.

00:24:43 – Finding insurance: where to turn.

00:25:51 – What else is out there for students going abroad?

00:28:00 – Top advice for an international student preparing to go to school out of the country.

Listen to the full conversation to learn more!

*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Related Links:

•  International Student Loan
•  Financial Aid for International Students in the USA
•  International Financial Aid Resources
•  IEFA: International Financial Aid and College Scholarship Search
•  International Student Insurance Plans (Country pages on the bottom right)
•  US School Insurance Requirements
•  International Student Insurance Explained
•  International Student & Study Abroad Resource Center
• International Students and the Individual Mandate Under PPACA
• The Affordable Care Act and J1 Participants in Non-Student Categories

Related Shows:

• Global Business Leadership at Wharton’s Lauder Institute
• Non-Academic Careers for PhDs: A Talk with Dr. Paula Chambers
• CommonBond’s Story: A Revolution in Student Loans
• Is a PhD a Good Idea?
• An Inside Look at INSEAD
• Leadership is King: Interview with IMD’s Lisa Piguet
• Interview with SoFi Co-Founder, Daniel Macklin

Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk:

Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes!     Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in Stitcher!

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http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/28/financial-aid-and-health-insurance-for-international-students/feed/ 1 Financial Aid,international student,podcast If you are one of the adventurous souls planning on leaving your comfort zone to study abroad, we’d like to introduce you to a treasure trove of invaluable resources. - Listen to the recording of our conversation with Ross Mason, If you are one of the adventurous souls planning on leaving your comfort zone to study abroad, we’d like to introduce you to a treasure trove of invaluable resources. Listen to the recording of our conversation with Ross Mason, VP of Envisage International for important tips and information about international student loans, health insurance, and other topics that matter to you. 00:03:31 – Envisage: Helping international students. 00:06:02 – How Ross got involved and what’s changed in past decade plus. 00:10:08 – Advice for a US resident applying to school abroad. 00:14:00 – Advice for a non-US resident applying to school in the United States. 00:19:42 – Health insurance for a US student accepted to an international school. 00:22:48 – What a non-US resident accepted to an US school needs to know about health insurance. 00:24:43 – Finding insurance: where to turn. 00:25:51 – What else is out there for students going abroad? 00:28:00 – Top advice for an international student preparing to go to school out of the country. *Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com. Related Links: •  International Student Loan •  Financial Aid for International Students in the USA •  International Financial Aid Resources •  IEFA: International Financial Aid and College Scholarship Search •  International Student Insurance Plans (Country pages on the bottom right) •  US School Insurance Requirements •  International Student Insurance Explained •  International Student & Study Abroad Resource Center • International Students and the Individual Mandate Under PPACA • The Affordable Care Act and J1 Participants in Non-Student Categories Related Shows: • Global Business Leadership at Wharton’s Lauder Institute • Non-Academic Careers for PhDs: A Talk with Dr. Paula Chambers • CommonBond’s Story: A Revolution in Student Loans • Is a PhD a Good Idea? • An Inside Look at INSEAD • Leadership is King: Interview with IMD’s Lisa Piguet • Interview with SoFi Co-Founder, Daniel Macklin Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk:       Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no 34:11
Kellogg 2015 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/27/kellogg-2015-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/27/kellogg-2015-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/#comments Wed, 27 Aug 2014 16:20:27 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24566 ]]> I strongly urge you to watch the videos where Kellogg defines what it means by Think Bravely. The qualified applicants who show they profoundly identify with that mission will have the best chance of acceptance.

Essays:

1.
 Resilience. Perseverance. Grit. Call it what you will…. Challenges can build character. Describe a challenging experience you’ve had. How were you tested? What did you learn? (450 words)

A perfect prompt for an essay showing that you take responsibility for you actions — even in challenging situations — and that you courageously face those challenges, deal with them, and grow from them.

The question asks you to describe one experience that you found challenging. I suggest you open with either a difficult moment or interaction, then describe what led up to it and continue with how you dealt with it. Reveal results both in terms of the situation and more importantly in terms of your personal character growth.

For more thoughts on resilience, please see Resilience: Moving On.

2.
 Leadership requires an ability to collaborate with and motivate others. Describe a professional experience that required you to influence people. What did this experience teach you about working with others, and how will it make you a better leader? (450 words)

This question reflects Kellogg’s emphasis on collaborative leadership. As in question 1, Kellogg is asking you to describe one experience. This time  the school seeks a professional one where you influenced others. You can use a STAR framework for this response (Situation, Task, Action, Results). Start with the situation and simply describe what was going on. Then relate your group’s task and responsibility. How did you motivate the others to move in one direction? How did you influence and persuade? Finally what were the results for the group, but more importantly for you? What did you learn about leadership, collaboration, and influence?

While it isn’t a requirement and I can imagine instances where this may not be true, in general examples where you led by virtue of your stature and others’ respect for you will be more compelling than those where you led by virtue of station and title. 

Re-Applicants Only: Since your previous application, what steps have you taken to strengthen your candidacy? (250 word limit)

No trick questions here. How are you a better candidate today than when Kellogg rejected you? Have you addressed weaknesses in your previous application? Check out MBA Reapplicant 101 — a lot of (free) resources. 

Additional Information (Optional): If needed, use this section to briefly describe any extenuating circumstances (e.g. unexplained gaps in work experience, choice of recommenders, inconsistent or questionable academic performance, etc.) (no word count)

This is a true optional question If necessary, use it to provide context for possible negatives. Take responsibility for mistakes if necessary and discuss what you have changed so that you don’t err in the same way again.

Keep this section short and to-the-point. Don’t be fooled by “No word count.”

Video Essay: 

 • The Video Essays provide applicants with an additional opportunity to demonstrate what they will bring to our vibrant Kellogg community – in an interactive way. Each applicant will complete two short video essay questions. The questions are designed to bring to life the person we have learned about on paper.

 • After submitting a completed application, each applicant will be asked to complete two Video Essay Questions. One will be about the candidate’s interest in Kellogg and the other will be a “getting to know you” type of question.

 • There are 10 practice questions which candidates can complete as many times as they like to get comfortable with the format and technology. The practice questions and experience will simulate the actual video essay experience, so this is meant to be a useful tool and help applicants feel prepared.

 • There is not an opportunity to re-do the answer to the official video essay questions. We encourage applicants to practice so they are comfortable with the format once it is time to complete the official questions.

 • Candidates will have 20 seconds to think about their question and up to 1 minute to give their response.

• We estimate the Video Essays will take 30 minutes to complete – which includes time for set-up and answering all the practice questions.

To prepare for your webcam session, you need to practice for the experience of talking to a video camera with no responses from another human being. For tips on how to prepare and behave during the webcam session, please see Kellogg’s “Video Essay” on its Application Components page as well as my Tips for Video MBA Essay Questions.

If you would like professional guidance with your Kellogg MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our  MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Kellogg application. 

Kellogg 2015 MBA Application Deadlines:

Round     . Due Date*            . Decisions Released
Round 1 September 24, 2014 December 17, 2014
Round 2 January 7, 2015 March 25, 2015
Round 3 April 1, 2015 May 13, 2015

*Your application must be received by Kellogg no later than 5p.m. CT on the deadline for the round in which you are applying.

Have our MBA admissions experts critique your Kellogg application!

Linda Abraham By , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

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UVA Darden 2015 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/24/uva-darden-2015-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/24/uva-darden-2015-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/#comments Sun, 24 Aug 2014 16:13:46 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24162 ]]> UVA_DardenDarden led the way with a one-essay application.  Some may feel that fewer essays indicate that essays are losing importance. My suspicion is that the remaining essays and short-answers are as or more important than they ever were. Especially at a program emphasizing the case method and experiential learning, evidence that you can communicate, analyze a problem from multiple perspectives, and handle the rigorous program that Darden is famous for are all critical. 

My tips for answering the Darden application essay are in blue below.

Essay:

1. Describe the most courageous professional decision you have made or most courageous action you have taken at work. What did you learn from that experience? (500 word maximum)

First of all, I strongly encourage you to watch the video with Darden’s Assistant Dean of MBA Admissions Sarah Neher where she lays out what they’re looking for in this essay:

What is courage? The strength to act in the face of fear, difficulty, criticism, opposition, and possibly danger. Hopefully you didn’t need courage because you were facing true danger on the job, but perhaps you needed it for some of the other reasons I provided. When did you have the strength and courage to take ownership of a project, position, or initiative? When did something become your baby?  What was the decision?  What did you do? Why was it so important to you? What was the result? And most importantly (per the video), what did you learn? 

They not only want to know your reaction to a particularly challenging situation; they want to see how you respond when you are personally invested and excited about a challenge, initiative, or project.

Final tidbit: Make sure you answer all elements of the question. That’s critical.

If you would like professional guidance with your UVA Darden MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the UVA Darden application. 

UVA Darden 2015 Application Deadlines:

Application Deadline Decisions Released
Round 1 October 10, 2014 December 17, 2014
Round 2 January 7, 2015 March 25, 2015
Round 3 April 1, 2015 May 6, 2015

Want more school specific MBA application essay tips? Click here!

Linda Abraham By , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

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Why Johnson? An Admitted Student Shares her Journey http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/22/follow-up-mba-interview-with-johnson-student-debra-yoo/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/22/follow-up-mba-interview-with-johnson-student-debra-yoo/#respond Fri, 22 Aug 2014 16:36:40 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25059 ]]> Debra_Yoo_Cornell_Johnson_StudentThis interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a follow up interview with Debra Yoo, who was recently accepted to Johnson at Cornell University. (We first met Debra last year – you can read our first interview with her here.)

Accepted: Welcome back! Can you just remind our readers — where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? Do you hold any other degrees?

Debra: I grew up in the Chicagoland area and attended Columbia University for undergrad where I majored in English and Asian American Studies along with completing Columbia’s Creative Writing Program (as you can see, I did not have a very business-oriented background!). After spending a few more years in NYC, I moved to Los Angeles with my husband. We were there for about four years before we relocated to Ithaca last month.

Accepted: Congrats on gaining accepted to Johnson! What are the 3 main traits of the Johnson school that attracted you to it?

Debra:

1) The people. Of all the students and alumni that I contacted at the various schools I applied to, those who attended Johnson had the highest response rate–by far. And not only did they respond promptly, they answered my questions very thoroughly and honestly. I was so impressed. It really speaks to the quality of Johnson’s smaller, tight-knit community.

2) The location. I know, I know–many folks out there don’t apply to Johnson because of its location, but Ithaca really appealed to me. Aside from its natural beauty, I wanted to be in a small town where I could get to know my fellow students without the distractions of a big city. I’m finding that many others here also had the same mindset when they chose Johnson, which once again shows that community is a high priority for most everyone here.

3) Johnson’s immersion program. I didn’t want my schooling to be completely academic and theoretical–I wanted as much hands-on experience as I could possibly get. At Johnson, most of the core coursework (accounting, finance, marketing, etc.) is completed during the first semester of the first year, leaving time during the second semester to complete an in-depth consulting project for a real-life company. For the marketing immersion, students in the past have completed projects for companies including Microsoft, Bayer and HP.

Accepted: How did you go about researching schools? Did you participate in any MBA fairs or events?

Debra: I attended a Forte Forum in Los Angeles in August 2013, which was unbelievably helpful. The Forum really helped me finalize my choices of schools; at that point, I had pored over a ton of websites but hadn’t made any connections with the schools in person. I looked into other MBA fairs, but none of them had all the schools I wanted to apply to–maybe two or three at most. The Forte Forum was the only event that had almost all the top schools present. If you are a woman planning on applying to top 20 b-schools, the forum is a great way to speak to recruiters from them in one room. And you get to do it in a smaller, female crowd. It’s wonderful all around.

Aside from the forum, I also emailed/spoke with ambassadors and alumni at all the schools I was interested in. I was originally planning on staying in the nonprofit space after graduating, so I had many questions about nontraditional paths that I wanted answers to. Speaking with the right alumni whose careers post-b-school resonated with me played a lot into my final decision making.

I was told that it was really important to visit campuses in person before applying, but I did not have the resources or time to do so. For a long time I agonized over whether I was decreasing my chances of admission by not doing campus visits, but I believe the impact was minimal (if it impacted me at all). But if you’re able to visit campuses, you really should! They can give you great fodder for your essays and help you make sure that the school is the right place for you.

Accepted: Can you talk about your experience with the Forte Foundation? What do they do and how have they helped you?

Debra: I love the Forte Foundation, and I owe much of my success so far to their support!

The Forte Foundation is a consortium of top b-schools and leading companies who support women in business. Women still have a ways to go when it comes to equal representation in business, especially in senior management. It’s an issue we all need to remain aware of and take thoughtful and deliberate actions to address.

I first discovered Forte when I started my MBA application process, and I’m so glad I did. I never thought that I would one day attend business school, so I was really starting my learning from scratch. I listened to several of Forte’s free webinars about the application process and read through their entire website for guidance.

I am also very thankful to have been selected a Forte Fellow by the Johnson admissions team. In addition to receiving a scholarship (that I am very, very grateful to have!), being a Fellow comes with many other benefits including networking opportunities and support for your job search.

I also attended the 2014 Forte MBA Women’s Leadership Conference that was held in Los Angeles earlier this year. It was an amazing feeling to be surrounded by hundreds of other talented, ambitious women who were all about to begin their MBA journeys. And it was also a great way to kick off our new lives as students and remind us that we are all working together toward closing the gender gap in business.

Accepted: Have you taken any classes or prepared in any other way to your smooth transition to business school?

Debra: I have never taken a single economics or statistics course in my entire life, much less accounting or finance. I was really concerned about my lack of experience in the area, so I completed an online pre-MBA mathematics course at a nearby university earlier this year. It exposed me to some of the common terms and calculations I’ll come across in school.

Johnson also provided us access to mbamath.com (I believe several other business schools do this, also) over the summer. I’ve been working my way through the units on finance, economics and statistics to prepare myself.

In addition to all the math, I switched my leisure reading time to business-related books, including authors like Malcolm Gladwell, Dale Carnegie and Sheryl Sandberg.

Accepted: What sort of career do you plan on pursuing post-MBA?

Debra: My background so far is in marketing/communications in the nonprofit sector. After school, I plan on doing marketing in the corporate world in the consumer packaged goods industry. I am hoping to return to the nonprofit sector later on down the line at a senior management level.

Accepted: B-school’s not cheap!  Do you have tips for financing an MBA?

Debra: It’s tough; really, really tough. The (very) few third-party scholarships I’ve found out there are for very specific populations and are for smaller amounts. All I can say is to really take your future career path into account when considering the cost of your program. If you are planning on entering the nonprofit space, look for schools with loan forgiveness programs like Yale or Stanford. And if you get scholarship offers, try negotiating the amount. When budgeting, keep a large buffer for travel expenses. Also check out loan alternatives like Common Bond. There’s some interesting stuff out there if you look for it!

Accepted: Do you have any advice for applicants about the start the MBA admissions journey?

Debra: Go beyond rankings, career placement stats and average starting salaries when narrowing down your options. Try to get as good a feel as you can for the community and the types of people at the schools you’re interested in. I think a good way to measure this is whether you feel a desire to contribute to and help develop and grow that community. You’ll be spending the next two years with those people and they will be your professional network for the rest of your life, so find a good match!

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school applications, please see our MBA Application Packages

Thank you Debra for sharing your story with us!

Attend_The_Forte_Forum

Accepted.com

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A B-School Professor on Main Street, USA http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/21/a-b-school-professor-on-main-street-usa/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/21/a-b-school-professor-on-main-street-usa/#respond Thu, 21 Aug 2014 17:11:56 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25048 ]]> Listen to the full recording of our interview with Scott Schaefer!Dr. Scott Schaefer escaped an economics conference and ended up in a fortuitous encounter that changed his life.

Listen to the recording of our conversation with Dr. Shaefer, Kendall D. Garff Chair in Business Administration and Professor of Finance at the University of Utah’s David Eccles School of Business, for some great insights into small business, business school, and the place where the two meet.

00:02:03 – How a trip to the shoe store inspired Roadside MBA.

00:06:35 – The Roadside MBA Manifesto.

00:12:54 – Want to hear some great stories?

00:17:43 – The story Scott wishes he had included in the book (and so does Linda).

00:24:57 – Surprising takeaways from Roadside MBA project.

00:28:53 – How the Roadside MBA changed the way Scott teaches.

00:33:45 – If only MBA students came to campus knowing…

Listen to the full conversation to learn more!*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Related Links:

Roadside MBA: Backroad Wisdom for Entrepreneurs, Executives and Small Business Owners (Linda highly recommends it.)
• 
Roadside MBA
Roadside MBA on Twitter
Entrepreneurship & the MBA

Related Shows:

MBAs Across America: Entrepreneurs with a Heart
• MBAs Across America: The Coolest HBS Internship (original interview)
Dr. Douglas Stayman Shares the Scoop on Cornell Tech NYC
Introducing the Master in Entrepreneurship Program at the Univ. of Michigan

Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk:

Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes! Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in Stitcher!

Download our free special report: Best MBA Programs

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http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/21/a-b-school-professor-on-main-street-usa/feed/ 0 podcast Dr. Scott Schaefer escaped an economics conference and ended up in a fortuitous encounter that changed his life. - Listen to the recording of our conversation with Dr. Shaefer, Kendall D. Garff Chair in Business Administration and Professor of Finance... Dr. Scott Schaefer escaped an economics conference and ended up in a fortuitous encounter that changed his life. Listen to the recording of our conversation with Dr. Shaefer, Kendall D. Garff Chair in Business Administration and Professor of Finance at the University of Utah’s David Eccles School of Business, for some great insights into small business, business school, and the place where the two meet. 00:02:03 – How a trip to the shoe store inspired Roadside MBA. 00:06:35 – The Roadside MBA Manifesto. 00:12:54 – Want to hear some great stories? 00:17:43 – The story Scott wishes he had included in the book (and so does Linda). 00:24:57 – Surprising takeaways from Roadside MBA project. 00:28:53 – How the Roadside MBA changed the way Scott teaches. 00:33:45 – If only MBA students came to campus knowing… *Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com. Related Links: • Roadside MBA: Backroad Wisdom for Entrepreneurs, Executives and Small Business Owners (Linda highly recommends it.) • Roadside MBA • Roadside MBA on Twitter • Entrepreneurship & the MBA Related Shows: • MBAs Across America: Entrepreneurs with a Heart • MBAs Across America: The Coolest HBS Internship (original interview) • Dr. Douglas Stayman Shares the Scoop on Cornell Tech NYC • Introducing the Master in Entrepreneurship Program at the Univ. of Michigan Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk: Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no 49:55
What is the Value of an MBA? [Infographic] http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/20/what-is-the-value-of-an-mba-infographic/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/20/what-is-the-value-of-an-mba-infographic/#respond Wed, 20 Aug 2014 16:41:13 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24970 ]]> We just had to share this excellent infographic about the ROI of an MBA from MBA@UNC:

Brought to you by MBA@UNC: an online mba program

Are You Misusing the B-School Rankings?

Accepted.com

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UCLA Anderson 2015 Essay Tips & Deadlines http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/19/ucla-anderson-2015-essay-tips-deadlines/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/19/ucla-anderson-2015-essay-tips-deadlines/#comments Tue, 19 Aug 2014 16:54:23 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24714 ]]> Check out the rest of our school-specific application essay tips!

UCLA Anderson

The advice that UCLA Anderson provides below is excellent, not just for Anderson’s essays, but for most MBA essays. Read it carefully. 

My tips are in blue below.

Your essays are the primary way for you to share your perspectives and plans with the admissions committee. The best essays are introspective, genuine and succinct in directly answering our questions and responding to our topics.

• Essay questions are listed below for both first-time applicants and re-applicants.
• You should try to distinguish yourself by showing what makes you different from others who share similar profiles.
• Personal expression is what we are looking for, not platitudes.
• Making a strong case for your future plans requires you to first do research on career paths and find one that resonates. Even if this target will change during business school, your application essays should lay out a clear trajectory for short-term and long-term goals. Do this by demonstrating how you expect to build on skills from your past, and those you expect to gain from the MBA.
• Essays are more compelling if they include specific courses, programs, groups, opportunities, activities, etc. from which you would benefit, if admitted to UCLA Anderson. These references are best found through website research, personal discussions and a campus visit (if possible).
• Content and clarity are key elements, as we seek superior communication skills.
• Style is a consideration too, although we understand that those who speak other languages may have different manners of expression in English.
• We do check your essays for plagiarism, so make sure you always submit your own work.
• Length does not equal strength. A well-written short essay can have even more impact than a longer essay. Please try to respect the word limits indicated below.
• All responses to essays must be on double-spaced pages that are uploaded as a document. We do not accept essays in any other media but written form.

Essay:

UCLA Anderson is distinguished by three defining principles: Share Success, Think Fearlessly, Drive Change. What principles have defined your life and pre-MBA career? How do you believe that UCLA Anderson’s principles, and the environment they create, will help you attain your post-MBA career goals?  (750 words maximum)

Anderson has simplified it’s essay requirements but gives you enough room to write a revealing response. Make sure that essay shows that can answer the question articulately and belong at Anderson.

First think about what’s important to you. What guides and drives your behavior? If you can summarize those principles in two words as Anderson does, that’s great. If not, don’t sweat it, but do be succinct. If you come up with more than three principles, choose the three that are most important to you, but I advise against going with more than three. If you want to use fewer than three, that’s OK too. And, for Heaven’s sake don’t be tempted to say that your guiding principles are verbatim identical to Anderson’s.

A great way to approach this essay would be to discuss an experience or anecdote that represents your guiding principles and then connect that story and your values to UCLA’s critical principles and the Anderson culture.  Then conclude by addressing the last part of the question: How Anderson’s principles and “environment” will help you realize your post-MBA career goals.

Optional Essay:

Are there any extenuating circumstances in your profile about which the Admissions Committee should be aware?  (250 words maximum)

If there are extenuating circumstances that would add perspective on or “explain” a weakness, you can discuss them here. A few years ago, UCLA added the following: “Please do not submit redundant information in the Optional Essay.” Good advice for all optional questions. For more suggestions, please see The Optional Question: To Be or not To Be

Required Re-applicant Essay:

Reapplicants who applied for the class entering Fall 2013 or 2014 are required to complete the following essay. Please be introspective and authentic in your response. We value the opportunity to learn about your aspirations and goals.

Please describe your career progress since you last applied and ways in which you have enhanced your candidacy. Include updates on short-term and long-term career goals, as well as your continued interest in UCLA Anderson. (750 words maximum)

This is the key question in every MBA reapplication: How have you enhanced your candidacy? Career progress is an obvious place to start and something you must address, but if academics were a weakness, then what have you done since you last applied to show you can excel at Anderson? 

If you would like professional guidance with your UCLA Anderson application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our  MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the UCLA application.  

Want more school specific MBA application essay tips? Click here!

UCLA 2015 Application Deadlines:

UCLA Anderson Application Deadlines

Linda Abraham By , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

 

Related Resources:

UCLA Anderson B-School Zone
• Student Body, Recruitment, Location: Future UCLA Anderson MBA Interview
• Hard Work and Humility: Reflections of a UCLA Anderson Student

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Wharton Class of 2015 Profile http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/18/wharton-class-of-2015-profile/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/18/wharton-class-of-2015-profile/#respond Mon, 18 Aug 2014 17:14:40 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24831 ]]> Let’s take a look at Wharton’s class of 2015 profile (from Wharton’s website):

Applying to Wharton? Join our webinar to learn how to get in!• Total applicants: 6,036
• Women: 42%
• Enrolled class: 837
• International students: 35%
• U.S. minorities: 30%
• Range of years of work experience: 0-13
• Mean years of work experience: 5
• Mean overall GMAT: 725
• Middle 80% GMAT range: 690-760
• Undergraduate majors:

-  STEM (25%)
–  Business (28%)
–  Humanities/social sciences/economics (44%)
– Other (3%)

 • Industry experience:

Join our upcoming webinar for great advice on how to get accepted to Wharton!

Are you looking to join the next Wharton class? Join us for our upcoming webinar, Get Accepted to the Wharton School, to learn key strategies to help you get accepted to Wharton and other top business schools!

Date: Tuesday, August 19, 2014
Time: 10:00 AM PT/1:00 PM ET

Register now: Get Accepted to the Wharton School

You CAN get accepted to Wharton! Click here to learn more.

Accepted.com

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MBA Admission: The Great Round 1/Round 2 Fight http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/18/mba-admission-round-1-vs-round-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/18/mba-admission-round-1-vs-round-2/#respond Mon, 18 Aug 2014 16:05:19 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24800 ]]> Check out MBA Admissions 101 for more b-school admissions advice!

“On my right, now entering the ring is Round 1. A perennial favorite with those who have stratospheric GMATs, patents, Nobel Prizes, and the like. And on my left, waving to the crowd is Round 2. He is favored by those with more average, but still respectable scores, grades, and experience.”

So goes the fight about when to submit an application. I am not impressed by attempts to win the admissions game through timing, at least using these arguments, which are specious and weigh less significant or non-existent factors as opposed to those that really count.

What counts above all else  is the quality of your application. You want to submit when it is at its best.

The argument that Round 1 is for superstars simply isn’t true. Many superstars apply round 2 (and even later, but I am going to limit this discussion to Rounds 1 and 2). But when you wait to apply Round 2, many seats have already been given to round 1 applicants.

At the same time, some applicants are absolutely determined to submit Round 1 because they want the “early advantage.” They will even foolishly rush their applications, submit something less than their best in this mad dash to a R1 deadline.

Let’s call this match a draw. The boxers can take off their gloves and pull up a chair. Listen to Linda’s rule:

“Apply as early as possible PROVIDED you don’t compromise the quality of your application.”

Just today I received an email from an applicant who has been struggling with her GMAT and wants to attend a top 15 program. She is unlikely to be admitted with her current score and she wants to apply Round 1. She is better off raising her GMAT and postponing her application to Round 2.

Someone else writes to a mailing list that he has good scores, grades, and work experience, but is in a common applicant sub-group and wants to apply round 2 because he believes competition will be less intense.

Big mistake. Competition is intense both rounds. Instead of focusing on this timing question, he should be working to improve his profile, differentiate himself, learn about the schools, and start on his essays so that he can submit round 1 when there are more spots available.

Is there an advantage to applying early in a round, especially round 1?

I don’t think so. More importantly, there is an advantage to holding onto a completed first application and submitting it closer to the deadline (Any school, CBS for example, on rolling admissions could be exceptions to this part of this post.) As you work on subsequent applications, you will improve your essays and see (and relate) experiences and goals with greater clarity. If you just put that first completed application away while you work on applications 2, 3, & N, then you can go back to Application 1 before that school’s R1 deadline and tweak it before you submit. That first application will then benefit from your recent writing experience and greater clarity.

Don’t, however, wait until the 11th hour to  upload your app and press SUBMIT. Many times servers are overloaded on deadline day. You don’t want to miss a deadline on an application that was completed weeks earlier because you waited too long.

Navigating the MBA Maze

Linda Abraham By , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

 

Related Resources:

• How Many B-Schools Should You Apply To?
• How to Write and Edit MBA Essays
• Top MBA Program Zones

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Future Whartonites…Tune On Tuesday! http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/17/future-whartonitestune-on-tuesday/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/17/future-whartonitestune-on-tuesday/#respond Sun, 17 Aug 2014 17:12:40 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24814 ]]> The webinar you’ve all been waiting for, Get Accepted to the Wharton School, will take place on Tuesday, August 19, 2014 at 10:00 AM PT/1:00 PM ET.

GetAcceptedToWharton

Reserve your spot now and tune in on Tuesday to hear important Wharton application tips that could transform your Wharton dream into reality!

Save my spot!

Accepted.com

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Interview with a Future NYU Stern MBA and Forte Fellow http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/15/interview-with-a-future-nyu-stern-mba-and-forte-fellow/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/15/interview-with-a-future-nyu-stern-mba-and-forte-fellow/#respond Fri, 15 Aug 2014 16:22:39 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24765 ]]> NYU Stern Admitted Student InterviewThis interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for an interview with Lourdes, a Forte Fellow who was recently accepted to NYU Stern.

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What’s your favorite non-school book?

Lourdes: I was born in Lima, Peru, and my family moved to Charlotte when I was very young. I grew up there and attended North Carolina State University, where I obtained degrees in Political Science and Spanish with a minor in Business Management. My favorite non-school book is “It Happened on the Way to War” by Rye Barcott.

Accepted: Why did you choose NYU Stern?

Lourdes: I decided to go to business school to fine tune my analytical and economic skills and sought a program that offered practical knowledge applied in real-world settings. I also wanted to be in a location that could offer a business playground as a complement to my education. NYU Stern offers the opportunity to learn in NY, which is at the vortex of the business world. I also appreciated the dynamic leadership of the administration, faculty and students. NYU Stern was a curriculum that not only had a legacy of excellence but also a commitment to innovation. Being able to build on the history of the program, as well as implement visionary thinking, was a key factor for me.

Accepted: How would you say you’re a perfect fit with the program? (Unless you believe you’re not a good fit, in which case, please talk about that!)

Lourdes: Throughout the admissions process, the more I learned about NYU Stern, the more I found I had in common with the program. From speaking with students about their goals, with Admissions representatives about international treks to reading articles in the school newspaper about student life, it became clear that NYU Stern was the right fit for me. The students I met were impressive, fun-loving and helpful. They were willing to share insight about their experiences and also be real with me.

At Diversity Weekend, Dean Peter Henry asked us to think about how we would use our MBA degree to make a difference. That resonated profoundly with me in my decision to attend NYU Stern.

Accepted: What clubs or extracurricular activities are you planning on being involved in with?

Lourdes: I plan on being involved with Stern Women in Business, the Association of Hispanic & Black Business Students and the Social Enterprise Association.

Accepted: What have you been doing professionally since college?

Lourdes: My family has a business in the construction and design/build industry. Upon graduating, I worked for the firm in a marketing capacity. I created a separate division of the company dedicated to the real estate investments and property management. I wanted to get my feet wet in the corporate world and was able to gain a position on the sales and trading floor at Sanford C. Bernstein in NY. I was on the sell-side research team dedicated to hedge fund clients. I learned from leaders in the field and wanted to amplify my client-facing skills in a setting more directly tied to the business community. I came across a role in which I could apply my marketing and relationship building skills as the director of public policy at the Charlotte Chamber of Commerce. I monitored issues that affect the cost of doing business in Charlotte and actively engaged chamber members to learn about pro-business public policies. It was necessary to collaborate with stakeholders from the private, public and social sectors to gain their buy-in for issues.

Accepted: Do you plan on staying in that same industry post-MBA, or switching to something new?

Lourdes: My experience in different industries has driven me to learn a holistic approach to business. For that reason, I am looking forward to specializing in Management, Strategy and Social Innovation and Impact to learn the best tools for achieving profit by means of impactful initiatives. I am considering different industries and am seeking a career that will allow me to help a company reach fiscal goals while maintaining a social-conscious approach.

Accepted: What has your experience with the Forte Foundation been like? How has Forte helped you?

Lourdes: I became aware of the Forte Foundation while I was working on my school applications. I was thankful that there was an organization dedicated to promoting women in business. So you can imagine how excited I was to be named a Forte fellow! I was able to attend the Forte Conference in Los Angeles in June. I benefited from networking with the companies and panelists offering advice based on their experiences both in business school and their careers. I was offered an internship at the conference, which I am considering, for next summer. Forte helped make those connections.

Accepted: As someone who’s successfully applied to business school, you must have some good advice! Can you share your top 3 admissions tips with our readers?

Lourdes: I found the most important part of the admissions process to be self-discovery in terms of why I was pursuing an MBA, how I hoped to use my degree and what school was the best fit. Although the applications ask these questions, it’s important you ask yourself them as well. My top three tips would be:

1. Know your strengths and weaknesses.


2. Attend every MBA event (that your schedule allows) to learn the most about each program’s offerings.

3. Speak with at least two current students from each program you are considering.

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages. For specific advice on how to create the best application for NYU Stern, check out our NYU Stern 2015 MBA Essay Tips.

Thank you Lourdes for sharing your story with us!

Attend_The_Forte_Forum

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Seats Running Out for Our Wharton Webinar… http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/13/seats-running-out-for-our-wharton-webinar/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/13/seats-running-out-for-our-wharton-webinar/#respond Wed, 13 Aug 2014 21:24:23 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24730 ]]> GetAcceptedToWharton

If you are applying to Wharton – then you’ll want to tune in on Tuesday, August 19, 2014 at 10:00 AM PT/1:00 PM ET for our webinar, Get Accepted to the Wharton School.

Access winning tips that put you ahead of your competition including the 4 key strategies you need to get accepted and advice for your team-based discussion.

Don’t get left behind – reserve your spot for Get Accepted to the Wharton School now!

Save my spot!

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Tips for Video MBA Essay Questions http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/12/tips-for-video-mba-essay-questions-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/12/tips-for-video-mba-essay-questions-2/#respond Tue, 12 Aug 2014 15:55:11 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24533 ]]> Get more MBA video essay tips!

The Kellogg School of Management

Rotman led the charge with a video essay question and last year Yale and Kellogg followed.

Worried about being literally on stage? Here are my tips if you need to respond to a question in a short 1-2-minute video.

First, realize that these video essays, like the written ones, are attempts to get to know you. Unlike the written word, however, the schools are seeking to see how you present yourself visually and with little time to prepare or polish answers. They are testing articulation and presence in a way that essays can’t and at much less expense than interviews. In that sense, these videos are a pre-interview screening device in addition to a way to learn more about your likes and dislikes, achievements, dreams, goals, and challenges.

And while you may not be able to prepare for a specific question, you definitely can and should prepare.

Learn how video essays came about, how they work, & how to ace them!

You need to practice for the experience of talking to a video camera with no responses from another human being. No body language. No facial expressions. No audience energy. Zero feedback. It’s just a dumb machine. Having created videos for Accepted, I found the experience very unnatural, but I think/hope I’ve gotten better with practice. You can too.

Until the questions become known, practice answering different essay questions in the announced time limit and then view the video. Here are a few sample questions to get you started, but I may update this list as we get more information from the schools:

• What do you do for fun?
• What are your passions, interests, and hobbies?
• If you could travel across the United States in a car with anyone, whom would you choose to travel with and why?
• What would you do on a rainy Sunday afternoon?
• How have you handled a difficult interaction? What did you learn from it?
• Describe a difficult professional decision you had to make.  What were the consequences, and what, if anything, did you learn?

If you are really nervous about the video exercise or about speaking in public, consider joining Toastmasters and forcing yourself to speak publicly. You will improve your “presence” and gain confidence. Both will help you with your video interview, any admissions interview, job interviews, and required public speaking.

So beyond preparing and simply getting comfortable with the format or anticipated questions, when it comes time for the real thing, do the following:

1. Dress neatly. Follow any dress guidelines the school provides. Women, put on make-up and jewelry lightly. If you wonder if your attire is too revealing, it is.  Men, have a hair-cut and shave. Make sure beard or mustache, if you have, are trimmed and neat.

2. It should go without saying, but keep your language clean — no profanity.

3. Think for a few seconds before you reply and then minimize pauses that we tend to fill with “ums” and “uhs.” They don’t contribute to “presence.”

4. If you tend to perspire, put on the air conditioning so the room is cool.

5. Sit up straight and lean a little bit forward.

6. Remember to smile. I put a smiley face next to the camera.

And two final points:

1. Schools want to accept students who reflect well on them.
2. You’ll do great!

If you would like help with your video essay, Accepted’s experienced MBA admissions experts, who have been prepping and critiquing MBA applicants for almost twenty years, are more than happy to help you.

Learn how video essays came about, how they work, & how to ace them!

Linda Abraham By , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

Related Resources:
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How to Fund Your MBA: On-Demand Webinar Available for Viewing http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/10/how-to-fund-your-mba-on-demand-webinar-available-for-viewing/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/10/how-to-fund-your-mba-on-demand-webinar-available-for-viewing/#respond Sun, 10 Aug 2014 16:55:22 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24223 ]]> Missed last week’s webinar, How to Pay for Your MBA? Still worried those b-school price tags will get the best of you? No problem. Get the facts you need to finance your business degree when you view How to Pay for Your MBA online now. The webinar, which was hosted by guest Matt Levin from CommonBond, was a huge success – loads of tips and suggestions on how YOU can secure the funds needed to pay for b-school.

Join Our Free Webinar to Learn How to Pay for Your MBA!

Don’t let tuition bills stand in your way. Get the MBA you need and deserve and learn how to pay for it with How to Pay for Your MBA. And as always, please be in touch if you have any questions – about paying for your MBA or about any other stage of the admissions process!

Watch the Webinar: How to Pay for Your MBA!

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6 Tips for Getting Started on Your Application Essays http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/10/6-tips-for-getting-started-on-your-application-essays-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/10/6-tips-for-getting-started-on-your-application-essays-2/#comments Sun, 10 Aug 2014 16:35:11 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24494 ]]> Sit down, think, and start writing!

Sit down, think, and start writing!

Sometimes the hardest part of writing a personal statement or application essay for college or grad school is finding the discipline to sit down and focus. Often, once you accomplish that, the ideas begin to form and the words begin to flow. The following 6 tips will help motivate you to start writing, and then to continue writing until you’ve got some solid material for a compelling essay.

1. Words beget more words. Here’s an important concept to think about when it comes to getting started – one word leads to another. Once you BEGIN writing, your brain will begin to generate ideas that will inspire you to CONTINUE writing. So even if you don’t think you have anything to say, just sit down and write whatever comes to mind. Set a timer for 10 minutes and don’t stop writing until the timer dings. I guarantee that when the buzzer goes off, SOME idea will have surfaced.

2. Write now, edit later. Do NOT get bogged down in the editorial details of your essay during the early writing stages. Now is the time to simply get your ideas out on paper (or computer screen). Write as you think – in fragments, in run-on sentences, or in vivid descriptions of images as they pass before your mind’s eye. Work on making them sound good later on.

3. Use details. During the brainstorming phase of your writing, as well as later on when you’re clarifying your work, you’re going to want to include details that will engage your reader. Think about what attracts someone to a good book – is it boring summaries and abstractions, or a few descriptions of people and places or specific dialog?

4. Include meaning. Description is key, but if you don’t internalize (and then show that you’ve internalized) the MEANING of the scene you’ve described, then the adcoms won’t care much about it. What do your experiences say about YOU?

5. Prove impact. Now that you’ve expressed what your experiences say about your qualifications or characteristics, it’s time to explain how those traits and strengths will contribute to your class. You’ve proven that you are a leader; how do you plan on using those skills?

6. Have faith.
 Maybe you’ve hit a wall and feel like you’ll never spin your ideas into a coherent essay. Have faith – the writing process takes time. Take a break and then return to your computer with a clear mind and a positive attitude to begin the brainstorming process from scratch.

Now, sit down, think, and start writing! Good luck!

5ffgeneric

Accepted.com

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What You Need to Know to Get Accepted to Wharton http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/08/what-you-need-to-know-to-get-accepted-to-wharton/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/08/what-you-need-to-know-to-get-accepted-to-wharton/#respond Fri, 08 Aug 2014 20:45:36 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24584 ]]> You CAN get accepted to Wharton!

We invite all Wharton MBA applicants to attend our upcoming webinar, Get Accepted to the Wharton School, in which Accepted.com CEO and b-school admissions expert, Linda Abraham, will teach you how to create a standout application for this world-class, highly competitive business school.

During the webinar, Linda will discuss:

• The 4 key strategy steps you need to get accepted to Wharton.

• How to ace Wharton’s team-based discussion/interview.

…and more!

The webinar will take place on Tuesday, August 19, 2014 at 10:00 AM PST/1:00 PM EST/5:00 PM GMT.

Click here to reserve your spot!

Spaces are limited! Reserve your spot for Get Accepted to the Wharton School now!

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Interview with 22 Year Old B-School Applicant, “Pulling That MBA Trigger” http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/08/interview-with-22-year-old-b-school-applicant-pulling-that-mba-trigger/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/08/interview-with-22-year-old-b-school-applicant-pulling-that-mba-trigger/#respond Fri, 08 Aug 2014 16:19:43 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24498 ]]> Check out more MBA applicant interviews!This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with MBA applicant bloggers, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at the MBA application process. And now…introducing our anonymous blogger, “Pulling That MBA Trigger.”

Accepted: Can you tell us a little about yourself – where are you from, where did you go to school, and what is your current job?

Pulling That MBA Trigger: Ah, I never really know how to answer this question. An entire lifetime in a few sentences? I’m way too chatty for that. Anyway, I’m 22 years old, female and fresh out of the college boat. Well, it’s been a year anyway, so I’m still not a jaded adult which is probably why I’m so gung-ho about this whole admissions thing.

I’m from India and I went to a school that is probably not known to the rest of the world, although a recently appointed CEO did go here. It’s doing a lot for our street cred. I graduated as an electronics engineer and I’m working for a tech startup that develops web and mobile applications when we’re not busy working with big data analytics and all that jazz. I also founded my own startup in the education space, so yeah pretty exciting stuff!

Accepted: Which schools do you plan on applying to?

PTMT: I’m glaringly honest with myself and I know that my chances of getting into the top 5 schools are astronomically low. With that said, I’m targeting the lower 10’s and pretty much any school in the 10-20 range. I haven’t narrowed down the names yet, but I’m angling towards MIT Sloan simply because of their focus on entrepreneurship and the fact that they happen to like engineers from the technology space. I’m also considering Yale (Ivy League, ’nuff said) and Booth (quant focused with a soft spot for younger applicants, or so I hear). I’m applying to a maximum of four schools and this is more strategic than anything else simply because if I get dinged from all four of them, I can reapply next year with plenty of options still left open.

Accepted: What would you say is your greatest profile strength? Weakness? How do you plan on overcoming that weakness?

PTMT: I guess my greatest strength lies in the fact that I am an entrepreneur and a leader at heart, and this kind of spills over everywhere in my application. I have only ever worked for startups and I have founded a startup. I never felt the need for an MBA to take that plunge and I guess I would say that I’m ballsy. Not sure how I would put that on my application, but eh.

Weakness is pretty obvious. I am very, very impatient. I can’t wait any longer to get that MBA and so I’m quite stupidly applying after having worked for only a year (or two at the time of matriculation). It’s going to be quite a challenge convincing schools that I’m emotionally and professionally ready to get an MBA.

Accepted: So…how are you going to convince the adcom that you’re a candidate worth paying attention to with only one year of work experience? 

PTMT: Honestly, I’m not even sure I’m convinced just yet! I’m just faking it as I go, maybe eventually I’ll actually believe that I’m someone worth paying attention to. But with that said, my plan is to focus on all that I have managed to achieve in such a short period of time, possibly as much as other people achieved in two years. Impatience has its own rewards, which is why I jam-packed my years in college and post-college with every activity imaginable and that is now paying off. I am mainly going to emphasize the success of my own startup (albeit on a modest scale) and my stint as the secretary of the student body in college.

Accepted: Why do you want an MBA? What are some of your goals and how will an MBA help you achieve them?

PTMT: In my current role as a software engineer, I’m limited to my work as a code monkey and I have no exposure to how the company gets its clients, or how they measure the bottom line and success/failure. I guess this kind of points to a role in consulting post an MBA, simply because it would allow me to look at how different companies across different industries function, without slotting me into a role that is limiting in terms of what I’m able to learn (i.e. software engineer, product manager, marketing manager and so on). Long term though, I’d like to use all the consulting knowledge from watching other companies’ mistakes to set up my own company in the tech space.

Accepted: What has the b-school application process so far taught you about yourself?

PTMT: The b-school process has forced me to thoroughly excavate my head. I had to visit corners I never wanted to revisit. It has been torturous at times and merely annoying at others. It’s taught me that I have a high tolerance for pain and that I should really get a commemorative tattoo when I’m done. Okay, okay. It’s also shown me that I have vast reserves of strength, resolve and motivation. I know I can pull through and even if I don’t, I know I’ll have the energy to do it again next year. I also think I’m a lot more interesting than I thought I was. I actually have interesting stories to write down in my essays. Who knew?!

Accepted: Can you tell us about your blog? Who is your target audience? What do you hope to gain from the blogging experience?

PTMT: My blog is called Pulling That MBA Trigger and it’s no coincidence that I want to shoot myself in the head about once a day during this whole process. It’s basically a place for me to vent and document my thoughts before I go crazy. I hope it provides slight comedic relief to others going through the same thing and perhaps makes them feel better about their own chances of getting in. At the end of it, I want to be able to look back and think, “Ah, I’ve made it so far,” unless of course I get dinged everywhere in which case I’m going to nuke the blog off cyberspace and pretend it never existed.

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages.

You can read more about PTMT’s b-school journey by checking out her blog, Pulling That MBA Trigger. Thank you PTMT for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

Navigating the MBA Maze

Accepted.com

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A Transformational Year: The MIT Sloan Fellows Program http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/07/a-transformational-year-the-mit-sloan-fellows-program/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/07/a-transformational-year-the-mit-sloan-fellows-program/#respond Thu, 07 Aug 2014 16:37:28 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24589 ]]> Listen to the show!What is the solution for a seasoned manager who is too experienced for an MBA, but not so enthusiastic about the idea of a part-time EMBA?

Listen to the recording of our conversation with Stephen Sacca for the low down on an 84 year-old secret that just might change your life: The MIT Sloan Fellows Program in Innovation and Global Leadership.

00:02:44 – What is the MIT Sloan Fellows program?

00:04:32 – Experienced candidates only.

00:05:22 – Overview of an intensive year.

00:07:48 – A great idea: The April orientation.

00:11:10 –The MIT Sloan Fellows Program in Innovation and Global Leadership: What is in a name?

00:15:56 – Integration with the various MIT Sloan programs.

00:17:59 – The common denominator among Sloan fellows.

00:19:52 – Trips: not just for fun.

00:25:41 – Why career changers need not apply.

00:28:55 – The most common feedback from graduates.

00:32:39 – Advice for applicants.

Listen to the full conversation to learn more!*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Related Links:

MIT Sloan Fellows Program in Innovation and Global Leadership
MIT Sloan School of Management
• Ace the EMBA
• Top Executive MBA Program Essay Questions: How to Answer Them Right!

Related Shows:

The Stanford MSx Program for Experienced Leaders
Business, Law and Beyond: An Interview with John Engelman
• Dr. Douglas Stayman Shares the Scoop on Cornell Tech NYC 

Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk:

Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes! Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in Stitcher!

Download your free copy of Ace the EMBA!

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http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/07/a-transformational-year-the-mit-sloan-fellows-program/feed/ 0 EMBA,MIT Sloan,MIT Sloan Fellows,podcast What is the solution for a seasoned manager who is too experienced for an MBA, but not so enthusiastic about the idea of a part-time EMBA? - Listen to the recording of our conversation with Stephen Sacca for the low down on an 84 year-old secret that ... What is the solution for a seasoned manager who is too experienced for an MBA, but not so enthusiastic about the idea of a part-time EMBA? Listen to the recording of our conversation with Stephen Sacca for the low down on an 84 year-old secret that just might change your life: The MIT Sloan Fellows Program in Innovation and Global Leadership. 00:02:44 – What is the MIT Sloan Fellows program? 00:04:32 – Experienced candidates only. 00:05:22 – Overview of an intensive year. 00:07:48 – A great idea: The April orientation. 00:11:10 –The MIT Sloan Fellows Program in Innovation and Global Leadership: What is in a name? 00:15:56 – Integration with the various MIT Sloan programs. 00:17:59 – The common denominator among Sloan fellows. 00:19:52 – Trips: not just for fun. 00:25:41 – Why career changers need not apply. 00:28:55 – The most common feedback from graduates. 00:32:39 – Advice for applicants. *Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com. Related Links: • MIT Sloan Fellows Program in Innovation and Global Leadership • MIT Sloan School of Management • Ace the EMBA • Top Executive MBA Program Essay Questions: How to Answer Them Right! Related Shows: • The Stanford MSx Program for Experienced Leaders • Business, Law and Beyond: An Interview with John Engelman • Dr. Douglas Stayman Shares the Scoop on Cornell Tech NYC  Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk: Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no 38:16
Chicago Booth 2015 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/06/chicago-booth-2015-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/06/chicago-booth-2015-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/#comments Wed, 06 Aug 2014 16:15:22 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24328 ]]> Get more MBA essay tips here!Chicago Booth has always prided itself on valuing applicants who can handle ambiguity and lack of structure. And it’s application reflects that principle. In spades. This year’s Booth also application mirrors the “streamlining” that has taken place throughout the b-school world as well as Chicago’s distinctive culture and love of ambiguity. This essay/presentation question, which is new for this year, is about as open-ended as it gets.

My tips are in blue below.

Presentation/Essay:

Chicago Booth values adventurous inquiry, diverse perspectives, and a collaborative exchange of ideas.  This is us.  Who are you?

This is a really difficult question.

What do you want to tell Booth that reflects your adventurous and curious nature, your distinctive perspective and experience, which will contribute to the class’ diversity, and your ability to contribute to a vigorous but still collaborative exchange of ideas?  And yes it should be genuinely you.

To start make a list of the experiences and achievements that you are most proud of and that best reflect who you are.   Then review the presentation/essay guidelines below as well as the Booth admissions criteria. Next to each item on your list, add the qualities from Booth’s criteria that this experience or achievement reveals.

Also look at the other information you are providing in the application including your resume and those boxes. What about you is absent from these other parts of the application? Write those experiences and attributes down too in a separate list.  Which items on your “absentee” list introduce the qualities Booth seeks?  Are any of them on your first list of achievements?

Focus on the items that are on both lists and that are most important to you and distinctive about you.  As Booth itself instructs “We’ve learned a lot about you throughout the application, but what more should we know?” The answer to that question is a critical part of a effective response to Booth’s essay question.

Presentation/Essay Guidelines

• Be reflective. We’ve learned a lot about you throughout the application, but what more should we know?
• Interpret broadly.  “Who are you?” can be interpreted in many different ways.  We encourage you to think critically and broadly about who you are, and how your values, passions and experiences have influenced you.
• Determine your own length.  There is no prescribed minimum or maximum length.  We trust that you will use your best judgment in determining how long your submission should be, but we recommend that you think strategically about how to best allocate the space.

Don’t give in to temptation. Lack of a word limit or guideline is not a license for verbosity or permission to write the great American novel (or autobiography). Concision is valued in the business world. Show good judgment and consideration for the reader’s time. Keep it short, but tell your story.

• Choose the format that works for you.  You can design your presentation or compose your essay in the format that you feel best captures your response. However, please consider the specific technical restrictions noted below.
• Think about you, not us.  Rather than focusing on what you think we want to hear, focus on what is essential for us to know about you. Simply put, be genuine.

Technical Guidelines

• File Size: Maximum file size is 16 MB.
• Accepted Upload Formats:  Acceptable formats are PDF, Word and Powerpoint.
• Multimedia Restrictions: We will be viewing your submission electronically and in full color, but all submissions will be converted to PDF files, so animation, video, music, etc. will not translate over.
• Preserve Your Formatting: We strongly recommend converting your piece to a PDF file prior to submitting to ensure that everything you see matches what we see.

A few thoughts:

Should you write an essay or use a visual presentation? That depends on you. If you are talented visually and love graphics and powerpoint, use a visual medium as long as it will translate to PDF. If you are a “words person” comfortable expressing your thoughts in writing, write the essay. Do what will make it easiest for you to express your essence.  

Optional Essay: If there is any important information that you were unable to address elsewhere in the application, please share that information here. (300 word maximum)

The instructions are pretty clear. Is there something you want the admissions committee to know about that is not included elsewhere, here’s the spot for it. A gap in employment? A dip in grades caused by illness or family problems? This is the spot.

Reapplicant Essay: Upon reflection, how has your perspective regarding your future, Chicago Booth, and/or getting an MBA changed since the time of your last application? (300 words maximum)

This is a critical essay for MBA reapplicants. Remember, Chicago (and any school you are reapplying to) wants to see growth. Same ol’, same ‘ol got you a ding last time and probably will again this time. Let this brief essay show a maturation and evolution of your goals and reasons for wanting to attend Chicago Booth.  Chicago loves to see critical thinking.

If you would like professional guidance with your Chicago Booth MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our  MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Booth application. 

Chicago Booth 2015 MBA Application Deadlines:

Submission Deadline Final Decision Notification
Round 1 September 25, 2014 December 18, 2014
Round 2 January 6, 2015 March 26, 2015
Round 3 April 7, 2015 May 21, 2015

 Have our MBA admissions experts critique your Booth application!

Linda Abraham By , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

 

Related Resources: 

• School-Specific MBA Application Essay Tips 
Chicago Booth B-School Zone
Audio & Video in Admissions, a free guide

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3 Mistakes Successful MBA Applicants Don’t Make http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/04/3-mistakes-successful-mba-applicants-dont-make/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/04/3-mistakes-successful-mba-applicants-dont-make/#respond Mon, 04 Aug 2014 16:41:26 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24029 ]]> Save yourself the heartbreak of rejection.

Save yourself the heartbreak of rejection.

Don’t make these mistakes when applying to b-school:

1. Applying without a clear idea of what you want to do after you earn the degree.

Having clear career goals is a MUST for successful MBA applicants. You may think you can cover up this lack of direction in your application, but the adcom are trained to see who has focused goals and who does not. Business schools are looking for applicants who will both succeed as students and as businesspeople in the post-MBA career world. If you don’t show direction early on, then there’s a chance you’ll flounder through b-school and won’t smoothly transition back into the workforce. YOU won’t get the most out of your MBA experience, and nor will the school. It’s a lose-lose for everyone.

Instead, solidify (with some degree of flexibility) what you want to do post-degree so that you present yourself as a strong, focused candidate in your applications. Remember, you’ll personally benefit from this research and direction, in addition to it boosting your chances of admission.

2. Writing what you think the admissions committee wants to know as opposed to what you want them to know.

You THINK that by writing what the adcom wants to hear, that your essay will be creative – ingenious even. But what ends up happening, is that everyone thinks the committee wants to hear the same thing and they end up writing something UN-original in order to fit those imagined specifications. Instead, look deep into yourself and think about what you truly would like to share with them – that’s the ONLY way that your final product will be authentically original, and the only way that you’ll really impress the adcom.

3. Applying exclusively to schools based on the rankings and without any sense of your own competitiveness.

If all applicants made this mistake, then Harvard, Stanford, and other top five programs would be even more selective than they are and VERY few people would ever gain admission. Yes, HBS is good for some people, and Stanford is good for others, but they’re certainly not the best schools for everyone. If there’s no possible chance that you’ll get accepted to a top five, top ten, or top fifty program, then start your quest by crossing those off your list. Save yourself the heartbreak of rejection and the costs and setback of reapplication by choosing reasonable programs to apply to.

That being said, so long as you apply to at least one safety and a few on-pars that you’d be thrilled to attend, then it certainly can’t hurt to try for a few reasonable reaches.

MBA 5 Fatal Flaws

Accepted.com

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Which Business School Will Get Me to Wall Street? http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/03/which-business-school-will-get-me-to-wall-street/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/03/which-business-school-will-get-me-to-wall-street/#respond Sun, 03 Aug 2014 15:06:24 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24524 ]]> I want to go into financial services. Which is the best MBA program for me?

Which b-schools are best for finance students? Download our free special report to find out!

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Snag Your Harvard Business School Class of 2017 Seat http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/01/snag-your-harvard-business-school-class-of-2017-seat/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/01/snag-your-harvard-business-school-class-of-2017-seat/#respond Fri, 01 Aug 2014 16:22:56 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=23493 ]]> If you’re aiming to attend Harvard Business School or another top 10 MBA program in 2015, then you’ll want to view our most recent webinar, Get Accepted to Harvard Business School.

In her presentation, Linda Abraham, CEO & Founder of Accepted.com, offers loads of advice on how to gain a competitive edge to a top b-school in general, and Harvard Business School in particular.

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View Get Accepted to Harvard Business School on-demand now!

Watch 'Get Accepted to Harvard Business School'!

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An Artist at B-School: Interview with an NYU Stern Langone Student http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/01/an-artist-at-b-school-interview-with-an-nyu-stern-langone-student/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/08/01/an-artist-at-b-school-interview-with-an-nyu-stern-langone-student/#respond Fri, 01 Aug 2014 15:45:04 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24342 ]]> Click here for more MBA student interviews!

This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Chris Alexander, a student at NYU Stern’s Langone Part-Time MBA program.

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? Do you hold any other degrees?

Chris: There’s a growing subset of the New York population who become affected, deeply and emotionally, when they hear the words “In-N-Out Burger.” They’re called Californians, and I’m one of them.

I grew up in Camarillo, a city in Southern California known for its legendary outlet mall. I got my Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of California, Santa Cruz where I studied Studio Art with an emphasis on metal sculpture. Many nights I would work late in the metal studio and emerge when the sun came up, exhausted and dreary-eyed with dozens of burns from running a MIG welder all night. You’re supposed to suffer for your art, right? Bronze and steel were my favorite mediums, and were a huge source of inspiration for me because I knew that the result of my work would be a piece of art that could last thousands of years.

I moved to New York City in 2008 for graduate school and got my Master of Arts in Graphic Communications Management and Technology from the New York University School of Continuing and Professional Studies. It was great to be surrounded by other craftspeople (designers, illustrators and photographers) that were all in the program for the same reason: to develop the vital skills needed to translate your art into real-world value with a dollar amount behind it.

After graduating with my M.A., I partnered with a current MBA student to enter the New Venture Competition at the NYU Stern School of Business. We had an idea to create a location-based craft beer bar discovery app (Think: Yelp + Pandora for craft beer enthusiasts). The competition itself was an intense experience and much more than just a pitch-off. It was months of marketing, finance and legal workshops, and exclusive unfiltered advice from some heavy-hitter VCs. We got eliminated about halfway into the competition, but in the end it was a truly priceless experience.

As I was not an MBA student at the time, this was a key moment that taught me two things: 1) My understanding of accounting, data analysis and start-up law was embarrassing, and 2) I absolutely needed to acquire those skills in order to be content with my professional self.

So I applied to the NYU Stern Langone Part-Time MBA and began in Fall 2012.

Accepted: What is your favorite non-school book?

Chris: I’ve grown the most from books that teeter on the edge between biography and business – the stories of people who have taken strategic risks, overcome adversity and held tightly – sometimes stubbornly – to the chance of seeing their dreams manifest in a very real way. Some of my favorites are Nothing is Impossible by Christopher Reeves, Losing My Virginity by Richard Branson, Onward by Howard Schultz and Delivering Happiness by Tony Hsieh. They’re all very inspiring stories with awesome life and business lessons.

Accepted: What year are you in at NYU Stern’s Langone Part-Time MBA program?

Chris: I’ll be heading into my third year in the program starting Fall 2014.

Accepted: Why did you decide to go part-time at Stern? What are the advantages and disadvantages of going this route?

Chris: The main reason I chose the part-time program was that, as an employee of New York University, I get a very generous tuition remission benefit. So from a financial and strategic perspective, this was simply the choice that made sense for me.

The biggest advantage of a part-time program is the opportunity to develop your academic knowledge in parallel with your professional skills. I know it sounds like a cliché sound byte from a recruitment video (I know because I worked in college admissions for seven years!) but I would actually learn new techniques in a Monday night class that I could pitch to my boss and begin implementing at work later that same week. This not only equipped me with fresh ideas at work, but it also helped me develop a keen sense of which lessons would be professionally applicable in the immediate term and which lessons were more suited for my long term development.

The very real disadvantage is that part-time programs simply take longer to complete. (I suppose there’s a hidden silver lining because one has more time to absorb the b-school experience.) But part-time programs require a real commitment to stay motivated for 3 or 4 years, despite all of the curveballs that work and personal life throws at you.

Accepted: What’s your favorite class so far? 

Chris: Digital Marketing with Professor Scott Galloway (@profgalloway) was the most professionally applicable class for me thus far. Galloway leads the business intelligence agency L2 Think Tank, and brought a wealth of cutting edge industry insights and fantastic guest speakers to the class.

Accepted: Why did you choose Stern? What’s your favorite thing about the program? Least favorite thing?

Chris: The primary reason I chose NYU Stern was because it’s very highly ranked among part-time MBA programs (#4 according to U.S. News and World Report’s 2014 ranking, surpassed only by Haas, Booth and Kellogg).

My favorite aspect of the program is having a community of smart, driven working professionals as classmates. There’s a shared understanding of how much everyone is sacrificing to be in this program, and a real respect for each other’s time. We don’t have the luxury of spending excess time on non-critical activities. People really cut the fluff and get down to business, and I like that.

My least favorite aspect of the program is that I wish there was a bit more representation from folks who are laser-focused on digital marketing and entrepreneurship. Finance is just such a dominant force at NYU Stern – as it should be given the location – but at times I struggled to fit in with a classroom full of investment bankers and stock traders. Though once I start taking more higher-level electives I’m sure that dynamic will change.

Accepted: Can you share some advice to incoming first year students, to help make their adjustment to b-school easier? What do you wish you would’ve known just before entering?

Chris: Definitely! Here are three nuggets of wisdom I wish I had known before starting the program:

1. Get to know what campus resources are available to you before getting swamped by readings, case studies and group projects. Once the semester starts, the pace and workload ramps up and doesn’t slow down. Even basic things were super helpful to know such as the location of printers, how to reserve study rooms or where to find coffee at odd hours.

2. Research professors ahead of time. Your class experience can range from mediocre to life-changing depending on the professor’s passion, background and teaching style. I constantly ask other students about their favorite professors, and keep a Google Doc with a running list for future reference.

3. Know what YOU want to get out of the MBA experience. In a part-time program, time is definitely your most limited resource, so have a real strategy going in. Academically, what do you want your skill-set to look like upon graduating? Personally, what kinds of relationships do you want to make and what types of people do you need in your network?

Accepted: Looking back, what was the most challenging aspect of the MBA admissions process? How did you approach that challenge and overcome it?

Chris: The most challenging part of the NYU Stern admissions process was the “personal expression” essay that prompts you to “describe yourself to your MBA classmates.” There are virtually zero constraints on the actual medium of the essay. Some applicants submit audio recordings, paintings, digital creations and everything in between.

But every challenge is an opportunity in disguise, or at least that’s how I approached it. This was my chance to differentiate myself and show them something unique. I consider myself to be a talented visual communicator, so I designed a huge infographic poster displaying key moments of my personal and professional development. Each moment became a node in a web of experiences that were color-coded, categorized and charted across the years of my life.

Accepted; Can you tell us about your resume writing email course?

Chris: As a personal project, I’ve been working on designing an online resource to help college students and recent grads beef up their resumes in preparation for finding a job. It’s called the Kickass Resume Course and it’s a free self-guided email course that walks students through a range of lessons from basic visual design principles to crafting a narrative around your work experience to quantifying your achievements.

In my eight years of working in higher education I’ve reviewed hundreds of student resumes and have interviewed many students for various jobs. I’ve met some super-sharp, ambitious students who didn’t get hired because they came in with lackluster resumes and zero interviewing skills. So I’ve packaged everything I’ve learned and observed over the years into this email course. It’s a way for me to give back and help other students get a boost during their first job interviews.

Students can sign up at www.kickassresumecourse.com. It’s always free and (hopefully) always awesome!

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages. For specific advice on how to create the best application for NYU Stern, check out our NYU Stern 2015 MBA Essay Tips

Thank you Chris for sharing your story with us!

Download our free special report: Best MBA Programs

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Career Direction: It’s Ok to Love Your Job! http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/31/career-direction-its-ok-to-love-your-job/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/31/career-direction-its-ok-to-love-your-job/#respond Thu, 31 Jul 2014 16:12:46 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24502 ]]> Click here to listen to the show!Don’t want to wake up at age 45 wondering why you’ve wasted your life pursuing an uninspiring and meaningless career?

Listen to the recording of our conversation with expert career coach, Akiba Smith-Francis, for essential advice on choosing a career path and laying the foundations for long-term fulfillment and success at work.

00:02:27 – Akiba’s journey from brand management to career coaching.

00:04:34 – The anatomy of bad advice (and some good advice to counter it).

00:16:53 – Tips for finding meaningful and enjoyable work.

00:22:57 – I want to follow my passion… but it has no market value. What should I do?

00:25:45 – How to get off the treadmill – even if you’ve been running since pre-school.

00:30:49 – Good networking: what it is and how to do it.

00:36:02 – Are all graduate school leadership development programs created equal?

00:39:51 – Advice for a young person figuring out a career path.
Listen to the full conversation to learn more!

*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Related Links:

• Services Section
• Akiba Smith-Francis on LinkedIn 
• 
Stepping Off the Path

Related Shows:

The Consortium: Diversifying B-School and Corporate Management
• Forte Helps Women in Business Thrive: Interview with Elissa Sangster 
• Interview with Anna Runyan of Classy Career Girl 
• Goal Setting, Job Searching, and Sweet Careers 
• From Luxury Marketing to Entrepreneurship: A Talk with Daria Burke
• Non-Academic Careers for PhDs: A Talk with Dr. Paula Chambers 

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http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/31/career-direction-its-ok-to-love-your-job/feed/ 0 career changers,career goals,podcast Don’t want to wake up at age 45 wondering why you’ve wasted your life pursuing an uninspiring and meaningless career? - Listen to the recording of our conversation with expert career coach, Akiba Smith-Francis, Don’t want to wake up at age 45 wondering why you’ve wasted your life pursuing an uninspiring and meaningless career? Listen to the recording of our conversation with expert career coach, Akiba Smith-Francis, for essential advice on choosing a career path and laying the foundations for long-term fulfillment and success at work. 00:02:27 – Akiba’s journey from brand management to career coaching. 00:04:34 – The anatomy of bad advice (and some good advice to counter it). 00:16:53 – Tips for finding meaningful and enjoyable work. 00:22:57 – I want to follow my passion… but it has no market value. What should I do? 00:25:45 – How to get off the treadmill – even if you’ve been running since pre-school. 00:30:49 – Good networking: what it is and how to do it. 00:36:02 – Are all graduate school leadership development programs created equal? 00:39:51 – Advice for a young person figuring out a career path. *Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com. Related Links: • Services Section • Akiba Smith-Francis on LinkedIn  • Stepping Off the Path Related Shows: • The Consortium: Diversifying B-School and Corporate Management • Forte Helps Women in Business Thrive: Interview with Elissa Sangster  • Interview with Anna Runyan of Classy Career Girl  • Goal Setting, Job Searching, and Sweet Careers  • From Luxury Marketing to Entrepreneurship: A Talk with Daria Burke • Non-Academic Careers for PhDs: A Talk with Dr. Paula Chambers  Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk:       Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no 45:23
Chicago Booth 2015 Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/31/chicago-booth-2015-executive-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/31/chicago-booth-2015-executive-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/#respond Thu, 31 Jul 2014 15:12:29 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24513 ]]> Check out more school-specific EMBA application essay tips!

Chicago Booth

The Chicago Booth EMBA questions are challenging because they separate your need for the MBA and your interest in the program – the first question asks, among other things, “Why are you seeking an MBA from Chicago Booth” and the second question asks “what you hope to gain from the MBA.” One could reasonably see these two questions as being basically the same. While the first question is wide ranging and includes what you’ll contribute to the program, the second question focuses on your goals – it’s the why-MBA part that overlaps. I suggest writing essay 2 first, because the goals discussion will provide context for what you hope to gain specifically from Chicago Booth. Taken together, these two questions allow you to create a well-rounded picture, with sharp focus on career in essay 2, and an opportunity to present selected highlights of your career (and non-work activities as well) in essay 1.

Essays:

1. Why are you seeking an MBA from Chicago Booth and what unique knowledge and experiences do you hope to contribute to the program? (maximum 2 pages, 12 pt. Times New Roman)

Let’s break this question into two parts. Part 1: why you’re seeking the MBA from Chicago Booth. This section should address the specific education you seek as dictated by your goals, which you will discuss in #2. It can also address other desired benefits, such as the chance to interact with accomplished peers from diverse industries. In answering this part, be specific about Booth’s offerings and add insight or reflection based on your perspective and situation. If you can cite conversations with students or alumni, that’s fantastic; give examples of insights you’ve gained from them.

Part 2: what you hope to contribute. Note the word “unique” – it does not mean that you should dredge up some exotic experience that no other applicant could possibly have done; it does mean particularizing your knowledge and experience to yourself, your perspective, your individual lens. This is a chance to showcase aspects of your career and your personal experience that distinguish and differentiate you. You can discuss work points exclusively or work and non-work. Select a few events or activities that complement each other and provide some depth and detail about each. Also, think strategically about what Chicago Booth values and what the rest of your application doesn’t reveal.

 2. Chicago Booth Career Services delivers innovative educational programming, offers one-on-one coaching, provides numerous networking opportunities, and provides access to job search tools in order to support your own career management. We would like to learn more about your career strategy and objectives. Please outline your career objectives, how you hope to achieve them, and what you hope to gain from the MBA to help you achieve them.  (maximum 2 pages, 12 pt. Times New Roman)

By listing its career resources, the Chicago adcom is showing that the program is invested in your career success. You should demonstrate your worthiness by delivering a thoughtful and detailed portrayal of your career objectives. Discuss not just general aspirations but specifics: industry, likely positions, which companies, possibly where, what you expect to actually do, possibly challenges you anticipate – and, as the question says, how. To transcend mere competence and make the essay compelling, also show how your goals are rooted in your experience, what motivates your goals, and your vision for your goals. Finally, discuss the educational needs these goals create that necessitate an MBA. You may also be interested in The Art of a Gripping MBA Goals Essay, an on-demand webinar.

Optional essay: If there is anything else you would like the admissions committee to know about you, please share that information here.  (maximum 2 pages, 12 pt. Times New Roman)

This question invites you to present new material that will enhance your application, as well as to explain anything that needs explaining (e.g., gap in employment, choice of recommender if not using a direct supervisor, etc.). As far as enhancement points, keep in mind that since you are making the adcom read more, there should be a clear value to the information you’re sharing. Also, such points should avoid material that more appropriately belongs in essay 1 (unique knowledge and experiences).

If you would like professional guidance with your Chicago Booth EMBA application, please consider Accepted’s EMBA essay editing and EMBA admissions consulting or our EMBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Chicago Booth EMBA application

Deadlines:

Round Application Deadline
Early Action October 3, 2014
Round 1 December 1, 2014
Round 2 February 2, 2015
Round 3 April 1, 2015

Download your free copy of Ace the EMBA!

Cindy Tokumitsu By , co-author of The EMBA Edge, and author of the free special report, Ace the EMBA. Cindy has helped MBA applicants get accepted to top EMBA programs around the world. She is delighted to help you too!

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Final Miscellany – Plan B, Research, Professional Support http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/30/final-miscellany-plan-b-research-professional-support-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/30/final-miscellany-plan-b-research-professional-support-2/#respond Wed, 30 Jul 2014 16:02:50 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=23967 ]]> Click here to download your complete copy of Why MBA!

Good preliminary research can prevent big mistakes.

“Final Miscellany – Plan B, Research, Professional Support” is excerpted from the Accepted.com special report, Why MBA? To download the entire free special report, click here.

I will wrap up this series with a few miscellaneous points.

Plan B

Think you’re done with MBA goals? Think again… In the current global economic volatility, having a Plan B for your immediate post-MBA goal can be not only good planning for you, but also enhance your goal essay’s credibility.  It’s particularly important if you’re targeting a difficult-to-enter industry (remember that VC-dreamer in the first post?) or changing careers.  In fact, adcoms have specifically said that they welcome this recognition of reality; it gives them more confidence that you can get employed.

The challenge, however, is to discuss a Plan B without using a lot of precious space and without sounding undirected.  In the goals essay, focus mostly on your main short-term goal. Then add one to three sentences about a reasonable alternative that you’d also consider, explaining how it also would be a good step toward your further goals.  Example: an applicant is targeting an IT manager role post-MBA with the long-term goal of CIO; a Plan B could be a tech strategy consulting post-MBA job.

Preliminary research

I’m always surprised at how few people do roll-up-the-shirtsleeves research on their goals before writing essays.  Digging around on the web for a couple of hours or talking to people in careers related to your goals can yield rich detail for your essays.  Moreover, mentioning this research in your essays enhances the sense of commitment to your chosen path.  I suggest reading up on the industry and its current and future challenges, and conducting informational interviews regarding the industry or business function.

Taking this step will enable you to write sharply and engagingly about your goals.  It enhances the interest factor of the essay.  Also it will prevent big mistakes like those of that Wharton reapplicant in the first post in this series.  By presenting selected tidbits of your research in your essay you’ll show you’re resourceful and committed, and equally important you’ll show you have something to say, i.e., contribute.

Professional assistance

I’ve said a lot of “do this” and “do that” in this series.  If you feel that having knowledgeable, experienced, committed assistance as you walk through this process would be helpful, please consider using Accepted.com’s MBA admissions consulting & essay editing services to help you perfect your application.

Get clear, practical guidelines for answering the MBA goals essay question. Click here to download our free report.

Cindy Tokumitsu By , author and co-author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports, including Why MBA and Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted.com.

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What Score Do You Need on the TOEFL? http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/29/what-score-do-you-need-on-the-toefl/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/07/29/what-score-do-you-need-on-the-toefl/#respond Tue, 29 Jul 2014 15:58:27 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=24479 ]]> If you’re an international student applying to the U.S., you’ve probably asked yourself this question: what TOEFL score do I need to get in? You might have heard that making it to the 100’s will guarantee you admission, but you’ve also had friends who reached that score and were turned down from schools. Confused yet? We’d be too!

But before you give up hope, our friends at Magoosh TOEFL have good news for you! They’ve just released a new infographic that shows what TOEFL sores you’ll need to get into top graduate schools in the U.S. It’s based off their research on the minimum scores required at top schools as well as what other students at those schools score on average. That means you now have a place to start and a goal to aim for when you decide to take the TOEFL. Cue sigh of relief!

TOEFL Scores Infographic

 

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