Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog » MBA Admissions http://blog.accepted.com Admissions consulting and application advice Sat, 22 Nov 2014 18:09:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0.1 Admissions consulting and application advice Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no Admissions consulting and application advice Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog » MBA Admissions http://blog.accepted.com/wp-content/plugins/powerpress/rss_default.jpg http://blog.accepted.com/category/mba-admissions/ CEIBS 2015 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/21/ceibs-2015-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/21/ceibs-2015-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/#respond Fri, 21 Nov 2014 18:36:05 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26951 ]]> Click here for more school-specific MBA essay tips!

Demonstrate that your goals fit the range of outcomes for the CEIBS program.

CEIBS (China Europe International Business School, pronounced “Seebs”), located in Shanghai, is the longest-running MBA program in China, boasting the largest MBA alumni pool in China and over 10,000 alumni around the world. Ranked by the Financial Times 2nd in China (behind HKUST) and 17th in the world, the program focuses on endowing students with a global business perspective plus a local Chinese cultural understanding. The curriculum places a great emphasis on understanding international business and how to apply these skills in China, in particular on endowing students with soft skills like interpersonal communication, strategy development, and an integrated management perspective that allows graduates to solve challenging business problems across functional business lines. Program graduates seem to do quite well: the average salary for graduates in the past 3 years is over $127,000.

CEIBS’s essay questions can cause some anxiety because of the choices applicants have for questions 2 and 3.

My comments and advice are in blue below:

1. Discuss your post-MBA career aspirations and explain how you plan to achieve them. (300 words) *

This is a straightforward career goal question. You need to demonstrate that your goals fit the range of outcomes for the CEIBS program: if your expectations are not aligned, the admissions committee cannot accept you since you will graduate unhappy – and possibly unemployed!

The second part of the question about how you plan to achieve these goals is also critical: you must demonstrate your insight into the skills and knowledge you will gain from the CEIBS program and also your understanding of the network, pavement pounding, and ladder climbing that you will need to do to reach your goals.

2. For question 2(a) and 2(b), you only need to answer one of the two questions.

2(a). CEIBS is situated in Shanghai – a truly global city, and the economic center of the world’s fastest growing economy. Given its unique location, how do you anticipate that Shanghai will differentiate your MBA experience and contribute to your goals? (400 words) *

Applicants excited to learn in Shanghai will do well to answer this question since their passion will be reflected in their response. CEIBS’s location in Shanghai allows it to offer experiential learning programs with many companies that have corporate offices in the city. CEIBS also hosts many local companies for on-campus presentations and recruiting; professors are experts in the Chinese economy, finance, and politics; and important personages are able to speak on campus because of its location. Demonstrate not only your knowledge of these rich offerings but also how they will help you reach your learning and career goals.

2(b). Discuss a situation where you have demonstrated significant leadership ability. (400 words) *

This is a nice straightforward leadership question. Applicants who choose to answer this question should discuss a situation in which they summoned exceptional contributions from others to overcome challenging obstacles and produce extraordinary results. Given CEIBS’s focus on international business and China context, if you have a choice of a situation that took place in Asia – or required an understanding of cultural differences with team members from/in Asia, that might be the ideal anecdote to share.

3. For question 3(a) and 3(b), you only need to answer one of the two questions.

3(a). Many would argue that entrepreneurship is not necessarily a state of being, but a state of mind. Describe an entrepreneurial experience where you went against the grain or conventional way of thinking, to discover and create new value. (400 words). *

The premise of this essay is that entrepreneurship is a state of mind: it isn’t necessarily just starting a business but may also describe a situation in which you introduce something that didn’t exist before. People with entrepreneurial mindsets start new business streams in their current companies, they see opportunities and they seize them. Applicants who have an experience in which they thought outside of the box to generate value will do well to share those anecdotes here.

3(b). Identify up to 3 trends, big or small, that you see unfolding in the next decade. Discuss how the(se) trend(s) will affect you and how you plan to deal with them both on campus and in the future. (400 words) *

Look into your crystal ball – and/or read what global pundits are predicting – and choose three trends that will affect you professionally and/or personally. A strong answer to this question will not only discuss the trend but will try to determine the ways in which it will affect how consumers use products, how those products are distributed, and how the CEIBS curriculum and extracurricular programming will help prepare the applicant to thrive in these changing environments. This essay may also draw on past experiences in which you recognized and capitalized on an emerging trend.

4. (Optional) Is there any other information that you believe would be helpful to the MBA Admission Committee in evaluating your application?(200 words). Re-applicants are suggested to describe the progress you have made since your previous application.

If you feel that the above essays provide a full picture of your experiences, then there is no need to write anything here. However, I never like to leave space unfilled. Assess the answers you provide in the required essays and identify an area of your background that you weren’t able to include elsewhere: your intercultural ability, your success in an extracurricular activity – particularly since the application form only allows you to list the names of the activities you have taken part in with no description of your roles in them – or an explanation of decisions you have made in your career path are just some of the many interesting facets of your background you can share here. I encourage you to use this space fully.

Application Form:

Keep in mind that CEIBS does not request a copy of your current CV/resume in the application. The only area of the application where an applicant may describe his work experience is in the Work Experience section, which requests data about dates of employment and salary and allows 40 words each for 4 responsibilities to describe each position (that’s approximately 160 words to describe each role). This is actually a fine amount of space; just be sure to use it to describe your work and impact. Don’t make the mistake of simply filling in some general responsibilities and losing the opportunity to share details about your initiatives and impacts.

If you would like professional guidance with your CEIBS MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, and interview coaching for the CEIBS application.

Application for entry into the MBA2017 is round based. The MBA Admissions Office will process applications according to the below dates. The final application deadline for admission is Mar. 23, 2015.

Round

Application Deadline

Decision by

1

Nov. 5, 2014

Dec. 10, 2014

2

Jan. 14, 2015

Mar. 11, 2015

3

Mar. 23, 2015

Apr. 29, 2015

Want more school specific MBA application essay tips? Click here!

Jennifer Bloom

By Jennifer Bloom who has been helping applicants to the top MBA programs draft their resumes, application forms, letters of recommendation, and essays for 15 years. She is happy to serve as your personal coach and hand-holder throughout the entire process. There’s no time like the present to begin!

Related Resources:

• School-Specific MBA Application Essay Tips
• Why MBA? 
• 7 Signs an Experience Belongs in Your Application Essays

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Prioritizing at an All You Can Eat Buffet: UNC Kenan-Flagler Student Interview http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/21/unc-kenan-flagler-mba-student-interview/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/21/unc-kenan-flagler-mba-student-interview/#respond Fri, 21 Nov 2014 17:46:17 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26483 ]]> Click here for more MBA student interviews!This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Alex Dea, second-year student at UNC Kenan-Flagler.

Accepted: First, can you tell us a little about yourself? Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What was your most recent pre-MBA job? 

Alex: I was born and raised in Rochester, New York, and went to Boston College in Chestnut Hill, to study business and theology. Upon graduation from BC, I joined Deloitte Consulting and spent three years in the Boston office. At Deloitte, I advised clients on how to use digital technology to transform their business strategy and operations. After three years at Deloitte, I moved to Chapel Hill, North Carolina in August 2013 to attend the University of North Carolina (Kenan-Flagler).

Accepted: Why did you choose UNC Kenan-Flagler? How would you say it was the best fit program for you? Which other schools had you considered? 

Alex: First and foremost, it was the people and the culture. I visited UNC and spoke to a handful of students, faculty and administrators and walked away feeling like these were the people I would want to work with and support. Furthermore, they seemed like people who wanted and were willing to support me. People at UNC Kenan-Flagler understand that a “rising tide lifts all boats,” and when someone achieves success it can be good for everyone.

Secondly, it was the leadership opportunities. I came to business school because I wanted to accelerate my development in becoming the leader I thought I was capable of becoming and was very impressed on the leadership development opportunities at UNC Kenan-Flagler.

Lastly, it was the curriculum. UNC has a robust core curriculum that I knew would allow me to hone some development areas in my business toolkit while allowing me to get depth in some of my areas of interest, such as Entrepreneurship and Marketing.

One of the things that was most important to me was finding a school where students both own and invest in the community. Everywhere I’ve gone, I’ve always taken pride in the communities and organizations I’ve associated myself with and have invested time and energy into those communities and I wanted to go somewhere that empowered people to do just that.

As such, I really looked at schools that seemed to have strong student-driven and community-like feel. This attracted me to UNC Kenan-Flagler, UC Berkeley (Haas) and Duke University (Fuqua). All of the programs I applied to are top-notch programs with great people. While I’m very happy at UNC, I have nothing but respect and admiration with all of these schools to the point where I still stay in touch with many of the individuals I met at those respective schools. This has come in handy, especially for some of my recruiting efforts and business school activities and pursuits. You never know when a connection you make can come in handy!

Accepted: If you could change one thing about the program, what would it be?

Alex: I think very highly of my fellow classmates, administrators, faculty and staff at UNC Kenan-Flagler. I think we can do a better job of sharing the talents, skills and gifts that we collectively possess with the outside world.

One of the nice things about being at Kenan-Flagler is it’s a very feedback-driven environment. I’ve shared some of these insights with some administrators within the program and they’ve been very receptive to my ideas and even shared some of the things they were doing to improve upon this. Sure enough, there were initiatives underway to work on this and even found opportunities for me assist in the process.

Accepted: Can you share some advice to incoming first year students, to help make their adjustment to b-school easier? What do you wish you would’ve known early on in your first year?

Alex: I think two critical concepts to business school are developing priorities and understanding opportunity cost. Business school can feel like an endless “all you can eat buffet.” There are so many great opportunities and experiences at top MBA programs – it really is overwhelming!

Developing your priorities will help you figure out which opportunities to pursue and which to ignore. You can’t do everything, but you can do a lot. Secondly, understanding opportunity cost will help you make those tough decisions. Inevitably, you’ll be given the choice to do either X or Y, both being really great options. Understanding what you give up in return for what you get is critical to evaluating opportunities that come your way, and can help you make those tough decisions. (Note: this is an ongoing process throughout your two years!)

Accepted: Where did you intern this past summer? What role did UNC play in helping you secure that position? 

Alex: This past summer I interned at Salesforce.com out in San Francisco, CA. I worked on a Product Marketing team for the Salesforce1 Platform and enjoyed learning the ins and outs of life as a Product Marketer and experiencing first-hand what it’s like to work at the world’s most innovative company (as deemed by Forbes).

While I went off-campus to recruit for this position, I got some help from a UNC Kenan-Flagler Alum who worked at Salesforce and was able to give me great insight into the people, culture and business of Salesforce. Furthermore, I relied on the Alumni network at UNC Kenan-Flagler for almost every company I applied to during the recruiting process. Whether it was getting insight into the company culture, understanding what interviewers were looking for or getting honest insights about career decisions the Kenan-Flagler Alumni network played a huge role in the process.

Furthermore, the UNC Kenan-Flagler Career Management Center (CMC) was instrumental in my recruiting process. Since I did not go through the traditional on-campus recruiting channels the CMC was very helpful in connecting me to Alums but also providing me coaching and feedback as to how to handle particular situations that occurred in the recruiting process. For instance, I had the fortunate problem of getting multiple offers with quickly expiring deadlines while I was still interviewing for a role that I wanted. The CMC staff was provided great guidance in how I needed to handle that situation while maintaining professional and positive relationships with all the companies and recruiters that were involved.

Accepted: Looking back, what was the most challenging aspect of the MBA admissions process? How did you approach that challenge and overcome it? 

Alex: My biggest challenge was that I was initially waitlisted at every school that I applied to. This was a tough pill to swallow, but after recognizing that I didn’t have time to sit idle I needed to take action and I needed help doing so. I was very fortunate in that I have a great network of current and former MBA students who were very familiar with the admissions process.

I’m someone who is comfortable networking and building relationships with others so I reached out to a handful of people who I thought could provide thoughtful guidance. These people were really helpful in being supportive about my situation while providing me with actionable insight on what I could do to move from the waitlist pile to the accept pile. In certain cases, they were able to directly connect me to admissions officers who gave me honest and direct guidance on what I could do to improve my odds of admission.

In the end things ended up working out, and while it was stressful it was a reminder that it’s not always but what happens, but rather, how you respond to what happens. Despite facing an uphill and daunting battle, I managed to get off the waitlist and attend a Top MBA Program of my choice.

Accepted: Can you tell us about your blog? What have you gained from the experience? What do you hope others will learn? 

Alex: Over the years, people have given me feedback that I give great guidance and advice and communicate effectively. Additionally, I’ve always wanted to write but thought I wasn’t a real “writer” so I shied away from doing anything.

Business school is about taking risks and stretching yourself, as such, I decided to take this feedback and run with it by creating a blog to share my thoughts and experiences on my MBA experience. I’ve met some incredible people and built great relationships through this experience. These people, have not only helped me learn, but have made a difference in my career. I wanted to combine all of this and share all of the knowledge, stories, experiences and thoughts so that others could learn and benefit from what I’ve gained.

So far, it’s been a very positive experience and something that I’ve enjoyed. Not only have I met great people, but I’ve also been able to reconnect with old colleagues/friends who have seen some of my work. Overall, it’s been a great learning experience and something I’ve truly enjoyed.

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages

You can read more about Alex’s journey by checking out his blog, A Digital Mentor. Thank you Alex for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

Learn How to Choose the Best MBA Program for You!

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

• UNC Kenan-Flagler B-School Zone
Leadership in Admissions
Waitlisted! Now What?

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International GMAT Test Takers Score Higher than Americans http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/20/international-gmat-test-takers-score-higher-than-americans/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/20/international-gmat-test-takers-score-higher-than-americans/#respond Thu, 20 Nov 2014 19:09:50 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26802 ]]> Got low stats? Find out how you can still get into a top b-school!

U.S. GMAT-takers performing poorly compared to test-takers from Asia-Pacific

U.S. GMAT test-takers are performing poorly compared to test-takers from Asia-Pacific reports a recent Wall Street Journal article. In response to this growing performance gap, adcom at U.S. schools are seeking to implement new evaluation metrics to make domestic students appear better.

Here’s an example of how things have changed: For the quant section, in 2004, a raw score of 48 would put the student in the 86th percentile; today, that same score would yield a ranking in the 74th percentile. More students (outside the U.S.) are scoring higher – especially in the quant section – making it a lot harder for U.S. test takers (whose raw scores have remained relatively flat) to hit those higher percentages. That is, their test scores haven’t changed, but their percentile rankings are falling.

Here are some additional stats from the WSJ article:

•  Currently, Asia-Pacific citizens make up 44% of GMAT test-  takers, compared to 22% a decade ago. U.S. students comprise only 36% of all test-takers.

•  Asians averaged a mean raw score of 45 on the quant section, compared to a raw mean for U.S. students of 33.  The global mean was 38.

•  10 years ago, the Asian students’ raw score was at 42; for U.S. students it was still 33.

To address concerns about the shifting global rankings of the test, this past September GMAC introduced a bench-marking tool that “allows admissions officers to compare applicants against their own cohort, filtering scores and percentile rankings by world region, country, gender and college grade-point average.” Adcom explain that they need a way to measure applicants against other test takers in an applicant’s region. They explain that they don’t just want to “become factories for high-scoring test-takers from abroad.”

Others respond by suggesting that American students need to receive a more intense math education, similar to the emphasis put on mathematics in Asia. But is lack of math education the problem or is it the amount of time Americans invest in test prep? GMAC reports that U.S. students only spend an average 64 hours prepping for the GMAT, compared to the 151 hours put in by Asian students.

Students concerned about their GMAT percentile may want to consider taking the GRE which is now accepted at 85% of b-schools.

Watch our free webinar: How to Get Accepted to Top B-Schools with Low Stats!

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best
Related Resources:

•  MBA Admissions Tip: Dealing with a Low GPA
•  Low GMAT Score? Don’t Panic…Yet.
•  Admissions Offers to International Grad Students Increase 9% Since 2013

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Everything You Wanted to Know About MD/MBA Programs http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/20/everything-you-wanted-to-know-about-mdmba-programs/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/20/everything-you-wanted-to-know-about-mdmba-programs/#respond Thu, 20 Nov 2014 18:25:54 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26912 ]]> Listen to the full conversation about MD/MBA programs with Dr. Maria ChandlerIntrigued by business and medicine? Not sure whether you want to be the next Steve Jobs or Jonas Salk?

AST’s guest this week is the person who can show you how to combine these two complementary, but in some ways disparate interests, with an MD/MBA.

Meet Dr. Maria Chandler, founder of the Association of MD MBA Programs and the UC Irvine MD/MBA program, MD/MBA Faculty advisor at UC Irvine, Assoc Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, Assoc Professor at the Paul Merage School of Business, and practicing pediatrician.

Tune in to our conversation for fascinating insight about the place where medicine meets management.

00:01:11 – Featured Applicant Question: Should I apply in Round 2 with my good essays, or apply Round 3 with excellent essays?

00:04:10 – Why Dr. Chandler decided to pursue an MBA.

00:06:30 – The story behind the founding of the UC Irvine MD/MBA Program.

00:08:08 – Inviting the east-coasters to Irvine in February: The founding of the Association of MD MBA Programs.

00:10:42 – Curriculum at the typical MD/MBA Program.

00:13:04 – Culture gap alert! What it’s like to go to b-school after med school.

00:17:51 – MD/MBA career paths.

00:20:15 – Do most MD/MBAs leave clinical medicine eventually?

00:22:14 – How and why this new degree became so popular so fast.

00:27:01 – The dual-degree application requirements.

00:31:35 – Maria’s dream for the future of medicine.

00:36:35 – Advice for applicants considering an MD/MBA.

Listen to the full conversation to learn more!*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Related Links:

• The Rise of the M.D./M.B.A. Degree
MD/MBAs: Fixing Hearts & Healthcare
UC Irvine M.D./M.B.A. Program
• Contact Maria: mchandle@uci.edu

Related Shows:

• Getting Into Medical School: Advice from a Pro
• MCAT Mania: How to Prepare
• Healthcare Management at Wharton and at Large
• Med School Application Process: From AMCAS to Decisions

Leave a Review for Admissions Straight Talk:

Check Out Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes! Check Out Admissions Straight Talk in Stitcher!

Download your free copy of 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Med School Application Essays!

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http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/20/everything-you-wanted-to-know-about-mdmba-programs/feed/ 0 MBA healthcare,MD/MBA,podcast Intrigued by business and medicine? Not sure whether you want to be the next Steve Jobs or Jonas Salk? - AST’s guest this week is the person who can show you how to combine these two complementary, but in some ways disparate interests, with an MD/MBA. Intrigued by business and medicine? Not sure whether you want to be the next Steve Jobs or Jonas Salk? AST’s guest this week is the person who can show you how to combine these two complementary, but in some ways disparate interests, with an MD/MBA. Meet Dr. Maria Chandler, founder of the Association of MD MBA Programs and the UC Irvine MD/MBA program, MD/MBA Faculty advisor at UC Irvine, Assoc Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, Assoc Professor at the Paul Merage School of Business, and practicing pediatrician. Tune in to our conversation for fascinating insight about the place where medicine meets management. 00:01:11 – Featured Applicant Question: Should I apply in Round 2 with my good essays, or apply Round 3 with excellent essays? 00:04:10 – Why Dr. Chandler decided to pursue an MBA. 00:06:30 – The story behind the founding of the UC Irvine MD/MBA Program. 00:08:08 – Inviting the east-coasters to Irvine in February: The founding of the Association of MD MBA Programs. 00:10:42 – Curriculum at the typical MD/MBA Program. 00:13:04 – Culture gap alert! What it’s like to go to b-school after med school. 00:17:51 – MD/MBA career paths. 00:20:15 – Do most MD/MBAs leave clinical medicine eventually? 00:22:14 – How and why this new degree became so popular so fast. 00:27:01 – The dual-degree application requirements. 00:31:35 – Maria’s dream for the future of medicine. 00:36:35 – Advice for applicants considering an MD/MBA. *Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com. Related Links: • The Rise of the M.D./M.B.A. Degree • MD/MBAs: Fixing Hearts & Healthcare • UC Irvine M.D./M.B.A. Program • Contact Maria: mchandle@uci.edu Related Shows: • Getting Into Medical School: Advice from a Pro • MCAT Mania: How to Prepare • Healthcare Management at Wharton and at Large • Med School Application Process: From AMCAS to Decisions Leave a Review for Admissions Straight Talk: Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no 39:39
Oxford Said 2015 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/19/oxford-said-2015-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/19/oxford-said-2015-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/#respond Wed, 19 Nov 2014 21:41:16 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26697 ]]> Click here for more MBA application essay tips!This program packs a lot into its one year, including a lot of team and group workTherefore, it needs students who can quickly connect and form working relationships (and hopefully personal relationships).  Also, its short duration means there is not time for creative soul searching and for exploring this and that industry or function – to get the most out of it and to gain desirable employment upon completion, you need to have self-awareness and focused goalsThese essays will elicit those qualities.

Essays:

1. What should Oxford expect from you? (500 words)

Interesting question. Can they expect you to get involved in specific activities? Which ones? How would you like to contribute to the school? Any activities you would like to initiate?

Do you have a business idea you want to develop as part of Oxford’s entrepreneurship project? Are you also thinking of participating in the strategic consulting project? Any places you would like to go on an optional student trek? Oxford is giving you 500 words here.

You have the room to show how you have contributed in the past and how you intend to contribute at Oxford. If you are getting the idea that you need to know something about the program before you respond to the question, you’re getting the right idea.

If you have specific ideas (along with relevant past experience), you can also mention how you will represent the school after you graduate.

2. How do you hope to see your career developing over the next five years? How will the MBA and Oxford assist you in the development of these ambitions? (500 words)

This essay focuses on shorter-term goals – the one MBA year and the four years following.  Describe your target post-MBA position, give an example or two of preferred organizations, and describe what you expect to do in that role.  Also, explain briefly why you are choosing this path, what motivates you.  Then sketch how you will likely advance over the four years – this time frame may include one company move or new position, but probably not more than that.  Finally, identify aspects of the program most important to you – those that will yield skills and knowledge relevant to your goals, and/or are meaningful to you for personal reasons.  

3. Plus your preferred essay from the options below:

Sport is pure competition. What does it teach us about companies, individuals, and markets? (500 words)

OR

The business of business is business. Is this true? (500 words)

Both of these options challenge you to express your thoughts about concepts related to business.  Therefore, they both present the danger of luring you to expound for 500 words in abstract terms about competition, the nature of business, etc.  Please do the opposite.  Whichever question you choose to answer, and whatever point you posit, ground your essay and your argument in specific examples, details, and/or experience.  That will make it both interesting and credible.  As for which to answer, which one elicits your interest and ideas?  Don’t hold back and be bland and mild in your opinions.  The adcom is looking for people who have something to say and can make a case for their ideas. 

Reapplicant Essay What improvements have you made in your candidacy since you last applied to the Oxford MBA programme? (Maximum 250 words)

This is they key question for all MBA reapplicants. What has changed that will make you a more compelling applicant this year than you were last time you applied?

If you would like professional guidance with your Oxford Said MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Oxford application.

Deadlines:

Application Deadline Decision Notification
Round 3 January 9, 2015 February 27, 2015
Round 4 March 13, 2015 April 24, 2015
Round 5 April 24, 2015 May 29, 2015
Round 6 May 29, 2015 June 26, 2015

Get clear, practical guidelines for answering the MBA goals essay question. Click here to download our free report.

Cindy Tokumitsu By , author and co-author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports, including Why MBA and Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted.com.

Related Resources:

School-Specific MBA Application Essay Tips
Leadership in Admissions
7 Signs an Experience Belongs in Your Application Essays

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Meet Ashley: A Wharton MBA Student Making an Impact http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/19/meet-ashley-a-wharton-mba-student-making-an-impact/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/19/meet-ashley-a-wharton-mba-student-making-an-impact/#respond Wed, 19 Nov 2014 17:43:15 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26868 ]]> Click here to read more MBA student interviews!

Wharton student Ashley Wells

This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Ashley Wells, a first-year student at Wharton.

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What was your most recent pre-MBA job?

Ashley: I have spent the last eight years living in Washington, DC, first to pursue my undergraduate degree in Political Science at The George Washington University and staying after undergrad to work in Deloitte Consulting’s Federal Practice. Although I grew up in Tampa, Florida and live for sunshine and the beach, I had an inherent love of government and politics which brought me to DC. Ultimately, this passion has transitioned into a broader realization that I love making an impact on people and communities around me, and I find that business can present profound solutions to social problems in addition to government.

In my career, I had some really interesting experiences learning about and trying to solve some of our country’s challenges alongside my clients. Working on issues such as reducing military suicides, tracking and protecting Department of Homeland Security personnel in the Middle East, and providing nutritious food to the one in five children who suffer from hunger in the United States were just a few of the challenges that brought me to work every day. I also had the opportunity to work in Deloitte’s Hong Kong practice, which is a very new joint venture between Deloitte US and Hong Kong. This “start-up” environment within the framework of a massive company enabled me to see the excitements and challenges that are innate to forming a company’s market presence from the ground-up.

Accepted: Can you tell us about Forte’s MBALaunch program? How did you decide to join the program and what did you gain for the experience?

Ashley: I was lucky to be an inaugural member of Forte’s MBALaunch program in Washington, DC in 2013! Forte has an incredible reputation within the business and MBA communities as a solid support network for women. Until this point, Forte focused on women currently pursuing MBAs and post-MBA women. I was really thrilled to see them offer a program for pre-MBA women to bring their programming full loop.

Like anything, the Forte MBALaunch program is what you make of it. I had an excellent relationship with my assigned Forte advisor who reviewed my essays, met with me monthly, and offered me encouragement throughout the process. I met with my assigned Forte small group over brunches and essay review sessions to offer one another feedback and support. At the end of our journey, many of us had gotten into top schools and we were beside one another (over mimosas!) to celebrate what we’d been through together. I took advantage of the Forte sessions on topics such as resume and interview preparation, which I believe gave me valuable insights that are not available from open-source information. Finally, I got a great network of friends from this and my investment in the program has already paid for itself in leaps and bounds. Two friends from the program actually connected the nonprofit I was on the board of to their companies, who then sponsored multiple major events for the nonprofit. All of the above benefits from the program far surpassed what I anticipated, and I look forward to my network continuing to grow from it moving forward.

Accepted: What are some of your most rewarding extracurricular activities (both before entering Wharton and current activities)? How have those activities helped shape your career?

Ashley: Two activities were core to my development and truly my identity prior to coming to Wharton. First was joining the board as a Vice President of United Women in Business (UWIB), a start-up nonprofit that provides professional development, networking, and community service opportunities to young female professionals. As a nonprofit entrepreneur, I teamed with fellow 20-something women to build UWIB, drive its overall programming strategy in three cities, and planned and executed all professional development events for DC women. This experience was aligned to my passion of impacting my community and taught me how much I enjoy building an organization, giving me an interest in start-ups that I am exploring in Business School. Furthermore, this experience positioned me well for my Wharton extracurricular activity leadership roles in Wharton Women in Business, and in Ashoka’s Catapult program where I advise six high school entrepreneurs starting a business.

Second, I actively challenged myself to broaden my horizons through travel. I traveled to 37 countries over six years, including studying in Madrid, Spain, backpacking Latin America for two months, working in Hong Kong this past summer, and religiously taking off work for 2-3 weeks each May to travel to a new region. These experiences reinforced my desire to live and work abroad throughout my career, and gave me a deeper sense of empathy, wonder, cultural differences, and appreciation for kindness that I believe will forever shape my career and my life.

Accepted: What is your favorite thing about Wharton so far? Is there anything you’d change about the program?

Ashley: My favorite thing about Wharton thus far is the energy. Walking into Huntsman Hall each day is just a beautiful commotion of ideas, priorities, learning, and conversations. People are eager to connect and support one another, hungry to learn and push their expectations of themselves, and excited to carve their niche in the world. The people here inspire me each day to be better and think bigger, and the environment is molding me to see the world more analytically and creatively. You just can’t get this experience taking business classes on Coursera.

One thing I would change is just making some of the “summer prep” content available earlier. Many schools have “math camp” style tutorials, accounting prep sessions, etc. during the summer, but it’s honestly never too early to start learning some of that content! Had I had a bit more time to prepare in advance, I think I might have felt a bit better about the extremely quant heavy curriculum. So, for those of you out there without calculus experience like me, I highly recommend learning from my mistakes and prepping for that now!

Accepted: How is Wharton helping you to secure your future internship?

Ashley: Wharton is extremely hands-on with the recruiting process. I usually don’t like having my hand held as a highly independent person, but with Career Services, you are paying for these services and you should absolutely take advantage of them. Career Services preps you for everything from going from “good to great” on behavioral interviews, to how to nail a case, to industry-specific career overviews, to in-depth resume reviews, to individual sessions one-on-one to help you plot your path to getting your dream job.

What I really like about Wharton Career Services and Wharton overall is that there is an enhanced focus on evaluating your interests holistically. Important parts of your personality and life are analyzed in addition to your career goals. There is an emphasis on thinking critically about careers where you can thrive in multiple dimensions of your life. They are also just an awesome reassuring presence to ascertain that every first year’s worst nightmare – not getting an internship or job! – is unrealistic because, as they always say, “Everyone gets a job. Everyone!”

Accepted: Can you share your top 3 MBA admissions tips with our readers?

Ashley:

•  Submit your applications when you’re ready. I submitted my applications saying to myself “They may not like me, but I gave 100%. There isn’t a single word I would change.” You should feel like you did absolutely everything you could on your application, and then you can mentally move on from it to more important things like interview prep and evaluating school choices.

•  But if possible, apply round one. Everyone has a different strategy for this, but from my perspective, it was so much easier to find out in December, make a decision by January, and then start planning an exciting and fulfilling summer pre-MBA. I don’t think I could have handled the prolonged anxiety of applying from August-March, but if you do go through multiple rounds of applications, just give yourself iterative breaks and rewards to sustain your energy.

•  Only apply to schools you really want to go to. I look back on one school specifically that I applied to, and it was truly a waste of my time. Had I been honest with myself, I would have realized that I would have been miserable there. No matter what school ratings say or how good the school’s reputation is, if you don’t get an inspiring vibe when you’re visiting and engaging with students there, it’s just not worth it. Instead, focus more attention on the schools you can envision being elated by when you hear the news that you got in.

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages

Thank you Ashley for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

Get Accepted to Wharton: Watch our free webinar to learn how!

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

• Wharton Executive MBA 2014 Essay Tips
• Get into the Wharton School, a free webinar
• Four Tips for the Wharton Interview

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MIT Sloan 2015 Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/18/mit-sloan-2015-executive-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/18/mit-sloan-2015-executive-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/#respond Tue, 18 Nov 2014 20:41:12 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26690 ]]> Click here to download a free copy of "Ace the EMBA"

This set of essay questions shows that MIT seeks applicants who have a vision for the career they are building, who understand the impacts of their actions, and who have the judgment and practical skills to effectively handle the challenges that will come at them like fastballs in a World Series.  The essays are your main means to show that you possess, as MIT’s website states, “strong leadership performance, global perspective, functional expertise, and innovation.”  While the statement of purpose challenges you to succinctly create your portrait as an applicant, the three essay questions, each in its own way, probe how you create value while responding to various types of challenges.

In an overall plan for the essays, the statement of purpose works as a context, a positioner, an opening pitch, a frame.  You will describe specific experiences in each of the three essays, so strategically try to select experiences that are different, to give a comprehensive view.  Also, usually it’s advisable to discuss recent experiences, to allow the adcom to see you working at a high level and showing what you’ll bring to the table.

Statement of purpose:

Please provide a statement indicating your qualifications, why you are pursuing the MIT Executive MBA Program, and what you will contribute to the program. (500 words or less, limited to one page)

This is your portrait – your candidacy at a glance.  It should convey a vivid, immediate sense of you as a person and as a candidate.  It should go beyond just facts to present a point of view and a message.  Decide your message first, before drafting the essay, and let it guide you in selecting and elaborating the content details.

Beware of a potential pitfall: in discussing qualifications, do not repeat your resume in prose format.  Also, don’t present all your qualifications.  Select carefully, focusing on those that (a) are really distinctive and relevant to the MBA and/or (b) support your goals directly or indirectly and also (c) reflect your message. Make a short, meaningful point about each qualification, such as the insight it lends or its influence on you, supported by a fact or example.

For why you are pursuing the MBA, of course you’ll discuss your professional goals and objectives.  Focus not only on what you want to do, but also on what you want to accomplish for the organization and/or its customers/market.

The contributions you mention should reference your own experience from work or outside work; think of what about you would be most meaningful and interesting to prospective classmates.  This element of your response is an opportunity to show that you understand the program.

Essays:

1. The educational mission of the MIT Sloan School of Management is to “develop principled, innovative leaders who improve the world.” Please discuss how you will contribute toward advancing this mission based on examples of past work and activities. (500 words or less, limited to one page)

In answering this question, clarify what “principled, innovative leader” and “improving the world” mean to you.  These points represent your point of view, your “vision” – they should be short, but without them this essay lacks focus.  The bulk of the essay will focus on action – your examples of past work and activities that make the case for how you have been and will continue to be a principled, innovative leader who improves the world.  They key to making this a gripping, memorable essay is strong experiences and examples combined with your reflection on them pertaining to the essay’s theme.  End by briefly discussing how you will build on these experiences to be such a leader in the future.

2. During your career, what is the hardest challenge that you have had to solve? Consider examples when more than one viable solution was present. (500 words or less, limited to one page)

There are really two points this question asks about: how you define and respond to a major challenge, and your decision-making process in selecting the solution.  Choose your topic accordingly.  With just 500 words, structure the essay simply: narrate the challenge as a brief story, portraying your thought process as you encounter it.  As you approach the solution part of the story, describe the solution options and your determination of which to take.  In writing the essay, clarify why you consider it the “hardest challenge” – is it one that was extraordinarily complex, one that had no desirable solution, one that had huge stakes, etc.? 

3. Tell us about a time within the past three years when you had to give difficult feedback to a peer. (500 words or less, limited to one page)

This question is a straightforward inquiry into your interpersonal skills, judgment, leadership, and (again) decision making.  It’s one thing to give difficult feedback to a subordinate – something you probably do as part of your supervisory role.  It’s another thing altogether to give such feedback to a peer – someone you don’t manage and whose performance you aren’t accountable for.  If possible, make the essay do “double duty” by selecting a story that also portrays you performing at a high level in a significant role.   Think about the topic and how your actions align with and complement the other essays.

Optional Essay.

As part of the MIT Executive MBA curriculum, you will participate in Organizations Lab (O-Lab). This Action Learning course focuses on making a substantive improvement in the performance of your organization, usually by fixing one of its processes.

Identify something, within your organization, upon which to improve. (This does not have to be a large change initiative, small improvements to a process can have a big impact). Please describe the change and why you might choose it? This can be something you have tried to improve in the past and has yet to be realized (whether based on lack of expertise or tools).

Should you do this optional essay? I believe yes. It’s an opportunity to further demonstrate your organizational awareness, possibly highlight important elements of your role, and show your perceptiveness. A key element here will be your perspective on change and its potential impact(s). Select an issue that has an interesting, challenging dimension. Consider the experiences you describe in the other essays and make sure this one isn’t redundant – it should reflect a new facet of your experience. Keep it short – certainly under 500 words. And keep it simple: describe the issue you’d like to improve (and why), and then very briefly reflect on why it’s challenging. You may suggest a possible solution or approaches to solutions, but you don’t have to “solve” it. MIT is interested in your thought process here.

Deadlines:

Application Opens: November 14, 2014

Round 1 Deadline: February 17, 2015 (11:59pm EST)

Round 2 Deadline: June 1, 2015 (11:59pm EDT)

If you would like help with MIT Sloan’s executive MBA essays, please consider Accepted.com’s Executive MBA packages or our hourly consulting/editing services.

Download your free copy of Ace the EMBA!


Cindy Tokumitsu By , co-author of The EMBA Edge, and author of the free special report, Ace the EMBA. Cindy has helped MBA applicants get accepted to top EMBA programs around the world. She is delighted to help you too!

Related Resources:

• School-Specific Executive MBA Essay Tips
• Tips for Executive MBA Reapplicants
• The GMAT and EMBA Programs

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MBA Interview Must-Know #4: The Interview Type http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/18/mba-interview-must-know-4-the-interview-type/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/18/mba-interview-must-know-4-the-interview-type/#respond Tue, 18 Nov 2014 19:55:31 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26425 ]]> Click here to download your copy of Ace the MBA!

Be prepared to address your weaknesses.

“MBA Interview Must-Know #4: The Interview Type” is excerpted from the Accepted.com special report, How to Ace Your MBA Interviews To download the entire free special report, click here

The Interview Type. Is it blind (where the interviewer knows only what’s on your resume and what you tell him or her)? Or is it informed with an interviewer who has gone thoroughly through your file. Is it a case presentation?

If blind, then you can use material from your application because that material presents your most impressive experiences, and it will be new to your interviewer, but don’t limit yourself to that material.

If you are interviewed by someone who has gone through your file, prepare to address weaknesses and gaps and also be ready to bring something new to the interviewer’s understanding of you. Know how to go deeper into the stories you have told and prepare to tell additional anecdotes.

Whether blind or informed, make sure to tell your interviewer of important developments that have occurred since you submitted your application – a better GMAT score, an A in a business-related course, a promotion, leadership of a community service initiative… This last step is particularly important if you are interviewing at schools like Harvard and Wharton, which in the past have discouraged or not accepted new information from applicants after the application submission date — even if the information is highly relevant and/or the applicant has sat on the waitlist for months.

MBA Interview Tip #4:
Know the type of interview you will have and prepare accordingly.

Tips to help you ace those MBA interviews!

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

• Tips for Your In-Person Interview with an MBA Student or Alumnus
• Tips for Your In-Person Interview with an Adcom Member
• Seven Tips for MBA Interview Prep

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What Are My Chances? Energy Sector Veteran With an Entrepreneurial Spark http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/17/what-are-my-chances-energy-sector-veteran-with-an-entrepreneurial-spark/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/17/what-are-my-chances-energy-sector-veteran-with-an-entrepreneurial-spark/#respond Mon, 17 Nov 2014 20:41:38 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26858 ]]> This blog post is part of a series of MBA profile evaluations called “What are My Chances?” by Michelle Stockman. Michelle, who started consulting for Accepted in 2007 and worked previously in the Columbia Business School admissions office, will provide selected applicants with school recommendations as well as an assessment of their strengths and weaknesses.

If you would like Michelle to evaluate your profile at no charge and as part of this series, please provide the information requested at http://reports.accepted.com/what_are_my_chances.

PROFILE #8: Sachin, energy sector veteran with an entrepreneurial spark

Check out more MBA applicant profile evaluations!

Stop right there. Retake your GMAT!

Note: This profile request arrived with very little information.

Give me more details folks!

-BACKGROUND: 30+ Indian male who graduated in 2001 from Nagpur University in India. Chemical engineer with 12 years managerial experience in the natural gas industry.

Sachin, why now? That would be my question for you.

You’re on the older end of the scale when it comes to MBA candidates. You’ve got to explain why you’re ready to interrupt your career for two years, lose income, and perhaps give up your current management position to pursue an MBA.

It’s not enough to be in a mid-career funk.

At first glance, if you want to advance your career within the industry, you might fit better into an EMBA program. Have you considered that?

-GOALS: Progress career within the energy industry, pursue entrepreneurship allied to the energy sector, and contribute towards India’s social development.

These goals definitely make sense with what you’ve shared about your background. When writing your essays, you should share specific, personal examples from your work experience that show past leadership successes. Then state what skills you are missing that an MBA will address.

As an older candidate, you also need to show you have the industry network and connections to move into your next position. Don’t think you can rely only on career services to make this transition.

-GMAT: 580 Verbal-37 Quant-77

Halt. Hit the breaks. Stop right there.

This is not a competitive GMAT score. Other aspects of your profile are really going to have to stand out for you to be accepted to any school. Right now they do not.

Retake your GMAT.

-GPA: 73.5%

Very good GPA from a strong, though relatively lesser known Indian university in terms of international renown. It’s not so important though, as you graduated more than a decade ago. Your GMAT is a better indicator, at this point, of your ability to keep up in an MBA classroom.

-EXTRACURRICULAR: Teamwork in social activities.

This is very vague. What kinds of activities? What did you accomplish?

-SCHOOLS:

Sorry. I’m not going to recommend any schools for you. Believe it or not, I’ve read applications with about this level of information from the candidate. They don’t get past a first read.

Sachin, you’ve got to go on some long walks and think about why you really want an MBA. What do you hope to achieve? What stories from your past indicate your leadership potential?

Don’t approach your MBA from a mental space of feeling stuck or wanting out of your current situation.

Research, have conversations throughout the energy sector, then connect the dots from your past to your future. Make your ability to do something extraordinary within your industry sound plausible.

Get clear, practical guidelines for answering the MBA goals essay question. Click here to download our free report.

Michelle Stockman is a professional journalist, former Columbia Business School admissions insider, and experienced MBA admissions consultant.

 

Related Resources:

What are My Chances?: Rahul, the Indian Male IT Guy 
Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One 

Leadership in Admissions 

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Can You Get Into B-School with Low Stats? http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/16/can-you-get-into-b-school-with-low-stats/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/16/can-you-get-into-b-school-with-low-stats/#respond Sun, 16 Nov 2014 18:38:06 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25701 ]]> Yes! Not everyone who goes to Harvard scores a perfect 800 and has a GPA of 4.0 (in fact, very few actually hit those perfect scores).

If you’re stats are less than ideal, that doesn’t (always) mean that you need to cross your top schools off your list!

Yes you CAN get accepted to a top b-school with low stats!

Now’s your chance to catch up on valuable information you may have missed during our webinar, How to Get Accepted to B-School with Low Stats. B-school applicants with low GPA and/or GMAT scores – you don’t want to miss this!

View How to Get Accepted to B-School with Low Stats for free now!

Watch the webinar

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

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Team-Based Discussion Interviews http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/16/understanding-the-mba-team-based-interview/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/16/understanding-the-mba-team-based-interview/#respond Sun, 16 Nov 2014 17:26:56 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26570 ]]> Check out our Wharton Zone for info, tips, stats and more.

Make your goal the team’s success, not its adoption of your idea.

Wharton and Ross initiated a new MBA interview format, the team-based discussion (TBD). This type of interview brings a group of applicants together in person to work through a problem together as an organizational team does. This team activity is followed by a short one-to-one talk with an adcom representative (either a second-year student or an adcom member). It is now part of Wharton’s regular mode for interviews. At Ross, it’s not required, and they use traditional methods for their evaluative interviews.

Why adcoms use this method:

• Some adcoms have found traditional interview modes increasingly ineffective as they feel that candidates over-prepare and over-strategize for interviews, thus undercutting authenticity.

• The adcoms want to see the candidates in team action, since students’ success in the program (and in their future career) will rest in part on their teamwork and interpersonal skills.

• This approach gives the adcom insight into the applicants that no other application component provides – how they actually respond to people and situations in real time.

• The post-activity discussion shows your ability to self-reflect and analyze your own role and performance – qualities the adcom values.

Process:

Wharton – When you receive an invitation to interview, you’ll go online and select a time and date to attend a 5- or 6-member, approximately 45-minute TBD. Wharton will send you a prompt, which is the topic for the team activity; Wharton advises spending about an hour preparing with this prompt. In the TBD, each person will have a minute to articulate his own idea on the topic, and then the team will work together toward a group decision. After the TBD, you will meet individually with one of the two evaluators for 10-15 minutes to discuss your thoughts on how it went. You and the evaluator may discuss other topics as well.

Ross – Ross sends no prompt. Rather, it’s more like a team-building activity. You’ll receive the invitation to participate when you receive your regular interview invite, and can accept or decline. If you accept, you’ll meet in a group of 4-6. The team is given 2 words, and they first prepare individual presentations connecting these words (10 minutes for this portion). Then the group receives additional random words, and they have 20 minutes to prepare a team presentation that uses the words to address a problem and articulate a solution. The individuals in the team, not the team as a whole, are evaluated either by second-year students or adcom members, who also interview them separately afterward.

Benefits and pitfalls for applicants:

• Benefit: You can showcase your interpersonal, team, and leadership skills more vividly than any essay or individual interview could portray.

• Benefit: You can get a real flavor of the programs’ teamwork dynamic.

• Benefit: You can enjoy meeting peers and potential classmates.

• Drawback: You have less control, as you have to assess and respond to the group dynamics instantly; there is no margin for error.

• Drawback: Logistically it’s complex – always harder to get a group together.

• Drawback: While the adcoms think it gives them a lens on you as a team player, in “real life” you usually have some time to adapt to a new team, and your true teamwork abilities will come out over time as you respond, whereas here there’s no time to grow and adapt with the team, so it’s a somewhat artificial setup.

How to make this type of interview work for you (this is in addition to all the common sense advice for good MBA interviews):

• Review Accepted.com’s tips for this interview format.

• For Wharton, prepare and practice your one-minute presentation.

• For Ross, do the word activity with yourself or a friend, to get used to it.

• Think about your inclinations, behaviors, feelings, and approaches when working in a team or group setting, and also ask a colleague or two for some objective feedback. You shouldn’t change your natural approach, but you can certainly play to your strengths and minimize negative tendencies.

• Read online about other applicants’ experiences with the group interview.

•Make your goal the team’s success and ability to complete the assigned task, not its adoption of your idea.

[NOTE: This post is part of a series about MBA interview formats, click here to check out the rest of the posts]

Have a TBD Coming Up? Practice with the pros before your big day! CLICK HERE TO REGISTER FOR A MOCK WHARTON TBD!

Cindy Tokumitsu By , author and co-author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports, including Why MBA and Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted.com.

Related Resources:

MBA Interview Formats Series
• Seven Tips for MBA Interview Prep
• How to Prep for Your MBA Interviews

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What is a Good GRE Score? [Infographic] http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/14/what-is-a-good-gre-score-infographic/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/14/what-is-a-good-gre-score-infographic/#respond Fri, 14 Nov 2014 18:07:08 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26778 ]]> Heading to grad school in the near future? Then you’ll need to take the GRE! But that leads to the million dollar question: What is a good GRE score?

The short answer: it depends.

Check out this wonderful infographic from our friends at Magoosh to find out what the answer to that question is for YOU!

Magoosh GRE Scores Infographic

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

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Interview with MBA On My Mind: An Applicant Aiming for Kellogg http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/14/interview-with-mba-on-my-mind-an-applicant-aiming-for-kellogg/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/14/interview-with-mba-on-my-mind-an-applicant-aiming-for-kellogg/#respond Fri, 14 Nov 2014 17:39:24 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26586 ]]> Click here for more MBA applicant interviews!This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with MBA applicant bloggers, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at the MBA application process. And now…introducing our anonymous blogger, “MBA On My Mind”…

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? Do you hold any other degrees? What is your current job?

MBA On My Mind: I am a 24 year old female from India. I was born in a quaint little town in Kerala and moved around a lot for most of my childhood (Delhi, Goa, Bangalore, some nondescript town in Karnataka, etc.). I’ve had an unconventional childhood but an immensely fun one. I went to a reputed, 100 year old school in Chennai and graduated with a B.A in Economics. I also have a Post Graduate diploma in Marketing Management, that I pursued part time to feed my burgeoning passion for marketing.

After school, I had a two year stint as Marketing Manager at a start-up that marketed teas (it was at this point that my fascination with tea blossomed and I enrolled to become a professional tea taster). Tea tasting to this day remains an elixir guaranteed to bust stress! In 2013, I co-founded a social enterprise business, in the Skill Development arena and have been absorbed in it ever since!

Accepted: What stage of the application process are you? 

MBA On My Mind: I am wedged somewhere in between insanity and a frenzied need to get stuff done… It’s been a harried 6 months, but I am loving every moment. At this point, I am prepping for my GMAT exam, while working on second drafts of essays for round 2. My days are full!

Accepted: Where are you applying to b-school? Do you have a top choice? Safety school?

MBA On My Mind: I plan to apply to 6-7 schools in round 2. (Yes, I am crazy.) My school list looks something like this 1. Kellogg  2. Ross  3. Stanford  4. Yale  5. Haas.

(I will be adding 2 or 3 schools to this mix provided they fit into my tally board.) Kellogg is my top school! I really really want to go there. The school just sings to me. I don’t have any safe schools so to speak, I understand that ‘safety schools’ are categorized based on higher acceptance levels (ergo, these schools are more open to candidates whose GMAT scores that aren’t particularly in the 99th percentile, <4.0 GPAs and folks who aren’t ridiculous overachievers), so although it makes sense to cover all your bases, for me the paramount deciding factor is fit and whether the school can offer what I want. There is not a single school on my tally board that I would not love to go to. I love all of them equally….okay, I lie. I love Kellogg a smidgen more than the rest. :)

Accepted: Can you tell us about your Business School Tally Board? 

MBA On My Mind: I am someone who likes to do things in a systematic and cogent fashion. So, when the application season rolled around and the time came for me to stop being vague about the schools I wanted to go to. I sat down and listed out my short term and long term goals.

A word of advice for anyone who is on the brink of plunging into the MBA applicant pool, you will be doing yourself a HUGE favor if you introspect and freeze in on your long term and short term goals. Your school selection will be so much easier, you just have to figure out which school will provide the best and most enriching route to achieving your goals.

The Business School Tally Board is more of a qualitative take on the entire school selection process, and it is inspired by this blog post I read and fell in love with, on the Kellogg MBA Students Blog. It still isn’t complete, though. I am still researching schools, there are 2 more schools I want to add to the tally!

Accepted: What has been the most challenging aspect of the admissions process so far? What steps have you taken to overcome that challenge? How would you advise others in a similar situation?

MBA On My Mind: Start early! Stay positive! Get the GMAT out of the way!

THE biggest challenge is time, initially I wanted to get two apps in by round 1, but I was unable to because I was not satisfied with my GMAT score. So I will be working overtime to get 6-7 applications ready for round 2. Luckily for me, I produce my best work under pressure.

Accepted: Do you plan on staying in your current industry post-MBA, or changing to a new field/career?

MBA On My Mind: My immediate post MBA goal is to work with a for-profit social enterprise, particularly in marketing, while my mid-long term goal is to come back to India and expand my social enterprise’s operations.

Expansion requires aggressive/out of the box marketing, market research, liaising with government officials and seamless dissemination of our vision to the end customer. I hope to pick up these skills up at my immediate post-MBA job. So, to answer your question, yes I intend to stay in my current industry.

Accepted: Why did you decide to blog about your experience? What have you gained from the experience? What do you hope others will learn?

MBA On My Mind: I remember stumbling upon a few MBA applicant bloggers in 2013, and reading their posts, more importantly the comment sections, there seemed to be a genuine camaraderie between fellow MBA applicant bloggers and the support that went around was amazing.

I knew I had to start a blog of my own to be a part of that world, besides I do love to write. Today, I can say with absolute certainty that I’ve forged close friendships with some wonderful people, through my blogging. (You know who you are!)

I can only hope that my readers find my posts helpful.

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages.

You can read more about MBA On My Mind’s b-school journey by checking out her blog, MBA On My Mind. Thank you for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

Learn how to create a compelling MBA goals essay.

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

MBA Applicant Blogger Interviews
Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One
School Specific MBA Application Essay Tips

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Analyzing Your GMAT Score: 4 Questions to Ask Yourself http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/13/analyzing-your-gmat-score-4-questions-to-ask-yourself/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/13/analyzing-your-gmat-score-4-questions-to-ask-yourself/#respond Thu, 13 Nov 2014 18:28:05 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26054 ]]> Click here for more GMAT info & advice!

Will your GMAT score destroy your admissions chances?

Do you need a perfect score on your GMAT to gain acceptance to a top-tier business school? No. But you definitely need your score to be high enough so that your application is seriously considered, so that the rest of your application isn’t fighting an uphill battle to overcome a sub-par GMAT score.

So, is your GMAT score good enough? To figure this out, you’ll need to ask yourself the following questions:

1. Who am I?

Who you are matters because admissions decisions don’t follow a strict formula or algorithm based entirely on numbers. You need to evaluate your score in the context of your demographic profile.

For example, if you’re a guy from India in the IT field who just spent the last five years sitting at a desk coding and crunching numbers, then you’re going to need a more competitive GMAT score than if you’re a gal from Chile who spent the last five years working for a energy-related non-profit that shuttled back and forth between Tierra del Fuego and Antarctica.

Again, even our Chilean social enterprising world explorer will need a score high enough to get her application looked at, but once she makes it past that point, she’ll have no trouble keeping their attention.

2. What does the rest of my application look like?

It is possible to recover from a not-so-ideal GMAT score, but that is if and only if the rest of your application is flawless (or nearly so).

If you have an almost perfect GPA, stunning application essays, amazing letters of recommendation, and a resume that shows that you’ve worked hard and succeeded, then you’ll be in a position to prove to the adcom that you’re a fantastic candidate and that the GMAT is just not your thing (again, it still needs to be good enough to get your app looked at).

3. Which b-schools am I applying to?

It goes without saying that some GMAT scores will be highly competitive at some programs and not even close to competitive at others. To see if your score is “good enough,” you need to visit your target schools’ websites and see what their GMAT range is. Don’t just look at the average; the range will give you a better idea of how low they’ll go before weeding out an application based on GMAT score alone.

4. What is my score?

If you scored above the 80th percentile on both the verbal and quant sections of the GMAT then you should consider yourself in the clear and good to go to apply to highly ranked MBA programs (assuming that the rest of your application is top-notch as well). If you received lower than that, that doesn’t mean that you need to retake the GMAT (necessarily), but does mean that you need to look at your GMAT in the larger scheme of things and consider retaking the GMAT if you feel your profile needs it and you are aiming for those top programs.

Once you’ve asked yourself these questions and done some serious soul-searching, you’ll have a much better idea of what your next steps should be – going ahead and applying to your target b-schools this year, waiting and applying to your top choices next year (or even the following year) while you work on improving your profile, applying this year, but to lower ranked programs, etc.

Last but not least, please be in touch if you need help analyzing your stats and determining where and when you should apply to b-school. We’re here to help!

Join our upcoming webinar: How to Get Accepted to Top B-Schools with Low Stats!

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

• That GMAT Score: Implications for Your MBA Application
• Low GMAT Score? Don’t Panic…Yet.
• GRE vs. GMAT: Trends

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An NYU Stern Grad and Strat Consultant Helping Vets Get Into School http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/13/an-nyu-stern-grad-and-strat-consultant-helping-vets-get-into-school/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/13/an-nyu-stern-grad-and-strat-consultant-helping-vets-get-into-school/#respond Thu, 13 Nov 2014 17:58:19 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26757 ]]> GusGiacomanWest Point grad. Iraq war vet. NYU Stern MBA. Engagement Manager and Senior Associate at Strategy&. Co-founder of Service to School.

Gus Giacoman, our guest this week, is a fascinating individual, dedicated to helping vets get into school of all kinds – everything from community colleges to law school, business school and diverse graduate programs.

Tune in to our conversation with the highly accomplished and tireless Gus for the low-down on how he helps vets get into school, advice for vets and other MBA applicants, as well as tips for future management consultants. Oh, and he tells some great stories.

00:02:38 – Service to School: Networking and guidance for veterans headed to college and grad school.

00:05:55 – The revenue model (you can’t charge family, right?).

00:06:55 – A breakdown of where Service to School applicants are applying.

00:10:28 – What success looks like (How about 3 Wharton/HBS admits!).

00:12:29 – Business school as the path returning vets to civilian life.

00:17:33 – The advantages and challenges of being a veteran in b-school and consulting.

00:21:41 – Why NYU Stern? And why consulting?

00:25:49 – The best skills for a future consultant to cultivate.

00:27:30 – 3 things Gus looks for in choosing a consultant for his team.

00:28:57 – What a college grad should do pre-MBA to prepare for a career in consulting.

00:33:01 – A great piece of advice for b-school applicants.

Listen to the full conversation to learn more!*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Related Links:

• Service to School 
Service to School on Twitter 
Service To School: Helping Veterans Get Into Top Schools

Related Shows:

• Breaking Some HBS Stereotypes: An Interview with Ben Faw
• How to Become a Management Consultant
• Case Interview Secrets and More with Victor Cheng

Leave a Review for Admissions Straight Talk:

Check Out Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes! Check Out Admissions Straight Talk in Stitcher!

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http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/13/an-nyu-stern-grad-and-strat-consultant-helping-vets-get-into-school/feed/ 0 Management Consulting,military applicants,NYU Stern,podcast West Point grad. Iraq war vet. NYU Stern MBA. Engagement Manager and Senior Associate at Strategy&. Co-founder of Service to School. - Gus Giacoman, our guest this week, is a fascinating individual, dedicated to helping vets get into school of all kin... West Point grad. Iraq war vet. NYU Stern MBA. Engagement Manager and Senior Associate at Strategy&. Co-founder of Service to School. Gus Giacoman, our guest this week, is a fascinating individual, dedicated to helping vets get into school of all kinds – everything from community colleges to law school, business school and diverse graduate programs. Tune in to our conversation with the highly accomplished and tireless Gus for the low-down on how he helps vets get into school, advice for vets and other MBA applicants, as well as tips for future management consultants. Oh, and he tells some great stories. 00:02:38 – Service to School: Networking and guidance for veterans headed to college and grad school. 00:05:55 – The revenue model (you can’t charge family, right?). 00:06:55 – A breakdown of where Service to School applicants are applying. 00:10:28 – What success looks like (How about 3 Wharton/HBS admits!). 00:12:29 – Business school as the path returning vets to civilian life. 00:17:33 – The advantages and challenges of being a veteran in b-school and consulting. 00:21:41 – Why NYU Stern? And why consulting? 00:25:49 – The best skills for a future consultant to cultivate. 00:27:30 – 3 things Gus looks for in choosing a consultant for his team. 00:28:57 – What a college grad should do pre-MBA to prepare for a career in consulting. 00:33:01 – A great piece of advice for b-school applicants. *Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com. Related Links: • Service to School  • Service to School on Twitter  • Service To School: Helping Veterans Get Into Top Schools Related Shows: • Breaking Some HBS Stereotypes: An Interview with Ben Faw • How to Become a Management Consultant • Case Interview Secrets and More with Victor Cheng Leave a Review for Admissions Straight Talk: Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no 36:55
Businessweek Rankings 2014 http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/12/businessweek-rankings-2014/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/12/businessweek-rankings-2014/#comments Wed, 12 Nov 2014 20:24:25 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26730 ]]> Let’s see how full-time MBA programs in the U.S. fared this year on the BW rankings…

Check out our Zone Pages for more info about the top MBA programs!

There were some huge changes this year! Let’s take a look at some of the highlights:

• Newcomers to the top 20 this year are Yale SOM, which made a huge jump from 21st place to 10th place; Maryland Smith which went from 24th to 17th place; and Emory Goizueta which jumped from 22nd place to 18th place this year.

• There are three new schools in the top 10 this year – Yale SOM, as mentioned above; Columbia Business School (13th in 2012 and 5th this year); and CMU Tepper (which moved just one place from 11th place to 10th place).

• Beyond that, there was some major shifting in the rankings. The top 3 schools were all different this year (Wharton and Booth still there, but rearranged), with Harvard Business School falling from 2nd place to 8th place.

UVA Darden also fell significantly this year, from 10th place to 20th.

• Big jumpers further down the rankings include Rice University Jones (from 34th to 25th); UC Irvine Merage (43rd to 31st); and Rochester Simon (50th to 38th).

• The schools that fell the most in the rankings include Texas A&M Mays (26th to 42nd); University of Wisconsin-Madison (33rd to 44th); Boston University (39th to 57th); Babson Olin (from 42nd to 58th); Thunderbird (45th to 62nd); and Arizona Carey (49th to 67th).

And here’s the scoop on the best U.S. undergraduate business schools in 2014…

Do MBA rankings really matter? Click here for the 2-min answer.

Some highlights include:

• Newcomers to the top 20 are Northeastern (from 25th last year to 19th this year) and CMU Tepper (from 24th last year to 17th this year).

• The only new school in the top 10 this year is Indiana Kelley, which jumped from 13th place last year to 8th place this year.

Michigan Ross fell from the top 10, from 8th place to 12th place.

• Big jumpers include Southern Methodist Cox, which jumped from 30th to 21st place; Babson, which jumped from 36th place to 26th place; UM Amherst Isenberg, which jumped from 45th to 36th; Bryant, which jumped from 63rd to 49th; and Case Western Reserve Weatherhead which jumped from 69th to 50th.

• Big falls include Villanova, which fell from 15th place to 24th; U of Illinois Urbana-Champaign which fell from 21st to 34th; and James Madison University which fell from 29th to 40th place.

For details on how ranking methodology see:

Best Business Schools 2014: How They Were Ranked

Best Undergraduate Business Schools 2014: How We Ranked Them

Analysis of the 2014 Businessweek Rankings

Businessweek made changes to its methodology (presented here and analyzed here by John Byrne, the founder of the BW rankings) this year.

The Basics of BW’s Rankings Remain Unchanged

This year, as in the past, BW surveyed recruiters and students. The recruiter satisfaction results comprise 45% of the ranking. The student satisfaction survey results comprise another 45% and the remaining 10% is determined by “expertise of each school’s faculty” as evidenced by faculty research published in prominent academic journals AKA intellectual capital.

What’s New in BW’s Rankings Methodology?

• The employer ranking reflects this year’s data only. Previous rankings used data from the last three surveys or six years of biannual rankings data while weighting the most recent year most heavily.

BW surveyed fifteen times the recruiters this year than it did in previous years. Previously, BW surveyed major recruiters who tended to recruit at multiple business schools. This year, BW attempted to survey as many MBA recruiters as possible, including “recruiters” who recruit primarily if not exclusively at their alma mater. The increased survey size is a major methodology change. The alumni recruiters may have a certain bias towards the school they attended. BW attempted statistically to reduce the impact of that bias, but it probably helped smaller schools like Duke, Tepper, and Yale, and hurt the traditional leaders, like Harvard, Wharton, and Chicago.

Impact of the Methodology Changes

• Surprise! The results will shock many applicants. Seven programs, including Duke and Yale, rank above HBS and MIT. Indiana Kelley and Maryland Smith rank above Haas, NYU Stern, and Darden. These are unexpected results.

• Reemphasizes the importance of understanding methodology. The changes highlight the need for anyone using the rankings as indications of “quality” or even reputation and brand value (a bad idea in my book) to look at the underlying data. Smith is ranked overall at 17. It was ranked #1 for student satisfaction and #51 in the employer survey ranking. Applicants to Smith should inquire about what is changing in its career management center. Clearly there is a satisfaction gap that has to be addressed.

• Increased volatility. Since BW has removed older rankings data from the ranking and has dramatically widened the survey pool while incorporating alumni recruiters, you are guaranteed to see more changes and more radical changes than with the previous methodology.

• Cognitive Dissonance. Either BW rankings will lose credibility because they don’t conform to expectations and will be more volatile, or people’s perception of the programs will change because of the BW rankings.

My money is on the former: loss of credibility. If BW’s results become less stable and predictable (like The Economist’s), they are more likely to lose credibility than to contribute to changes in school reputation.

As always my best advice to applicants reviewing the rankings is to:

• Use specialty rankings to get a sense of what schools excel in your areas of interest.

• Use the data that the ranking databases provide.

• If you have any thought of actually using the overall rankings, understand what they measure, and ask yourself if those qualities are of paramount importance to you. BW has been wonderfully transparent and even shared the questions actually asked in the survey.

• Layer in reputation and brand, i.e. ranking, after determining what schools best support your goals and are most likely to accept you.

Are You Misusing the B-School Rankings?

Linda AbrahamBy Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

 

Related Resources:

• 2014 Economist MBA Rankings
• MBA Rankings: Why Should I Care?
• U.S. News 2015 Best Colleges

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LIVE TOMORROW: 10 Commandments of MBA Interviews Webinar http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/12/live-tomorrow-10-commandments-of-mba-interviews-webinar/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/12/live-tomorrow-10-commandments-of-mba-interviews-webinar/#respond Wed, 12 Nov 2014 18:48:59 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26743 ]]> Last call! Our newest webinar, The 10 Commandments of MBA Interviews, will be airing live tomorrow, at 10:00 AM PT / 1:00 PM ET.

MBA Interview Commandments

Thou shalt not be late to this important engagement! Reserve thy spot for The 10 Commandments of MBA Interviews now!

10MBACommandments_ReserveYourSpotSee you tomorrow!

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MBA Interview Must-Know #3: The School http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/12/mba-interview-must-know-3-the-school/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/12/mba-interview-must-know-3-the-school/#respond Wed, 12 Nov 2014 17:09:41 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26421 ]]>
Click here to download your copy of How to Ace Your MBA Interviews!

“Convince your interviewer that that school is a good bridge between your past & your future plans.”

“MBA Interview Must-Know #3: The School” is excerpted from the Accepted.com special report, How to Ace Your MBA Interviews To download the entire free special report, click here

The School. What does the school value and emphasize? Innovation? Leadership? Teamwork? Yes, I know all schools value all these qualities, but some emphasize one more than another. You need to understand those differences. How do they define the qualities they value?

Note the effort that Haas devotes to clarifying what it values when it says “Leading through Innovation” or when it discusses its defining principles. At its presentations and on its web site, Leading through Innovation and these principles have become a major focus. First understand what the school values and then prepare to explain why and how you share those values.

How does the program work? Cohorts? Learning teams? Projects, lectures, cases? Plan to answer questions in a way that demonstrates your knowledge of the program and prepare a few questions that show you have done your homework. Let your questions and answers reveal that you have thought deeply about the program and how it meets your educational needs and will help you achieve your professional goals, while also recognizing opportunities for you to contribute and pursue your nonprofessional interests.

Again, drawing on BW’s interview with Dawna Clarke, Tuck’s Admissions Director, who advises:

“Another piece of advice is to do research on the school. A lot of schools will talk about the fact that they’re looking for fit, and basically what that means is that they’re looking for people who’ve done their research and are going about this decision using some insight and good judgment about what it is that they’re looking for and what that school has to offer. There are so many good schools out there, and what you want to do is convince your interviewer or your admissions committee that that school is a good bridge between your past and your future plans.

“The best way to make a compelling case is to really show that you’ve done your research and that you know what the school has to offer and what you have to offer the school.”

MBA Interview Tip #3:
Know what the school values and be ready to show that you share those values.

Do you know the 10 commandments of MBA interviews?

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

Leadership in Admissions
• B-School Zones for Top MBA Programs
Tips for Researching MBA Programs

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Seven Tips for MBA Interview Prep http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/11/seven-tips-for-mba-interview-prep/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/11/seven-tips-for-mba-interview-prep/#respond Tue, 11 Nov 2014 18:18:21 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26667 ]]> Click here to download your free copy of How to Ace Your MBA Interviews!

Prepare teamwork-based stories.

1. If you fail to prepare, you prepare to fail.

While you may not have control over the questions you’re asked, you can prepare a set of flexible responses. You should be able to discuss the following:

1.  A walk through your resume (Focus on what you accomplished and learned at each job, and then why you transitioned to the next position)

2.  Why you chose your undergraduate college

3.  A story when you accomplished something extraordinary in the context of your job

4.  A story when you influenced stakeholders to help you make an idea become a reality

5.  A story when you led a team to produce quantifiable results

6.  A story when you failed

7.  Your career goals

8.  Why you want an MBA (make it school specific)

2. How to tell your stories

I suggest loosely following the S-O-A-R framework: Situation-Objective-Action-Result. (I also suggest adding one more letter to the acronym: L for “Learned”.)

Situation: Give background and context to the situation such as where you were working, what your role was, and who were the stakeholders involved. Be succinct, yet specific.
Objective: Describe what your goal was, and any obstacles that complicated the situation.
Action: Discuss how you proceeded toward your goal, and how you overcame your obstacles.
Result: Quantify the impact that you had on the situation.
Learned: Tell the interviewer what you learned about yourself from the experience.

Your response should take no more than about 2-3 minutes. You don’t want to bore the interviewer with a lot of theory and tangents. Once you’ve got your top stories down, you have a reservoir from which to pull when you’re on the spot that will be easily adaptable to the interviewer’s questions.

3. Practice with someone who is not your significant other/family member. Then practice with a significant other.

A friend may notice something that a family member, who is closest to you, may not. A family member might be more willing to be frank with you than a friend. A family member might be willing to put in the time with you. An objective party can give you feedback about your first impression and body language. In any case, you want to practice, a lot. Use 2-4 people. (Of course, you are also welcome to do a mock interview or get interview coaching from an Accepted professional, including me.)

4. What’s your latest?

Let’s say they ask you what accomplishment you are most proud of. In your heart of hearts, it might have been working two jobs to put yourself through university. Now that is quite an accomplishment. But if it was more than say, 3 years ago, you need to pull from something more recent. The interviewer might think, ‘Why is he or she not talking about something that you’re doing right now?’

If it truly was a significant achievement from your past, you can use it. But bring that accomplishment into the present, say, by how it influences your values or interests right now.

5. Watch your tone. Focus on teamwork accomplishments, rather than academic results.

Business schools are looking to weed out arrogant, insecure and emotionally immature candidates. During your conversation, don’t pepper your responses with achievements such as high test scores, a high GPA, or a plethora of individual publications. The ad comm can look at your transcript to find out your grades. Alumni really don’t care. Also, don’t argue with them over a question they might have asked you. These types of responses are culturally off putting to US-based interviewers. You want to come across as friendly, at ease, communicative. Again, by preparing teamwork-based stories, you’re going to add to this perception.

6. Non-blind interviews

Schools like MIT and Harvard grant non-blind interviews. That means they’ve taken the time to review your resume and your essays. Most other schools rely on alumni and current students who generally serve as marketing tools for the school, comment on your English speaking skills, and indicate whether or not they would have liked you as a classmate.

In non-blind school interviews, they want to know the details behind the accomplishments you’ve mentioned. They also want to get a sense of the sort of person you are. They may throw some oddball questions your way, just to see how you handle pressure.

They are particularly interested in decision and turning points in your life. Take the time to have an objective person look over your resume to see if they can identify any holes or questions, or lack of link between your past and your future goals. Work on explaining these connections and transitions. Write down SOAR-L’s for all the pertinent bullet points on your resume so that you’re ready to discuss them. Don’t fudge over holes or “bad periods” from your past. Be honest! Say ‘Yes, that was a tough period, but this is what I learned from it. This is what it motivated me to do.’

7. Group interviews

Wharton and Ross now require group interviews. If you can, sign up for a group interview prep service. You’ll be amazed at how quickly the time flies, and how you react in a group setting. This experience can prepare you to provide the group with a session framework, without sounding arrogant or pushy. Business schools want to see how you interact with others under pressure. You don’t want to steamroll the other applicants or turn into a shrinking violet. Strive to have your voice heard, but also to be inclusive.

Have a TBD Coming Up? Practice with the pros before your big day! CLICK HERE TO REGISTER FOR A MOCK WHARTON TBD!

Michelle Stockman Michelle Stockman is a professional journalist, former Columbia Business School admissions insider, and experienced MBA admissions consultant.

 

Related Resources:

How to Ace Your MBA Interviews
MBA Interview Format Series
• The 10 Commandments of MBA Interviews

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Thou Shalt Not Forget Thursday’s Webinar! http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/10/thou-shalt-not-forget-thursdays-webinar-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/10/thou-shalt-not-forget-thursdays-webinar-2/#respond Mon, 10 Nov 2014 21:39:37 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26675 ]]> Spaces for our upcoming webinar, The 10 Commandments of MBA Interviews, are filling up!

MBA Interview Commandments

The webinar will take place on Thursday Nov. 13th at 10:00 AM PT / 1:00 PM ET.

Learn how to ace your MBA webinar – sign up for The 10 Commandments of MBA Interviews now!

10MBACommandments_ReserveYourSpot

GIVEAWAY ALERT: One lucky webinar participant will win a mini mock interview with Natalie Grinblatt Epstein. Make sure you’re there for a chance to win!

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

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Are You Ready for Your Team-Based Interview/Discussion? http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/10/are-you-ready-for-your-team-based-interviewdiscussion/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/10/are-you-ready-for-your-team-based-interviewdiscussion/#respond Mon, 10 Nov 2014 16:31:20 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26665 ]]> WhartonTBDCominUpRound 1 team-based interviews will be taking place SOON and we’d love to help you prep!

Prep with the best by joining one of two of our upcoming Mock Wharton Team-Based Discussions, on either Tuesday, November 11th at 4:00 PM PT/7:00 PM ET or on Tuesday, November 18th 10:00 AM PT/1:00 PM ET.

You can purchase this service by clicking here now. This is your last reminder before the event – time is ticking and spots are running out. Grab one of the remaining seats today!

PrepWithTheBest

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

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HKUST 2015 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/09/hkust-2015-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/09/hkust-2015-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/#comments Mon, 10 Nov 2014 01:30:02 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26661 ]]> HKUST aims to educate global leaders with cultural insight and strong Chinese business understanding. HKUST prides itself on the large percentage of career function and industry changes that its graduates are able to make: 77% of grads switch job functions and 67% change industries from their pre-MBA role after HKUST. Its essay questions aim to understand your goals and what you can contribute to the class. My tips are in blue below:

Essay Questions: 

1. Tell us about your short-term and long-term career goals after the MBA, and why you think HKUST MBA would be a good fit for you. (max 7500 characters, ~500 words)

To answer this question well, you need to know what direction you want to take your career in after the MBA. While a career change is likely, applicants need to convey how their career and experiences until now have prepared them for these ambitions. They must also explain how the HKUST MBA will complement those experiences to enable them to succeed in reaching and performing well in their target roles. To explain why HKUST’s curriculum is a good fit for you will require an understanding of HKUST’s three-tiered core curriculum and insight into some of the areas you will want to explore in the 40+% of the HKUST MBA that are electives. And it will almost certainly require some discussion of why the Chinese context, global perspectives, and management insight that HKUST offers will be critical to your advancement.

2. Our mission is to inspire and transform individuals to be future business leaders for Asia and the world. We embrace diversity, and are looking for ambitious and open-minded candidates with a passion to contribute. With your background and professional experience, what unique values can you bring in to enrich the learning experience at HKUST MBA? (max 7500 characters, ~500 words)

With just 100-120 students each year, HKUST aims to include a diverse range of backgrounds and industries in the class. You don’t want to be pigeon-holed as a generic consultant or financier: you need to demonstrate in this essay that you are a worldly candidate with experiences that your classmates will be eager to hear about and learn from – and that you have the personal qualities that will allow you to share those experiences. The best essays will include two or three examples of values adhered to, experiences gained, and/or achievements accomplished that demonstrate that you are ambitious, possess a wealth of experience, and are personable.

Application form:

Keep in mind that HKUST does not have a place to upload your current CV/resume. The only area of the application where you may describe your work experience is in the Work Experience section of the application, which requests data about dates of employment and salary and allows 1000 characters to describe each position (that’s approximately 150 words to describe each role). This is actually a fine amount of space; just be sure to use it to describe your work and impact. Don’t make the mistake of simply filling in some general responsibilities and losing the opportunity to share details about your initiatives and impacts.

If you would like professional guidance with your HKUST MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the HKUST application.

The HKUST MBA program intake 2015 will start in August 2015.

Below is the admissions timetable:

Application Deadline Decision Notification
 Round 1  November 13, 2014  January 9, 2015
 Round 2  January 13, 2015  March 13, 2015
 Round 3  March 13, 2015  May 8, 2015

*International students requiring student visa to study in Hong Kong are strongly recommended to apply for the first or second round to allow sufficient time for visa application once they are admitted.

Download our free special report: Best MBA Programs

Jennifer Bloom By Jennifer Bloom who has been helping applicants to the top MBA programs draft their resumes, application forms, letters of recommendation, and essays for 15 years. She is happy to serve as your personal coach and hand-holder throughout the entire process. There’s no time like the present to begin!

Related Resources:

• Why MBA?
• 2015 MBA Application Essay Tips
• 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your MBA Application Essays

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5 Key IMD Officials Resign http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/09/5-key-imd-officials-resign/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/09/5-key-imd-officials-resign/#respond Sun, 09 Nov 2014 18:17:31 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26657 ]]> Click here to check out our IMD B-School Zone!In a letter last week, Ralf Boscheck, the Program Director of the IMD MBA Program, announced that the school has “decided to realign the MBA Office with our new MBA program starting in January 2015.” He goes on to bid farewell to five long-time officials of the program, Claire Lecoq, Lisa Piguet, Janet Shaner, Marine Frey, and Simone Kuhn.

Their resignations follows a controversial move by IMD to begin reporting career stats every three years, rather than annually. After the new approach was announced, there was an uproar among alumni and applicants, especially when it became clear that this change covered up deteriorating salary and placement results for MBA graduates. The school explains, as noted in a September Poets & Quants article, that the declining salary stats are due to other changes made by the program, in particular a smaller class size, and currency fluctuations.

In a second Poets & Quants article chronicling the IMD saga, Boscheck says, “I would like to sidestep the commoditization of this industry and have a program that prepares 90 selected students not having to worry about being compared to other MBA programs that are less differentiated. These are not typical MBAs. They are junior executives and you can learn with them. It’s a senior, more experienced group. This school is an executive development network. We have 8,000 executives every year on campus and the trick is to bring the MBA program back into the core of the school and leverage what we have best which is our executive development.”

I was interviewed for the most recent Poets & Quants article on the IMD shake-up. My take on the turmoil:

“I don’t know who was behind that decision, but I do know there is a new program director and he probably wants ‘his people’ in positions that affect recruiting both of new students and potential employers. Either the old staff wasn’t comfortable with his approach and resigned, or they saw handwriting on the wall about their futures and resigned.

“I think IMD is going to struggle until the changes the new program director wants to make are implemented and prove popular with recruiters and students. If the changes are successful and the results are realized quickly, IMD will bounce back stronger than ever.

“If the changes prove unpopular or the results take a long time to be seen, IMD will decline until the new program director is replaced. In the latter case, its reputation and brand will be weakened.”

Are You Misusing the B-School Rankings?

Linda AbrahamBy Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

 

Related Resources:

Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right Ones
• 2014 Virtual Panel: Exploring European B-Schools
• Business and Science Meet: Insights of an IMD Grad and Former Medical Doctor

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From CPA to MBA: An Applicant Shares His Journey (And GMAT Tips) http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/07/mba-applicant-interview-with-jon-taves/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/07/mba-applicant-interview-with-jon-taves/#respond Fri, 07 Nov 2014 18:08:30 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26250 ]]> Click here for more interviews with MBA applicants!

This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with MBA applicant bloggers, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at the MBA application process. And now…introducing our Jon Taves…

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What’s your favorite non-school book?

Jon: I grew up in a tiny town in Northern Minnesota and went to undergrad at Concordia College in Moorhead, MN – a private liberal arts college near Fargo, ND. There I double-majored in economics and accounting.

Above all else, I’m a huge economics nerd. To me, nothing’s better than using economic theory to analyze and explain markets. In my freshman year at Concordia I read Moneyball by Michael Lewis and was fascinated by his subject: Billy Beane. Not so much from a baseball standpoint, but by how he exploited market inefficiencies. That led me to take Economics 201 my sophomore year, and the rest is history.

For its long-lasting influence on my life, I’d have to say Moneyball is my favorite book. (Not to mention the fact that Michael Lewis is a fantastic writer. His story-driven approach to explaining complex topics is a style I try to mirror in my own writing.)

Accepted: What stage of the application process are you up to so far?

Jon: I plan to apply in Round 2, so I’ve got a few more months to put the finishing touches on my essays and press “submit.” I probably could’ve done so in Round 1, but I want more time to coach my references and get involved in the community again – I’ve missed it while I was studying for the GMAT all spring and summer.

Accepted: What’s been your greatest admissions challenge? What steps did you take (or are you taking) to overcome that challenge?

Jon: To date, my greatest admissions challenge has been the GMAT. Prior to the GMAT, the last test I’d taken was the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) exam. To pass one of the four parts of that exam it’s a simple equation: spend 150 hours reviewing topics and answering practice problems. Get something wrong? Study that topic. Lather, rinse, repeat.

That’s not a formula for success on the GMAT. More than I’ve ever experienced before, the GMAT is truly a test of how you think. I’d read about that in guides and various sources online, but it took me awhile to actually believe it. After taking the GMAT, I can honestly say that that’s the most important takeaway. (I’ll elaborate further in the next question.)

Accepted: It looks like you’ve got lots of GMAT advice on your blog. What are the three categories one should allocate their time to when studying for the GMAT?

Jon: In short, one should allocate their time between the following three categories:

1. Topical areas

2. Timing of answers

3. Identifying question patterns

To expand on what I said in question #3, the GMAT is a test of how you think. The best advice I can give is that having an above-average understanding of the topics covered is important, but having an above-average understanding of test strategy is even more important. In total, I studied about five months for the GMAT. At first glance, one might assume that 5% of their time studying should be spent on test strategy and 95% on topical areas. After all, that ratio was successful in high school and college, right? That couldn’t be farther from the truth: I would estimate that I spent 60% of my time on test strategy and 40% on topical areas. (If it focused only on topical areas, an eighth grader would be able to ace the GMAT.)

How long it takes for you to achieve that 60/40 ratio will vary. If it takes you a month to get comfortable with grammar rules and geometry, then plan for two months spent on test strategy. Test strategy is broken up into two parts: timing and patterns. The pace in which you answer questions matters. If the goal of the GMAT is to test how well you think, then it’s relevant to incorporate not only how long it takes you to answer a question, but also in what order you answer correctly/incorrectly. Think of the GMAT as a water park. You want your timing to be like a “lazy river.” Simply put, getting five questions wrong with consistent timing will equate to a higher score than answering the same amount correctly while riding the Verruckt.

With its proclivity for patterns, the GMAT is like Taco Bell. Have you ever noticed how they introduce a new product every few months – although it isn’t really “new,” it’s just some derivative of a taco or burrito? Similarly, all GMAT questions are testing the same thing: “What’s the best way to solve this problem?” Keep that in mind while you’re studying. When doing practice problems, your work isn’t done once you answer it. Make sure to ask yourself what other questions it relates to. This will make those thirty-seven quant questions look less like thirty-seven individual feats of mathematics and more like a bunch of tacos and burritos.

To close, I’d like to comment on the importance of the GMAT. Do your best, but don’t let the pressure to perform well consume you. A great GMAT score and nothing else doesn’t amount to much. Perhaps when schools preach about their “holistic” approach to admissions they’re underselling the GMAT’s importance, but that doesn’t mean it’s everything. It’s a lot easier to dominate one test than to be a well-rounded applicant that’s not only intelligent, but also a leader, collaborator, and problem solver.

One of my favorite quotes comes from Mark Cuban. He says that “there are three types of entrepreneurs: innovators, imitators, and idiots.” To stand out to an admissions committee, you need to distinguish yourself. Everyone applying to the top schools will have fantastic GMAT scores. What’s different about you? Whether it’s an interesting initiative you led at work, an extracurricular activity, or a unique perspective on the world, remember that you’re more than a score from 200-800 in ten point increments.

Accepted: What is your current job? Do you plan on staying in that same industry post-MBA? Or moving into something new?

Jon: My first job out of college was for a public accounting firm in Minneapolis. I worked there for a little over two years until I left for Travelers last November. At both companies I’ve worked on federal tax projects for C-corporations. Accounting is a solid field and I’ve met some amazing people while working in it. Post-MBA, however, I’d like to switch careers.

In the short run, I hope to use my MBA to start working in management consulting. After that I hope to start a social enterprise. I was on the board of directors for a non-profit in Minneapolis for two years; I’ve seen firsthand how difficult it is to be financially sustainable. I hope to put together a business whose profits will be able to support the communities I love indefinitely – not just until the last grant dries up. I believe the credibility and connections that I’ll gain through an MBA program will allow me to make that dream a reality.

Accepted: Where and when do you plan on applying to b-school?

Jon: I’ve narrowed down my list to the University of Michigan (Ross) and the University of Minnesota (Carlson). Both schools have the characteristics I’m looking for, most notably: strong entrepreneurship programs and a plethora of experiential learning opportunities. Ross and Carlson are pioneers in the hands-on method of teaching; students are able to go out into the marketplace to solve problems, not only study cases about them in the classroom.

Where they separate from each other is with Ross’ prestige and its relationship with Detroit, MI. There’s no more fertile ground than there to do the kind of work I’m interested in. Carlson, however, can give me something Ross can’t: a built-in network. Particularly for my post-MBA plans, I understand the importance of relationships. (And my mother would be much happier if I stayed in the state of Minnesota.)

Accepted: Can you tell us about your blog? Who is your target audience? What have you gained from the blogging experience?

Jon: A professor told me my junior year at Concordia that the best way for him to retain information – and truly understand it – was to write it down. I recalled this advice a few years ago when I wanted to find a way to remember the information I was reading in economics and finance-related books and articles. It’s been one of the greatest decisions I’ve ever made. Not only do I feel like I know more about the topics that interest me than ever before, but I’ve rediscovered my love of writing. (I was the guy in your college writing class that asked all of the questions and revised his essays a dozen times.)

To be honest, my audience is myself. I don’t publicize my posts on social media, but thanks to the wonder of WordPress, I’ve gained a small following of fellow GMAT takers and MBA applicants. It makes me extremely happy that I’ve been able to help others along their journey. In general, I write about whatever interests me in the economics/finance sphere. At the time, it’s business school. If my musings on those topics interest others, as well, that’s terrific. I suppose in that sense I have a Field of Dreams-esque approach to my blog: “If you build it, they will come.”

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages.

You can read more about Jon’s b-school journey by checking out his blog, EF ESSAYS: Essays on Economics & Finance. Thank you Jon for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

Download your free copy of Navigating the MBA Maze!

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

GMAT, GRE, SAT, and All Things Test Prep
• Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One 
School-Specific MBA Application Essays

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Get Ready, Get Set, and ACE that Team Interview Challenge! http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/06/get-ready-get-set-and-ace-that-team-interview-challenge/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/06/get-ready-get-set-and-ace-that-team-interview-challenge/#respond Thu, 06 Nov 2014 21:15:48 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26629 ]]> Have a TBD interview coming up? Practice with the pros before your big day!

Participate, don’t dominate!

The team-based interview/discussion. Not as straightforward as the traditional one-on-one interview, many applicants feel tripped up and nervous just thinking about it. Well now you can WORRY NO MORE. We’d like to help you prep for your upcoming team-based interview/discussion by offering you the following tips (with a special emphasis on #4):

1. Participate, don’t dominate. Balance is key here. If you chime in infrequently, then you won’t give the group (not to mention the interview leader) an opportunity to hear your voice and get to know you; run your mouth non-stop, however, and they may get to know you more than they’d like. Take the middle ground here and participate as though you would in a regular polite conversation.

2. Politeness matters! Thought-provoking, interesting comments are always welcome, but don’t cross the line into overly controversial, and certainly not offensive.

3. Dress the part. The idea of a discussion is meant to induce a feeling of casual conversation, but not too casual! Your board shorts and Hawaiian shirt? Save that for your next luau. Instead, stick with business attire only.

4. Attend our upcoming Mock Wharton Team-Based Discussion. The best way to prep for your team exercise is by experiencing one first-hand before interview day. Join us on Tuesday, November 11th at 4:00 PM PT/7:00 PM ET or on Monday, November 18th 10:00 AM PT/1:00 PM ET for a simulated group interview that will provide you with the ins and outs, not to mention a huge boost of confidence, when it comes to your Wharton Team-Based Discussion or any other group interview or activities you may have coming up. You must purchase this service in advance to reserve your spot.

We wish you lots of luck! Please be in touch with any questions!

Have a TBD Coming Up? Practice with the pros before your big day! CLICK HERE TO REGISTER FOR A MOCK WHARTON TBD!

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

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PayScale: How Much Can You Earn, and How to Earn It? http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/06/payscale-how-much-you-can-earn-and-how-to-earn-it/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/06/payscale-how-much-you-can-earn-and-how-to-earn-it/#comments Thu, 06 Nov 2014 17:15:20 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26604 ]]> lydia-frank-payscaleTrying to figure out if grad school will pay off? How much you’ll earn with your career of choice? Which graduate program will position you to for the best payoff?

If so, tune in to our conversation with Lydia Frank of PayScale to find out how to get the stats and info that you need to make an informed financial decision.

00:03:11 – PayScale: who they are and what they do.

00:04:35 – The College Salary Report (and the recent inclusion of grad school data).

00:05:53 – How PayScale collects data (and why you should complete their survey, too!).

00:09:13 – Helpful resources for folks in the research stage.

00:12:47 – What surprises people about the PayScale survey results.

00:16:46 – Different uses for the (many!) resources at PayScale.

00:24:28 – New data we’ll be seeing in the future reports.

00:29:03 – Accounting for the opportunity cost of education in the salary report. (Yes, they do.)

00:30:28 – Advice from Lydia for balancing what you love with what pays.

Listen to the full conversation to learn more!*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Related Links:

• Which Grad Schools Produce the Highest Earners?
• Lifetime Earnings by Degree & Major
Social Mobility Index

Related Shows:

• Career Direction: It’s Ok to Love Your Job!
• How to Become a Management Consultant
• The Facts About Financial Services
• Is a PhD a Good Idea?
• Which Schools are Good for PE/VC and VC-Backed Entrepreneurship
• Interview with Anna Runyan of Classy Career Girl

Leave a Review for Admissions Straight Talk:

Check Out Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes! Check Out Admissions Straight Talk in Stitcher!

The Quick Guide to Admissions Resumes: Get your free copy!

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http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/06/payscale-how-much-you-can-earn-and-how-to-earn-it/feed/ 1 career goals,MBA ROI,podcast,Rankings Trying to figure out if grad school will pay off? How much you’ll earn with your career of choice? Which graduate program will position you to for the best payoff? - If so, tune in to our conversation with Lydia Frank of PayScale to find out how to ... Trying to figure out if grad school will pay off? How much you’ll earn with your career of choice? Which graduate program will position you to for the best payoff? If so, tune in to our conversation with Lydia Frank of PayScale to find out how to get the stats and info that you need to make an informed financial decision. 00:03:11 – PayScale: who they are and what they do. 00:04:35 – The College Salary Report (and the recent inclusion of grad school data). 00:05:53 - How PayScale collects data (and why you should complete their survey, too!). 00:09:13 - Helpful resources for folks in the research stage. 00:12:47 – What surprises people about the PayScale survey results. 00:16:46 – Different uses for the (many!) resources at PayScale. 00:24:28 – New data we’ll be seeing in the future reports. 00:29:03 – Accounting for the opportunity cost of education in the salary report. (Yes, they do.) 00:30:28 – Advice from Lydia for balancing what you love with what pays. *Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com. Related Links: • Which Grad Schools Produce the Highest Earners? • Lifetime Earnings by Degree & Major • Social Mobility Index Related Shows: • Career Direction: It’s Ok to Love Your Job! • How to Become a Management Consultant • The Facts About Financial Services • Is a PhD a Good Idea? • Which Schools are Good for PE/VC and VC-Backed Entrepreneurship • Interview with Anna Runyan of Classy Career Girl Leave a Review for Admissions Straight Talk: Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no 40:27
Team-Based Interview Invites Sent Out to Wharton and Ross Applicants! http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/05/team-based-interview-invites-sent-out-to-wharton-and-ross-applicants/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/05/team-based-interview-invites-sent-out-to-wharton-and-ross-applicants/#respond Wed, 05 Nov 2014 21:41:29 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26565 ]]> Click here to register for a mock Wharton TBD! The admissions teams at Wharton and Ross have sent out interview invitations over the last few weeks. If you received one, congrats! Here are some tidbits about the Ross interview invites:

• Invitations were sent out on Monday, October 20th.

 • If you didn’t receive an interview invitation, that doesn’t necessarily equal a ding – you could still be waitlisted or asked to interview during Round 2.

• If you’re wondering about the percentage of interviewed applicants that get admitted, Soojin Kwon, Michigan Ross’s Director of Admissions, explains: “[T]hat depends on the number of interview invitations we make – which varies from year to year depending on the approach we want to take (e.g., cast a wide net, which could mean more interviewees are placed on the waitlist), and the number of admission offers we make, which depends on projected yield (i.e., our estimate of how many admits will decide to enroll).” So don’t necessarily create predictions based on previous years’ numbers!

• The Ross blog provides links to helpful videos on interviewing at Ross. See here and here.

And for Wharton:

• Round 1 team-based discussions will be held on campus (in Philadelphia), as well as at off-campus locations in San Francisco, London, Dubai, Sao Paulo, Mumbai, Shanghai, Seoul, Tokyo, and Singapore.

• Interviews will take place in November. Invites were only sent out on Friday, October 31st, so yours could still be in the mail….

• Wharton provides more info about their team-based discussion here.

Stay tuned for tomorrow’s post with tips on how to ace the TBD! Have a TBD Coming Up? Practice with the pros before your big day! CLICK HERE TO REGISTER FOR A MOCK WHARTON TBD! Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best Related Resources:

• Tips For Tackling Team Interviews • MBA Interview Tips Post 4: Team-Based Discussion Interviews • Handling Wharton’s Team-Based Discussion

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Have an Open Mind, Learn Skills, Build Relationships: Darden MBA Interview http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/05/have-an-open-mind-learn-skills-build-relationships-darden-mba-interview/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/05/have-an-open-mind-learn-skills-build-relationships-darden-mba-interview/#respond Wed, 05 Nov 2014 17:40:01 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26182 ]]> Click here for more MBA student interviews!

Archana

This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Archana Rao, second-year student at UVA Darden.

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Can you tell us a little about yourself? Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad?

Archana: Originally from India and being an Army Officer’s daughter I studied in 8 different schools and lived in more than 16 different states. Studied Electronics and Telecomm Engineering and pursued a course in Advertising and Public Relations to strike a balance between my quantitative and qualitative skills sets.

Accepted: What year are you at UVA Darden? 

Archana: Second Year Darden

Accepted: Why did you choose Darden? Why did you think it was the best fit for you? Has it lived up to its expectations? 

Archana: I chose Darden because I wanted to study in a college town with a rich history, wanted a small class size, and the case study method. Darden fit this exact criteria and it lives up to its expectations every single day.

Accepted: If you could change one thing about the program, what would it be?

Archana: I wish there was a larger focus on Technology careers. Measures are being taken to build better relations with the Bay Area.

Accepted: Which other MBA programs had you considered? Did you only consider programs in the U.S.? Why or why not?

Archana: I looked at Yale, Kellogg and Haas for particular concentrations that they specialize in. I got accepted at the Indian School of Business, Hyderabad, but chose to study in the US given the global exposure offered and the extensive diversity here.

Accepted: What was your pre-MBA job? Do you plan on returning to that industry after you receive your MBA?

Archana: I worked at the HSBC Bank as a project management consultant where I was also a global sustainability champion doing pro-bono consulting for non-profit partners in Education. This drove me to join the Teach for India movement where I taught English and Math in a public school.

I realized that there was lack of mentorship beyond school hours and decided to co-found a non-profit called Mentor Me India in Mumbai.

Most recently I spent the summer with the Boston Consulting Group in Houston working in Global Education strategy for the World Economic Forum and industry benchmarking for unconventional shale gas. I will continue to be in consulting full-time given the steep learning curve and opportunity to work across different industries and functional areas.

Accepted: Can you talk about the internship process at Darden? What role did they play in helping you secure your internship at BCG?

Archana: The internship process at Darden is competitive and begins almost immediately as you step on grounds in first year. Being focused, organized, and confident is the key in being successful in the process.

There are numerous support structures like the career development center and your second year coach to guide you all along the way. Your second years are the most valuable resource given that they just came back from a summer internship and have been through the whole process only a few months ago. I utilized all of the above to be well prepared to secure the internship at BCG.

Accepted: Can you share some advice to incoming first year students, to help make their adjustment to b-school easier?  

Archana:

1. Have an open mind coming in, with a vague idea of what you might like doing for a career. Recruiting begins sooner than you think!

2. Focus on learning skills rather than just grades.

3. Build meaningful relationships with your classmates and professors. They are world-class at a top-business school.

Accepted: Looking back, what was the most challenging aspect of the MBA admissions process? How did you approach that challenge and overcome it?

Archana: Having had a variety of experiences in my career before b-school I was not sure how to communicate my short term and long term goals. But talking to people who had inspiring careers and understanding how they got there gave me a roadmap to how I could communicate those questions. It’s a very reflective process. It was very valuable for me to invest time in thinking about what I really wanted out of life and how I wanted to spend my time.

Accepted: Can you tell us about your blog? Who is your target audience? What have you gained from the blogging experience?

Archana:

1. My first blog (Life is My Classroom) shares my learnings from experiences I have had at Teach for India and at Darden. It gives everyone a window into thoughts and observations that others in these institutions also experience but don’t necessarily share. I love writing and it’s a great way to de-stress when things get extremely busy at Darden as well!

2. Life on a Post-it In today’s world where people’s attention spans are shrinking, I believe that cartooning is a strong medium in communicating my thoughts, observations, and musings about life, career, education, relationships etc. on a post-it! I enjoy cartooning and post-its and this blog lets me combine the both.

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages

You can read more about Archana’s journey by checking out her blog, Life is My Classroom. Thank you Archana for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

Download our free special report: Best MBA Programs

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

• UVA Darden 2015 MBA Questions, Deadlines, Tips
Against the Odds: MBA Admissions for Indian Applicants
• How to Become a Management Consultant

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Take Command of Your MBA Interview! http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/04/take-command-of-your-mba-interview-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/04/take-command-of-your-mba-interview-2/#respond Tue, 04 Nov 2014 21:16:47 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26556 ]]> MBA Interview Commandments

Acing an MBA interview is no easy feat! You need to simultaneously:

• Exude confidence without boasting;

• Find the balance between being too terse and talking your interviewer’s ear off;

• Stay positive even when a curveball is thrown at you; and

• Be honest and quick thinking at ALL times.

Worried you may not be able to keep it together on the big day? Stop worrying (because that really won’t help) and instead take a step in the direction of interview success by signing up for our upcoming webinar, The 10 Commandments of MBA Interviews.

The webinar will be presented by Natalie Grinblatt Epstein, current Accepted.com consultant and former admissions director, who will walk you through 10 interview musts AND giveaway a free mock interview session to one lucky webinar attendee!

The webinar will take place next Thursday, November 13, 2014 at 10:00 AM PT / 1:00 PM ET / 6:00 PM GMT.

10MBACommandments_ReserveYourSpot

Reserve your spot for The 10 Commandments of MBA Interviews now!

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

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MBA Interview Must-Know #2: You http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/04/mba-interview-must-know-2-you-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/04/mba-interview-must-know-2-you-2/#respond Tue, 04 Nov 2014 17:32:51 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26419 ]]>

Download your copy of MBA Interview Prep: How to Ace Your MBA Interviews!

“MBA Interview Must-Know #2: You” is excerpted from the Accepted.com special report, How to Ace Your MBA Interviews To download the entire free special report, click here.

You. You are the first topic you need to know. After all, the interview will be about you. What do you want to do after your MBA? Why do you want to attend this program? When have you demonstrated the qualities this school appreciates, the qualities that will show you belong here? Much of this information appears in your essays or was uncovered in the preparation and introspection that took place before you drafted your essays. (Did you jot down notes? Keep a journal? Use them.)

In a BW interview, Dawna Clark, Director of Admissions at Tuck, gave the following very concrete advice to applicants facing a “blind” interview, which at many programs means the interviewer only sees your resume.

“I would recommend that people approach their interview with a strategy. When candidates are applying to Tuck, so many of them are so bright and so impressive, and there are probably 50 things that they would love to talk to us about in their interview. But there’s limited time, and I would recommend that they spend some time thinking about five of the top skills, experiences, or accomplishments that they most want to emphasize.

“I would literally write a list of everything that you’re proud of before your interview and then cut it in half, and cut it in half again and cut it in half again, until you say, ‘You know what? If I have limited time, here are the five points I’m really hoping to get across in this interview.’ With each of those five bullet points come up with some examples and substantiate them.”

Dawna provides excellent suggestions for an interview strategy where you will truly be prepared to present yourself.

MBA Interview Tip #2: Know the few most important things you are proud of and be prepared to discuss them.

Do you know the 10 commandments of MBA interviews?

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

• Tips for Your In-Person Interview with MBA Student or Alumnus
• Preparing for Behavioral and General Interview Questions, a short video
• 6 Steps to Follow After You Receive Your MBA Interview Invite

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Successful GRE Score = Successful MBA Students http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/03/successful-gre-score-successful-mba-students/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/03/successful-gre-score-successful-mba-students/#respond Mon, 03 Nov 2014 22:13:16 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26481 ]]> Want to know what HBS has to say about accepting the GRE?An Educational Testing Service (ETS) press releases reports on a study conducted by ETS that examines the performance of part-time and full-time MBA students who had taken the GRE revised General Test. Results show that high GRE scores predict solid student performance in MBA programs.

According to David Payne, Vice President and COO of Global Education at ETS, “The GRE® Program has a long history of predictive validity for graduate-level programs such as social sciences, including business, which is why more than 1,100 business schools worldwide are accepting GRE scores for their MBA Programs. This new study provides even more evidence regarding the specific population of MBA students.”

The ETS press release also shares the following points:

• Currently, almost all top b-schools (90% of U.S. News’ top 100 schools) accept the GRE.

• GRE test takers report positively about the GRE’s ScoreSelect which allows test takers to submit only their best sets of scores to schools for up to five years from the test day.

• Test takers also provide positive feedback regarding their ability to skip questions and return to them later on.

Learn How to Choose the Best MBA Program for You!

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

• The GMAT, the GRE, and the Guy Who Knows them Well
• GMAT vs. GRE: Harvard Business School Weighs In
Should You take the GMAT or the GRE?

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Indian School of Business MBA Admissions Q&A http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/03/indian-school-of-business-mba-admissions-qa/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/03/indian-school-of-business-mba-admissions-qa/#respond Mon, 03 Nov 2014 15:12:47 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26513 ]]> Discover the benefits of attending India’s top-ranked business school, the Indian School of Business (ISB), when you attend our upcoming admissions Q&A with Mr. Rupesh Bisht, Associate Director – Admissions & Financial Aid at ISB.

Join our live Indian School of Business (ISB) Admissions Q&A!

In addition to answering your questions, Mr. Bisht will discuss various topics including:

  • The admissions process and application requirements.
  • ISB’s advanced curriculum and goals.
  • Financing and scholarship options.
  • Career opportunities for ISB students.

Register now to reserve your spot for the live ISB MBA Admissions Q&A [Wednesday, November 5, 2014, at 9 AM PT / 12 PM ET / 5 PM GMT / 10:30 PM IST].

Save my spot!

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

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What’s an MBA Really Worth? http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/02/whats-an-mba-really-worth/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/02/whats-an-mba-really-worth/#respond Sun, 02 Nov 2014 18:17:33 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26383 ]]> Applying to top MBA programs? Download your free copy of Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One

How much do MBAs really earn?

This is the question tackled in a recent Poets & Quants article in which John Byrne presents PayScale data provided exclusively for P&Q. In the analysis, PayScale calculates the estimated median pay and bonuses (not including stock-based compensation, retirement benefits, or non-cash benefits like healthcare) of graduates from the top 50 U.S. MBA programs from 2004 to 2014. Here are some of the highlights from the article:

Harvard, Stanford, and Wharton earn the most over a 20-year period (at $3,233,000, $3,011,000 and $2,989,000 respectively), with average income at the former nearly doubling the average income of graduates from Texas A&M’s Mays Business School (at $1,781,820.)

• Some schools “punched above their weight class” like Boston University, whose graduates earned an average of $2,329,000, making the school rank in 19th place on this list, while ranked overall (in the regular MBA full-time rankings) by P&Q in 40th.

• Another high roller from lower down on the list is UC-Irvine Merage, where MBAs earn $2,319,932 over 20 years, putting them in 21st place, though generally ranked in 47th.

• More food for thought: At HBS, the average age of graduation is 29 years old. Our 20-year payout here brings these MBAs up to 49 years old, giving them another 16 years until retirement at 65. Based on their 20-year earnings, they may earn another $3.2 million, which combined with their 20-year earnings, brings their total up to $6.5 million. (Remember, this is a conservative estimate as it doesn’t include stock and non-cash compensation.)

• Compare the above HBS figures to the $2.5 million estimated lifetime earnings (age 24 to 64) of people with a master’s degree (non-MBA). (Data from the U.S. Census Bureau.) Someone with an MBA from Harvard will earn nearly three times as much as someone with a master’s degree. And someone with an MBA from Texas A&M will still earn about $1 million more than the average MA/MS holder.

• More comparisons (based on U.S. Census Bureau data): The average high school graduate can expect to earn $1.2 million in a lifetime, compared to the $2.1 million of someone with a bachelor’s degree. PhDs earn $3.4 million on average during their working lifetime. Doctors and lawyers can expect lifetime earnings of about $4.4 million – still less than the lifetime earnings of MBAs from at least 28 business schools.

• According to PayScale data, graduates from BA programs earn a median $1,301,000 20 years post-graduation. All MBAs, on average, earned $1,771,000, with those in the top 50 earning a median $2,266,000. An MBA in general will earn you about half a million more than a BA; an MBA from a top 50 school will get you yet another half a million more.

Looking for admissions advice?
Source: PayScale for Poets&Quants

For MBA admissions tips, check out our MBA Admissions 101 Pages!
Source: Payscale Inc. for 20-year estimate, business schools reporting to U.S. News for 2013 starting pay and bonus.

Learn How to Choose the Best MBA Program for You!

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One
• B-Schools with the Highest ROIs
• Which Graduate Schools Should You Apply To?

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How to Ace the GRE Quant Section Without (Too Much) Math http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/02/how-to-ace-the-gre-quant-section-without-too-much-math/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/11/02/how-to-ace-the-gre-quant-section-without-too-much-math/#respond Sun, 02 Nov 2014 17:40:22 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26363 ]]> Need more GRE advice?

Don’t try to “Math” your way through the GRE!

Many people think that the GRE is designed to test your math and verbal skills. While this is true to some degree, the tests are really designed to test your critical thinking skills. Trying to “math” your way through every problem on the quantitative section is possible, but it will likely take a lot of time. Let’s take a look at a sample GRE question and see how we can solve it in different ways.

On Monday, 2/5 of a full tank of water is emptied. On Tuesday, 1/5 of what’s left is emptied out of the tank. How full is the tank on Wednesday?

A] 2/25

B] 3/25

C] 2/5

D] 12/25

E] 3/5

First, we’ll go through the math. Then we’ll talk about how to do this problem without math.

The tank is originally completed full, or 5/5 full. Then 2/5 of the tank is emptied, so 5/5 – 2/5 = 3/5. At the end of Monday, the tank is 3/5 full.

Then 1/5 of the remaining water is emptied. 1/5 of 3/5 means 1/5 x 3/5 = 3/25. So on Tuesday, 3/25 of the overall volume of the tank is drained. So 3/5 is left, then 3/25 is taken out, so we’ll need to convert the numbers into common denominators and we end up with 15/25 – 3/25 = 12/25. The tank remains 12/25 full.

There’s the math based way to solve this question. But because the GRE is actually a critical thinking test, is there another way to solve this problem what will get you to the answer more quickly?

Let’s take a look at how to do this without so much math

Take a look at the answer choices. On the first day, 2/5 of the tank is drained, leaving 3/5. No matter what, more water will be drained, so E cannot be the answer. Further, this problem is more complicated than simply doing this math: 1 – 2/5 – 1/5 = 2/5. Eliminate C.

If you simply multiply 1/5 and 2/5, you get 2/25, and we can eliminate A, as that is too easy. This leaves us with B] and D], and if you simply consider that the tank should still be around half full, after 1/5 of 3/5 is removed, only D] remains in the ballpark.

Approaching the problem in this way will save you time, if you know how to apply these methods. This is what preparing for the GRE is all about. Not just hammering at questions with direct math and being fast at it. It is about recognizing what the test is actually testing. The second method will take far less time on test day, and time management is a huge part of attaining a high score on the GRE.

Next Step Test Preparation, specializes in 1-on-1 tutoring for the GRE, GMAT, LSAT and MCAT. Contact them today to discuss your goals and to learn how they can help you achieve them.

Download our free report: GET YOUR GAME ON: Preparing for Your Grad School Application

Related Resources:

• GRE vs. GMAT: Trends
Get Your Game On: Prepping for Your Grad School Application
Graduate School Admissions 101

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RoadToMyMBA: 26-Yr Old Consultant from Brazil Applying to Top US B-Schools http://blog.accepted.com/2014/10/31/mba-applicant-interview-with-roadtomymba/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/10/31/mba-applicant-interview-with-roadtomymba/#respond Fri, 31 Oct 2014 17:19:08 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26180 ]]> Click here for more MBA applicant interviews!This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with MBA applicant bloggers, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at the MBA application process. And now…introducing our anonymous blogger, RoadToMyMBA…

Accepted: First, can you tell us a little about yourself? Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? What is your current job? 

RoadToMyMBA: Hi, I’m a 26 year old financial consultant from Brazil. I have a BA degree in international relations from a private university here in my city and I’ve also studied economics for 3 years in another university but did not obtain this second bachelor’s degree since I’ve put my registration as “on-hold.”

I currently work for a Big 4 consulting firm in the corporate finance area. I work with valuation, M&A and long-term fundraising projects with companies of various sizes throughout Brazil. I’ve been working here for about 4 years and right now I’m a Senior Consultant.

Accepted: Where do you plan on applying to b-school? 

RoadToMyMBA: I’m planning to apply exclusively to US MBA programs and right now I’m narrowing my choices, but they are between Tuck, Stern, Darden, Fuqua, McCombs, Kenan-Flagler and Kelley. I know it’s a lot of options but it’s a hard decision, especially for me that can’t travel to the campus and to the best MBA events in USA. I’m doing my best to make the right choice.

Accepted: What attracts you to the U.S. programs, as opposed to other top schools in Europe or Asia? 

RoadToMyMBA: When I was younger (15 years old to be precise) I had the opportunity to live in the USA for one year as a high school exchange student. Since then, I’ve thought to come back and live in the USA for a longer period.

Another important aspect is how well renowned the American universities are in business education. I’m looking forward to studying with some bright students and world-class faculty.

Accepted: What stage of the application process are you up to so far? What has been the most challenging step and how did you work to overcome it? 

RoadToMyMBA: I’m pretty much in the beginning of my application. I truly believe that I will only be able to apply in the second round for all MBA programs I’ve chosen so far.

The most challenging step so far is the GMAT. I did my first GMAT test two weeks ago and scored a low 560. Right now I’m back to studies since I’m planning to retake the GMAT in mid-November.

Accepted: Do you plan on staying in your current industry post-MBA, or changing to a new field/career? 

RoadToMyMBA: I would like to change my career to work in the financial sector, such as investment banking or private equity more precisely. Since I work as a corporate finance consultant, the change will not be very hard. At least that is what I think…

Accepted: Why did you decide to blog about your experience? What have you gained from the experience? What do you hope others will learn? 

RoadToMyMBA: The main reason is to help others in the same situation as me (professionals coming from emerging countries that want to do a top notch MBA abroad and needing some help in the process).

The other reasons are to help improve my communication abilities in English and to make me relax a little bit during the whole process.

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages.

You can read more about RoadToMyMBA’s b-school journey by checking out his blog, Road to My MBA. Thank you for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

Get clear, practical guidelines for answering the MBA goals essay question. Click here to download our free report.

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

• Which Schools are Good for PE/VC and VC-Backed Entrepreneurship
MBA Applicant Blogger Interviews
• Financial Aid & Health Insurance for International Students

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The GMAT, the GRE, and the Guy Who Knows them Well http://blog.accepted.com/2014/10/30/the-gmat-the-gre-and-the-guy-who-knows-them-well/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/10/30/the-gmat-the-gre-and-the-guy-who-knows-them-well/#respond Thu, 30 Oct 2014 16:56:00 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26454 ]]> Click here to listen to our conversation with Arthur Ahn!If you have the GMAT or GRE in your future, then you’ve most certainly heard of Kaplan Test Prep. Trying to figure out which test to take? Getting ready for test day? This podcast episode is for you!

Listen to the full recording of our podcast interview with Arthur Ahn, Senior Manager, Product Development at Kaplan Test Prep for the GRE and the GMAT for some great insight into test prep, test taking and what matters to admissions committees.

00:01:00 – Linda answers the oft-asked question: “I got accepted to School X. Should I attend?”

00:05:03 – The test prep biz: Instructing students, but not as the enemy.

00:06:23 – What Kaplan offers future GMAT and GRE test-takers.

00:08:28 – GMAT vs GRE: Differences in prepping & test taking.

00:16:04 – Why a low GRE score is the biggest application killer (by far).

00:22:31 – Is it the total GRE Score, or section scores, that make it or break it.

00:28:32 – Arthur’s top 3 GRE prep tips.

00:30:34 – How to make the big GMAT vs GRE decision.

00:34:20 – Too early to assess: Do applicants with lower scores have a better chance of admissions with one test over the other?

00:39:12 – Why most b-schools don’t really care yet about GMAT IR section scores.

00:47:25 – Last minute advice for exam takers.

Listen to the full conversation to learn more!*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Related Links:

• Kaplan Survey: Two Years After its Launch, a Majority of Business Schools Still Not Sold on the Importance of the GMAT’s® Integrated Reasoning Section; Most Deem it Unimportant, but Students Ignore it at their Own Risk
• What’s the Biggest Graduate School Admissions Application Killer? A Low GRE® Score, According to Kaplan’s 2014 Survey of Admissions Officers
GRE® Test Takers Are Successful in MBA Programs
•  www.kaptest.com
Kaplan GRE Prep on Twitter
• Kaplan GMAT Prep on Twitter

Related Shows:

• Bruce DelMonico on The Yale School of Management
• Chris Ryan of Manhattan GMAT on What MBA Applicants Need to Know
• Kisses of Death for your Grad School Application

Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk:

Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes! Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in Stitcher!

Learn how to use sample essays to create an exemplary essay of your own! Click here to download our free report!

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http://blog.accepted.com/2014/10/30/the-gmat-the-gre-and-the-guy-who-knows-them-well/feed/ 0 GMAT,GRE,podcast If you have the GMAT or GRE in your future, then you’ve most certainly heard of Kaplan Test Prep. Trying to figure out which test to take? Getting ready for test day? This podcast episode is for you! - Listen to the full recording of our podcast int... If you have the GMAT or GRE in your future, then you’ve most certainly heard of Kaplan Test Prep. Trying to figure out which test to take? Getting ready for test day? This podcast episode is for you! Listen to the full recording of our podcast interview with Arthur Ahn, Senior Manager, Product Development at Kaplan Test Prep for the GRE and the GMAT for some great insight into test prep, test taking and what matters to admissions committees. 00:01:00 – Linda answers the oft-asked question: “I got accepted to School X. Should I attend?” 00:05:03 – The test prep biz: Instructing students, but not as the enemy. 00:06:23 – What Kaplan offers future GMAT and GRE test-takers. 00:08:28 – GMAT vs GRE: Differences in prepping & test taking. 00:16:04 – Why a low GRE score is the biggest application killer (by far). 00:22:31 – Is it the total GRE Score, or section scores, that make it or break it. 00:28:32 – Arthur’s top 3 GRE prep tips. 00:30:34 – How to make the big GMAT vs GRE decision. 00:34:20 – Too early to assess: Do applicants with lower scores have a better chance of admissions with one test over the other? 00:39:12 – Why most b-schools don’t really care yet about GMAT IR section scores. 00:47:25 – Last minute advice for exam takers. *Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com. Related Links: • Kaplan Survey: Two Years After its Launch, a Majority of Business Schools Still Not Sold on the Importance of the GMAT’s® Integrated Reasoning Section; Most Deem it Unimportant, but Students Ignore it at their Own Risk • What’s the Biggest Graduate School Admissions Application Killer? A Low GRE® Score, According to Kaplan’s 2014 Survey of Admissions Officers • GRE® Test Takers Are Successful in MBA Programs •  www.kaptest.com • Kaplan GRE Prep on Twitter • Kaplan GMAT Prep on Twitter Related Shows: • Bruce DelMonico on The Yale School of Management • Chris Ryan of Manhattan GMAT on What MBA Applicants Need to Know • Kisses of Death for your Grad School Application Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk: Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no 52:14
MBA Interview Must-Know #1: Your Interview Goal http://blog.accepted.com/2014/10/29/mba-interview-must-know-1-your-interview-goal/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/10/29/mba-interview-must-know-1-your-interview-goal/#respond Wed, 29 Oct 2014 20:54:17 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26414 ]]> Click here to download a copy of Ace Your MBA Interviews!

Show how your background & needs fit with the school’s strengths & opportunities.

“MBA Interview Must-Know #1: Your Interview Goal” is excerpted from the Accepted.com special report, How to Ace Your MBA Interviews. To download the entire free special report, click here

Your Interview Goal. It’s three-fold:

Show fit. In the words of the Wharton Adcom Blog, “The interviewer is assessing your fit for the Wharton MBA program.” Think of your professional and educational background and needs and the school’s methodology, strengths, and career opportunities. Realize, however, that the interview is not just about you as a professional: it is also about you as an individual and human being.

Inform the school about recent accomplishments and achievements. Did you retake the GMAT? Earn an A in calculus? Get a promotion? Take on a leadership role in a new project? Try to inform your interviewer of any new attainments. Doing so will strengthen your profile overall and portray you as a growing, dynamic individual.

Demonstrate your communications and interpersonal skills. The latter is important for all, but critical if English is your second language and/or your transcript and test scores lead one to question your communications skills.

MBA Interview Tip #1: Enter the interview with SID:

Show you are a match with the program.
Inform the interviewer of recent accomplishments.
Demonstrate your interpersonal skills.

Tips to help you ace those MBA interviews!

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

Leadership in Admissions
• Preparing for Behavioral and General Interview Questions, a short video
• MBA Admissions According to an Expert

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What Are My Chances? Indian Architect with Designs on a Real Estate Career http://blog.accepted.com/2014/10/29/what-are-my-chances-indian-architect-with-designs-on-a-real-estate-career/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/10/29/what-are-my-chances-indian-architect-with-designs-on-a-real-estate-career/#respond Wed, 29 Oct 2014 17:30:19 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26313 ]]> This blog post is part of a series of MBA profile evaluations called “What are My Chances?”  by Michelle Stockman. Michelle, who started consulting for Accepted in 2007 and worked previously in the Columbia Business School admissions office, will provide selected applicants with school recommendation as well as an assessment of their strengths and weaknesses.

If you would like Michelle to evaluate your profile at no charge and as part of this series, please provide the information requested at http://reports.accepted.com/what_are_my_chances.

PROFILE #7: Lakshya, the Indian architect with designs on a real estate (or energy) career

Click here for to check out the rest of the profiles in the What Are My Chances series!

Think of your app as you would a building you’re designing. Build it for its intended use, and users.

Note: This profile request arrived with very little information. In my evaluation, I’m going to mention “ideal” details that would make him stand out.

-BACKGROUND: 24-year-old Indian male who graduated in 2013 from Dehradun Institute of Technology in India. Six months full-time training at renowned architecture firm. Two years of work experience as a chief designer and team leader for various projects.

Lakshya, you’re on the younger side of the MBA applicant pool. I’m not sure how you could have 24 months of full-time work experience having graduated in 2013. Perhaps you wrapped your class schedule around your job or you’re counting months to matriculation? You need to clarify this.

My advice? Wait.

Unless you have some significant leadership or design accomplishments–you need another year or two of work experience to accrue noteworthy leadership stories for your application. This would also give you time to research and network your target schools.

What leadership stories might stand out? First, be careful about how you word your experience. You must come across as talented, yet humble. A “renowned” architecture firm won’t mean much to an ad comm member. They are going to be impressed by YOUR extraordinary accomplishments in an ordinary job.

So give some context. Seeking an MBA with an architecture background is distinctive. You’re going to be one of the few, if admitted, in a global MBA program. You must be exceptional.

Are you a wunderkind in India’s “green design” field?  Did you introduce a socially conscious kind of design to a building project at your company that saves resources or energy in a country where conservation is a necessity? What was your impact on the job? Or have you come up with an ingenious method using cheap materials at hand to help the disadvantaged build cheap, sturdy shelters as a humanitarian project? Have you shared your experience at architecture conferences around the country?

If not, start now.

-GOALS: Work in the real estate and energy sector.

You obviously know the guts of building. I assume now you want to understand the business side of decision-making–that impacts your design. You must communicate three things with your goals.

1. Make them ambitious: Show the admissions committee that it’s not just about making money, but responsibly developing an overcrowded nation. Inspire them with your ideas for India’s future development.

2. Focus: Real estate and energy are two vast markets. Choose one. Then choose a specific part you want to be involved with. Make it relate to your past.

3. Experience: You must show the admissions committee that you do have some experience working on business deals. This piqued your interest and now you need an MBA to fill in the gaps in your knowledge to achieve your goals.

-GMAT: 720

No breakdown was given, but this is a decent score. You don’t necessarily need to retake the test, especially if you can match yourself well to a program.

-GPA: 3.5

Your GPA comes a bit out of left field because you graduated from an Indian university. Do not feel that you need to translate your percentage score to the 4.0 scale. US and UK MBA programs understand the Indian system well enough to understand your GPA.

Overall it’s a solid GPA.

-EXTRACURRICULAR: Arranging cancer check up camps in my city and giving presentations on cancer awareness.

This is great. I want to know more. Did you come up with this idea? Why? How did you identify the need? How involved were you? For how long? What kind of difference has it made in your community?

Perhaps, you came up with this idea after you or someone close to you was stricken by cancer. You decided to create an awareness campaign that you funded through donations and fundraisers. You are involved in the administration of this program on a weekly basis. You used technology as much as possible to advertise and streamline administration of the program. For example, you convinced a mobile phone service provider to run free text msg. based ads to remind people to get their cancer screenings.

Thanks to this program, “x” number of people have been evaluated, and “x” number of cases were caught in preliminary stages. You’ve shared your plan with, perhaps, a regional hospital system, and they intend to copy the program in several villages.

If you haven’t, begin to think on this scale!

-SCHOOLS:

Stretch matches: Berkeley, Stanford, Columbia, Cornell, Duke, Wharton, UCLA

On-par matches: University of Texas – Austin, UNC, USC, Ross, Amity University — RICS School of Built Environment

Safety matches: Warwick, Rice – Jones, Aberdeen Business School, University of Calgary (Haskayne School of Business)

Overall, I write this with the caveat that ALL THESE SCHOOLS ARE STRETCH MATCHES unless you start networking now to get to know alumni, students and the admissions committee. You also need to tailor your application specifically to your target schools. Think of your application as you would any building you are designing. Build it for its intended use, and users.

MBA admissions tips for Indian applicants! Download Free. s
Michelle Stockman is a professional journalist, former Columbia Business School admissions insider, and experienced MBA admissions consultant.

 

Related Resources:

What are My Chances?: Rahul, the Indian Male IT Guy 
Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One 

Leadership in Admissions 

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Last Call for Columbia Business School Admissions Webinar! http://blog.accepted.com/2014/10/28/last-call-for-columbia-business-school-admissions-webinar/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/10/28/last-call-for-columbia-business-school-admissions-webinar/#respond Tue, 28 Oct 2014 17:07:36 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26410 ]]> Tomorrow is the day you’ve been waiting for! The day when application-changing tips on how to apply successfully to Columbia Business School will be generously doled out by our very own CEO and founder, Linda Abraham!

Register for our live webinar: Get Accepted to Columbia Business School! Do you have questions on optimizing your CBS application for admission?

Do you need concrete tips on how to answer the essay questions?

Do you need help evaluating your profile to determine if CBS is the school for you?

Time’s running out. Reserve your spot for Get Accepted to Columbia Business School before it’s too late. The webinar will air live TOMORROW, on Wednesday, October 29, 2014 at 10:00 AM PST/1:00 PM EST.

Save Your Spot at Get Accepted to Columbia Business School
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Are You Growth Minded? Mastering Kellogg’s Changing Brand http://blog.accepted.com/2014/10/27/are-you-growth-minded-mastering-kelloggs-changing-brand/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/10/27/are-you-growth-minded-mastering-kelloggs-changing-brand/#respond Mon, 27 Oct 2014 16:21:24 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26262 ]]> Episode 2 in our Big Brand Theory Series for MBA applicants: Northwestern Kellogg.

Two days before Kellogg’s Dean Sally Blount announced Kellogg’s motto change from “Think Bravely” to “Inspiring Growth,” I received an email and video link in my inbox from my education hero, Sal Khan about why he will never tell his son that he is smart.

His Khan Academy disrupted the education paradigm and made me a super fan years ago when my then, 10-year-old son ran into my arms, but not for a hug…no, he wanted my computer so he could earn badges. At first I thought he was planning to play a game. I limited his computer use to 15 minutes and then watched him open up the Khan Academy site and whiz through math problems that were two grades ahead of his own (earning his badges along the way). I didn’t take the computer away until dinnertime.

His love for the Khan Academy reminded me of Dr. Carol Dweck’s research on motivation, success and the growth mindset. I had read her work a few years before my son fell in love with the Khan Academy. In her book, Mindset: The New Psychology of Success, which I highly recommend if you are applying to Kellogg, she compares and contrasts growth-oriented minds and fixed minds

The growth mindset is something to behold, and I watched it unfold over the years as my son solved my husband’s 5X5X5 Rubik’s cube, conquered my father in chess, and created “inventions” that he thought would make my life easier. I love the way his mind works. Thank you, Sal Khan and Thank you, Carol Dweck.

However, as a former admission dean and director, I often wondered when I would see Dr. Dweck’s concepts flourish in business schools. While I think several schools filter applicants for growth mindsets and challenge their students to stretch themselves, Kellogg’s new brand strategy was the first time I’ve seen Dr. Dweck’s approach become the very essence of the school.

Just as the growth mindset is dynamic and constantly seeks challenges and change, Kellogg has also reinvented itself many times over. I don’t think people will ever get over the fact that Kellogg is a marketing giant. However, since Dean Blount’s arrival, they’ve moved from “Team-Oriented” to “Think Bravely” to “Inspiring Growth” in the span of just a few years. These moves are reflected in their essay prompts, in their video essays, and in their interviews. You as an applicant need to respond to this change and address the filters Kellogg has added to its admissions process.

When working with clients applying to Kellogg, I always discuss my clients’ greatest challenges; then I push and push and push, until we discover something that they were initially afraid to reveal. If you are doing this yourself, realize that this inquiry means going deep within your psyche to figure out if you truly have a growth mindset or a fixed mindset (and I always recommend reading Dr. Dweck’s research. See link to her book above).

If at the end of our meetings my clients realize that they are not happy stretching, taking risks, and testing themselves, I ask them to rethink their school choice. Yes, Kellogg students are team-oriented; yes, Kellogg students are bright; yes, Kellogg students are personable, but Dean Blount got it right: Kellogg students are intellectually curious. They are resourceful. They challenge themselves to go beyond what they think are their limits. They have a growth mindset, and Kellogg inspires that growth.

For you the Kellogg motto means showing that you have the mindset to benefit from and contribute to Kellogg’s community dedicated to growth. As you apply to Kellogg demonstrate that you share Kellogg’s commitment to growth as an individual and as a future leader of your community and the business world.

(Look for Next Week’s Episode in the Big Brand Theory: Does Stanford Really Change the World?)

Download our free special report: Best MBA Programs - A Guide to Selecting the Right One!

Natalie Grinblatt Epstein By , an accomplished Accepted.com consultant/editor (since 2008) and entrepreneur. Natalie is a former MBA Admissions Dean and Director at Ross, Johnson, and Carey.

 

Related Resources:

Kellogg 2015 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
Leadership in Admissions

• What Does “At The Very Center of Business” Mean for CBS Applicants? 

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2016 Columbia Business School Class Profile http://blog.accepted.com/2014/10/26/2016-columbia-business-school-class-profile/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/10/26/2016-columbia-business-school-class-profile/#respond Sun, 26 Oct 2014 16:41:51 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26026 ]]> Want to learn the secret to getting into Columbia Business School?Let’s take a look at who makes up Columbia’s class of 2016 (from the CBS website)…

 • Applications received: 5799

 • Students accepted: 1056

 • Students enrolled: 743 (Aug. entry class size – 544; Jan. entry class size – 199)

 • Women: 36%

 • U.S. minorities: 32%

 • International students: 41%

 • Average GMAT score: 716

 • Middle 80% GMAT score: 680-780

 • Average undergraduate GPA: 3.5

 • Middle 80% undergraduate GPA: 3.1-3.8

 • Average work experience: 5 years

 • Middle 80% work experience: 3-7 years

 • Average age: 28

 • Middle 80% age range: 25-30

Breakdown of Undergraduate Majors:

Previous Industries:

Do you want to be counted among Columbia’s next crop of students?

Learn how to get in when you attend Accepted’s upcoming webinar, Get Accepted to Columbia Business School, on Wednesday, October 29th at 10:00 AM PT/1:00 PM EST.

Columbia_Webinar_1

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

• Columbia Business School 2015 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
• What Does “At The Very Center of Business” Mean for CBS Applicants?
Columbia Business School Zone

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Journey of Nigerian MBA ReApplicant and Future Entrepreneur http://blog.accepted.com/2014/10/24/journey-of-nigerian-b-school-reapplicant-and-future-entrepreneur/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/10/24/journey-of-nigerian-b-school-reapplicant-and-future-entrepreneur/#respond Fri, 24 Oct 2014 17:17:44 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26110 ]]> Click here for a free copy of Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One!

NaijaMBAgal

This interview is the latest in an Accepted.com blog series featuring interviews with MBA applicant bloggers, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at the MBA application process. And now…introducing our anonymous blogger, NaijaMBAgal…

Accepted: First, can you tell us a little about yourself? Where are you from? What did you study as an undergrad? What is your current job?

NaijaMBAgal: I’m a twenty-something years old Nigerian female. I have six years experience in risk assurance and one year in non-profit. I have a B.Sc in computer science and I love to dance even though I can’t sing.

Accepted: When did you first apply to b-school? 

NaijaMBAgal: I first applied to business school last year. It was a disaster and I got several dings.

Accepted: What do you think went wrong that time and what are you doing this time to improve your candidacy?

NaijaMBAgal: Everything was wrong. My GMAT score was really low and I did nothing to make up for it in the applications. Also, my applications did not show my reasons for picking each school and by the time I realized that and changed it, it was round three and most of the class was already filled. I really think the timing affected my outcome.

Before applying this year, I took the GMAT again, my new score was within the 80% range of all the schools I was targeting. Also, I’m applying earlier this time. I’ve submitted my applications in round one (hopefully, I will not have to apply in round two but I will definitely not be applying in round three). Another thing I did differently this year was to ensure that I showed why I wanted to be part of each school in my application; talking to current students really helped me achieve this goal.

Accepted: Where did you apply this time? Do you have a top choice? Are you applying to “safety schools”?

NaijaMBAgal: I applied to Booth, Sloan, Stanford and Wharton. My top choice kept on changing as I researched each school, right now it’s a tie between Stanford and Wharton but that may have something to do with submitting their applications most recently.

I did not apply to any safety school; last year, I got into my safety school but could not convince myself to attend, so this year, I applied to schools that I will love to attend when admitted.

Accepted: Do you plan on staying in your current industry post-MBA, or changing to a new field/career?

NaijaMBAgal: I know it’s a cliche but I’m tired of the consulting industry which is amusing because I find a lot of people get an MBA to get into consulting. I plan to become an entrepreneur either during or after my MBA.

Accepted: What are your thoughts on the presentation essay on Booth’s application? 

NaijaMBAgal: I love Booth’s presentation essay. I think it was my favorite part of the applications. For me, anything is better than writing an essay but the fact that it was a presentation made it more interesting, I should probably mention that I make a lot of presentations so I am very comfortable with the medium. I think the presentation is the best reflection of Booth’s culture, giving applicants that flexibility with a main essay is phenomenal.

Accepted: How do you think being from Africa affects your candidacy?

NaijaMBAgal: It’s like a double edged sword. On one hand I think it amplifies my profile, gives me an edge and reduces the applicant pool that my application sits in. On the flip side, there is a smaller percentage of the class available for us regardless of how many good applicants there are within that pool. Since both sides nil-off, I don’t think it helps or hurts my application – except if there are a lot of less qualified applicants in the pool then it’s good for me.

Accepted: Can you tell us about your blog? What have you gained from the experience? What do you hope others will learn?

NaijaMBAgal: When I started my blog, it was not supposed to be an application blog but a b-school experience blog but it had to transform with my plans. One of the best things that has happened since I started blogging is that I have become a part of this amazing group of people composed of fellow applicants (including bloggers) and current students. I have had people give me advice, books and templates which I try to share on my blog so that people that read my blog can use that information in their own application. I hope others can leverage on my experience to make their own admission process smoother.

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages.

You can read more about NaijaMBAgal’s b-school journey by checking out his blog, Naija MBA Gal. Thank you for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

Download our free special report: Best MBA Programs

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

Get Accepted to Top B-Schools with Low Stats
• Rejected MBA’s: Now What?
MBA Applicant Blogger Interviews

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Application Volume Increases at MBA Programs http://blog.accepted.com/2014/10/24/application-volume-increases-at-mba-programs/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/10/24/application-volume-increases-at-mba-programs/#respond Fri, 24 Oct 2014 16:37:35 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26178 ]]> Looking for MBA admissions advice?

65% of programs reported an increase in foreign applicants.

Here are some highlights from GMAC’s recent Application Trends Survey:

 • For the third year in a row, application volume increased for full-time two-year MBA programs. This year, 61% of programs reported application growth, up from 50% in 2013.

 • Application volume also increased for professional MBA programs (part-time, online, EMBA, and flexible), as well as Master in Marketing and Communications, Master of Accounting, Master in Information technology, and Master in Management programs.

 • Other specialized business master programs saw decreases in application volume. Master of Finance programs saw a decrease in application volume for the third year in a row.

 • 65% of U.S. full-time two-year MBA programs reported an increase in applications from foreign applicants. Master in Finance programs received the largest number of foreign applications at 82%. This is compared to the 52% of foreign applicants who applied to full-time two-year MBA programs.

For more details, see the GMAC press release.

Download your free copy of Navigating the MBA Maze!

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

• 2014 Economist MBA Rankings
• Masters in Finance: What You Need to Know
MBA Admissions 101

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Bruce DelMonico on The Yale School of Management http://blog.accepted.com/2014/10/23/bruce-delmonico-on-the-yale-school-of-management/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/10/23/bruce-delmonico-on-the-yale-school-of-management/#respond Thu, 23 Oct 2014 17:15:51 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26245 ]]> Click here to hear the full conversation with Bruce DelMonico. If your goal is a spot in the Yale School of Management, what could be better than an inside look into its MBA  program and admissions office?

Listen to the recording of our conversation with Bruce DelMonico, Assistant Dean and Director of Admissions at Yale SOM, for an overview of the MBA program and insight into what the adcom is looking for.

00:01:04 – Linda answers one of the most common b-school admissions questions.

00:05:00 – Overview of the 2 year MBA at Yale SOM.

00:08:34 – Networks with Yale and the Global Network Model.

00:17:18 – What role does leadership play in determining a candidate’s admissibility.

00:22:20 – The Silver Scholars Program (sorry Linda, you don’t qualify).

00:31:16 – The video essay: Why Yale wants it, what they are looking for, how it works, & tips for staying calm.

00:44:50 – Why Yale accepts the GRE.

00:48:52 – How the SOM adcom stays “collectively on their game” even as the hour gets late.

Listen to the full conversation to learn more!*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Related Links:

Yale School of Management 
• 
Silver Scholars Program 
• Yale SOM 2015 MBA Essay Tips 
• Tips for Video MBA Essay Questions

Related Shows:

• The Tuck School of Business and the Global Insight Requirement
• Honing in On the Cornell Johnson MBA
• The Georgetown McDonough MBA: Everything You Need to Know

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http://blog.accepted.com/2014/10/23/bruce-delmonico-on-the-yale-school-of-management/feed/ 0 podcast,Yale SOM If your goal is a spot in the Yale School of Management, what could be better than an inside look into its MBA  program and admissions office? - Listen to the recording of our conversation with Bruce DelMonico, If your goal is a spot in the Yale School of Management, what could be better than an inside look into its MBA  program and admissions office? Listen to the recording of our conversation with Bruce DelMonico, Assistant Dean and Director of Admissions at Yale SOM, for an overview of the MBA program and insight into what the adcom is looking for. 00:01:04 – Linda answers one of the most common b-school admissions questions. 00:05:00 – Overview of the 2 year MBA at Yale SOM. 00:08:34 – Networks with Yale and the Global Network Model. 00:17:18 – What role does leadership play in determining a candidate’s admissibility. 00:22:20 – The Silver Scholars Program (sorry Linda, you don’t qualify). 00:31:16 – The video essay: Why Yale wants it, what they are looking for, how it works, & tips for staying calm. 00:44:50 – Why Yale accepts the GRE. 00:48:52 – How the SOM adcom stays “collectively on their game” even as the hour gets late. *Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com. Related Links: • Yale School of Management  • Silver Scholars Program  • Yale SOM 2015 MBA Essay Tips  • Tips for Video MBA Essay Questions Related Shows: • The Tuck School of Business and the Global Insight Requirement • Honing in On the Cornell Johnson MBA • The Georgetown McDonough MBA: Everything You Need to Know Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk:   Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no 54:25
2014 Economist MBA Rankings http://blog.accepted.com/2014/10/23/2014-economist-mba-rankings/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/10/23/2014-economist-mba-rankings/#respond Thu, 23 Oct 2014 16:21:07 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26236 ]]> 2014 Economist Full-Time Global MBA Rankings:Download your free copy of MBA Rankings: What You Need to Know

1. Chicago Booth (U.S.)

2. Dartmouth Tuck (U.S.)

3. UVA Darden (U.S.)

4. HEC Paris (France)

5. IESE Business School (Spain)

6. Harvard Business School (U.S.)

7. UC Berkeley Haas (U.S.)

8. NYU Stern (U.S.)

9. Stanford GSB (U.S.)

10. Columbia Business School (U.S.)

11. UPenn Wharton (U.S.)

12. MIT Sloan (U.S.)

13. UCLA Anderson (U.S.)

14. Northwestern Kellogg (U.S.)

15. London Business School (U.K.)

16. University of Queensland Business School (Australia)

17. Emory Goizueta (U.S.)

18. INSEAD (France)

19. Yale SOM (U.S.)

20. Michigan Ross (U.S.)

Top 10 B-Schools with the Highest GMAT Scores:

table

Top 10 MBA Programs for “Potential to Network”:

1. HEC Paris (France)

2. Vlerick Leuven Gent Management School (Belgium)

3. Thunderbird School for Global Management (U.S.)

4. NYU Stern (U.S.)

5. UC Berkeley Haas (U.S.)

6. Notre Dame Mendoza (U.S.)

7. Warwick Business School (U.K.)

8. USC Marshall (U.S.)

9. Melbourne Business School (Australia)

10. UVA Darden (U.S.)

A Poets & Quants article on the rankings states that at least 17 business schools declined to participate in this year’s rankings, many claiming that The Economist’s methodology is faulty. Some of these schools include Babson Olin, Toronto Rotman, Sauder School (British Columbia), Minnesota Carlson, McGill Desautels, Purdue Krannert, and, University of Manchester (U.K.), Imperial College Business School (U.K.), University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Regarding methodology, 80% of the data used for the rankings is derived from surveys provided by the schools themselves. The remaining 20% of information comes from current students and recent grads.

John Byrne notes that since The Economist rankings launched in 2002, Harvard, Stanford, and Wharton have never topped the charts. This year, the schools rank at 6th, 9th, and 11th place, respectively. In 2005, Harvard and Wharton weren’t included in the rankings as they declined to contribute data. (That year, those two programs also declined to participate with the Businessweek rankings.)

Matt Symonds, who wrote a critique of the rankings, “Leave no MBA ranking unquestioned,” provides these additional points:

• Booth took the #1 spot for the third year in a row, and the fifth time in the last eight years.

• There are only six European schools in the top 25; in 2008, there were 11. This year, Cambridge Judge and Oxford Saïd both dropped 15 places, to 52nd and 69th place respectively.

• The breakdown of the criteria used to rank the schools goes as follows: personal development/education experience (35%), open new career opportunities (35%), increase salary (20%), and potential to network (10%).

• This year, more than 20 schools rose or fell by double-digits (and thus the rankings have been criticized for their volatility).

• Big droppers include University of Bath School of Management which fell 23 spots from its previous 20th place; York Schulich fell to 41st place from 22nd last year.

• Big jumpers include Kellogg and Yale which both jumped 9 places up to 14th and 19th place respectively; Rochester Simon and Temple Fox both jumped 20 places to 58th and 57th place respectively.

Are You Misusing the B-School Rankings?

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

• MBA Rankings: Why Should I Care?
MBA Rankings: What You Need to Know
• Top 10 B-Schools with the Most Satisfied Graduates

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Introducing NEW Consulting CEO Rankings http://blog.accepted.com/2014/10/22/introducing-new-consulting-ceo-rankings/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/10/22/introducing-new-consulting-ceo-rankings/#respond Wed, 22 Oct 2014 16:54:45 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26115 ]]> FirmsconsultingCEORankingsFirmsconsulting just released new rankings that compare the performance of CEOs from six top consulting firms, McKinsey & Co., BCG, Bain & Co., Deloitte S&O, PwC Strategy& and Roland Berger. Each Sunday, the rankings will be republished based on new performance findings.

Here are some points to keep in mind:

1. How a CEO fares does not correlate to the prestige of the firm.

2. Feedback is collected directly from firm partners.

3. The real-time ranking updates allow Firmsconsulting to track weekly changes. For consulting firms, a yearly ranking would simply be outdated by the time it was published, taking into account data from a bygone era.

4. Based on a CEO’s past performance, Firmsconsulting believes one can infer from these ranking the likely future performance of a CEO.

You can view the real-time rankings and check out CEO profiles here.

Accepted.com: Helping You Write Your Best

Related Resources:

• How to Become a Management Consultant
• Consulting at Top MBA Programs
• MBA In Sight: Focus on Management Consulting

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GMAT Grammar Time: The Complete Consort Dancing Together http://blog.accepted.com/2014/10/22/gmat-grammar-time-the-complete-consort-dancing-together/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/10/22/gmat-grammar-time-the-complete-consort-dancing-together/#respond Wed, 22 Oct 2014 16:14:57 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26107 ]]> Need more GMAT tips?

The good news: This is a “dance” you can learn!

The GMAT Verbal section overall tends to focus less on individual words and more on the meanings of whole sentences.  When comparing the GRE vs the GMAT, vocabulary is essential on the GRE, but students need worry considerably less about vocabulary on the GMAT.  If GRE Verbal tests words, GMAT Verbal tests sentences.

The GMAT Sentence Correction expects you to recognize well-constructed sentences.  What is a well-constructed sentence?  The title, a line from the fourth of the Four Quartets by TS Eliot, gives Eliot’s rather fanciful description of a well-constructed sentence.  Let’s be a little more practical.

Of course, good grammar is essential.  The GMAT will expect you to have subjects and verbs agree, to use correct tenses, and to recognize the difference of that vs. which.  Every nugget of grammar has to be correct, but that’s just the start.

By way of analogy, part of a city planner’s job is to make sure every traffic light in a city is working, but getting each individual light working is only part of the challenge.  An effective city planner has to think about “higher level” issues — timing of the lights, patterns of congestions, etc.  How does the whole picture of city traffic, the “complete consort,” fit together?

Similarly, the GMAT expects you to analyze sentences not just at the level of grammar but at the higher levels of syntax and meaning.  Parallelism is a perfect example.  It’s hard to define parallelism precisely because it higher level — we can put individual words in parallel (noun, verbs, adjectives, etc.) or, as is much more typical for the GMAT, we can put entire phrases and clauses in parallel.  If we have structure such as “not only [phrase #1] but also [phrase #2]”, it’s not enough that each individual phrase be free of grammar mistakes —- the two phrases must “match” (e.g. both participial phrases, or both infinitive phrases).  Parallelism is about whether different parts are “dancing together.”

A very different issue of words “dancing together” concerns idioms. How important are idioms for GMAT Sentence Correction?  Very!  Here, we mean idioms in the sense of which words “belong” with each other.  For example, we would say “an ability to do X”, not “an ability for doing X” or “an ability in doing X.”

Higher level issues extend to logical problems, such as misplaced modifiers or pronouns with unclear antecedent.  Finally, the sentence overall must be work rhetorically — it must be unambiguous yet succinct, overall making a direct and powerful statement.  That, indeed, is the “complete consort dancing together”!

Part of achieving a good score on the GMAT entails mastering this hierarchy of sentence-construction skills.  How you learn this stuff?  It’s important to find a tried and true GMAT study schedule, and to avail yourself of the best GMAT material.

It’s important to read high-brow material, such as the Economist magazine.  With good materials and practice, this is a “dance” you can learn!

MBA 5 Fatal Flaws

MagooshThis post was written by Mike McGarry, resident GMAT expert at Magoosh, a leader in GMAT prep. For more advice on taking the GMAT, check out Magoosh’s GMAT blog.

Related Resources:

• That GMAT Score: Implications for Your MBA Application, free webinar
• The GMAT Score Preview and Application Boxes
• GMAT vs. GRE: Harvard Business School Weighs In

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Columbia Applicants – Have You Registered? http://blog.accepted.com/2014/10/21/columbia-applicants-have-you-registered/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/10/21/columbia-applicants-have-you-registered/#respond Tue, 21 Oct 2014 17:08:07 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26197 ]]> Register for our live webinar: Get Accepted to Columbia Business School!

Hey future Columbia students, have you signed up for our upcoming webinar, Get Accepted to Columbia Business School?

During the webinar, Linda Abraham, Accepted’s CEO & Founder, will explain the do’s and don’ts of applying to CBS.

This is important stuff folks – you don’t want to miss it!

It’s not too late (though it will be soon), so grab your seat by registering now!

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What Does “At The Very Center of Business” Mean for CBS Applicants? http://blog.accepted.com/2014/10/20/what-does-at-the-very-center-of-business-mean-for-cbs-applicants/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/10/20/what-does-at-the-very-center-of-business-mean-for-cbs-applicants/#respond Mon, 20 Oct 2014 16:34:52 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=25936 ]]> Want to learn the secret to getting accepted to Columbia Business School?Episode 1 in our Big Brand Theory Series for MBA applicants: Columbia Business School’s motto.

Columbia Business School Essay 2 asks you to watch a short video entitled, “The Center” and then use it to answer the question, “How will you take advantage of being ‘at the very center of business’?” The video and the essay question are Columbia’s attempts to regain its brand and market share.

Over the years, Columbia strayed from its core strength: its geographic location and the access that the school offers its students. As a reaction to New York’s financial industry shrinkage and then, a drop in applications, they began pitching teams, clusters, and close-knit communities. I’m sorry, but those words do not even begin to describe Columbia.

CBS is just like New York: historical, large, gritty, and filled with surprises. It doesn’t coddle its students, and its students don’t expect to be coddled. They are smart, resourceful, and assertive.

So what does it mean to be at the very center of business? Well, you have the usual suspects: access to corporate world headquarters, brown bags with executives, subway rides to everything. But I ask you, where else can you have an accidental meeting at a cultural event with the Morgan Stanley’s CEO, James Gorman, or award winning entertainer and entrepreneur Dr. Dre?

Columbia wants its students to embrace New York and at the same time not allow the abundance of everything to intimidate them.  Years ago, I watched a Columbia Business School PowerPoint presentation. The closing slide displayed a world map. The Columbia campus was superimposed on a big red apple that spread over half the Atlantic Ocean and an arrow pointing to the apple as the “Center of the World.” I keep that image in my mind as I offer my Accepted.com clients my best rendition of the song, New York, New York, “if you can make it there, you can make it anywhere” (High kicks and all. Fortunately they can’t see me when I do it)

As a former admissions dean and director, I would expect to see an answer to that essay that would enable me to identify (and admit) people who thrive in the hustle bustle of New York.  I would want my applicants to capture the energy of the city that never sleeps. At the same time, I would filter out students who would be intimidated by New York. I would want my students to love their NYC experience: rats, roaches and all.

And now I need an Accepted.com consultant to help me edit this blog down to 250 words or less.

(Look for next week’s episode of the Big Brand Theory: Kellogg – Are you Growth Minded?)

Discover the Secret to Acceptance at Columbia Business School! Click here to register for the free webinar!

Natalie Grinblatt Epstein By , who when she’s not listening to old Frank Sinatra songs about New York, consults with Accepted.com clients and reminisces about her Admission Director days.

 

Related Resources:

• Columbia Business School 2015 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
How to Get Accepted to Columbia Business School
• Columbia Business School Hosts AIGAC!

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2 Reasons Why You Love Columbia that You SHOULDN’T Share in Your App (and 2 that You SHOULD) http://blog.accepted.com/2014/10/15/2-reasons-why-you-love-columbia-that-you-shouldnt-share-in-your-app-and-2-that-you-should/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/10/15/2-reasons-why-you-love-columbia-that-you-shouldnt-share-in-your-app-and-2-that-you-should/#respond Wed, 15 Oct 2014 17:29:45 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=26134 ]]> Register for our live webinar: Get Accepted to Columbia Business School!

Let’s face it, even if Columbia weren’t smack in the middle of NYC, it would still be an amazing business school, so you need to make sure that when you explain why CBS is the school of you, you don’t focus exclusively on the city, but include attractive aspects of the school itself.

2 Reasons You Should Keep to Yourself:

1. You love the underground world of tunnels and subways.

2. Sony Theater has the world’s longest free-standing escalator, and it’s only 11 minutes from CBS.

2 Reasons You Could Share:

1. You’re excited about the access and opportunities Columbia provides because it is at the center of an international business hub. And you can give specific examples of how you intend to take advantage of that accessibility.

2. You love the cultural richness that Columbia pulls from its central location in NYC – from Nobel Prize winning professors to unique consulting projects to clubs relating to the arts.

Listen, the fact that Columbia is in NYC is a perk – a huge perk – but remember, you’re applying to the school, not to the city!

Want more tips about how to apply successfully to Columbia Business School? Register for our upcoming webinar, Get Accepted to Columbia Business School, which will air live on Wednesday, October 29, 2014 at 10:00 AM PST/1:00 PM EST. Spaces are limited – grab yours now!

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