Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog » College Admissions http://blog.accepted.com Admissions consulting and application advice Fri, 18 Apr 2014 14:50:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.8.3 Admissions consulting and application advice Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no Admissions consulting and application advice Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog » College Admissions http://blog.accepted.com/wp-content/plugins/powerpress/rss_default.jpg http://blog.accepted.com/category/college-admissions/ Tuck Announces New December Business Bridge Program http://blog.accepted.com/2014/04/14/tuck-announces-new-december-business-bridge-program/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/04/14/tuck-announces-new-december-business-bridge-program/#comments Mon, 14 Apr 2014 14:55:12 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=22108 ]]> Check out our Dartmouth Tuck b-school zone!

Tuck Hall at Dartmouth

Tuck Announces New December Business Bridge Program Liberal arts undergrads have been attending the Tuck’s summer Business Bridge program for the last 18 years. Now the Tuck Business Bridge program will be adding a December option for students, starting December 2014.

This new session will be open to any undergraduate or graduate student, but it is designed for Dartmouth undergrads and will run December 1-19 and will cover (for the most part) the same topics covered during the four-week summer program (and will therefore be more intensive due to the shorter period of time). The program will introduce students to important business and managerial subjects (corporate finance, managerial economics, financial accounting, marketing, etc.), and will feature team projects, industry explorations, and career coaching.

4,000 undergrads have attended Bridge since its inception in 1997. About 30% of alumni have gone on to attend top b-schools.

Application deadlines for December Bridge are June 1, August 1, and October 1. There will be financial aid available for the December program.

Learn more about the program here.

Learn how to use sample essays to create an exemplary essay of your own! Click here to download our free report!

Accepted.com

Tags: ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2014/04/14/tuck-announces-new-december-business-bridge-program/feed/ 1
College Planning: May is for Making Your Case http://blog.accepted.com/2014/04/14/college-planning-may-is-for-making-your-case-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/04/14/college-planning-may-is-for-making-your-case-2/#respond Mon, 14 Apr 2014 14:18:28 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=22023 ]]> Start your college applications off right by downloading our free special report!

The keys are incorporating your challenges into your college search.

Are you a high school junior planning to apply to top colleges and universities next year? This post is part of a series of posts that will help you prepare for next year’s application process. 

Oh, and if you don’t want to wait for the monthly posts, please download Preparing for College in High School: A To-Do List for Eleventh Graders. It’s all there.

Your high school path suddenly takes a detour. Your grades, which had been steady and consistent, take a nosedive. Perhaps it’s due to illness, personal or family issues, or a learning disability that eventually made itself clear. As you move forward into the summer before your senior year, it is time to consider whether or not this impacts the colleges you plan on applying to.

For most students, the answer is yes. Sometimes, the circumstances change your mind about how far you would like to be from home. In other cases, illness or other family issues have a financial impact that necessitates finding financial safety schools, or looking first to a nearby community college for a period of time. If your challenges impacted your GPA or course selection, then that also may impact the schools you choose to apply to.

Yes, you will have opportunities to explain your circumstances, and many times, you will be met with  a sympathetic reader on the other side of your application. Sympathy, however, does not guarantee  admission. Be prepared to discuss your situation. You can do this through your essay, an additional  statement, your guidance counselor recommendation, or, in some cases, a personal interview on campus with an admission counselor. In most situations, the admissions staff will be evaluating your response to the challenge. Did you overcome adversity? What did you learn from the situation? Is the college going to be able to meet any future needs you might have?

In most cases, it is to your benefit to discuss any aberrations or weaknesses in your academic  performance. The keys are incorporating your challenges into your college search and then finding the  appropriate avenue to explain your record.

Download Free: Preparing for College in High School: A To-Do List for Eleventh Graders

Accepted.com

Tags: ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2014/04/14/college-planning-may-is-for-making-your-case-2/feed/ 0
How Does the Essay Affect Your SAT Score? http://blog.accepted.com/2014/04/10/how-does-the-essay-affect-your-sat-score/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/04/10/how-does-the-essay-affect-your-sat-score/#respond Thu, 10 Apr 2014 14:47:32 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=22043 ]]> Download Free: Preparing for College in High School: A To-Do List for Eleventh Graders

Love it or hate it, your essay will influence your SAT score.

Although the SAT essay is going to be optional before long (when the test changes in 2016), as of right now it’s a must. So, love it or hate it, your essay will influence your SAT score, and the admissions offices at the colleges you’ll apply to will see that score. So let’s answer one key question: how much does the SAT essay actually count for?

The Numbers

First, the essay is scored according to its own grading system. There will be two readers—real people, not a Scantron machine!—who read and judge your writing, each assigning a mark of zero to six. Zero is the worst (in case that wasn’t totally obvious), but it’s only used for the absolutely ungradable essays. If you write on a completely different topic than what’s assigned, for example, you will get a zero. That means no memorizing a fantastic essay ahead of time! You have to write on the topic they give you. You’d also get a zero if you wrote in another language, say, or simply put no clear thoughts on paper.

A six, on the other hand, is reserved for long, structured essays that are full of clear, concrete ideas, high-level vocabulary, and correct grammar. There’s a bit more to it, but that’s the gist.

After each reader goes through and marks your essay, the two scores will be added to give you a score of 0–12 (if you actually wrote anything remotely relevant, that’s 2–12).

Then that score, in turn, is added to the raw score from the Writing multiple-choice questions, since the essay is just a part of the Writing Section. The multiple-choice sections count for more points, altogether.

Then, once they have the raw total of your essay score and your multiple-choice score added up, they convert that score into the scaled, 200–800 score.

The Importance of the Essay

The scaled score is a little bit hard to explain—how it’s calculated, I mean—and it’s not worth really getting stuck talking about. All that matters is the zero to twelve score ends up affecting how many hundreds are in that scaled score. And I did say that the multiple-choice counts for more than the essay, but that doesn’t mean the essay isn’t important.

In truth, the SAT essay score counts for around 30% your total writing score—in the ballpark of 200 points, altogether. It’s not the only thing, but it’s a significant piece of the puzzle.

And what about those who say the essay doesn’t matter? Simply put, they’re usually wrong. Most schools were really skeptical of the Writing Section when this version of the SAT first debuted it back in 2005. And sure, some are still not totally signed on, but for the most part it does factor into your admissions. And 99% of the time, you’ll have no idea how much that lady who works in the admissions office cares about your Writing score—you’ll just have to trust that a high score is better than a low one.

And for that high score, you need to put some energy into preparing to write your essay!

Download Free: Preparing for College in High School: A To-Do List for Eleventh Graders

Magoosh SAT This post was written by Lucas Fink, resident SAT expert at Magoosh. For more advice on SAT prep, check out Magoosh’s SAT blog.

Tags: , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2014/04/10/how-does-the-essay-affect-your-sat-score/feed/ 0
Can I Use Humor In My Application Essays? http://blog.accepted.com/2014/04/08/can-i-use-humor-in-my-application-essays/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/04/08/can-i-use-humor-in-my-application-essays/#respond Tue, 08 Apr 2014 14:15:32 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=22027 ]]> Want to let your funny side show in your application essays? Here is what Linda Abraham has to say about humor in admissions:

For more application essay advice, download a free copy of our popular special report Five Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Personal Statement.

Accepted.com

Tags: , , , , , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2014/04/08/can-i-use-humor-in-my-application-essays/feed/ 0
Get a GRIP on Team Questions http://blog.accepted.com/2014/04/06/get-a-grip-on-team-questions/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/04/06/get-a-grip-on-team-questions/#respond Sun, 06 Apr 2014 14:39:52 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=21917 ]]> Learn 4 tips for displaying teamwork in your application essays.

Remember that a tight GRIP = a tight team

I took away a lot of wonderful concepts, frameworks and strategies from my MBA education that led to a successful admission career. In fact, one of the most powerful lessons I learned at Michigan (now Ross) was how to lead and work effectively on teams.

Professor Noel Tichy, one of the gurus of Organizational Behavior and Leadership offered us a simple acronym that has stuck with me to this day: GRIP.  His theory was as follows:  if everyone on the team works toward a common goal that each individual fully understands and to which he/she commits; and everyone on the team understands and has the skills to carry out his/her roles and responsibilities; and everyone on the team shares information in a way that is productive; and the team has agreed to a process by which they will accomplish the goal, then the team will be effective.  In fact, our teams would periodically do a GRIP check to make certain that our GOALS, ROLES, INFORMATION and PROCESS would align to keep the projects moving forward.  When a team has only one GRIP element out of place, the team will be dysfunctional.

I use this framework with my clients when they need to describe their own teams’ successes or failures.  It helps them pinpoint what really happened to the team and not point fingers at an individual that may not have carried or had the skills to carry his/her weight because the “R” was out of alignment.  It helps them understand that by not having a process “P” in place, misunderstandings may occur.  It helps them understand the importance of working towards a common goal.  And it helps them understand the importance of transparent and effective communication “I”.

So when you are asked about teamwork, remember that a tight GRIP = a tight team and I will remember to thank Dr. Tichy for his wisdom and insight and for telling me to get a GRIP on my team.  Thank you Dr. Tichy.

Download our special report- Leadership in Admissions

Natalie Grinblatt Epstein By , an accomplished Accepted.com consultant/editor (since 2008) and entrepreneur. Natalie is a former MBA Admissions Dean and Director at Ross, Johnson, and Carey.

Tags: , , , , , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2014/04/06/get-a-grip-on-team-questions/feed/ 0
GMAT, GRE, SAT, and All Things Test Prep http://blog.accepted.com/2014/04/03/gmat-gre-sat-and-all-things-test-prep/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/04/03/gmat-gre-sat-and-all-things-test-prep/#respond Thu, 03 Apr 2014 14:39:11 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=21977 ]]> Bhavin-1-closeup-500x500GMAT, GRE, SAT… If one of these tests graces your future, tune in to our interview with Bhavin Parikh, CEO and founder of Magoosh, the leading online test prep company.

Listen to the recording of our conversation with Bhavin for great test prep advice and the lowdown on Magoosh.

00:02:17 – The story behind Magoosh and a word about it’s future.

00:04:10 – Why Bhavin is on a “mission to change the way people learn.”

00:06:09 – More effective than traditional test-prep: How do you know?

00:07:44 – What makes Magoosh different.

00:11:39 – The risks of self-study (Magoosh is like a gym membership).

00:14:24 – Best GMAT (and GRE) prep tips.

00:18:29 – The million dollar question: GMAT or GRE?

00:22:15 – SAT changes ahead.

00:25:43 – The Hansoo Lee Fellowship for Haas entrepreneurs.

00:27:58 – Bhavin’s stand on the debate about the value of the MBA to entrepreneurs.

00:30:18 – Last pieces of advice for applicants.

Listen to the full conversation to learn more!

Admissions Straight Talk Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes so you don’t miss a single episode! *Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Relevant Links:

•  Magoosh
•  Should You Retake the GMAT?
•  How to Put Your Best Foot Forward on Test Day 
•  The Hansoo Lee Fellowship
•  7 Steps to a Successful MBA Application

Related Shows:

•  Interview with Chris Ryan of Manhattan GMAT
•  Linda Abraham on Overcoming Weaknesses
•  MBA Admissions According to an Expert
•  CommonBond’s Story: A Revolution in Student Loans

Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk:

Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes!     Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in Stitcher!

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2014/04/03/gmat-gre-sat-and-all-things-test-prep/feed/ 0 GMAT,GRE,Magoosh,SAT,UC Berkeley Haas GMAT, GRE, SAT… If one of these tests graces your future, tune in to our interview with Bhavin Parikh, CEO and founder of Magoosh, the leading online test prep company. - Listen to the recording of our conversation with Bhavin for great test prep ad... GMAT, GRE, SAT… If one of these tests graces your future, tune in to our interview with Bhavin Parikh, CEO and founder of Magoosh, the leading online test prep company. Listen to the recording of our conversation with Bhavin for great test prep advice and the lowdown on Magoosh. 00:02:17 – The story behind Magoosh and a word about it’s future. 00:04:10 – Why Bhavin is on a “mission to change the way people learn.” 00:06:09 – More effective than traditional test-prep: How do you know? 00:07:44 – What makes Magoosh different. 00:11:39 – The risks of self-study (Magoosh is like a gym membership). 00:14:24 – Best GMAT (and GRE) prep tips. 00:18:29 – The million dollar question: GMAT or GRE? 00:22:15 – SAT changes ahead. 00:25:43 – The Hansoo Lee Fellowship for Haas entrepreneurs. 00:27:58 – Bhavin’s stand on the debate about the value of the MBA to entrepreneurs. 00:30:18 – Last pieces of advice for applicants.  Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes so you don’t miss a single episode! *Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com. Relevant Links: •  Magoosh •  Should You Retake the GMAT? •  How to Put Your Best Foot Forward on Test Day  •  The Hansoo Lee Fellowship •  7 Steps to a Successful MBA Application Related Shows: •  Interview with Chris Ryan of Manhattan GMAT •  Linda Abraham on Overcoming Weaknesses •  MBA Admissions According to an Expert •  CommonBond’s Story: A Revolution in Student Loans Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk:       Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no 32:24
5 Million to Share: The 43North Competition http://blog.accepted.com/2014/03/20/5-million-to-share-the-43north-competition/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/03/20/5-million-to-share-the-43north-competition/#respond Thu, 20 Mar 2014 17:48:23 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=21705 ]]> Want to know more? Listen to the full episode!Do you have a great business idea but need 1 million dollars to get yourself started? Meet Peter Burakowski, Senior Marketing Manager at 43North.

Listen to the recording of our fascinating conversation with Peter to find out why 43North is going to give away $5 million dollars to eleven promising entrepreneurs and what you need to do if you want to be one of the winners.

00:01:43 – About 43North (and why you really want to win).

00:10:06 – Who can apply.

00:11:21 – Why retail and hospitality are excluded.

00:12:25 – The 43North application process.

00:14:30 – What are the judges looking for?

00:16:33 – Setting up shop in Buffalo.

00: 21:49 – How many applicants are vying for the gold?

00:23:37 – About the judges. (Will you be one of them?)

00:27:32 – Mentorship and community.

00:31:03 – A lot more than a t-shirt: what happens to the semi-finalists.

Listen to the full conversation to learn more!

Admissions Straight Talk Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes so you don’t miss a single episode! *Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Relevant Links:

•  43North
•  Which Universities Contribute the Most to VC-Backed Entrepreneurship?
•  MBA Admissions Special Reports
•  Grad School Admissions Special Reports
•  Med School Admissions Special Reports
•  Law School Admissions Special Reports

Related Shows:

•  MBAs Across America: The Coolest HBS Internship
•  Which Schools are Good for PE/VC and VC-Backed Entrepreneurship
•  Business, Law and Beyond: An Interview with John Engelman
•  Dr. Douglas Stayman Shares the Scoop on Cornell Tech NYC
•  Jeff Reid on Entrepreneurship
•  CommonBond’s Story: A Revolution in Student Loans

Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk:

Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes!     Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in Stitcher!

Tags: , , , , , , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2014/03/20/5-million-to-share-the-43north-competition/feed/ 0 entrepreneurship,podcast Do you have a great business idea but need 1 million dollars to get yourself started? Meet Peter Burakowski, Senior Marketing Manager at 43North. - Listen to the recording of our fascinating conversation with Peter to find out why 43North is going to ... Do you have a great business idea but need 1 million dollars to get yourself started? Meet Peter Burakowski, Senior Marketing Manager at 43North. Listen to the recording of our fascinating conversation with Peter to find out why 43North is going to give away $5 million dollars to eleven promising entrepreneurs and what you need to do if you want to be one of the winners. 00:01:43 – About 43North (and why you really want to win). 00:10:06 – Who can apply. 00:11:21 – Why retail and hospitality are excluded. 00:12:25 – The 43North application process. 00:14:30 – What are the judges looking for? 00:16:33 – Setting up shop in Buffalo. 00: 21:49 – How many applicants are vying for the gold? 00:23:37 – About the judges. (Will you be one of them?) 00:27:32 – Mentorship and community. 00:31:03 – A lot more than a t-shirt: what happens to the semi-finalists.  Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes so you don’t miss a single episode! *Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com. Relevant Links: •  43North •  Which Universities Contribute the Most to VC-Backed Entrepreneurship? •  MBA Admissions Special Reports •  Grad School Admissions Special Reports •  Med School Admissions Special Reports •  Law School Admissions Special Reports Related Shows: •  MBAs Across America: The Coolest HBS Internship •  Which Schools are Good for PE/VC and VC-Backed Entrepreneurship •  Business, Law and Beyond: An Interview with John Engelman •  Dr. Douglas Stayman Shares the Scoop on Cornell Tech NYC •  Jeff Reid on Entrepreneurship •  CommonBond’s Story: A Revolution in Student Loans Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk:       Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no 35:53
The Likely Letter http://blog.accepted.com/2014/03/20/the-likely-letter/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/03/20/the-likely-letter/#respond Thu, 20 Mar 2014 15:40:13 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=21689 ]]> Check out Linda Abraham's 6 Tips for Waitlisted Applicants

April 1st is only a few weeks away.

I shared lunch today with a group of mothers of high school seniors.  Some of the students had applied and been accepted early decision; most had at least one acceptance from an early action or rolling admission college.  Their parents were anxiously waiting for the April 1st decision date.

The April first date used to loom large, like tax day, or your birthday, circled in red for all the significance it implied.  Were decision letters mailed on April first, or would you receive it on April first?  Then, like in other aspects of college admission, the arms race started.  “If only we could get our letters out a few days ahead of the others, our admitted students might be more inclined to matriculate,” one admissions office thought.  I don’t doubt their psychology.

Decisions began to trickle in during that last week of March.  A few even hit the email inbox in early March.  But for a few students, the surprise comes in the dead of winter: the likely letter.  The likely letter has its roots in the Ivy League; it was a tool used by Ivy League athletic programs to maintain interest in the absence of athletic scholarship. Currently, a number of colleges use some form of this letter to try and attract SOME of their most promising applicants.

Some “likely letters” are obvious indicators of admission; others are more veiled.  Colleges handpick these students carefully, and receipt of such a letter should imply forthcoming admission. Is it a guarantee of admission?  No, although a change in status would be unlikely without disastrous grades or disciplinary action in your current school.  Should you expect a likely letter?  No.  Some colleges send out only a handful.  The timing varies, and there is always a chance that your application hasn’t even made it through the reader queue yet. If you do receive one, yes, it’s good news.  If your neighbor, lab partner, or best friend receives one, it doesn’t mean that you won’t be admitted to the college of your choice.

Regardless, April 1st is only a few weeks away.  Your wait time is limited.  Hang in there.

Accepted.com

Tags:
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2014/03/20/the-likely-letter/feed/ 0
Can You Get Accepted After Doing Something Stupid? http://blog.accepted.com/2014/03/16/can-you-get-accepted-after-doing-something-stupid/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/03/16/can-you-get-accepted-after-doing-something-stupid/#comments Sun, 16 Mar 2014 14:50:02 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=21603 ]]> Check out our MBA Admissions 101 Pages!

Don’t try to hide a conviction.

The point of this article is not to tell you that you shouldn’t engage in disorderly conduct, petty theft, or other minor (or major) infractions (though you really shouldn’t…); what we want to discuss here is how you should overcome the obstacle of a criminal record when approached with the application question: “Have you ever been convicted of a crime? If yes, please explain.”

If you did something stupid, something deserving of a conviction or suspension, how do you prove to an admissions committee that you are worthy of their acceptance?

First, don’t try to hide a conviction. Clients often ask me if they really need to bring up their troubled past, and I tell them they do. Admissions committees (and the firms they hire) conduct background checks on applicants, and an unexplained discrepancy gives them an easy reason to reject your application or withdraw an offer of admission, so, when asked, own up to your behavior on your application.

Don’t make excuses. The biggest struggle I face when helping troubled clients is getting them to move past their tendency to justify their behavior: their writing tends to get overlong with explanations. Even very subtle self-serving statements can be read by an admissions committee as failure to take responsibility for your behavior, so leave out the excuses and directly address what you did.

Don’t go overboard addressing the infraction. The second biggest struggle I face is keeping clients from turning their applications into overblown mea culpas. A client once came to me having written two required essays and an optional essay all addressing a mistake from the past—too much! Often, a well-written response to an application’s “failure” essay question is enough.

Do show that you learned your lesson and that your past behavior won’t happen again. This step tends to be less of a struggle for clients, because usually they can show remorse, they can show the actions they took to atone for their behavior, and they can show how they matured from their experiences. Often such clients become heavily involved with their community, counseling others who tend toward their same behavior and managing to turn their failure into a success benefitting others.

Perfect execution of these suggestions certainly will increase your chances of admission, but they may not be enough to gain you acceptance to a top school. So avoid having to deal with this situation altogether: think twice and three times before you do something that you could regret for a very long time.

Learn how to use sample essays to create an exemplary essay of your own! Click here to download our free report!

 

Accepted.com

Tags: , , , , , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2014/03/16/can-you-get-accepted-after-doing-something-stupid/feed/ 2
SAT Aims to Reconnect with the Classroom http://blog.accepted.com/2014/03/09/sat-aims-to-reconnect-with-the-classroom/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/03/09/sat-aims-to-reconnect-with-the-classroom/#respond Sun, 09 Mar 2014 16:07:44 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=21529 ]]> Download "Preparing for College in High School: A To-Do List for Eleventh Graders"!

The essay, which is now required, will become optional.

The College Board announced this week that it would be taking measures to restructure the SAT so that it becomes more connected to high school work. Here are some highlights outlined in the New York Times article on the subject:

• Students will no longer be tested on obscure, little-used vocabulary words.
• Math problems will focus mainly on proportional thinking, linear equations, and functions.
• A calculator will not be allowed for all sections of the exam.
• Low-income students will receive fee waivers and will be allowed to send scores to up to four colleges at no charge.
• The College Board in partnership with the Khan Academy will provide practice problems and tutorial videos online for free.
• The test will switch back to the 1600 scoring system from the current 2400 system.
• The exam will be available via computer or on paper.
• The essay, which is now required, will become optional.
• Test takers won’t be penalized for an incorrect answer (i.e. points won’t be deducted for guessing).

According to College Board president David Coleman, the exam should reinforce the skills that students are learning and using in high school, and shouldn’t simply be used to test test-taking tricks.

Many observers view these changes as steps that will make the SAT more like its competitor, the ACT, which has gained market share in recent years.

Download Free: Preparing for College in High School: A To-Do List for Eleventh Graders

Accepted.com

Tags: ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2014/03/09/sat-aims-to-reconnect-with-the-classroom/feed/ 0
Writing an Interesting SAT Essay in 25 Minutes http://blog.accepted.com/2014/03/03/writing-an-interesting-sat-essay-in-25-minutes/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/03/03/writing-an-interesting-sat-essay-in-25-minutes/#respond Mon, 03 Mar 2014 15:34:00 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=21418 ]]> Download Free: Preparing for College in High School: A To-Do List for Eleventh Graders

A skeleton does not a human make.

A common mistake students make on the SAT essay is thinking that if they stick to a formulaic approach, they will get a good SAT score essay-wise. The thing is using a “cookie cutter” approach to the essay can often result in a dull, predictable—and not at all convincing—essay.

What is this approach, I speak of? Well, many students have the following formula in mind: intro with a thesis, three body examples (topic sentence and final sentence that ties back to the thesis), and a conclusion. They plod their way through the essay with about as much enthusiasm as someone about to go the dentist’s to get his wisdom teeth pulled.  That is not to say you don’t want to follow a general outline. Indeed, that quick formula is about as good as any other. However, a skeleton does not a human make. In other words, you got to make your essay interesting, by keeping your examples fresh and your writing lively.

Below are two excerpts from the SAT essay prompt: Do we need adversity to help us realize our true potential?

Example #1

We need to struggle to improve. Last year, I got a bad score on my history test. It was the first ‘F’ I got. I was very disappointed with myself. Moving on from that time, I studied every day history because I wanted to score well. This time was very hard for me. But I studied all night for the final and I got an ‘A’. Therefore, we need adversity to help us improve.

Example #2

In the sophomore year, the Napoleonic Wars held about as much fascination for me as paint drying on a wall—and it showed: I failed the first history midterm. I had always been at least a ‘B’ student, something I could pull off without too much effort. But history, with all those facts, dates, and names, made my head throb in pain, and attaining a ‘C’ seemed like a feat that would require more than one all night study session. At first, it was worse than I thought. After hours of studying I could only remember a few main themes (okay, the Austrian Empire lost the war); but Mr. Thompson would want to know the exact date and the names of the losers and winners. After weeks of struggle, I came up with a system of memorizing facts that actually worked. For someone with a memory of a sea sponge, this was an incredible accomplishment. I didn’t end up falling in love with history, but through the adversity of actually failing a test, I learned to become a better learner. Oh, and that World History class? I actually ended up getting an A-.

Besides some questionable grammar, what is the major difference between these two essays? The second one actually tells an interesting story. Not one with generic facts (“bad score”, “studied all night”), but with specific and engaging details (“my head throb in pain”, “the Austrian Empire lost the war”, “ended up getting an A-“). Notice the second essay also has some comical phrases (“paint drying on a wall”, “memory of a sea sponge”). That is not to say that you have to write exactly like this student. But learn to inject colorful details and clever turns of phrases to your writing. If you do so, your essay will be more persuasive.

I should note that the second example is not perfect; there isn’t too much analysis on how adversity shapes us. Also, it is a little vague on this pivotal “system of memorizing facts”. I would have liked a bit more on how the process was very difficult and the student felt like giving up, but that he/she stuck with the “memory system”, making them a better student. That said, the second example keeps our attention riveted throughout with its turns of phrases, and would probably be a part of an essay that went on to score a ‘10’ (SAT essay scores are based out of ‘12’ points).

The moral of this story: Don’t get so fixated on structure that you forget to tell an interesting—but relevant—story. And to tell an interesting story, don’t be afraid to use a colorful phrase (or two!).

Download Free: Preparing for College in High School: A To-Do List for Eleventh Graders

magooshThis post was written by Chris Lele, resident SAT expert at Magoosh. For more advice on taking the SAT, check out Magoosh’s SAT blog.

Tags: , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2014/03/03/writing-an-interesting-sat-essay-in-25-minutes/feed/ 0
Waitlisted! What Now? http://blog.accepted.com/2014/02/27/waitlisted-what-now/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/02/27/waitlisted-what-now/#respond Thu, 27 Feb 2014 19:08:02 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=21411 ]]> Listen to the full recording of 'Waitlisted! Now What?'So, you’ve been waitlisted and you’re not sure whether to laugh or cry. You can choose to do either, neither or both, but then it is time to figure out what to do next.

Listen to the recording of our latest podcast episode to hear Linda Abraham’s six tips for waitlisted applicants. Make sure you know what to do (and what not to do!) to ensure that you are the candidate on the very top of that waitlist.

00:01:28 – Devastated about your waitlisted status? Don’t give up!

00:02:16 – Don’t be an independent thinker please.

00:03:43 – Self-evaluate and take action.

00:04:24 – Spread the good word (even if it doesn’t relate to your weaknesses).

00:05:44 – Schools like applicants who are interested in attending their program!

00:06:13 – Don’t spam the adcom.

00:06:48 – How a waitlist letter should begin and what it should include.

00:07:33 – Addressing your weaknesses without sounding weak.

Admissions Straight Talk Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes so you don’t miss a single show!

*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Relevant Links:

•  MBA Waitlist Advice 101
•  Med School Waitlist Advice 101
•  Grad School Waitlist Advice 101
•  College Waitlist Advice 101 
•  The Nine Mistakes You Don’t Want to Make on an MBA Waitlistan ebook
•  The Nine Mistakes You Don’t Want to Make on a Med School Waitlistan ebook
•  The Nine Mistakes You Don’t Want to Make on a Law School Waitlist, an ebook

Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk:

Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes!     Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in Stitcher!

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2014/02/27/waitlisted-what-now/feed/ 0 MBA Waitlist,podcast,Wait List,weakness So, you’ve been waitlisted and you’re not sure whether to laugh or cry. You can choose to do either, neither or both, but then it is time to figure out what to do next. - Listen to the recording of our latest podcast episode to hear Linda Abrahamâ... So, you’ve been waitlisted and you’re not sure whether to laugh or cry. You can choose to do either, neither or both, but then it is time to figure out what to do next. Listen to the recording of our latest podcast episode to hear Linda Abraham’s six tips for waitlisted applicants. Make sure you know what to do (and what not to do!) to ensure that you are the candidate on the very top of that waitlist. 00:01:28 – Devastated about your waitlisted status? Don’t give up! 00:02:16 – Don’t be an independent thinker please. 00:03:43 – Self-evaluate and take action. 00:04:24 – Spread the good word (even if it doesn’t relate to your weaknesses). 00:05:44 – Schools like applicants who are interested in attending their program! 00:06:13 – Don’t spam the adcom. 00:06:48 – How a waitlist letter should begin and what it should include. 00:07:33 – Addressing your weaknesses without sounding weak.  Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes so you don’t miss a single show! *Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com. Relevant Links: •  MBA Waitlist Advice 101 •  Med School Waitlist Advice 101 •  Grad School Waitlist Advice 101 •  College Waitlist Advice 101  •  The Nine Mistakes You Don’t Want to Make on an MBA Waitlist, an ebook •  The Nine Mistakes You Don’t Want to Make on a Med School Waitlist, an ebook •  The Nine Mistakes You Don’t Want to Make on a Law School Waitlist, an ebook Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk:       Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no 12:34
Two Ways to Reveal Leadership in Your Applications http://blog.accepted.com/2014/02/25/two-ways-to-reveal-leadership-in-your-applications/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/02/25/two-ways-to-reveal-leadership-in-your-applications/#respond Tue, 25 Feb 2014 16:12:26 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=21367 ]]> Leadership is one of the of the most valued attributes in admissions. In this short video, Linda Abraham discusses two main ways you can show the adcom that you are a leader.

For more tips on revealing leadership in your applications, check out:

•  Leadership in Admissions, a free special report.

•  4 Ways to Show How You’ll Contribute in the Future

•  What Should I Write About? Making a Difference

•  MBA Admissions A-Z: L is for Leadership

Accepted.com

Tags: , , , , , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2014/02/25/two-ways-to-reveal-leadership-in-your-applications/feed/ 0
Review of BenchPrep’s Online Test Prep Site http://blog.accepted.com/2014/02/20/review-of-benchpreps-online-test-prep-site/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/02/20/review-of-benchpreps-online-test-prep-site/#respond Thu, 20 Feb 2014 19:34:41 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=21045 ]]> Check out BenchPrep!I just logged into the BenchPrep test prep website and am welcomed with their greeting of “Gain an unfair advantage on test day”; I like this – a test prep site with an edge! Let’s continue exploring…

After you sign in and choose your test (see list below), you’ll then choose your target test date. The program then generates a study plan of week-by-week tasks that you’ll need to complete to achieve your optimal preparedness for your chosen exam. Each task has a timeframe next to it, indicating the expected amount of time the exercise should take – a nice touch.

As you move through the little icons on the left side of the screen, you’ll encounter some nice features – games (mainly flashcard games – pretty simple and straightforward), practice tests, discussion boards, study groups, and others. Another organizational feature is the table of contents icon which, when you click on it, gives you a very clear outline of your study plan with links to other parts of the site.

There is also a BenchPrep mobile app (Android and iPhone), making this program excellent for test-preppers on-the-go!

One thing I’d like to see more of on this site are videos. There is certainly no shortage of written prep resources here – there are loads of practice tests and explanations and tips, which of course are extremely important. For some people, this may be exactly what they’re looking for, but others – those auditory/visual types – the absence of video will be noticed.

Tests (a sampling):

ACT • GMAT • PMP Exam
• AP Exam • GRE • Police Officer Exam
• CFA Level I Exam                       . • LSAT • Postal Exam
• CLEP • MCAT • Praxis Test
• EMT • Nursing School Entrance Exams        . • SAT
• FRM • PCAT
• Firefighter Exam • PE Exam

Features:

• Ask-a-tutor, and receive an answer within 24 hours
•  Bookmarking and highlighting features
•  Ratings/tracking of your confidence level (so you can go back to review those weak areas)
•  Games
•  Practice tests
•  Discussion boards
•  Study groups

Head to BenchPrep now to check out these features on your own!

MBA Admissions A-Z: 26 Great Tips

Accepted.com

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2014/02/20/review-of-benchpreps-online-test-prep-site/feed/ 0
Personal Statement Fatal Flaw #1: Lack of Substance http://blog.accepted.com/2014/02/19/personal-statement-fatal-flaw-1-lack-of-substance-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/02/19/personal-statement-fatal-flaw-1-lack-of-substance-2/#respond Wed, 19 Feb 2014 16:12:53 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=21236 ]]> Click here to learn how to avoid the other 4 personal statement fatal flaws.Writing about nothing tends to bore, like a trite sitcom or movie with no plot. They lack substance and so will your essay if it isn’t based on:

• Substantive self-reflection.

• Use of specifics, examples, and anecdotes.

• Willingness to reveal your thought processes and feelings.

So start your writing process with self-knowledge. You don’t have to search the internet or a large library. Start with your experiences and your dreams. Search your head and your heart. That is where the substance of a good personal statement is stored.

Then use anecdotes, specifics, and examples to reveal what’s in your heart and show that your dreams are grounded in experience. Good examples can bring your essays to life and engage the reader.

At the same time, recognize that essays with only examples and anecdotes don’t reveal your thought processes and consequently are also superficial. Make sure you balance your stories with insight and analysis.

Avoid Fatal Flaw #1: Bring your essays to life with self-reflection and astute use of examples balanced by analysis.

This tip is an excerpt from Five Fatal Flaws: Eliminate the 5 Most Common Flaws in your Application Essays and Personal Statements. To view the entire free special report, please click here.

5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Application Essay or Personal Statement

Accepted.com

Tags: , , , , , , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2014/02/19/personal-statement-fatal-flaw-1-lack-of-substance-2/feed/ 0
How to Write Waitlist Update Letters http://blog.accepted.com/2014/01/31/how-to-write-waitlist-update-letters-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/01/31/how-to-write-waitlist-update-letters-2/#comments Fri, 31 Jan 2014 16:23:38 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=20363 ]]>
You are so close to acceptance, but still not quite there! Get the guidance you need to get that offer of admission.

Continue fighting for that acceptance!

The application process is not over for waitlisted applicants. You’ve still got a chance of getting into your dream school, so now’s not the time to slack off, and it’s certainly not the time to give up. Continue fighting for that acceptance!

Your waitlist updates (you write those) and letters of support (other people write these) should focus on three areas:

1) Your growing list of qualifications. You want to prove to the adcoms that while you were a responsible, accomplished, impressive candidate before, now you are even more so. Discuss recent initiatives you’ve taken—in the workplace and in your community—and developments or advances you’ve made in your career or academics.

2) Steps you’ve taken to ameliorate shortcomings. Figure out what weaknesses were revealed in your application and/or interview and work to improve them. Be able to discuss specific changes you’ve made in your life—education and career—that make you a stronger candidate.

3) How you fit with the school. You were born to attend this school and this school was created just for you. Your fit is as perfect as a cozy glove on a cold hand.

Waitlist Update Writing Step-By-Step:

1) Begin your letter by briefly thanking the school for considering your application. Don’t talk about your disappointment; instead focus on how the school’s philosophy and approach fit your educational goals.

2) Discuss your recent accomplishments. Choose achievements that you did not address in your application and try and tie them back to key themes in your essays. These could include a recent promotion, freshly minted A’s, a new leadership role in a project or organization, a recent volunteer experience, initiatives you’ve taken in your department, business, or club, additional work responsibilities, etc.

3) Talk about the measures you’ve taken to ameliorate your weaknesses, if necessary. Focus on the action you’ve taken rather than on the actual shortcoming. For example, if you have/had weak communication skills, discuss how you enrolled in Toastmasters and how the experience has influenced and inspired you.

4) If you are sure that upon acceptance you would attend, inform the school of your commitment.

Above all, stay positive as your letter will reflect your attitude. Adcoms do not want to read a bitter and angry letter, nor will they want that writer in their classrooms.

A couple of caveats:

• Don’t waste your reader’s time by repeating material already in your application.

• Don’t write if the school states explicitly that it doesn’t want to hear from you.

Help! I'm on the waitlist!

For more information on how to transform your waitlist status into an acceptance, check out one of Accepted’s popular waitlist ebooks:

• The Nine Mistakes You Don’t Want to Make on an MBA Waitlist

• The Nine Mistakes You Don’t Want to Make on a Med School Waitlist

• The Nine Mistakes You Don’t Want to Make on a Law School Waitlist

Accepted.com

Tags: , , , , , , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2014/01/31/how-to-write-waitlist-update-letters-2/feed/ 3
So You Aced the PSAT: Should You Still Study for the SAT? http://blog.accepted.com/2014/01/26/so-you-aced-the-psat-should-you-still-study-for-the-sat/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/01/26/so-you-aced-the-psat-should-you-still-study-for-the-sat/#respond Sun, 26 Jan 2014 18:10:43 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=20703 ]]> Check out 'Preparing for College in High School: A To-Do List for Eleventh Graders'

Warning: A top score on the PSAT doesn’t guarantee anything.

Man, what a feeling. You take the PSAT at the start of junior year and have a higher score than almost anybody you know. You’re set, right? In the clear. Don’t even have to worry about the SAT—it’s pretty much the same thing right?

Alright, so this doesn’t happen to everybody. After all, only 10% of students can be in the 90th percentile. That’s how it works. But let’s say this is you, just as it was me: you’ve confirmed that you’re a good test-taker and you know your stuff, and you’re ready to wash your hands of the whole thing.

Stop there. Don’t get cocky; it’s not that simple. Even if you already know everything you need to know about the PSAT vs the SAT, a top score on the PSAT doesn’t guarantee anything. Yes, if you did well, you’ll probably do well on the SAT, too. But it’s not a sure thing, and this isn’t worth gambling over. SAT scores fluctuate, sometimes by a hundred points or more, and the less experience you have with the test, the more likely that there’s going to be some inconsistency.

Besides that, your reach schools might be looking for scores that are already on level with your PSAT score as it is, even if it is high. And if your PSAT scores drop jaws but your goal schools are only modest, then it’s time to start looking at even higher-tier schools: ivy leagues tend to look pretty good on resumes, and you’ve just shown that your test-taking skills, at least, might be up to snuff.

And if you do decide to go for the gold and apply to the best-ranked schools, then you might need to do some serious test prep to seal the deal, rather than gambling based on your PSAT score. Take a look at Harvard SAT scores, for example: 75 percent of students score over 2100. (If we compare that to the PSAT, that’s around a 200 composite score.) The story isn’t so different with Yale SAT scores, either; top schools expect top scores. Are you absolutely certain you’re going to score that high? If you aren’t—and who is?—then yeah, you might want to study for the SAT. It’s a lot of work to take on when you’ve already got classes, extra-curriculars, and a life, but whatever you can make time for is worth it if it brings you closer to your dream school.

All that being said, I want to make it clear that I don’t recommend serious prep for everybody. If you’re absolutely sure that any and every school you want to apply to has average SAT scores much lower than what you’re expecting based on your PSAT, then there are probably other things you should be focusing on. Your test scores are only part of the package, and if they’re already the strongest part by far, then you shouldn’t spend too much time and energy on them, of course.

But be careful not to write those scores off, either.

Here is what you can do to prep for college in high school.

magooshThis post was written by Lucas Verney-Fink, resident SAT expert at Magoosh. For more advice on SAT prep, check out Magoosh’s SAT blog.

Tags: , , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2014/01/26/so-you-aced-the-psat-should-you-still-study-for-the-sat/feed/ 0
4 Tips for Writing about Last Minute Extracurricular Activities http://blog.accepted.com/2014/01/14/4-tips-for-writing-about-last-minute-extracurricular-activities/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/01/14/4-tips-for-writing-about-last-minute-extracurricular-activities/#respond Tue, 14 Jan 2014 19:31:46 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=20636 ]]> Learn how to demonstrate leadership in your admissions essays!

It’s possible that you’ve been involved in extracurricular activities without even realizing it.

You want to write about all your fantastic non-school and non-work endeavors so that you really stand out from your competition, but when you start to think about it…you draw a blank. There must be SOMETHING you can show for how you use your free time, but what?

Have you found yourself in a last minute lurch looking for extracurricular activities? Note the following:

1. Better Late than Never.

If you don’t have any extracurricular activities to speak of, then I suggest you find something interesting to do and start NOW. You may ask: “Isn’t it better to try and bypass the subject of extracurriculars entirely rather than highlight the fact that I’ve only gotten involved in an activity for the sake of my application? Won’t that seem phony?” While involvement in an extracurricular activity for just a few months is less impressive than long-term participation, it’s still better than presenting no participation at all. You can keep kicking yourself, over and over again, wishing that you had thought of this earlier and gotten involved in some activity years ago, but now’s not the time to harp on regrets; now is the time to act. Get out there and do something.

2. Even Short-Term Involvement Can Transform You.

Participation in a non-school and non-work activities, even if just for a limited period of time, will elevate your flat, one-dimensional admissions profile into something more vibrant, colorful, and interesting. Now’s your chance to transform yourself from a pile of grades and scores into a real, live human being – one who pursues his or her interests and passions outside of the work and school arenas.

3. Your Application Efforts May be Delayed or Extended.

Another reason why you should jump right into an extracurricular activity, even though you may feel like it’s too last minute, is because you don’t know for certain the outcome of your application effort. You may, for one reason or another, decide to push off applying until the next year; you may get waitlisted; you may get dinged from all your top choice schools and decide to reapply next year – whatever the case may be, this could be the beginning of what turns out to be an entire year of extracurricular involvement.

4. Hobbies are Good for YOU!

Forget for a minute that you’re applying to school (if that’s possible) and think about what’s actually good for you. It’s not healthy to site at work for 18+ hours a day only to go home and crash on the couch because you’re too tired to make it to bed. Forget the application process – you should find something to do non-work (and non-school and non-other-obligations) related because it will enrich your life and make you a happier person.

Also, it’s possible that you’ve been involved in extracurricular activities without even realizing it. Mine your experiences to uncover unique experiences that could be considered “extracurricular.” You don’t need clear-cut activities like “Acted as president of the chess club” or “Volunteered in local soup kitchen”; consider non-traditional or non-altruistic activities, like singing in a choir, participating in a weekly fiction writing circle with friends, helping your hyperactive triplet cousin do homework catch-up once a week since forever ago.

These are all completely valid ways of breaking from work, and it won’t be hard to illustrate your passions and interests in these activities, not to mention the leadership skills your developed and the other ways in which you grew and learned from them.

Take home message: It’s NEVER too late to get involved in some meaningful, interesting, and fun extracurricular activity!

Learn everything you need to know about how to tackle the tricky leadership questions that the adcoms love to throw into applications and interviews.

Accepted.com

Tags: , , , , , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2014/01/14/4-tips-for-writing-about-last-minute-extracurricular-activities/feed/ 0
What You Need to Know About Post-bac Programs http://blog.accepted.com/2014/01/09/what-you-need-to-know-about-postbac-programs/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/01/09/what-you-need-to-know-about-postbac-programs/#respond Thu, 09 Jan 2014 16:21:40 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=20589 ]]> Listen to our conversation with Dr. Barry Rothman!Career changers and academic enhancers on the way to med school: Meet Dr. Barry Rothman, a leader in the field of post-bac education, SFSU Professor of Biology, Director of Post-Bac Programs, Director of SFSU’s Health Professionals Advising Committee, Director of the Pre-Health Professions Certificate Program, and Director of the SFSU U of Pacific Dental Post-bac Program (wow!).

Listen to the full recording of our interview for excellent insights into post-bac education and admissions from the post-bac guru.

00:03:21 – The journey from snail nervous system research to post-baccalaureate education.

00:08:57 – The support group model: The SFSU post-bac program.

00:15:33 – Post-bac programs for career changers.

00:18:30 – Post-bac programs for academic enhancers.

00:21:50 – When is it time to actually apply to med school? (And a word about tug-of-war with parents.)

00:24:51 – The advantages of a formal post-bac program.

00:29:00 – Post-bac programs come in many flavors: how to figure out which is best for you.

00:33:10 – Is there a future for post-bac education online?

00:36:07 – Advice for career changers.

00:37:57 – “I study so hard, but my friends get As and I get Bs!” Sound familiar?

00:47:36 – Plan on applying to med school in June? The fastest way to medical school is slowly. A good pace can = good results.

Admissions Straight Talk Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes so you don’t miss any segments! Stay in the admissions know.

*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Relevant Links:

• A Second Chance at Medical School: The A-Z of Applying to Postbac Programs
• Navigating the Med School Mazetips to help you apply successfully to medical school.
• Medical School Reapplicant Advice: 6 Tips for Success

Health Professions @SFSU with info about different post-bac options.
Dr. Barry Rothman’s Bio
The Student Doctor Network
AAMC Post-Bac Resources Page

Related Shows:

• A Window into the World and Life of Medical Scribes
• MCAT Tips and Strategy: An Interview with Don Osborne
• Med School Admissions with Cyd Foote
• Med School Application Process: AMCAS, Secondaries, Interviews, Decisions & More!

Subscribe:

Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes!     Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in Stitcher!

Tags: , , , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2014/01/09/what-you-need-to-know-about-postbac-programs/feed/ 0 podcast,Post-bac Career changers and academic enhancers on the way to med school: Meet Dr. Barry Rothman, a leader in the field of post-bac education, SFSU Professor of Biology, Director of Post-Bac Programs, Director of SFSU’s Health Professionals Advising Committee, Career changers and academic enhancers on the way to med school: Meet Dr. Barry Rothman, a leader in the field of post-bac education, SFSU Professor of Biology, Director of Post-Bac Programs, Director of SFSU’s Health Professionals Advising Committee, Director of the Pre-Health Professions Certificate Program, and Director of the SFSU U of Pacific Dental Post-bac Program (wow!). Listen to the full recording of our interview for excellent insights into post-bac education and admissions from the post-bac guru. 00:03:21 – The journey from snail nervous system research to post-baccalaureate education. 00:08:57 – The support group model: The SFSU post-bac program. 00:15:33 – Post-bac programs for career changers. 00:18:30 – Post-bac programs for academic enhancers. 00:21:50 – When is it time to actually apply to med school? (And a word about tug-of-war with parents.) 00:24:51 – The advantages of a formal post-bac program. 00:29:00 – Post-bac programs come in many flavors: how to figure out which is best for you. 00:33:10 – Is there a future for post-bac education online? 00:36:07 – Advice for career changers. 00:37:57 – “I study so hard, but my friends get As and I get Bs!” Sound familiar? 00:47:36 – Plan on applying to med school in June? The fastest way to medical school is slowly. A good pace can = good results.  Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes so you don’t miss any segments! Stay in the admissions know. *Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com. Relevant Links: • A Second Chance at Medical School: The A-Z of Applying to Postbac Programs • Navigating the Med School Maze, tips to help you apply successfully to medical school. • Medical School Reapplicant Advice: 6 Tips for Success • Health Professions @SFSU with info about different post-bac options. • Dr. Barry Rothman's Bio • The Student Doctor Network • AAMC Post-Bac Resources Page Related Shows: • A Window into the World and Life of Medical Scribes • MCAT Tips and Strategy: An Interview with Don Osborne • Med School Admissions with Cyd Foote • Med School Application Process: AMCAS, Secondaries, Interviews, Decisions & More! Subscribe:       Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no 54:34
Interview Tip: Prepare Questions http://blog.accepted.com/2014/01/09/interview-tip-prepare-questions-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/01/09/interview-tip-prepare-questions-2/#respond Thu, 09 Jan 2014 15:48:19 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=20343 ]]> Learn how to use sample essays to create exemplary essays of your own!

An interview is a two-way street.

Usually when applicants prepare for their admissions interviews, they spend their time trying to figure out what questions will be asked and how they can best answer them. This is important and a good idea. But it’s not the only step to prepping for an admissions interview.

An interview is a two-way street.

Your interviewer will ask you questions and listen your answers, and then will turn the asking over to you. When your interviewer says, “Do you have any questions?” you don’t want to shut the interview down by saying, “Nope, I’m set” but want to keep the flow of the conversation going by taking the reins of the interview into your hands and asking some questions of your own.

There are two things you can do before your interview to help you come up with intelligent questions:

1) Familiarize yourself with the program’s website and other literature. Never ask a question that can be answered easily online.

2) Review your application. Your questions should be specific to your unique situation – your skills, interests, and goals. Questions about the faculty or clubs, for example, should relate to your own education, career, and goals.

Since your goal should be to come up with questions that are specific to your situation, I can’t give you a list of must-ask questions without knowing who YOU are. But here are a few sample questions that you can review and tweak so that the questions are more appropriate for YOU:

• How difficult is it to enroll in a popular class like XYZ? (Insert a class that appeals to you. Not a required course.)

• Do recruiters from XYZ (a company or a particular field that interests you) visit the school? How do students get interviews with recruiters?

• Are business plan competitions (or something else that’s relevant to you) open to all students, or are there certain requirements to qualify?

If you are interviewing with school alum or a second-year student, then you should ask questions about their experiences, for example:

• Who were some of your favorite professors? Favorite classes?

• What is/was a typical day like for you?

• Are there clubs or activities that you would recommend for someone interested in XYZ? What clubs are you involved in? How important do you think it is to be involved in extracurricular activities?

• If you could change anything about your experience at this program, what would it be?

You get the idea. You want to come up with questions that personalize you and that show you have an interest in your interviewer’s experience (if relevant). Be specific, show that you’ve done your research, and most importantly, relax!

Good luck and let us know how we can further help you prepare for your interviews!

Click here to download our free report!

Accepted.com

Tags: , , , , , , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2014/01/09/interview-tip-prepare-questions-2/feed/ 0
SAT Myths Debunked http://blog.accepted.com/2014/01/08/sat-myths-debunked/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/01/08/sat-myths-debunked/#respond Wed, 08 Jan 2014 19:42:15 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=20583 ]]> Check out our free report: Preparing for College in High School: A To-Do List for Eleventh Graders

Don’t believe all the rumors you hear about the SAT!

The SAT has a deep-seated cultural importance. For many students, it’s the single most significant test they will take in the course of their education. It’s no big surprise, then, that there’s plenty of junk info on the test; people get scared of it, and rumors get spread. It doesn’t help any that there are lots of less-than-upstanding test prep companies with their own agendas to fuel the misconception fire.

Is the SAT basically an I.Q. test?

This is more complicated than either the College Board or most large test prep companies would have you believe. The College Board says that the test is a reflection of your academic achievements—that many of the skills you learn in school are directly tested. That’s half the truth, if even that.

Meanwhile, Princeton Review gives a different answer to this question: “Your SAT scores reflect how good you are at taking the SAT (as well as how much time you spent preparing)–and that’s about it.” This is different than the College Board’s intention of testing your academic achievements. As you can see, opinions on this topic vary. The reality really lies somewhere in between the two.

It’s true that preparing for the test will raise your scores. It’s also true that many of the skills tested are test-specific. Think about functioning under time pressure, for example—when else in your life will you have a situation like this, other than on standardized tests? Or how about multiple choice guessing strategies?

But what they want you to believe is that they have some magic key that will unlock the test for you—that SAT questions are just sneaky tricks. That’s nonsense. Doing well on the SAT is actually about three things:

1. Knowing the concepts, rules, and academic vocabulary. This is the most important piece, and can come from school studies or test-specific preparation.

2. Knowing how to take a standardized test effectively. The only way to improve this is with test-specific preparation.

3. Innate logical abilities. A monkey can’t be trained to take the SAT and score well, no matter what. Meanwhile, a student who figured out how to solve a Rubik’s cube on their own will do pretty well, regardless of how much attention they pay in school. This is only a piece of the whole picture, but it is there, like it or not.

You can improve, yes; everybody can improve. But the big picture is more complicated than most “experts” will admit to.

How much time do I need to study for the SAT?

There are two common mistakes here, but the most important one to avoid is starting studies too late. Many students only start studying a few weeks before the exam, and that’s not ideal. In a perfect world, in order to be sure that you really built up your math knowledge, vocabulary, and test taking skills as much as possible, you’d have 2 or 3 months to prepare. It’s possible to make an effective one month SAT study schedule, but it takes serious devotion if you’re really going to bring up your score.

Does studying Latin actually help?

It can, but not nearly as much as studying English does. If you want to bring up your verbal score, there’s absolutely nothing better than reading as much high-level material as possible. Word lists and flashcards are useful if they’re used right—you really have to know how to remember SAT vocabulary—but it’s the reading, the natural expansion of your vocabulary, that has the greatest effect on your scores. Most of the reading comprehension questions don’t rely heavily on vocabulary; they test how comfortable you are with difficult texts in general. So that’s what you should be practicing.

That being said, reading takes time. It may even take too much time, depending on your schedule, so cramming English vocabulary can help. But don’t worry about Latin.

How hard is SAT math?

That question’s a bit tricky to answer, but everyone seems to be asking it. So just how hard is SAT math? Well, the core concepts that are tested are no harder than most sophomore high school classes. The majority of SAT takers actually studied every math concept on the test, and many of them finished covering those topics years ago. There’s no trigonometry, no calculus, no serious statistics—it’s mostly just algebra, geometry, arithmetic and number properties. But that doesn’t mean it’s easy, not even for students who are taking calculus. This is where the logic I mentioned earlier comes in—the most difficult questions are puzzles. They don’t demand crazy formulas or long, complicated calculations: they test reasoning. Getting better at this is partly just about getting to know the types of puzzles that the SAT uses (and the common traps), so it’s not exactly something you’ve learned in school.

So you might hear one person say that SAT math is easy, and they’re right, in a way: it’s all from relatively basic areas of math. And you might hear another person say that it’s actually really hard, and they’re right too. The tricky questions are really tricky, even if the formulas are basic enough.

High School Juniors: Find out what you can do NOW to make applying to college go as smoothly as possible!

magooshThis post was written by Lucas Verney-Fink, resident SAT expert at Magoosh, providing online SAT prep. For more advice on taking the SAT, check out Magoosh’s SAT blog.

Tags: , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2014/01/08/sat-myths-debunked/feed/ 0
The Best of 2013 at Accepted.com! http://blog.accepted.com/2014/01/01/the-best-of-2013-at-accepted-com/ http://blog.accepted.com/2014/01/01/the-best-of-2013-at-accepted-com/#respond Wed, 01 Jan 2014 18:01:12 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=20480 ]]> Best wishes for a happy, healthy new year!
5 Things Y’all Wanted to Learn More About in 2013:

1. Addressing MBA Application Weaknesses. Let’s face it. Nobody is perfect.

2. The Accepted.com Team! And who can blame you. To know them is to love them we say (and our clients agree).

3. Writing about Goals in a Grad School Statement of Purpose. The opportunity to prove that you know what graduate school is all about.

4. All Things Related to MBA Interviews. Making a good impression on paper is only half the battle.

5. How to Obtain Winning Med School Letters of Recommendation.

Everyone Loves a Sample Essay. :) Here Are the Favorites:

MBA: The Goals Essay  It is critical in the goals essay found in almost every MBA application to show that you have clear direction and purpose based on experience and planning. Business school is not another opportunity to “find yourself.”

Med: The Story  This essay is one of our favorites. The applicant tells a story and weaves a lot of information about his background and interests into it. Note how the lead grabs attention and the conclusion ties everything together. 

Grad: Public Health Essay  “My days in the physical therapy department often made me think about the prevention of injuries as well as the injuries themselves.”

Law: Returning to School  Note how this applicant successfully explains his career change and highlights his professional achievements.

College: While the World Sleeps  “When I wake up to the ear-splitting sound of my alarm clock, and blindly search for the snooze button, a sudden thought dawns: “What am I doing?”"

8 Blog Posts Our Readers Loved Last Year:

•  Harvard Business School 2014 MBA Application Tips

•  Tips for Completing Your Princeton Supplement to the Common Application

•  What to Include in Your Admissions Resume

•  6 Tips for Video MBA Essay Questions

•  7 Fatal Resume Flaws to Avoid

•  Boost your GPA for Med School Acceptance

•  Common Application Essay Tips

•  University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine Secondary Application Essay Tips

Accepted.com

Tags: , , , , , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2014/01/01/the-best-of-2013-at-accepted-com/feed/ 0
Do’s and Don’ts for Writing Your Resume – Part 2: The 10 Don’ts http://blog.accepted.com/2013/12/31/dos-and-donts-for-writing-your-resume-part-2-the-10-donts/ http://blog.accepted.com/2013/12/31/dos-and-donts-for-writing-your-resume-part-2-the-10-donts/#respond Tue, 31 Dec 2013 21:38:50 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=20354 ]]> Recently we offered 9 Do’s for Writing Your Resume. Let’s get right to business now talking about the 10 ‘Don’ts.’

Click here for more resume advice!

Don’t make things up!

1) First and foremost, don’t make things up. This includes inflating your accomplishments, your level of responsibility, or your skills. Besides the fact that it’s dishonest, your resume reviewer may find out (like if he or she follows up on one of your references or does a background check) and then you’ll be busted…not to mention jobless.

2) Don’t turn your resume into an autobiography. Your resume will include biographical information, but its primary purpose is to focus on aspects of your life and career that make you an ideal b-school candidate and that address a potential employer’s needs. Don’t include information from high school or earlier.

3) Don’t provide personal data. This includes marital status, age, height/weight, race, religion, or any other non-work-related information. Besides the fact that it’s irrelevant, it may also be used illegally to discriminate against you.

4) Don’t include a separate “objective” line at the beginning of your resume.

5) Don’t use articles (“the,” “a”) or pronouns (“I,” “you”). They waste precious space, detract from resume impact, and reduce professionalism.

6) Don’t overuse a few action words. There are more words you can use besides “led” or “developed.” Consider similar terms like “accelerated,” “delivered,” “established,” “implemented,” “initiated,” or “reengineered.”

7) Don’t forget your dates. Even functional resumes should include dates of employment, even if they’re only included at the end.

8) Don’t use long paragraphs to describe your accomplishments. If you have a lot of information to convey, use bulleted points instead of dense, wordy paragraphs. Each bullet should be limited to two lines of text, and there should really be no more than five bullets per position.

9) Don’t use clichés like “dynamic” or “self-starter.” Rather, use the details of your resume to show that you personify these qualities.

10) Don’t turn your resume into a list of job duties. Instead, list your accomplishments within each position.

For individualized help with your MBA admissions resume or cover letter, visit Accepted’s catalog of resume services or speak with one of our experienced admissions consultants today!

Download our free special report, Leadership in Admissions.

Linda Abraham By , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

Tags: , , , , , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2013/12/31/dos-and-donts-for-writing-your-resume-part-2-the-10-donts/feed/ 0
2013 SAT Scores by the Numbers [Infographic] http://blog.accepted.com/2013/12/27/2013-sat-scores-by-the-numbers-infographic/ http://blog.accepted.com/2013/12/27/2013-sat-scores-by-the-numbers-infographic/#respond Fri, 27 Dec 2013 16:43:08 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=20276 ]]> Many thanks to the folks at LA Tutors for this excellent infographic!

2013 SAT Scores by the Numbers

Tags: ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2013/12/27/2013-sat-scores-by-the-numbers-infographic/feed/ 0
What Our Listeners Loved in 2013! http://blog.accepted.com/2013/12/26/what-our-listeners-loved-in-2013/ http://blog.accepted.com/2013/12/26/what-our-listeners-loved-in-2013/#respond Thu, 26 Dec 2013 16:41:01 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=20381 ]]> 2013 has been an incredible year for the Admissions Straight Talk podcast. Thank you to all of our fascinating, insightful guest and of course our wonderful listeners!

AdmissionsStraightTalk2013

Check out the 10 episodes that were most listened to in 2013 and subscribe in iTunes, Stitcher, or Zune to ensure that you don’t miss the best of 2014. :)

1.   MBA Video Essays: A Conversation with Rotman’s Niki da Silva

2.   Case Interview Secrets and More with Victor Cheng

3.   Dr. Douglas Stayman Shares the Scoop on Cornell Tech NYC

4.   Global Business Leadership at Wharton’s Lauder Institute: IV with Dr. Marcy Bevan

5.   Interview with SoFi Co-Founder, Daniel Macklin

6.   Interview with Duke Fuqua’s Sheryle Dirks

7.   Med School Application Process: AMCAS, Secondaries, Interviews, Decisions & More!

8.   Kisses of Death for your Grad School Application

9.   Health Care Management at Wharton and at Large: IV with June Kinney

10. Are Online MBAs the Real Thing? A Conversation with MBA@UNC’s Beth Flye 

If you have any comments, ideas, or feedback, we’d love to hear it! Just leave a comment on this blog post or in iTunes or just shoot us an email at onlinesupport@accepted.com.

Happy listening!

Accepted.com

Tags: , , , , , , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2013/12/26/what-our-listeners-loved-in-2013/feed/ 0
Do’s and Don’ts for Writing Your Resume – Part 1: The 9 Do’s http://blog.accepted.com/2013/12/24/dos-and-donts-for-writing-your-resume-part-1-the-9-dos/ http://blog.accepted.com/2013/12/24/dos-and-donts-for-writing-your-resume-part-1-the-9-dos/#respond Tue, 24 Dec 2013 15:48:43 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=20264 ]]> Use these resources to help you construct a winning business school resume. While some potential employers or b-school adcoms may spend a few minutes looking at your resume, the vast majority will spend less than that. You may conclude from that that your resume is not so important since it will only receive a cursory glance, but it actually works the other way around: Since they’ll only be spending about 20 to 30 seconds looking at your resume, you need to make sure that your resume is written in a way that only a moment’s glance will provide its readers with an understanding of your key skills and experiences.

This is not an easy feat.

The following “Do’s and Don’ts” will help you create a powerful, dynamic resume that will enable you to sail through the employer’s initial 15-second screening process and earn your outstanding qualifications the closer look they deserve. If your resume will be used in your b-school application, these tips will help you compose a resume that complements the other components in your application to help show that you are the well-rounded, capable, and compelling applicant that the adcoms are seeking.

The Do’s:

1) Place your strongest material at the top of your resume. Create a two-inch space 2 5/8 inches from the top of the page and use this as your “primetime” space—this is where you’ll showcase your most impactful, impressive qualifications and achievements. If your resume reader only gets this far, at least he or she will have received a compelling image of who you are and what you can do. You should write this professional profile/qualifications section after you’ve completed the rest of your resume, when you have a better idea of what your strongest assets are.

2) Give your most recent professional experience the most attention. This position should receive the most space on your resume and should include more bulleted accomplishments than previous positions.

3) Rank accomplishments in order of decreasing relevance.

4) Use details to quantify your impact on the organizations you’ve worked for. Include how much or by what percentage you reduced expenses. Say how many people were on the team that you supervised. Demonstrate your impact by using specific numbers.

5) Place your educational information after your work experience if you’ve been working for more than five years.

6) Resume design should be as important as resume content. Use a 10- to 12-point conservative typeface (nothing in script or with squiggles that you think looks fancy or pretty), use lines to separate resume sections, and try and stay within 1″ margins (slightly smaller on the top and bottom of the page).

7) Include resume “extras” like honors, publications, presentations, patents, professional licenses or certifications, and relevant volunteer experiences. These points of interest could be what convince the employer or adcom to invite you in for an interview.

8) Proofread and edit mercilessly. Reduce fluff and make every word count. Spell check, grammar check, and style check. Have a friend or a professional editor look over your resume for errors you may have missed.

9) For your MBA application, stick to a one-page resume.

Stay tuned for Do’s and Don’ts for Writing Your Resume – Part 2: The 10 Don’ts.

Click here to download your free report!

Linda Abraham By , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

Tags: , , , , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2013/12/24/dos-and-donts-for-writing-your-resume-part-1-the-9-dos/feed/ 0
How to Edit Your Application Essays http://blog.accepted.com/2013/12/19/how-to-edit-your-application-essays/ http://blog.accepted.com/2013/12/19/how-to-edit-your-application-essays/#respond Thu, 19 Dec 2013 16:18:40 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=20295 ]]> Linda AbrahamIn an exclusive interview with… well, herself, Linda Abraham shares some advice that she’s learned over the course of almost two decades of application essay editing.

Listen to the full recording of this excellent episode to learn concrete steps you can take right now to ensure that your essays are working for –and not against –you.

00:01:22 – The three goals of an application essay and how to make sure your essays realize them.

00:02:55 – Is your resume hiding you? (The mistake of friends’ children & children’s friends.)

00:05:24 – How to evaluate each of your essays individually: Know if you need to rewrite before you submit, not after you are rejected.

00:07:57 – You may not like this, but proofing is vital. Here are the three critical steps to proofing when you think you can’t proof anymore.

Admissions Straight Talk Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes so you don’t miss any segments! Stay in the admissions know.

*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Relevant Links:

•  Accepted Services Section
•  MBA Admissions 101
•  Med School Admissions 101
•  Grad School Admissions 101
•  Law School Admissions 101
•  College Admissions 101

Most Popular Shows:

•   MBA Video Essays: A Conversation with Rotman’s Niki da Silva
•   Case Interview Secrets and More with Victor Cheng
•   Dr. Douglas Stayman Shares the Scoop on Cornell Tech NYC
•   Interview with SoFi Co-Founder, Daniel Macklin
•   Interview with Duke Fuqua’s Sheryle Dirks

Subscribe:

Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes!     Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in Stitcher!

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2013/12/19/how-to-edit-your-application-essays/feed/ 0 application essay,personal statement,podcast,writing techniques In an exclusive interview with… well, herself, Linda Abraham shares some advice that she’s learned over the course of almost two decades of application essay editing. - Listen to the full recording of this excellent episode to learn concrete steps... In an exclusive interview with… well, herself, Linda Abraham shares some advice that she’s learned over the course of almost two decades of application essay editing. Listen to the full recording of this excellent episode to learn concrete steps you can take right now to ensure that your essays are working for –and not against –you. 00:01:22 – The three goals of an application essay and how to make sure your essays realize them. 00:02:55 – Is your resume hiding you? (The mistake of friends’ children & children’s friends.) 00:05:24 – How to evaluate each of your essays individually: Know if you need to rewrite before you submit, not after you are rejected. 00:07:57 – You may not like this, but proofing is vital. Here are the three critical steps to proofing when you think you can’t proof anymore.  Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes so you don’t miss any segments! Stay in the admissions know. *Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com. Relevant Links: •  Accepted Services Section •  MBA Admissions 101 •  Med School Admissions 101 •  Grad School Admissions 101 •  Law School Admissions 101 •  College Admissions 101 Most Popular Shows: •   MBA Video Essays: A Conversation with Rotman’s Niki da Silva •   Case Interview Secrets and More with Victor Cheng •   Dr. Douglas Stayman Shares the Scoop on Cornell Tech NYC •   Interview with SoFi Co-Founder, Daniel Macklin •   Interview with Duke Fuqua’s Sheryle Dirks Subscribe:       Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no 15:16
Approaching the Diversity Essay Question http://blog.accepted.com/2013/12/17/approaching-the-diversity-essay-question-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2013/12/17/approaching-the-diversity-essay-question-2/#respond Tue, 17 Dec 2013 16:39:29 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=20075 ]]> For more application essay writing tips, check out our free special report 'From Example to Exemplary'!

Show how your background will add to the mix of perspectives at the college you are applying to.

Many applications now have a question, sometimes optional, geared to encouraging people with minority backgrounds or unusual educational or family histories to write about their background.  If you are an immigrant to the US, the child of immigrants or someone whose ethnicity is a minority in the US, you might find this question an interesting one to show how your background will add to the mix of perspectives at the college you are applying to. If you are applying after having an unusual experience for applicants like joining the military, becoming part of a dance troupe, or caring for an elderly relative, you can use your experience to evoke the way in which you will bring diversity to campus.

Your family’s culture, situation and traditions, and the way they have helped you develop particular character and personality traits are of interest, as well unusual experiences that have shaped you. Perhaps you have grown up with a strong insistence on respecting elders, attending family events or learning your parents’ native language and culture. Perhaps you are close to grandparents and extended family who have taught you how teamwork can help everyone survive. Perhaps you have had to face and deal with difficulties that stem from your parents’ values being in conflict with those of your peers. Perhaps teachers have not always understood the elements of your culture or outside-of-school situation and how they pertain to your school performance. Perhaps you have suffered discrimination and formed your values and personality traits around your success in spite of the discrimination. Perhaps you have learned skills from a lifestyle that is outside the norm–living in foreign countries as the child of diplomats or contractors, performing professionally in theater, dance, music or sports, or communicating with a deaf sibling.

Understanding and explaining how your experience built your empathy for others, a strong will, and character is a good focus for the diversity question.

Learn how to use sample essays to create an exemplary essay of your own! Click here to download our free report!

Accepted.com

Tags: , , , , , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2013/12/17/approaching-the-diversity-essay-question-2/feed/ 0
Which Schools are Good for PE/VC and VC-Backed Entrepreneurship http://blog.accepted.com/2013/12/12/what-schools-are-good-for-pevc-and-vc-backed-entrepreneurship/ http://blog.accepted.com/2013/12/12/what-schools-are-good-for-pevc-and-vc-backed-entrepreneurship/#respond Thu, 12 Dec 2013 17:37:12 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=20156 ]]> Browse through other episodes of Admissions Straight Talk.Admit it: You love the ring of ‘venture capital’ and ‘private equity.’

Enter Pitchbook, the ultimate resource for those looking for a future in PE/VC (and those looking for VCs to fund their futures).

Listen to the full recording of our conversation with Andy White, Senior Research Associate for Pitchbook for some great stats, info, and predictions that every PE/VC wannabe should know.

00:02:22 – PitchBook: Cat-and-mouse game or encyclopedia? (Or both?)

00:04:34 – “Top Universities Producing VC-backed Entrepreneurs.” Why this topic and why these schools.

00:07:54 – Several reasons that some schools just manage to produce more funding-receiving entrepreneurs.

00:13:55 – There is hope for you to get a PE/VC job if you don’t attend Harvard, Wharton, Stanford, Booth, Kellogg. But there is even more hope if you do.

00:19:11 – Another important factor for breaking into the VC industry: your pre-MBA work.

00:22:36 – Spreading the word about the world of VC & PE.

Admissions Straight Talk Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes so you don’t miss any segments! Stay in the admissions know.

*Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com.

Relevant Links:

•  MBA in Sight: Focus on Finance
•  Accepted Blog: Posts on Entrepreneurship
•  PitchBook.com
•  PitchBook Blog
•   “Harvard, 4 Other Schools, Make Up Most MBAs at PE & VC Firms
•  “Top Universities Producing VC-backed Entrepreneurs
•  “Could You Live Without Private Equity?”

Related Episodes

•  Business, Law and Beyond: An Interview with John Engelman
•  Dr. Douglas Stayman Shares the Scoop on Cornell Tech NYC
•  From Luxury Marketing to Entrepreneurship: A Talk with Daria Burke
•  Jeff Reid on Entrepreneurship
•  Interview with Anne Perigo, UM Master in Entrepreneurship

Subscribe

•  Admissions Straight Talk on iTunes
•  Admissions Straight Talk on Stitcher

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2013/12/12/what-schools-are-good-for-pevc-and-vc-backed-entrepreneurship/feed/ 0 Chicago Booth,entrepreneurship,finance,Harvard,Northwestern Kellogg,podcast,Stanford GSB,Wharton Admit it: You love the ring of ‘venture capital’ and ‘private equity.’ - Enter Pitchbook, the ultimate resource for those looking for a future in PE/VC (and those looking for VCs to fund their futures). - Admit it: You love the ring of ‘venture capital’ and ‘private equity.’ Enter Pitchbook, the ultimate resource for those looking for a future in PE/VC (and those looking for VCs to fund their futures). Listen to the full recording of our conversation with Andy White, Senior Research Associate for Pitchbook for some great stats, info, and predictions that every PE/VC wannabe should know. 00:02:22 – PitchBook: Cat-and-mouse game or encyclopedia? (Or both?) 00:04:34 – “Top Universities Producing VC-backed Entrepreneurs.” Why this topic and why these schools. 00:07:54 – Several reasons that some schools just manage to produce more funding-receiving entrepreneurs. 00:13:55 – There is hope for you to get a PE/VC job if you don’t attend Harvard, Wharton, Stanford, Booth, Kellogg. But there is even more hope if you do. 00:19:11 – Another important factor for breaking into the VC industry: your pre-MBA work. 00:22:36 – Spreading the word about the world of VC & PE.  Subscribe to Admissions Straight Talk in iTunes so you don’t miss any segments! Stay in the admissions know. *Theme music is courtesy of podcastthemes.com. Relevant Links: •  MBA in Sight: Focus on Finance •  Accepted Blog: Posts on Entrepreneurship •  PitchBook.com •  PitchBook Blog •   “Harvard, 4 Other Schools, Make Up Most MBAs at PE & VC Firms” •  “Top Universities Producing VC-backed Entrepreneurs” •  “Could You Live Without Private Equity?” Related Episodes •  Business, Law and Beyond: An Interview with John Engelman •  Dr. Douglas Stayman Shares the Scoop on Cornell Tech NYC •  From Luxury Marketing to Entrepreneurship: A Talk with Daria Burke •  Jeff Reid on Entrepreneurship •  Interview with Anne Perigo, UM Master in Entrepreneurship Subscribe •  Admissions Straight Talk on iTunes •  Admissions Straight Talk on Stitcher Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog no 29:56
Happy Thanksgiving! http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/28/happy-thanksgiving-5/ http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/28/happy-thanksgiving-5/#respond Thu, 28 Nov 2013 15:27:47 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=19936 ]]> Today is a national holiday here in the United States, when we pause — at least for a brief moment — to count our blessings. Wherever you are, that is a good exercise.

My family has expanded this year with the birth of two grandchildren. We’ve had a couple of children move to California with their families, and love having our children and grandchildren near by. I certainly have what to be grateful for. We are  truly blessed.

As I have done annually for the last few years on Thanksgiving, I want to highlight one of my favorite posts: Admissions Tip: Thanksgiving Appreciation.

And with that, let me wish anyone reading this blog today a Happy Thanksgiving!

Linda Abraham By , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

Tags: , , , , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/28/happy-thanksgiving-5/feed/ 0
Getting Serious for the SAT http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/27/getting-serious-for-the-sat-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/27/getting-serious-for-the-sat-2/#respond Wed, 27 Nov 2013 17:21:27 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=19638 ]]> For more SAT prep resources check out our SAT 101 page.

Did you know that guessing on the SAT is not a bad thing?

It’s easy to pick up an SAT prep book and just flip through it every now and then. And this isn’t that bad of thing either: you can brush up on the basics, do some practice problems, and, with barely any sweat on your brow, move on to something else.

One reason students have this attitude is the SAT takes place almost every month throughout the school year. It is easy to shrug off serious prep and tell yourself that you’ll do more later (remember grades and social stuff will intrude!).

But if you want to do your best on the SAT, you got to hunker down. In other words, grab that SAT prep book (preferably the one published by College Board), turn off that smartphone, and find a comfortable place to sit. It’s time to get serious.

Vocab Prep

Many SAT students put off studying vocab to the last minute, thinking that it is just like any vocab quiz they’ve studied before in the past—study for 10 minutes, before and voila, regurgitation time.

With the SAT you have to deal with thousands of words, and the sooner you start the better. But don’t just start going through generic SAT word lists. Using flashcards that come in a set testing the most common SAT words is a great place to start. You can also use quizlet.com to make your online flashcards for those words you encounter while you prep.

Learn the Ropes

Don’t just do practice problem after practice problem. Learn how the test actually works. The College Board book has a great introduction, and you can learn SAT basics from blogs such as Magoosh. Think you already got that part down? Well, did you know that guessing on the SAT is not a bad thing? In fact, guessing—in certain cases—can help improve your score. You’ll also learn how to avoid common SAT traps. Doing so will definitely improve your score.

Timed Sessions

Okay, so you know how the test works, and the way the test writers try to trick you. Then it is time to get serious. Start creating practice sessions. First time yourself on an entire section. Grade the section, try to figure out your mistakes (don’t just look at the answer), and think of ways to avoid making the same mistakes in the future. As you near the big day, you should be able to take an entire timed SAT test (and don’t forget to turn off your phone!).

Need a Hand?

Sometimes, trying to follow a set routine is hard. Hey, after all that is part of the reason you’ve only been able to crack the SAT book open every now and then. But don’t worry—we have devised a three-month SAT study schedule that will help get you into SAT shape (without taking away your social life—at least not all of it!).




magooshThis post was written by Kevin Rocci, resident SAT expert at Magoosh. For more advice on SATprep, check out Magoosh’s SAT blog.

Tags: , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/27/getting-serious-for-the-sat-2/feed/ 0
Your $100 Savings Expires TODAY! http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/27/your-100-savings-expires-today/ http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/27/your-100-savings-expires-today/#respond Wed, 27 Nov 2013 15:51:54 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=19849 ]]> Seeking one-on-one assistance on your college/grad/med/law/business school application? Get the help you need AND put $100 back in your pocket when you take advantage of our November Special.



Through MIDNIGHT (Pacific Standard Time) TODAY, Wednesday, November 27th, you can save $100 on all non-rush orders over $2000 with coupon code Nov100.

Get crackin’ on those apps – deadlines will be here before you know it! Choose from the following catalogs of services: MBA, Medical School, Law School, Grad School, College



      

Accepted.com

Tags: , , , , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/27/your-100-savings-expires-today/feed/ 0
Yale 2014 Tips for the Common Application http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/25/yale-2014-tips-for-the-common-application/ http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/25/yale-2014-tips-for-the-common-application/#respond Mon, 25 Nov 2013 17:10:52 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=19788 ]]> Check out more 2014 common app tips!

“What would you do with a free weekend next month?”

A student wrote me an email a few weeks ago.  In it, he asked, “Do you think I should submit a version of the essay about economics that I wrote for Penn as the Yale essay?”

I’m in favor of streamlining the essays for your college applications. Often there are ways to adapt an essay or theme that you have crafted for another college with few additional edits.  This time however, I sent a single sentence reply.  “Is your interest in economics the most important thing you have to share with Yale?” 

We didn’t need to discuss this further.  Of course he had plenty of other experiences to draw upon in crafting an essay.  Yale’s request, to “reflect on something you would like us to know about you that we might not learn from the rest of your application or on something you would like to say more about,” is completely open-ended.  It also encourages applicants to think creatively and cohesively about their entire Yale application.  Don’t repeat themes or topics you have already written about in the Common Application.

Aspiring engineers applying to Yale will also need to write an additional essay outlining their interest and experiences related to engineering.

My favorite part of the Yale application is the short answer section.  In addition to identifying the roots of your interest in Yale, there are five questions, each requiring an answer of less than 150 characters.  It’s a chance to be creative, concise, and human.  “What would you do with a free weekend next month,” and “What is the best piece of advice you have received while in high school,” Yale wants to know.  With these, often the first answer that comes to mind is a version of the correct one, but I encourage you to be certain that you have shared your own personality in your answers.  As with all of your applications, this is the only chance you have to be understood, in your own words, by the admission committee.   Take your time, be judicious, draft carefully, and edit thoroughly.







Whitney Bruce By , who has worked in college admissions since 1996. She has served as a Senior Assistant Director of Admissions (Washington U), Application Reader (University of Michigan), Assistant Director of College Counseling (private prep school in St. Louis), and an independent college counselor. She is happy to advise you as you apply to college.

Tags: , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/25/yale-2014-tips-for-the-common-application/feed/ 0
Save $100. Smile. Get Accepted. http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/25/save-100-smile-get-accepted/ http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/25/save-100-smile-get-accepted/#respond Mon, 25 Nov 2013 16:22:37 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=19845 ]]> Want to move closer to acceptance at your top choice school and put $100 back in your pocket?

Save $100 on all non-rush admissions services over $2000! Click here to shop now! Purchase non-rush Accepted.com editing or consulting services totaling $2000 or more through Wednesday, November 27, 2013 and save $100!

Choose the service that meets your admission goal:

MBA Admission Essay Editing and Consulting Services

Medical School Admissions – Catalog of Services

Law School Application and Personal Statement Consulting

Grad School Admission and Personal Statement Services

College Catalog of Admission Services

Don’t delay – get your $100 discount today with coupon code NOV100!

Accepted.com

Tags: , , , , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/25/save-100-smile-get-accepted/feed/ 0
Penn Sees Huge Increase in Early Decision Applications http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/20/penn-sees-huge-increase-in-early-decision-applications/ http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/20/penn-sees-huge-increase-in-early-decision-applications/#respond Wed, 20 Nov 2013 17:07:16 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=19724 ]]> A Daily Pennsylvanian article notes Penn’s new high in early decision applications. This year, 5,133 students applied to Penn early decision, an increase of 6.6% from last year and of 41% since 2008 when only 3,631 applicants applied early decision.

This year, Penn extended its early decision undergraduate application deadline by ten days after applicants experienced technical glitches with the common app’s CA4 platform. The university also extended its deadline last year (due to Hurricane Sandy) and two years ago (also weather-related).

Check out college admissions 101!

(Image from the Daily Pennsylvanian article, “Penn Admissions sees new high in ED applicants”)









Accepted.com

Tags: ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/20/penn-sees-huge-increase-in-early-decision-applications/feed/ 0
Tips for Completing Your Princeton Supplement to the Common Application http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/19/tips-for-completing-your-princeton-supplement-to-the-common-application-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/19/tips-for-completing-your-princeton-supplement-to-the-common-application-2/#respond Tue, 19 Nov 2013 17:50:02 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=19540 ]]> Woodrow_WilsonI’ve always enjoyed working with students who are applying to Princeton.  As a group, they have interesting and engaged minds.  Extracurricularly, their accomplishments are varied and distinctive.  The Princeton application tries to elicit specifics about those facets of each applicant through its supplement.  In the age of streamlined “easy apps” and electronic application review that makes applicants seem more similar than different, Princeton is one of the colleges that seek to learn more about the person behind the papers.

The section entitled “A Few Details” has been a part of the Princeton application for years, and applicants can truly address the categories in just a few words.  Complete sentences and lots of explanation aren’t necessary or even encouraged. As a Princeton applicant, you are no doubt intelligent, passionate, and accomplished.  Be that same intelligent, passionate, accomplished teenager in this section.  Your answers to these details need not all be highbrow, super-intellectual, SAT-word answers.  Resist the urge to be someone you are not in this section.

Recently, there has been a lot of press about how a high school student should spend his or her summers to enhance college applications.  Princeton asks you to specifically detail your recent summer activities.  Whether you travelled extensively, studied intensely, or worked a full-time job, you learned something.  Think about those life lessons as you list your summer activities.  There may also be material for your longer writing sample lurking in those months of summer vacation.
As a longer writing sample, Princeton offers four choices for candidates to write one essay of about 500 words.

1. Tell us about a person who has influenced you in a significant way.

With this topic, it is easy to tell the reader a lot about the person who has influenced you, yet miss the opportunity to explain how that person’s influence has impacted you.  A strong essay does both, with an emphasis on the latter. If you considered answering the Common Application prompt about a place where you are content, this one takes the same sort of balance as the CA prompt.

2. Tell us how you would address the questions raised by the quotation below, or reflect upon an experience you have had that was relevant to these questions.

“How can we unlearn the practices of inequality? In other words, how do we increase our capacities not just to act without racism but to actively promote racial equality?”

Imani Perry, Professor, Center for African American Studies, and Faculty Associate, Program in Law and Public Affairs, Princeton University.

This is a great question to answer if you have actively engaged with issues of racial equality over the past four years. Perhaps, you’ve written research papers on the topic, or debated it. Maybe you have worked on political campaigns or been involved in social justice work. If you have felt the sting of racial inequality in your own life– how do you suggest fixing the problem?

3. Using the statement below as a starting point, tell us about an event or experience that helped you define one of your values or changed how you approach the world.

“Princeton in the Nation’s Service” was the title of a speech given by Woodrow Wilson on the 150th anniversary of the University. It became the unofficial Princeton motto and was expanded for the University’s 250th anniversary to “Princeton in the nation’s service and in the service of all nations.”

Woodrow Wilson, Princeton Class of 1879, served on the faculty and was Princeton’s president from 1902–1910.

4. “Culture is what presents us with the kinds of valuable things that can fill a life. And insofar as we can recognize the value in those things and make them part of our lives, our lives are meaningful.”

Gideon Rosen, Stuart Professor of Philosophy, chair of the Council of the Humanities and director of the Program in Humanistic Studies, Princeton University.

5. Using a favorite quotation from an essay or book you have read in the last three years as a starting point, tell us about an event or experience that helped you define one of your values or changed how you approach the world. Please write the quotation at the beginning of your essay.

The final three topics all address one point: “Tell us about an event or experience that helped you define one of your values or changed how you approach the world.”  Each of these questions is asking you, the applicant, to tell a story. Pick an experience, large or small, that impacted you, and share it with the admissions committee.  As you tell your story, ensure that you address its impact on you.  Your options in this question allow you to address this in any number of ways, from the most macro, global event, to a smaller, more personal moment.  Don’t be afraid to think, draw connections, and demonstrate maturity through your essay.

Download 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid to learn how to eliminate the most common flaws in your application essays.

Whitney Bruce By , who has worked in college admissions since 1996. She has served as a Senior Assistant Director of Admissions (Washington U), Application Reader (University of Michigan), Assistant Director of College Counseling (private prep school in St. Louis), and an independent college counselor. She is happy to advise you as you apply to college.

Tags: , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/19/tips-for-completing-your-princeton-supplement-to-the-common-application-2/feed/ 0
4 SAT Study Secrets http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/18/4-sat-study-secrets/ http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/18/4-sat-study-secrets/#respond Mon, 18 Nov 2013 16:35:31 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=19677 ]]> Check out our SAT 101 page for more tips.

Get accustomed to reading with a timer.

What exactly is the key to a high mark on the SAT? Many individuals claim hard work, memorization, and practice are the central components to scoring well. While these claims contain some truth, there are also less known and more effective ways to improve your score results. Continue reading this article to learn how even watching television or simply utilizing logic can aid you in bettering your performance on the SAT.

1. Less is more

Ironically, the longer students devote to perusing the passages on the Critical Reading section, the more they often struggle with the accompanying questions. Test-takers typically have only enough time to briefly skim the passages. The key to mastering the Critical Reading portion of the SAT is unlearning many of the typical tactics learned. For instance, techniques that urge students to underline, take notes, and read slowly should all be disregarded on the SAT. Due to the limited amount of time allotted during the exam, students must break these habits that have been instilled in them in order to succeed on the SAT. To do this, you should get accustomed to reading with a timer. Your goal should be to push through the reading, rather than work hard to understand it on a deep level.

2. Learn from unexpected sources 

For many students, vocabulary is one of the most daunting aspects of this assessment. To expand vocabulary, high schoolers can gain a great deal from watching certain television programs. Shows with legitimate historical, legal, and medical themes can be particularly educational, for example. During a single episode of a courtroom drama, the SAT words “erroneous,” “exonerate,” and “vindicate” could all easily pop up. When watching shows that fall into these categories, keep a paper and pen nearby in order to jot down any words that are unfamiliar to you. Compared to memorizing lengthy lists of terms, this method is a contextual, more natural way of learning vocabulary. Undoubtedly, difficult words are easier to understand when displayed in relevant scenarios.

3. Use foreign languages

An additional strategy to excel in SAT vocabulary is to pay close attention in your foreign language class. Spanish, French, Italian, and the other romance languages are all derived from Latin. Knowledge of any of these languages behooves test-takers, as many of the more sophisticated words in English have Latin roots. For example, the SAT word “lucid” is defined as “clear, easily understood, or bright.” This word originates from the Latin term for light, lucidus (luz in Spanish and luce in Italian). Additionally, consider the link between loqui in Latin (“to speak”) and the English words “eloquent” and “loquacious,” which are popular SAT words. The prevalence of similarities between SAT terms and their foreign counterparts is truly astounding. If such a class is available, taking Latin in high school could be even more beneficial. A strong understanding of Latin can help just as much with vocabulary as it can with the sentence corrections portion of the SAT.

4. Employ your natural logic

Considering the sentence correction questions with a critical and rational mind is essential to doing well. For instance, analyze the sentence, “My terrier likes playing fetch more than most dogs.” At first glance, it may seem that nothing is grammatically wrong. However, you should ask yourself if the sentence is logical. The sentence really means to say, “My terrier likes playing fetch more than most dogs do,” or, “My terrier likes playing fetch more than most dogs like playing fetch.” The original phrasing is synonymous with stating, “My terrier likes playing fetch more than he/she likes most dogs,” and we know that is not the message that the author is intending to convey. While familiarizing oneself with English grammar principles is likely to increase one’s score on the SAT, you must not forget that utilizing logic and reason can result in a great difference, too.







Tiffany Sorensen is a professional SAT tutor and contributing writer for Varsity Tutors. She holds a Bachelor’s degree in Spanish Language & Literature from Stony Brook University.

Tags: ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/18/4-sat-study-secrets/feed/ 0
5 Keys to Concreteness http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/11/five-keys-to-concreteness/ http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/11/five-keys-to-concreteness/#respond Mon, 11 Nov 2013 16:40:34 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=19359 ]]> Make sure your application essays don't contain any of the 5 fatal flaws!

Chris Adcom: Smart, hardworking, and short on time.

I like to apply the principles established in Chip Heath and Dan Heath’s Made to Stick to personal statements and application essays. In this post I focus on concreteness.

The third of Made to Stick‘s six key principles, concreteness, doesn’t seem to apply to intangibles like leadership, achievement, teamwork, or character – the topics you typically need to cover in your essays. Yet, even when discussing abstractions, if your essays are concrete they will communicate more effectively and more memorably.

Here are five tips to make your personal statements and application essays concrete:

1. Use sensory language when appropriate. Write in terms of sights, sounds, smells, touch, and taste.

2. Break down large ideas into smaller sub-topics and concepts. (For more on this idea, please see “Fatal Flaw #4: Superficiality.” ) The grand summary or platitude won’t cut it.

3. Quantify when possible. Did you increase membership a lot when president or did you increase membership by 50%? Did you lead a team or did you lead a 10-person team?

4. Without using clichés, relate events, entities, and concepts to ideas that the reader already knows and trusts. For example if I say that “Accepted is the McKinsey of admissions consulting firms,” clients will expect top-notch work and a strategic approach to admissions.

5. Think about the human beings you are addressing in your essays. You have read interviews of and met with admissions committee members. Perhaps create a character that represents Chris Adcom for you. For me, Chris is usually smart, professional, and hard-working. Typically a “people-person” with a genuine interest in others, she also has a well–practiced nose for baloney and doesn’t like the odor. She is always short on time and consequently ends up skimming essays if they are boring or don’t answer the question, even though she doesn’t like to do so. She is dedicated to helping her school create a diverse, talented class of students who will be happy to attend her school, contribute to campus life as students, and add to the school’s reputation as alumni. That’s her job. Write your essays for Chris.

Use these five keys to concreteness when crafting your essays to make them more compelling.







Linda Abraham By , president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

Tags: , , , , , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/11/five-keys-to-concreteness/feed/ 0
NYU Stern Offers New Scholarship http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/10/nyu-stern-offers-new-scholarship/ http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/10/nyu-stern-offers-new-scholarship/#respond Sun, 10 Nov 2013 19:20:00 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=19522 ]]> Learn more about NYU Stern.

“We’re in the dream-enabling business at NYU”

NYU Stern received a $10 million gift that will go towards a scholarship fund for college seniors who wish to pursue their MBAs at Stern after they graduate. The scholarship is named for the donor, William R. Berkley, NYU alumnus and vice chairman of the NYU board of trustees. Berkley’s $10 million gift is part of NYU’s six-year campaign to raise $1 billion for scholarships.

Exceptional college students must apply to Stern’s full-time MBA program and The William R. Berkley Scholarship Program during their senior year on the regular Stern application deadline schedule.

The program provides awardees with “a scholarship that covers the full two-year tuition and fees, provides a housing stipend of $18,000/year, and includes a $10,000/year stipend for books and other expenses. Berkley Scholars will also receive intensive mentoring from the Stern community.” In other words, it covers virtually everything.

“We’re in the dream-enabling business at NYU,” says Peter Henry, NYU Stern’s dean. “With Bill’s support, we have the opportunity to inspire the best young minds around the country and the world to dream big. Whether they’ve studied engineering or economics, physics or philosophy and everything in between, we want to put the tools of business into the hands of the most promising leaders of tomorrow.”

I emailed Jessica Neville, Executive Director of Stern’s Office of Public Affairs, with a few questions. I thought I’d share her answers here:

1. Is this for ANY college senior? In other words do you have to be an undergraduate student at NYU or do you have to be a U.S. resident or citizen? Are there any other restrictions?

Jessica Neville: Yes, domestic and international college seniors are eligible to apply. We are seeking seniors who demonstrate a combination of stellar academic performance and exceptional potential to contribute to business and society.

2. How many students a year (or at least in the first year) do you anticipate will be awarded the scholarship?

JN: The program will be highly selective with a maximum of 10 students per year.

3. Does the student need to start the MBA immediately upon graduate, or is there a deferral option?

JN: There is no deferral option. College seniors will be required to start the Stern full-time MBA program in the fall after graduating from college.

(See NYU’s press release announcing the scholarship for more info.)






Accepted.com

Tags: , , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/10/nyu-stern-offers-new-scholarship/feed/ 0
Which Universities Contribute the Most to VC-Backed Entrepreneurship? http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/08/which-universities-contribute-the-most-to-vc-backed-entrepreneurship/ http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/08/which-universities-contribute-the-most-to-vc-backed-entrepreneurship/#respond Fri, 08 Nov 2013 16:02:59 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=19353 ]]> PitchBook did a study that ranks universities around the world based on the number of graduates who have founded U.S. companies with VC-funding from 2010 to 2013. The idea is that a school’s ranking success shouldn’t just reflect its scores or its sports teams, but that it should reflect how actively the schools are producing economic value in the U.S. – attracting investors and generating jobs.

Check out our College Admissions 101 page.

The Indian Institutes of India is the only non-American school on the list, showing, as the PitchBook blog post points out, the value immigrants bring to the U.S. economy.

See the PitchBook blog for more info.







Accepted.com

Tags: , , , , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/08/which-universities-contribute-the-most-to-vc-backed-entrepreneurship/feed/ 0
Resourceful Essay Recycling http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/05/resourcesful-essay-recycling/ http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/05/resourcesful-essay-recycling/#respond Tue, 05 Nov 2013 15:40:48 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=19368 ]]> Click here for tips for writing exemplary applicaiton essays.

Recycle with Caution.

You’re applying to six different schools and each one requires 2-7 essays/personal statements which equals…a whole lot of writing. How can you draft so many essays and still maintain a fresh and original voice in each?

Did you know that you can probably adapt one essay from a given application to another essay on another application?

You can, and you should – that is, if you follow the guidelines below to ensure that you’re not simply cutting and pasting (no matter how similar the questions appear to be) and that you’re not sloppy about it.

A few helpful tips:

1. Give Each Essay a Unique Theme and Focus on Different Experiences: If you present two essays on the same experience in a single application, you’ll probably end up with duplicate copy, and at least one of the essays will be boring. Within a single application, you want to present varied experiences, keep repetition as close to zero as possible.

2. Chart Yourself: If you have multiple essays/personal statements to manage, consider making a chart and attributing certain experiences, accomplishments, and skills to certain questions so you don’t end up using the same experience, accomplishment, or skill for more than one question at a given school.

3. Portray Your Multi-Dimensional Self: While composing multiple essays, keep in mind the different layers and textures of your personality. Try to present these layers in your essays so the adcoms receive a rich, multi-dimensional portrait of you as a human being.

4. Double Check Your Name Dropping: Check CAREFULLY (and then check again) to make sure that you don’t forget to change an occurrence of “Wharton” to “Ross” when you adapt your essay. Sending a “Why I want to go to Wharton” essay to the Ross adcom doesn’t bode well for you!








Accepted.com

Tags: , , , , , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/05/resourcesful-essay-recycling/feed/ 0
Application Essay Tip: Generic-Itis Prevention http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/01/application-essay-tip-generic-itis-prevention-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/01/application-essay-tip-generic-itis-prevention-2/#respond Fri, 01 Nov 2013 15:30:04 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=19123 ]]> Suffering from Generic-itis? We can help.

If you are suffering from Generic-itis, make sure to seek treatment.

Accepted’s editors have noted an epidemic. Generic-itis.

The symptoms:

• Mind-blowing, meaningless, and grand generic declarative statements without any substance, specifically related to why an applicant wants to attend a certain program.

• Irritation to admissions readers causing them to believe that you know nothing about their school and don’t belong.

Treatment:

• For the Adcom: Deny the application as quickly as possible and move on to the next application.

• For Applicants: See below.

Here is an example of a severe case of generic-itis that I drafted based on several different examples I recently read, along with years of experience in this business:

“I find Top Choice’s global MBA program very exciting and interesting. With it, I will be able to elevate my already diverse knowledge of the world to a higher and more sophisticated level.  Combining the business analytical skills that I will obtain at Top Choice with my advanced mathematical skill, I will be able to help the fast-growing industry of clean energy progress and profit.  Moreover, I will explore Top Choice’s other outstanding academic fields, thus exposing me to resources outside the business school.  Not to mention Top Choice’s amazing students and alumni who will become my colleagues and with whom I will be sharing my experiences. TOP CHOICE will certainly add to my expertise and help me achieve my goal in the future. Having ambitious goals, I need the help of a great school like TOP CHOICE, a school that also has great ambitions.  I can and will use the Top Choice’s education to the fullest possible extent.  Today, I would be proud to join the community of TOP CHOICE, and tomorrow, TOP CHOICE will be proud to have me as an alumnus connecting Top Choice to the world of business and clean energy.”

I hope you are thinking that no one really writes like this. In that case your immune system is strong even if your conclusion is incorrect. However, if the above bears any resemblance to the reasons you provide for wanting to attend a specific program, you are suffering from generic-itis.

Your treatment:

• Find specifics in the program that compel you to apply and attend.

• Tie those specifics to your future goals or to your educational preferences.

Although the example above is for an MBA application, if you are writing “Why this school” essays or paragraphs  for college, law, medical school or any other program you too could be suffering from Generic-itis.

Have yourself tested today. Accepted’s staff of experienced, professional editors would be happy to help you just as we have helped thousands of other generic-itis sufferers.







Accepted.com

Tags: , , , , , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2013/11/01/application-essay-tip-generic-itis-prevention-2/feed/ 0
2014 Tips for Completing Your Harvard Supplement to the Common Application http://blog.accepted.com/2013/10/31/2014-tips-for-completing-your-harvard-supplement-to-the-common-application/ http://blog.accepted.com/2013/10/31/2014-tips-for-completing-your-harvard-supplement-to-the-common-application/#respond Thu, 31 Oct 2013 16:10:49 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=19274 ]]> Click here for Harvard Application Essay Tips.Last year, more than 35,000 students applied to Harvard College.  Of those, 2,047 received offers of admission to join the class of 2017.  That’s 5.8%.  With 35,000 applicants, most of whom present nearly perfect academic credentials and outstanding commitments to extracurricular excellence, you face a critical question: How do you stand out?

With the entire college process, be yourself.  Be your best self, but yourself. Your Harvard application is no different.

This year, Harvard has reinstated the restrictive early action process. If Harvard is your first choice, you can consider applying early with a deadline of November 1.  The restrictive early action choice prohibits applicants from filing additional single choice early action, or early decision applications.  It does allow for submission of rolling admission or regular decision applications prior to receiving a decision from Harvard.  If you are admitted to Harvard under the early action program, you have until May 1 to decide whether or not to accept the offer of admission.

A completed Harvard application includes either the ACT with writing or the SAT exam.  Harvard also requires two SAT II subject tests.  To allow for your application to be fully reviewed, and to save the expense of rush reporting, try to complete all of your testing requirements in advance of the deadline, by the October deadline for early action and the November test date for regular decision.

The Harvard Common Application supplement does not require an additional essay, however, you may choose to submit one on the topic of your choice.  Before you feel compelled to fill blank space, be certain that you will enhance your application by adding additional information.  Has there been more to the last 18 years of your life than you have already explained?  Probably.  Will it take time and introspection to write a worthwhile supplemental essay?  Yes.  Before you begin writing, consider the information you have already provided through your common application.  Brainstorm about other experiences that might differentiate you from other candidates, and put yourself at the initial center of your essay.  You are the person the admission committee wants to understand. The key in answering this open-ended essay is to be certain that the reader knows more about the way you think about, engage in, or reflect on the world around you after reading the supplement than before.

One of the Harvard suggestions is to include a list of books that you have read in the last 12 months.  If you spend substantial time reading for pleasure or intellectual engagement, this list might provide compelling insight on your application.  If your list outside of AP English includes only a few bestsellers and a “Chicken Soup for the Soul,” consider a different approach to the question.

While it is tempting to ignore the question, or submit an essay that you have already written for another application, take the time to put your best work in front of the Harvard admission committee.  When you have finished the first draft, consider the reader of your application.  One extra page, times 35,000 applicants, means you best have something meaningful to say.







Whitney Bruce By , who has worked in college admissions since 1996. She has served as a Senior Assistant Director of Admissions (Washington U), Application Reader (University of Michigan), Assistant Director of College Counseling (private prep school in St. Louis), and an independent college counselor. She is happy to advise you as you apply to college.

Tags: , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2013/10/31/2014-tips-for-completing-your-harvard-supplement-to-the-common-application/feed/ 0
2014 Tips for Completing Your Cornell Supplement to the Common Application http://blog.accepted.com/2013/10/27/2014-tips-for-completing-your-cornell-supplement-to-the-common-application/ http://blog.accepted.com/2013/10/27/2014-tips-for-completing-your-cornell-supplement-to-the-common-application/#respond Sun, 27 Oct 2013 16:40:20 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=19191 ]]> Check out our college special reports for more great admissions tips!A friend of mine has a son who studying at Cornell.  When I look at the Cornell supplement, it isn’t hard to picture “John”, sitting at his computer, writing the supplemental statement.  It’s also easy to see why he was such a compelling applicant to their admission committee.  John is a birder, and he was well acquainted with Cornell’s ornithology program.  As a high school student, he had spent hours searching for specific species and summers tracking birds in northern Canada.  He could tell you specifically what he was going to do with his Cornell education.

Happily now, he’s in Ithaca, following through on his initial plans. If you are searching for academic options in the Ivy League, look carefully at Cornell.  Its undergraduate enrollment is larger than its Ivy brethren, and the diversity of its offerings and majors complements its size.  Applicants select one (and sometimes an alternate) of the 7 undergraduate divisions when submitting an application.



While it might be tempting to check the box for a less competitive division (although they are all competitive) and then change after admission, Cornell’s supplemental essay questions ask students to write specifically about the roots of their interests.  The admissions committee is searching for students who have made deliberate choices about their intended areas of study. You’ve embarked upon a tough fiction-writing task to convince the committee of your desire to study architecture when you fulfilled your arts requirement exclusively with drama, avoided physics like the plague, and have devoted your extracurricular time to soccer and the soup kitchen.

While it isn’t uncommon for students to change their minds about their areas of study while in college, devoting thought to what excites you intellectually now will help you determine what type of environment suits you in college, and will give you career direction as you move forward in the next few years.

For students who are planning to apply to a number of colleges, writing about your area of academic interest is a common question.  For each of these questions, avoid general statements such as “English is my favorite class” and instead focus on the specifics about studying English that appeal to you.  Did a specific project excite you?  Do you enjoy a particular genre of writing?  What are your career goals, and how does your intended major relate to that?  If you are writing about extracurricular pursuits, which are particularly relevant to Agriculture and Hotel Administration applicants, again, be specific about your experiences and what you’ve learned from them.

Applicants to Cornell generally demonstrate very high levels of academic achievement in the classroom and on standardized tests.  Each undergraduate division at Cornell, however, has slightly different requirements for admission regarding testing and high school curriculum.  Double-check the requirements to ensure that you have completed all of the necessary components before submitting your application.







Whitney Bruce By , who has worked in college admissions since 1996. She has served as a Senior Assistant Director of Admissions (Washington U), Application Reader (University of Michigan), Assistant Director of College Counseling (private prep school in St. Louis), and an independent college counselor. She is happy to advise you as you apply to college.

Tags: , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2013/10/27/2014-tips-for-completing-your-cornell-supplement-to-the-common-application/feed/ 0
Tips for Completing Your 2014 Columbia Supplement to the Common Application http://blog.accepted.com/2013/10/23/tips-for-completing-your-2014-columbia-supplement-to-the-common-application/ http://blog.accepted.com/2013/10/23/tips-for-completing-your-2014-columbia-supplement-to-the-common-application/#comments Wed, 23 Oct 2013 18:25:37 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=19126 ]]> New York City

What makes Columbia special?

When I visited Columbia University, it was clear to me that the undergraduate college takes distinct pride in two things: the 100-year-old Core Curriculum and the University’s relationship with the city in which it resides.  The Columbia University supplement reflects those emphases.  As a prospective student, I encourage you to think about how these two components of the Columbia education fit with your educational goals.

The Columbia supplement consists of several lists and three short answer questions.  For the quick questions about your interests, which ask you to list books, concerts, media that you have enjoyed over the past year, provide straightforward responses.  As an academically engaged student, there should be plenty of media and arts that have captured your attention.  Share both the mundane and the more unusual.  If you have a strong interest in a subject area, chances are your reading interests at least peripherally relate.  The Core Curriculum at Columbia includes humanities courses that focus on music and art in addition to literature, and the question about performances or exhibits dovetails with this component of the curriculum. These courses also take advantage of the rich opportunities available to students in New York City.

The three 300 word responses are equally straightforward.  With each of these questions, remember to relate your answers to your own experiences and how they have impacted you. This year, Columbia is one of a number of colleges who have adapted the “expand upon an extracurricular activity” from previous versions of the Common Application.  The second question asks you to expand upon one of the books, artworks, or creative works you listed earlier in the supplement.

The final response asks applicants what they consider most appealing about Columbia.  In answering this, you have so many options, including Columbia’s place as one of the few remaining colleges with a swim test (College only, not engineering) but think carefully about what makes Columbia special, including the integration of a strong campus center (the vast majority of students live on campus for four years) with the accessibility of the city and its commitment to a core curriculum.  There are many facets to Columbia that make it distinctive, and therefore, your short answers about your interest in Columbia should be specific.  If you feel that you need more information about Columbia and its programs, check the website for more information about their fall evening programs in cities around the United States.

Columbia is a member of the Common Application, and does offer an early decision program for students who are confident that Columbia is their first choice.

Download 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid to learn how to eliminate the most common flaws in your application essays.


Whitney Bruce By , who has worked in college admissions since 1996. She has served as a Senior Assistant Director of Admissions (Washington U), Application Reader (University of Michigan), Assistant Director of College Counseling (private prep school in St. Louis), and an independent college counselor. She is happy to advise you as you apply to college.

Tags: ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2013/10/23/tips-for-completing-your-2014-columbia-supplement-to-the-common-application/feed/ 2
Wharton Leadership Program for High School Seniors http://blog.accepted.com/2013/10/21/wharton-leadership-program-for-high-school-seniors/ http://blog.accepted.com/2013/10/21/wharton-leadership-program-for-high-school-seniors/#respond Mon, 21 Oct 2013 16:20:49 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=18969 ]]> Get the lowdown on Wharton

The Wharton Campus in Philadelphia

Do you know about Wharton’s Leadership in the Business World Program for Rising HS Seniors?

We urge high school juniors to check out this cool program if they’re interested in business education. Wharton’s Leadership in the Business World (LBW) program is an intensive summer program for rising high school seniors who are interested in exploring business education. During the program, students will be introduced to undergraduate business education and will receive the opportunity to further develop their teamwork, leadership, and communication skills.

LBW is run on both the Wharton campus in Philadelphia and the Wharton campus in San Francisco.

To get accepted to this highly selective program, you must provide a record of academic excellence, demonstrate leadership ability, and show an interest in further honing your leadership skills. Applications open on November 1, 2013 and must be submitted by the February 21, 2014 deadline. There is a required essay.






Accepted.com

Tags: , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2013/10/21/wharton-leadership-program-for-high-school-seniors/feed/ 0
How to Choose X Number of Essay Questions to Answer from Y Number of Choices http://blog.accepted.com/2013/10/14/how-to-choose-x-number-of-essay-questions-to-answer-from-y-number-of-choices/ http://blog.accepted.com/2013/10/14/how-to-choose-x-number-of-essay-questions-to-answer-from-y-number-of-choices/#respond Mon, 14 Oct 2013 15:46:58 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=18894 ]]> Optional Essays: When & how to write them.

How do you know which one(s) to pick?

If you face multiple essay questions on an application, how are you going to choose which one(s) you should answer and which one(s) you should skip? (Note: Fewer schools are offering multiple-question options though it’s good to know how to approach this issue if you’re using the Common Application, or applying to Stanford GSB or one of the other schools that does offer you question choices.)

First, options are good! But they do force you to think (a task we’re not always so excited to do). If a school makes you choose two out of four or three out of four questions to answer – how do you know which one(s) to pick?

You want to choose the questions that allow you to portray yourself at your best – to present your most impressive qualifications and talents, and to demonstrate to the adcom that you’re top applicant material.

How?

• Choose topics that complement the other topics that you have discussed (or will discuss if you haven’t written any yet), and that complement the information you’ve provided in other parts of your application (like your resume/CV, letters of rec, transcript, etc.). For example, your resume presents your work history, but can’t go into any depth. Your essays can go into depth and can discuss experiences in greater detail, as well as non-professional experiences that didn’t make it into your resume.

• If you feel uncomfortable writing about a certain topic (like if a question asks about your career vision, and your career goals are still fuzzy), then that’s another reason to choose (or not choose) one question over another.

In short, figure out what you would like the admissions board to know about you, and then choose essays that will do the job and minimize repetition.

You’ve got options – and opportunity!







Accepted.com

Tags: , , , , , , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2013/10/14/how-to-choose-x-number-of-essay-questions-to-answer-from-y-number-of-choices/feed/ 0
Our Very Own Judy Gruen is Published in the Wall Street Journal! http://blog.accepted.com/2013/10/13/judy-gruen-in-the-wall-st-journal/ http://blog.accepted.com/2013/10/13/judy-gruen-in-the-wall-st-journal/#respond Sun, 13 Oct 2013 16:22:28 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=18862 ]]> Check out Judy Gruen's profile!

No, she’s not leaving Accepted.

Accepted’s own Judy Gruen has her first column, “Too Many Reps to Raunchy Music Hurt My Core”, in the Wall Street Journal! If you’re a subscriber, just click on the link. If you’re not a WSJ subscriber, google “Judy Gruen Wall Street Journal” and it may come up without requiring login.

No, she’s not leaving Accepted, and the piece is social commentary and unrelated to admissions, but the fact that an Accepted consultant is also a Wall Street Journal contributor is indicative of the kind of editing skill that Accepted brings to your application. And of course Judy has the admissions know-how too. She has been advising applicants since 1996 and co-authored MBA Admission for Smarties along with many admissions ebooks, special reports, and blog articles.

Congrats Judy Gruen!







Accepted.com

Tags: , , , , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2013/10/13/judy-gruen-in-the-wall-st-journal/feed/ 0
Cramming for the SAT: Worst Idea of the Year http://blog.accepted.com/2013/10/10/cramming-for-the-sat-worst-idea-of-the-year/ http://blog.accepted.com/2013/10/10/cramming-for-the-sat-worst-idea-of-the-year/#respond Thu, 10 Oct 2013 18:35:02 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=18665 ]]>

There are more options for SAT preparation than clothes in your closet.

Packing is an art. And I’m not talking about for your trip to Disneyworld. I’m talking about packing your brain for the SAT. Many students, for so many reasons, at some point, end up packing and cramming at the last minute for a test or a project. Sometimes you can’t avoid a cram session. But this is the worst possible scenario for the SAT. Stanford University knows this and recommends the same thing to their students:

“…the majority of the information gained through cramming sessions ends up being forgotten not just over a period of time but even during the actual test itself. … cramming places too much stress onto the brain, pushing it beyond its limits. When the brain is overworked too much, too often, it increases feelings of anxiety, frustration, fatigue and even confusion.”

For the SAT, and for your future success, don’t cram.

Some keys to avoid cramming involve sleep, proper planning, good materials, and taking breaks:

Don’t Skip Sleep

A recent study at UCLA found a clear trade off between sleep and cramming. They were initially surprised that students who crammed would have more academic problems in the days following their cram session. “But then it made sense once we examined extra studying in the context of sleep. Although we expected that cramming might not be as effective as students think, our results showed that extra time spent studying cut into sleep. And it’s this reduced sleep that accounts for the increase in academic problems that occurs after days of increased studying.”

Make sure that you get eight hours of sleep while preparing for the SAT. This is the easiest thing you have to do for your studying—just sleep. Not study words or do practice problems—just sleep.

Don’t Study Whenever

Haphazard studying can be as bad as not studying. One researcher from the UCLA study had this to say, “Academic success may depend on finding strategies to avoid having to give up sleep to study, such as maintaining a consistent study schedule across days, using school time as efficiently as possible and sacrificing time spent on other, less essential activities.”

Not only should you plan for eight hours of shut eye, but also you need to plan everything else. High schoolers have busy schedules with classes, sports, clubs, college admissions, social life, and now studying SAT idioms and coordinate geometry. So even before you start studying, look at your weeks and budget time to study for the SAT. I know. It seems impossible to fit another thing into your schedule, but remember that this is for college, so cut back on the nonessential activities to make more time for SAT practice.

Don’t Study Whatever

Choosing which course, which book, or which study schedule is worse than choosing what to wear to the next dance. Actually, it might be harder because there are more options for SAT preparation than clothes in your closet.

Before you decide what to study, make sure to consider your needs. Some books are tailored to advance students, others beginning students. Some courses are too short or filled with too many students to be effective for some students. Research options for online, self-study courses. Good material will cover all the SAT question types in detail and give you tips for identifying common wrong answer types. Make sure that it includes full practice tests and plenty of practice. Ultimately, you’ll need to spend time to find the right materials before you begin studying.

Don’t Study Every

Day Just as your brain needs sleep, it also needs breaks. When you study SAT reading comprehension or grammar points, schedule breaks before returning to what you studied.

Another study showed that “massing” all of your studying into a single session, on one topic, had negative effects on learning. What the researchers found was that a study break is essential to remembering something in a week or in six months. According to Science Daily, “When two study sessions were separated by breaks ranging from five minutes to six months, with a final test given six months later, students did much better if their break lasted at least a month.”

Now this doesn’t mean you get to take a month break. But there are two important take aways here: first, space your study so that you return to a concept or question type after a couple of weeks of working on it. Second, make sure you have enough time before the test to study everything with breaks between concepts. You cannot use this strategy if you cram, so start studying a few months in advance.







magooshThis post was written by Kevin Rocci, resident SAT expert at Magoosh, a leader in SAT prep. For more advice on taking the SAT, check out Magoosh’s SAT blog.

Tags: ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2013/10/10/cramming-for-the-sat-worst-idea-of-the-year/feed/ 0
4 Application Strategy Tips: Stand Out AND Fit In http://blog.accepted.com/2013/10/09/4-application-strategy-tips-stand-out-and-fit-in-2/ http://blog.accepted.com/2013/10/09/4-application-strategy-tips-stand-out-and-fit-in-2/#comments Wed, 09 Oct 2013 16:10:32 +0000 http://blog.accepted.com/?p=18753 ]]> Check out our free special report "From Example to Exemplary" for great tips on writing a compelling application essay!It can be confusing: Half of the advice you read urges you to stand out in your application, while the other half advises you to explain how you’ll fit in. So which is it? Should you stand out or fit in?

The answer, unsurprisingly, is BOTH. You need to show your distinction and demonstrate fit simultaneously.

Here are some tips to help you juggle the stand out/fit in dichotomy:

1) Highlight unique interests, hobbies, or activities. You can safely assume that there will be other applicants in your professional/social/economic/geographic group. Whether you’re an Indian IT male applying to b-school or a Long Island Jew applying to law school or an Exeter Prep student applying to an Ivy League college… you’re probably (okay, definitely) not alone. In these cases you’re going to need to highlight your individuality. You’ll need to prove to the adcom that while your profile lands you smack in the middle of their “Typical” file, you’re actually an incredibly distinct and unique person. For example, you play the harp professionally. You started your own moving company when you were 19 years old. You won the regional juggling competition six years in a row. Now you’ve got their attention.

2) Connect your “stand out” factor to your goals to create a coherent overall message. Distinguishing your personality through your unique interests is one way to stand out, but it’s not the only way, or even the most effective way. You should also distinguish yourself by expressing your unique goals. Maybe most psych majors who apply to med school go into psychiatry. Your motivation for becoming a doctor, however, wasn’t the psychology courses you took in college, but your summer job in an orthopedist surgeon’s office. You want to combine your passion in psychology with your interest in the human skeleton to become a geriatric orthopedist. Congratulations – you’re no longer the typical psych-major-turned-med-student!

3) Demonstrate fit for balance. For those who fit snugly into an overrepresented profile group, demonstrating fit should be a piece of cake – after all, so many of you are attracted to Top School X probably because it’s the best school for people like you to pursue their goals. Conversely, those who have no trouble distinguishing themselves (like, say, a coffee farmer from Kenya), may need to tug at their creative strings to make the “fit factor” happen. How do you convince the adcoms that you’re a good fit for their program? By explaining the ways in which you and the program are MFEO – how the program will help you achieve your goals and how you, in turn, will contribute to the class and to the school’s overall goals and missions.

4) Envision a mosaic. A good way to both demonstrate fit and distinguish yourself is to think of a mosaic. Each tile is distinct – with its own shape and color combination – yet when pieced together with the other tiles, becomes part of a large, beautiful, cohesive picture. You want the adcom readers to think that they’ve stumbled upon the missing tile in the mosaic that will become the next Top B-School, College, Law School, Med School, or Grad School Class: YOU. You in all your differentiating glory and unifying power. You who both stands out and fits in perfectly.

Learn how to use sample essays to create an exemplary essay of your own! Click here to download our free report!

Accepted.com

Tags: , , , , , , ,
]]>
http://blog.accepted.com/2013/10/09/4-application-strategy-tips-stand-out-and-fit-in-2/feed/ 1