Integrated Reasoning: 6 Months Later

Integrated Reasoning on GMATTwo recent GMAC articles (“Integrated Reasoning and Admissions” and “Demystifying the GMAT: What We Know About IR 6 Months After Launch”) talk about the demystification of the six-month-old Integrated Reasoning section of the GMAT.

A few points:

  1. Did this section put any of the following groups at a disadvantage: non-native English speakers, non-US citizens, non-white test takers, and non-business undergrad majors? Results show less than one quarter or a standard deviation – the “observed differences are psychometrically minor and practically inconsequential.”
  2. Does the IR section adequately predict core course grades? New analysis shows that the introduction of IR will increase the average multiple R to .59 or higher – this is compared to an average multiple R of .53 in 2008 (without the IR section).
  3. What does the IR section contribute beyond verbal and quant testing? The study shows that IR tests something “more” than the original two sections, and that is “the ability to synthesize information from multiple sources and formats, evaluate output and identify possible solutions, consider alternative decisions, and predict outcomes.” It also gives business schools another data point to consider when evaluating candidates and predicts how well students will do in a business setting.
  4. How do employers and alumni view IR? According to the data, 85% of employers consider IR skills as “relevant or very relevant.” 97% of employers interviewed said that they value IR-related skill sets – including the ability to organize, integrate, synthesize, and combine information – as important. About 85% of alumni say that they use IR skill “most or all of the time in the workplace.”

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